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Black History
 



9200 - NORTH CAROLINA EARLY BILL OF SALE FOR A NEGRO BOY NAMED "LOTT" TO THE CAPE FEAR NAVIGATION COMPANY IN 1816
, 8" X 13" manuscript bill of sale where James Webb sells the Negro boy named LOTT aged about 24 years old for the sum of $600 to the Cape Fear Navigation Company dated September 16th, 1816 with complete warranty. Webb was from Hillsboro County, NC. The sale was finalized on the 18th with a notation of the money exchanging hands. Very fine..............................................
$225.00




9201 - THE BOY JERRY SOLD IN NORTH CAROLINA
, August 27th, 1816, Hyde County, 8" X 13" manuscript well written in bold ink bill of sale for the Negro man named JERRY aged about 22 years was sold by Lovett Bell to Samuel Vines for the sum of $600 and was unconditionally warranted by the seller. Some verso fission restoration in several spots, otherwise really a bold manuscript in large script.............................
$195.00

9203 - A NEGRO SERVANT LEAVING TO TAKE CARE OF A CONFEDERATE SOLDIER AWAY IN VIRGINIA, Sunday, August 19th, [1861], 4 page letter in ink along with a hand-carried addressed envelope addressed to Mr. C. W. Broadfoot, Company H, 1st North Carolina Volunteers at Yorktown, VA by his mother. She relates in part...she apologizes for not putting a button hole in his "Havelock", she tells him not to use it as a handkerchief or near food for the solution it is soaked in contains "sugar of lead" [a toxic solution used in the dying of fabrics. The Havelock she made was soaked in this solution to dye the fabric]. BOB WILL SOON BE WITH YOU AND I HOPE YOU WILL BE RELIEVED FROM COOKING AND WASHING. I ASKED HIM IF HE NEEDED ANYTHING FOR HIS CONVENIENCE AND HE SAID SOMETHING IN THE WAY OF COFFEEPOTS WHICH YOUR FATHER BOUGHT FOR HIM. BOB SPORTS THAT HE IS PARTICULARLY ATTENTIVE TO JARVIS C. HAIGH AND YOURSELF. She is sending his flask full of wine, discusses more items to be sent with his box, more on affairs at home. Interesting commentary on the use of "sugar of lead" in dying his Havelock and of course the servant being sent to Yorktown to take care of young Broadfoot's needs, cover and letter, rare content.........................$195.00

9204 - SLAVERY IS ALIVE IN PHILADELPHIA IN 1787, The Pennsylvania Packet and Daily Advertiser, Philadelphia, PA. November 22, 1787, 4 pages, 13" X 20", front page ads for the sale of Negroes, "A Likely Negro lad about 20, has had the smallpox, very healthy and understands housework", another for "A young healthy Negro wench, suitable for a family in town or country, has had the small pox." On page three, an ad for the runaway slave named WILL, reward of $10, has a long standing cough, fond of pleasure and company, more on his characteristics, he has supposed to have gone to sea." Reward offered by Trench Coxe...Tench Coxe (May 22, 1755 -- July 17, 1824) was an American political economist and a delegate for Pennsylvania to the Continental Congress in 1788 - 1789. He wrote under the pseudonym "A Pennsylvanian," and was known to his political enemies as "Mr. Facing Bothways." Printed in the year of the Constitution 1787............................$65.00



9205 - SLAVERY IS ALIVE IN PHILADELPHIA IN 1788
,
The Pennsylvania Packet and Daily Advertiser, Philadelphia, PA. March 12th, 1788, 4 pages, 13" X 20", A RUNAWAY NEGRO MAN FIVE POUNDS REWARD, WILL was 22 or 23 years of age bow-legged, scar down his right cheek, another runaway Negro ad for the man NATHAN, SAID SLAVE RAN AWAY FROM HIS OWNER IN KENT COUNTY, MARYLAND, A FIVE POUND REWARD WAS OFFERED FOR HIS CAPTURE AND RETURN. He was a good farmer, fond of hard liquor, has good teeth, very black, and he will tell as "good story", another runaway named HARRY, he is about 21 years and has a very sharp nose for a Negro, a blacksmith by trade, the owner offers a $40 reward for his securing him, or 20 pounds if brought home........................$75.00

9206 - AN EX CONFEDERATE REFLECTS ON HIS POSSIBLE DISFRANCHISEMENT TO VOTE, GENERAL WADE HAMPTON ADDRESSES THE FREEDMEN IN COLUMBIA, HE CONCEDES THEIR RELATIONS ARE NOW ALTERED WITH THEIR FORMER DEPENDANTS [SLAVES], undated but from previous communications written in the fall of 1865, no date or place but written by William Broadfoot to one of his sons [Charles] [Fayetteville area, North Carolina], 1 page in ink signed "F" [for Father]. He relates in part, I cannot answer your question as to whether I am disfranchised or not and I am very indifferent about voting anyway. I have now had that right for 40 years and have enjoyed it less than most me of my age. God will it and in his own good will rejoice with the grateful hearts. I send you news with General Hampton's address to the Freedmen in Columbia. While the General stands in the same category that rendered the leaders of the Confederate cause distasteful to me, he now speaks...as he should all his life before. Our relations are altered to our former dependants. "F". Broadfoot served as a public servant during the war in the Confederate Depository Office in Fayetteville, NC. He speaks of his possible loss of his voting privilege being a Confederate official, his feelings about General Wade Hampton, and the turn of events with the freedom of the Negroes. The reference to Hampton addressing the Freedmen relates to his speech in late 1865 in Columbia urging that Negroes be allowed to vote and urging peace and harmony with the races for the betterment of the nation. See the attached speech he made in 1884 regarding that previous speech made in 1865. Great content! Accompanied by four other short notes [1865 although undated to his son Charles of various content]........................................................$135.00


9015 - LARGE PRE PRINTED BILL OF SALE FOR THREE SLAVES IN NEW ORLEANS IN 1835, 9.5" X 15.5", pre-printed and filled-in sale of three named slaves by name; PETER aged 17 or 18 years old at $1000, SAM 15 years old valued at $800, and CAREY 14 years of age valued at $850. Thomas Bondville Poindexter of Charleston, SC sold the three slaves to Josias Chambers of Rapides Parish Louisiana for the sum of $2650 payable on a draft due January 1st, 1836. The sale was complete in the City of New Orleans May 26th, 1835 with a impressed seal to the bottom left. All warranted by the seller as to health and ownership by Poindexter. Josias Chambers owned Oakland plantation in Rapides Parish Louisiana. Later the plantation was owned by his son Josiah Chambers. JOSIAH CHAMBERS, the son of Josias Chambers who owned Oakland Plantation was a planter, solider. Born, Rapides Parish, LA, August 9, 1820. Privately educated; attended Kenyon College, Ohio. Married Frances Ann Williams, 1841. Planted cotton and sugarcane on Bayou Robert lands. Served with Graham's Volunteers in Mexican War, Episcopal Church, Alexandria, LA, 1847. Served as a Whig party delegate to state convention, January, 1861; first lieutenant in Captain Benjamin's cavalry company in Civil War. Died 1917; interred Mount Olivet Cemetery, Pineville, LA. Josiah inherited from his father Josias 6000 acres a few miles south of Alexandria, the town laid out by Alexander Fulton. The Chambers' Oakland Plantation is where the campus of LSU Alexandria stands today. Josiah and Frances Williams Chambers expanded their inheritance by 4000 acres. By the time of the Civil War, Josiah Chambers was the fourth largest planter in Rapides Parish. In 1860, there were at least 336 slaves on the Oakland Plantation, producing cotton, sugar cane and corn, sweet and Irish potatoes. The Chambers family also owned mules, horses, oxen, sheep, and pigs. After the Civil War, Chambers had to sell 5,000 of his 10,000 acres in order to avoid bankruptcy. Thomas Bondville Poindexter is listed as a slave owner and shipper of slaves on the Savannah registry. Slave merchants such as Poindexter frequented New Orleans bringing slaves to the numerous slave markets in the city. Planters such as Chambers attended these markets to procure new labor especially in the spring of the year. Choice condition..............................................SOLD

9017 - JOSIAS [JOSIAH] CHAMBERS OBTAINS MORE LANDS IN LOUISIANA FOR HIS PLANTATIONS, One of the earliest plantation owners in Rapides Parish, Louisiana and the owner of numerous slaves; Josias [Josiah] Chambers applied for and was granted 443 68/100 acres of land in 1851. Josiah Chambers inherited 6000 acres near Alexandria, LA mostly Oakland Plantation from his Father Josias. The land was subject to sale in Opelousas, LA. 10" X 17" vellum land grant signed by Asst. Secretary Alexander W. Cormick for President Millard Fillmore. In choice condition with applied paper seal to lower left. Dated May 8th, 1851. The Chambers' Oakland Plantation is where the campus of LSU Alexandria stands today. Josiah and Frances Williams Chambers expanded their inheritance by 4000 acres. By the time of the Civil War, Josiah Chambers was the fourth largest planter in Rapides Parish. In 1860, there were at least 336 slaves on the Oakland Plantation, producing cotton, sugar cane and corn, sweet and Irish potatoes...................................$75.00




8006 - YOUNG BLACK MAID 1860'S
, 1/6th plate tintype in a full leather case. A young black woman seated in a landscape pose wearing a high collared blouse and a white apron with a white bandana on her head. She was most probably a house servant for a well to do family as her clothes are of nice quality, circ. 1860's......................
$350.00



8008 - AN ELDERLY BLACK WOMAN WEARING A KNITTED BONNET
, 1/4 plate tintype in a full leather case. This black woman is very advanced in age and her dress and lace bonnet suggests she was a house servant of a well to do family as well as the image being a quarter plate. The image dates from the 1860's. The large format tintype is sharp and clear with just some rubbing of the emulsion near her clasped hands..................................................
$395.00


8012 - COLONIAL NORTH CAROLINA, THE CASE OF THE NEGRO WENCH LUCIE AND HER SUCKLING MALE CHILD
, Two large documents 8" X 13 dated 1788 and 1790 regarding the ownership and value of the Negro wench named LUCIE and her suckling male child being 170 pounds. Both documents are fastened together with paper seals, one being a bond and the other an affidavit of ownership, both very detailed giving the history of the sale and describing ownership rights. Mecklenburg County, NC and Washington County, Southwest Territory [now Tennessee]. 2 large documents written in bold brown ink, both documents.................................................................
$450.00

61503 - 7 SLAVES ARE ARRESTED IN LINCOLN COUNTY, KENTUCKY IN 1812, dated June 1812, 5" X 6" manuscript. The Constable of Lincoln County, KY. William Hill bills the Commonwealth of Kentucky $14.50 for arresting Seven named Negro slaves for felonies. Those arrested were STEPHEN the property of Morris Brown, PHIL AND CRULY the property of Joseph Senter, PHILLIS, RACHAEL, AND GERY the property of John T. P. Lewis, and also ESSEX the property of Mrs. Huston. The Cost of capturing all seven was $2 each or $14. Also there was a cost for summoning four witnesses in the same case at 12 1/2 cents each. The total cost to the Commonwealth was $14.50. Well written and very scarce content...................................................................$195.00


9900 - CHARLESTON SLAVE TAG FOR A PORTER, 1852 Diamond Shaped Tag, #1134 made by William Rouse, in sequence CHARLESTON, #113, PORTER - 1852. Rouse has clipped the corners of two edges. This badge is exceptionally well struck. Usually these 1850's badges have some softly struck areas and this one does not have that characteristic. Smooth fields with a small edge fissure done when the badge was being trimmed. Porter badges are much scarcer than Servant badges..................$2,150.00

9901 - EARLY CHARLESTON SERVANT BADGE 1814, a square shaped early Servant badge denoting an even year of issue, stamped LAFAR on verso denoting the tag make some letters weak but evident. An extremely well struck tag. In sequence CHARLESTON #513  - SERVANT 1814...the hanging hole was punched out by Lafar in a square instead of the usual drilled round hole. Well struck with nice surfaces. Excavated in late 2006 in Charleston, SC. These early square tags are extremely scarce and difficult to locate on the market today..............................................................$3,200.00

9902 - A RARE CHARLESTON MECHANIC TAG WITH MECHANIC SPELLED MECHANICK, 1838, A rare diamond shaped slave tag made by William Rouse with the rare spelling of MECHANICK. This was only done in the years 1836 - 1838. In sequence, CHARLESTON, 1838, MECHANICK, #422. The details are sharp, minor dings due to the wearing by a mechanic, attractive color to the copper being a mellow chocolate brown. Less then 9% of all tags issued were issued for a Mechanic. By 1838, the cost of a mechanic tag had risen to $7 from the price in 1800 which was only $2. The third rarest of all the occupations......................$2,995.00


9903 - NEGRO LABORERS MOVING ROSIN BARRELS ON A SAVANNAH WHARF
, Stereo card by Underwood and Underwood, several Negro workers moving rosin barrels on the wharf at Savannah, GA. Very fine.....................................
$45.00

9904 - COTTON IS KING, A PLANTATION SCENE IN GEORGIA, Stereo by Underwood and Underwood. A busy scene of Negro women and men picking cotton in a field in Georgia, large cotton baskets filled with picked cotton, overseer on horseback in the background, great details, fine............................$55.00

9905 - TAXES PAID ON 56 SLAVES IN MISSISSIPPI ALSO INCLUDED ARE BOWIE KNIVES, Adams County, MS., January 10th, 1855, 3" X 6" pre-printed and filled in document listing taxes paid by Emanuel Rogellis totaling $97.29 for 750 acres of land valued at $9000, 2 carriages, 57 slaves, 46 cattle, 2 horses, 2 watches. Although it is not shown as him having BOWIE KNIVES or Pistols, it is printed on the receipt. signed by the Sheriff. Adams County, which NATCHEZ is in, was the home of JIM BOWIE whose fighting knife design was made famous by him. To our knowledge this is the only county hat listed BOWIE knives on the tax bill. Choice condition. Born in Kentucky, Bowie spent most of his life in Louisiana, where he was raised and where he later worked as a land speculator. His rise to fame began in 1827 on reports of the Sandbar Fight. What began as a duel between two other men deteriorated into a melée in which Bowie, having been shot and stabbed, killed the sheriff of Rapides Parish with a large knife. This, and other stories of Bowie's prowess with a knife, led to the widespread popularity of the Bowie knife.................................$125.00

9906 - AN INVENTORY OF SLAVES AND PROPERTY DIVIDED UP AMONG HEIRS IN 1854, CLAY COUNTY, MISSOURI, Clay County [Missouri] 2 large 8" X 13" pages in manuscript on blue paper detailing the division of lands and Negro slaves among the wife of David Walker and two other heirs December 30th, 1854. Listed by name and value within the estate are over 25 listed slaves by name...ANN valued at $600, RICK valued at $800, JIM and boy ALEXANDER valued at $500, OLD GEORGE valued at $100, MARTHA and child LUCY valued at $150, VANCE valued at $400, PATSEY valued at $00, RUBIN valued at $700, and many more. The commissioners sign the division acknowledging that the wife received $94 in value more than the other two heirs [children]. Clay County was settled primarily from migrants from the Upper Southern states of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia. They brought slaves and slaveholding traditions with them, and quickly started cultivating crops similar to those in Middle Tennessee and Kentucky; hemp and tobacco. Clay was one of several counties settled mostly by Southerners to the north and south of the Missouri River. Given their culture and traditions, this area became known as Little Dixie. In 1860, slaves made up 25% or more of the county's population. Residents generally supported the Confederacy during the Civil War, as the Confederate flag flew over the county courthouse for many years following the end of the Civil War. Very fine.......................$225.00


9909 - AM I NOT A MAN AND A BROTHER
, 1790's, the popular copper token being the earliest anti-slavery token [Middlesex] political token with kneeling male slave/verso - clasped/bound hands, Slabbed by NGC as XF-45, nice tone, difficult to find so nice..............................................
SOLD


9910 - AM I NOT A WOMAN AND A SISTER
, dated 1838, kneeling slave woman with hands bound, produced in the United States and used as a hard times political token by anti-slave advocates. Slabbed by NGC as extremely fine, slight blem to side of rim [trivial]..................................................
SOLD


9912 - HARRIET BEECHER STOWE
, Wet plate albumen carte de visite, a seated pose of her seated facing slightly to the left. An American abolitionist and author. She came from a famous religious family and is best known for her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852). It depicts the harsh life for African Americans under slavery. It reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and Great Britain. It energized anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South. She wrote 30 books, including novels; three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential for both her writings and her public stands on social issues of the day. Very fine.......................................................................
$95.00


6000 - BLACK NURSE AND SMALL CHILD, Carte de Visite by J. M. South of Baltimore. Seated black mulatto nurse and a small by identified on the verso as Samuel Baile McKinstry at aged three years. The light complexioned black nurse is well dressed and the photo dates to 1867 - 8. Samuel B. McKinstry father was a prominent miller in Carroll County, Maryland. The McKinstry Mills Historic District is a national historic district in Union Bridge, located in Carroll and Frederick County, Maryland. The district comprises the entirety of the settlement of McKinstry Mills, a 26 acre hamlet consisting of six separate properties that were owned and developed in the 19th century by the McKinstry family, local millers. At the center is a 3 1/2 - story grist mill constructed in 1844. Also included are the McKinstry homestead, built between 1825 and 1835, the residence of miller Samuel McKinstry, dated 1849; a store building of 1850. There is another photo [CDV] included of young Samuel B. McKinstry alone at age 2 1/2 years by the same photographer. The Negro nurse is light complexioned but definitely of African - American heritage as her hands are much darker than her face probably due to the reflection on her face when the photo was taken. 2 images.................................................$225.00




6001 - A YOUNG BLACK CHIMNEY SWEEPER
, Carte de Visite by Thompson of Kingston, Jamaica. A young dark-skinned black boy about 18 - 20 seated with a high hat on the floor and holding a long handled broom used for cleaning chimneys. He is bare footed and wears coarse clothing, c 1864 - 70. Great details, a very uncommon black occupational photograph..........................................
$200.00



6003 - EARLY NORTH CAROLINA BILL OF SALE FOR THE NEGRO MAN TAFF
, 8" X 13", all manuscript in large script, Hyde County, North Carolina. For the sum of $1025, the Negro man named TAFF was sold by William Brooks giving right and title to Willoughby Higsen dated May 17th, 1819. Very fine condition, ideal to frame with such large manuscript...............................
$250.00

6006 - A NEGRO MAN SOLD TO THE CAPE FEAR NAVIGATION COMPANY IN 1816, 8" X 10" manuscript bill of sale to the President of the Cape Fear Navigation Co., in Fayetteville, NC. The Negro man FRANK described as being about 25 years of age for the sum of $600. FRANK was warranted to the buyer in every respect. The bill of sale is dated September 17th, 1816. Condition is excellent. Pres. John Winslow reported to the shareholders in 1817, the CFN Co. spent time and effort in 1816 in clearing snags between Wilmington and Fayetteville, particularly at Spring Hill Shoal where over 100 hundred snags were removed and "a great deal of work {was} done in the neighborhood of Moorhead shoals, about 6 miles above Elizabeth{town}." The success of that effort was demonstrated by the commencement of steam navigation at Fayetteville in 1818, with the construction of the Henrietta a few miles above Fayetteville. Slaves were used to do such work on the river..............................................................SOLD

6007 - A NEGRO MAN SOLD TO THE CAPE FEAR NAVIGATION COMPANY IN 1816, 8" X 10" manuscript bill of sale to the President of the Cape Fear Navigation Co., in Fayetteville, NC. The Negro man JACK described as being about 21 years of age for the sum of $600. JACK was warranted to the buyer in every respect. The bill of sale is dated September 5ht, 1816. Condition is excellent. Pres. John Winslow reported to the shareholders in 1817, the CFN Co. spent time and effort in 1816 in clearing snags between Wilmington and Fayetteville, particularly at Spring Hill Shoal where over 100 hundred snags were removed and "a great deal of work {was} done in the neighborhood of Moorhead shoals, about 6 miles above Elizabeth{town}." The success of that effort was demonstrated by the commencement of steam navigation at Fayetteville in 1818, with the construction of the Henrietta a few miles above Fayetteville. Slaves were used to do such work on the river........................................SOLD


5053 - ARKANSAS, $10.00, April 1862, Arkansas Treasury Note, Negro carrying a full basket of cotton to the left, printed on State Bank of Arkansas exchange notes at Van Buren, Arkansas, near uncirculated.........................................$145.00

5054 - ALABAMA, CENTRAL BANK OF ALABAMA, $10.00, Montgomery, AL, 1856, large TEN in red overprint, huge slave vignette of slaves picking cotton, carrying a full cotton basket, and a far view of an overseer on horseback watching slaves at work. The largest slave vignettes you will find on a banknote, very good - fine.......................SOLD

5055 - ALABAMA, EASTERN BANK OF ALABAMA, $5.00, Eufaula, Alabama, 18_, a remainder as usual, attractive green lace overprint, large vignette of slaves in the field working, in foreground a slave on a mule driven wagon of cotton bales, to far right a slave pressing a cotton bale with overseen watching. Extremely fine+, banknotes from this bank are among the most attractive of the slave vignette notes available - just saw an AU offered at $350............................................................SOLD

5056 - TEXAS, WASHINGTON COUNTY SCRIPT, WASHINGTON COUNTY, TEXAS, $3.00, red and green overprint THREE, Negro picking cotton into a basket, remainder as usual, 186_. Crisp uncirculated.........................................................$145.00

5057 - SOUTH CAROLINA, PLANTERS BANK OF FAIRFIELD, $5.00, Winnsboro, SC, 1854, Overseer on horseback watching slaves at work, one of the most popular slave related vignettes as it is central to the note and quite large, very good - fine.......................................$115.00

5058 - SOUTH CAROLINA, BANK OF THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA
, $1.00, 1862, Charleston, SC, central vignette of slaves loading a wagon, fine, CC...............................
SOLD

5059 - MISSISSIPPI, THE MISSISSIPPI AND ALABAMA RAILROAD CO, $5.00, Brandon, MS 1837, great vignette of slaves loading a cotton wagon, Desoto and Indian vignette, very fine..................................................$125.00

5060 - TWO NEGRO WOMEN SOLD IN NEW ORLEANS BY THE SLAVE TRADER WILLIAM F. TALBOTT, June 13th, 1849, a slave bill of sale, 8" X 10" manuscript, New Orleans, LA. James Akins for the sum of $1300 purchased from William F. Talbott the Negro girl NANCY of black color, aged 19 years for $675.00 and MATILDA of brown color aged about 17 years of age for $675.00. Both were guaranteed by the seller to be free from all vices and maladies proscribed by law. This slave dealer from Lexington, KY bought slaves for the New Orleans market which was the most active slave market at that time in the United States. With only ten thousand inhabitants in 1860 Lexington, KY had only six slave dealers, three of which specialized in interregional trade and eleven individual traders. They were all men of means like William F. Talbott who could dispose of great quantities of cash. Each person he bought would have cost him $25,000 cash in today's money. The profit he would have made on each individual selling in the New Orleans market [a prime market for Kentucky traders] would have resulted in huge profits. Fine condition..........................................................$275.00


42000 - NEGRO WITH A BASKET OF COTTON, BANK OF COMMERCE SAVANNAH, GA. $1.00 BANKNOTE ISSUED IN 1861 AFTER SOUTH CAROLINA SECEDED FROM THE UNION, A Central vignette of a Negro with a basket of cotton. Sailing ship at center, signed by G. B. Lamar as President of the Bank Gazaway Bugg Lumar was an investor and banker who became involved in securing supplies and funds to aid the Confederate cause in the Civil War. Prior to the outbreak of hostilities, he resided in New York as president of the Bank of the Republic. In 1861, he returned to Savannah to become head of the Bank of Commerce. He served as paymaster for Georgia troops, financial advisor to the Confederate government, and as head of the Importing and Exporting Company of Georgia, which was involved in blockade running. He was arrested and thrown in the Old Capital Prison in Washington as a suspect in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. After his release three months later, he tried to claim his cotton, which was stored at warehouses in Georgia and Florida, but was arrested for stealing government property and trying to bribe a government official. A military commission convicted him and he returned to prison for a short time. President Johnson finally commuted his sentence a few days before his term expired. Very good - fine condition, red ONE overprint.......................................$55.00 

PLANTATION TOKENS FROM LOUISIANA

2850 - After the demise of the slavery era on the south the sharecropper era began with ex slaves being hired to work all the plantations. Hired hands were paid as low wages as possible and many plantations had mercantile stores on the plantation or nearby to sell staples to their hired hands. Stores and plantations in many cases used tokens for trade either paying in tokens or giving token in change. Some stores charged exorbitant prices for goods with the old phrase being coined "Owe my soul to the company store." These token were used well into the 20th century. We have a set of 6 different denominations of brass tokens from RAYMOND WALKER'S store known as the JEFFERSON STORE, ST. JAMES, LOUISIANA. Jefferson College in Convent, LA was nearby as well as a host of plantations with many workers during this period. St. James Parish had numerous sugar plantations as well as growers of "perique tobacco." Perique is a type of tobacco from St. James Parish, Louisiana, known for its strong, powerful, and fruity aroma. When the Acadians made their way into this region in 1776, the Choctaw and Chickasaw tribes were cultivating a variety of tobacco with a distinctive flavor. A farmer named Pierre Chenet is credited with first turning this local tobacco into what is now known as Perique in 1842 through the labor-intensive technique of pressure-fermentation. All in very fine condition. Rarity as listed in "Louisiana Trade Tokens" page 283 is 10 or less known of each. We have several individual denominations that are sold individually...................................5 Cents - $35.00; 25 Cents - SOLD; 75 Cents - $40.00; 80 Cents - $40.00

NEGRO LABORERS AT WORK ON SOUTHERN PLANTATIONS

2851 - COTTON IS KING, A PLANTATION SCENE IN GEORGIA, Stereo by Underwood and Underwood. A busy scene of Negro women and men picking cotton in a field in Georgia, large cotton baskets filled with picked cotton, overseer on horseback in the background, great details, fine...............................$55.00



2860 - A SOUTHERNER AND HIS BLACK SERVANT
, 1/6th plate ambrotype in a full leather case. A white southerner seats well dressed in a wide brimmed hat alongside his man servant who is quite decently dressed. The black servant is dark skinned and sports a wide bowtie. The white man holds a book upright so that a date can be made out on the spine to be 1858. There is solarization to the image at the edges but does not affect the individuals to a large degree. The image came out of Arkansas. Fully cased with mat and glass............................
SOLD

2862 - HARRIET BEECHER STOWE, Wet plate albumen carte de visite by Silsbee & Case of Boston. Full standing pose standing by a chair taken in the period of the Civil War. Harriet Elisabeth Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 - July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and author. She came from a famous religious family and is best known for her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852). It depicts the harsh life for African Americans under slavery. It reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and Great Britain. It energized anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South. The book's emotional portrayal of the effects of slavery on individuals captured the nation's attention. Stowe showed that slavery touched all of society, beyond the people directly involved as masters, traders and slaves. Her novel added to the debate about abolition and slavery, and aroused opposition in the South. She wrote 30 books, including novels; three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential for both her writings and her public stands on social issues of the day. Very fine.................................$195.00

A GROUP OF PLANTATION TAX RECEIPTS FROM WARREN COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI TAXING SLAVES AND PROPERTY

3000 - PORT GIBSON, MS, TAXES ON 4 SLAVES, 3" X 7" pre-printed and filled in receipt taxing Harvey Cornelia of Warren County, MS, in July 1853 paying the county tax for 1852. He was taxed on a watch as well as the 4 slaves. Very fine...........................................$89.00

3001 - WARREN COUNTY, MS, TAX ON 19 SLAVES AS WELL AS LANDS, 3" X 7", pre-printed and filled in receipt for R. H. Whitaker's Estate paying taxes for the year 1849 on 19 slaves, 1 watch, 1 horse and lands valued at $1,232. The total tax paid was $22.69. Fine, light age tone..................................................$95.00

3002 - WARREN COUNTY, MS, 1842 TAXES PAID ON 13 SLAVES AND PROPERTY, 3" X 7" pre-printed and filled in receipt for taxes paid by Mrs. Sarah McArthur of Warren County, MS for 13 slaves, 20 head of cattle, 1 clock valued at $5 paid for the year 1842 amounting to $14.96. Signed by the Sheriff, very fine................................................$95.00

3003 - TAXES PAID ON 11 SLAVES, WARREN COUNTY, MS, 3" X 7" pre-printed and filled in receipt for taxes paid by A. M. Lurum for the year 1846 on 11 slaves. Although none was taxed, printed on the form is BOWIE knife. Only some counties in Mississippi listed BOWIE knives as taxable entities. Crisp paper, light stain at right margin..................................$89.00



27001 - APPRAISAL OF AN ESTATE INCLUDING FIVE SLAVES, LINCOLN COUNTY, KENTUCKY
, 8" X 13", manuscript accounting of the estate of MOSES CALYAR dated June 29th, 1814 listing all his possessions including five slaves...mentioned were a Negro woman BECK valued at $350, a Negro woman DINE and two small children valued at $550, and one girl named MINT valued at $250. Animals, clothing, and plantation items are also listed on this long two page document. The total assessment was $1835.62. The paper is crisp and fresh with a seam restoration. Otherwise very good, a scarce early Kentucky document....................................$125.00

27002 - SECRETARY OF THE NAVY GEORGE E. BADGER APPOINTED BY WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON COMMENTS ON A WHITE MINISTER PREACHING TO A BLACK CONGREGATION, Raleigh, NC, May 27th, 1858, 3 well written pages to his sister in ink. He relates personal news and discusses a visiting minister...George [the minister] preaches three times on Sunday in Dr. Smeles' Chapel, and then at night to the blacks at the Methodist Church. Our congregation is most pleased with his sermons also his black audience was delighted and greatly stirred...some of the sisters expressing that they wish they could have him always...Badger practiced law in North Carolina, was active in state politics, and served as a state superior court judge. A supporter of Andrew Jackson from the 1820s, he separated with him in the mid-1830s, became a leader of the Whig party and helped carry the Whigs to victory in the 1840 Presidential election. Upon taking office, President William Henry Harrison appointed Badger as his Secretary of the Navy, and he continued in that post for a few months (until September 1841, when he resigned to resume private practice) when John Tyler succeeded to the Presidency upon Harrison's death (April 1841). Badger's brief term as Secretary was marked by efforts to strengthen the Navy in the face of tension with Great Britain, the establishment of the U.S. Home Squadron, and growing interest in steamships. Badger resigned in September 1841, during a general cabinet shakeup. He was elected to the Senate in 1846 to fill the unexpired term of William Henry Haywood, Jr. and remained a Senator until 1855, after choosing not to run for re-election. He was nominated by President Millard Fillmore as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court in 1853, but was not confirmed by the Senate (John Archibald Campbell got the position). He was a Union ist during the secession crisis but thereafter supported the Confederate war effort. Very fine, one of the few appointments by Harrison before his death.........................................................$85.00


2015 - STATE OF ARKANSAS, $10.00, 1862, Arkansas Treasury Warrant, Negro carrying a basket of cotton to left, small archival repair at right edge, otherwise very good.......................................................$89.00


2017 - FARMERS AND EXCHANGE BANK
, $5.00, Charleston, SC, 1861, central vignette of a Negro man leading a team of oxen, slaves in the field in background, John C. Calhoun to right, fine............................................
SOLD

2018 - CORPORATION OF COLUMBIA, 5 Cents, June 1861, blue print, large vignette of a slave picking cotton and carrying a cotton basket, great reverse vignette of a sailor on a flagpole with a South Carolina flag with the motto "Southern Independence", old ink notation on verso "Found in Port Royal" most probably a war souvenir. Fine - Very fine, small archival repair on verso, bright blue print...........................................$115.00

2019 - THE TIMBERCUTTERS BANK, $1.00, Savannah, GA, 1858, red ONE, Negroes working in a forest with an overseer on a horse, another Negroes working in cotton field, one carries a basket of cotton over his shoulders, two slave vignettes, fine...................................SOLD

2020 - THE FARMERS AND MECHANICS BANK, $2.00, Savannah, GA, 1860, large orange 2, Negro in cotton field carrying a basket of cotton, other slaves and overseer in the background, nice color, fine.........................................SOLD


2021 - THE STATE OF GEORGIA
, $4.00, 1864, Milledgeville, GA, Negro carrying a full basket of cotton, others picking in background, another harvesting wheat, VG - F, scarce $4.00 denomination...........................................
$149.00

2022 - BANK OF LEXINGTON, $5.00, Lexington, NC, 1859, Negro picking cotton, Negro slaves moving cotton bales, orange overprint, two vignettes, two goddesses in center, very fine most attractive and colorful......................$145.00    EF++.................................$169.00

2023 - MINERS AND PLANTERS BANK, $10, Murphy, North Carolina, 1860, orange large TEN, overseer on horse, slaves in the field as a central vignette, miners working to the left, fine, nice color......................................................$125.00


2024 - STATE OF FLORIDA
, $5.00, Tallahassee, FL, 1862, Negroes picking cotton, another carries a full basket of cotton away, very fine. Scarce state note...............................
$165.00

2025 - STATE OF MISSISSIPPI, $50.00, Jackson, MS, May 1862, green overprint COTTON PLEDGED, Negro slaves pick cotton to right, Indian to left, very fine.......................$135.00    another extremely fine.......................SOLD

2026 - BANK OF CHATTANOOGA, $3.00, 1863, Chattanooga, TN, Negro slave carries a full basket of cotton, other slaves with overseer in background, very good, scarcer denomination...................................................SOLD

2027 - CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, $100, 1862, a great central vignette of Negro slaves working in a cotton field, attractive orange overprint HUNDRED, John C. Calhoun to left C #41, nice very fine or better.........................................$145.00      AU+, choice, Savannah and Jackson interest stamps on verso..................................$195.00


1859 - A CONFEDERATE NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD, OWNER OF SLAVES, Construction began on this railroad in 1836. The Raleigh and Gaston Railroad was a Raleigh, North Carolina - based railroad opened in April 1840 between Raleigh and the town of Gaston, North Carolina, on the Roanoke River. It was North Carolina's second railroad (the Wilmington and Raleigh Railroad opened one month earlier). The length was 100 miles (160 km) and built with 4 ft 8 in (1,422 mm) gauge. The Railroad was built with slave labor and in the summer of 1861 the stockholders of the Railroad appropriated $125,000 for the purpose of buying slaves. This railroad served the Confederacy during the Civil War with practically no interference from the enemy. The line offered the most - direct route between Richmond, Raleigh, and Charlotte until 1864. In September of 1863, trains were engaged in mass troop movement of the army of General Longstreet from the battlefields of Virginia near Orange Court House above Richmond and Charlottesville, to Chickamauga, Georgia, near Chattanooga. The Confederacy finally brought destruction to the Raleigh & Gaston Railroad. Upon the fall of Richmond, the company's bridge across the Roanoke River at Gaston was destroyed, never to be rebuilt by the company. However, the locomotives and most of the rolling stock were safety stored across the river at Gaston and protected from the Federal troops. In 1863 Jeremy Gilmer Chief of the Engineer Bureau of Richmond, the company's bridge across the Roanoke River at Gaston was destroyed, never to be rebuilt by the company. However, the locomotives and most of the rolling stock were safely stored across the river at Gaston and protected from the Federal troops. In 1863, Jeremy Gilmer Chief of the Engineer Bureau of Richmond handed Captain Meyers the authority to appropriate 50% on the un-laid iron rails for the war effort. A certificate of 14 Shares of stock at $100 each in the Raleigh & Gaston RR made out to John H. Bryan in November 1861, handsome vignette of an antique train. A red over stamp assigns the certificate to an increase of the capital stock of $1,500,000. Bryan was a politician and slave owner himself. Possibly this stock insurance was made to cover the purchase of slaves that summer, very fine, issued, 6" X 8".............................................................SOLD

1013 - A SALE OF THREE NEGRO MEN IN 1855 TO A SLAVE TRADER, 8" X 10" manuscript bill of sale on blue paper, November 6th, 1855, not datelined but from Shelby County [Memphis, TN]. Three Negro men were sold for the sum of $3450 to A. S. Caldwell. BOB was valued at $1200 and was 20 years of age, MITCHELL aged 20 years was also valued at $1200, and ALFRED aged 15 years valued at $1050. All were warranted to be of sound body and mind and "slaves for life" and were also warranted to be free from all lawful claims. The slaves were sold by M. & W. Little by Benjamin Little. A. S. Caldwell was a noted Memphis slave dealer - see the above ad found in an 1855 Memphis newspaper. Bold manuscript, very fine...........SOLD

1014 - A NEGRO WOMAN AND HER CHILD SOLD AND THEN SOLD AGAIN TO A SLAVE TRADER, December 10th, 1851, 8" X 10" manuscript, Shelby County, Tennessee [Memphis], R. M. Anderson and Sally Wyatt for the sum of $700 have sold to C. Biers a Negro woman named POLLY and her infant child PHILIMON. POLLY was described as being about 23 years of age. Both slaves were warranted to be sound and sensible and slaves for life and their title was guaranteed against all claims. On the verso, C. Biers the new owner of the slaves then sells the pair "for valued received" on January 31st, 1853 to A. S. Caldwell along with all rights and title, dated at Memphis, TN. The slaves being described as POLLY and CHILD...A. S. Caldwell was a Memphis SLAVE MERCHANT see the ad in the Memphis Eagle and Inquirer February 17th, 1855. A rare double sale of two slaves with the second purchaser being a noted Memphis slave dealer, fine...................................SOLD


10312 - HENRY WILSON, ABOLITIONIST, VICE PRESIDENT UNDER GRANT, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Brady. Bust pose facing slightly left. Wilson was the 18th Vice President of the United States (1873 - 1875) and a Senator from Massachusetts (1855 - 1873). Before and during the American Civil War, he was a leading Republican, and a strong opponent of slavery. He devoted his energies to the destruction of the "Slave Power" - the faction of slave owners and their political allies which anti-slavery Americans saw as dominating the country. On July 8, 1862, Wilson drafted a measure that authorized the President to enlist African Americans who had been held in slavery and were deemed competent for military service, and employ them to construct fortifications and carry out other military-related manual labor, the first step towards allowing African Americans to serve as soldiers and President Lincoln signed the amendment into law on July 17. One of the most important abolitionists of the 19th Century. Very fine.............................................$110.00

10313 - HENRY WILSON, ABOLITIONIST, VICE PRESIDENT UNDER GRANT, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Black & Case - Boston. Seated pose facing slightly left. Wilson was the 18th Vice President of the United States (1873 - 1875) and a Senator from Massachusetts (1855 - 1873). Before and during the American Civil War, he was a leading Republican, and a strong opponent of slavery. He devoted his energies to the destruction of the "Slave Power" - the faction of slave owners and their political allies which anti-slavery Americans saw as dominating the country. On July 8, 1862, Wilson drafted a measure that authorized the President to enlist African Americans who had been held in slavery and were deemed competent for military service, and employ them to construct fortifications and carry out other military-related manual labor, the first step towards allowing African Americans to serve as soldiers and President Lincoln signed the amendment into law on July 17. One of the most important abolitionists of the 19th Century. Very fine......................$145.00

10314 - HORACE GREELEY, EDITOR, PROPONENT OF AN END TO SLAVERY, wet plate albumen carte de visite, no imprint but a from life photo of Greeley facing slightly left. He was the editor of the New York Tribune, among the great newspapers of its time. Long active in politics, he served briefly as a congressman from New York, and was the candidate of the Democratic and Liberal Republican parties in the 1872 presidential election. He helped found the Republican Party in 1854, but about then broke with Seward and Weed, backing other presidential candidates against Seward at the 1860 Republican National Convention, and supporting the nominee, Abraham Lincoln. When the Civil War broke out, he mostly supported Lincoln, though urging him to commit to the end of slavery before the president was willing to do so. After Lincoln's assassination, he supported the Radical Republicans in opposition to President Andrew Johnson. Very fine........................................................$110.00

SLAVE PERIOD RESTRAINTS

We hesitate to label these restraints as "slave shackles" because specific provenance to a particular plantation is not available. We often see the word "slave" pinned to every type of restraint even those we know were made in the late 19th Century. Thus we offer these as restraints that were made in the period before the Civil War and are typical of the restraints used on plantations in the South.

A SET OF LEG SHACKLES EARLY 18TH CENTURY

82802 - COLONIAL PERIOD WROUGHT IRON WRIST/ANKLE SHACKLES, Early 18th Century, 13" overall, 3 1/2" dual leg rings, single bar with large flange end, one large link attached to the bar. This style is typical of the early 18th Century and is very similar to the leg shackles found on the famous slave ship Henrietta Marie that sank off the Florida coast in 1700 after delivering a shipment of slaves. Normal rust patina but in excellent condition overall for excavated iron. Rare so early...........................................................$595.00

82803 - EARLY STYLE EXCAVATED SHACKLES, locally made with a crude locking mechanism on one side, typical clasping ankle ring on the other, massive hand-made links, 3.5" rings with 13" of chain links. The locking mechanism has been rusted in such a fashion you can see the inside of the lever lock. Overall very decent for a dug example and the style of the 1830's - 40's.......................................................$495.00


9204 - SENATOR CHARLES SUMNER - CRUSADER FOR NEGRO RIGHTS, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Anthony. Rare seated pose of Sumner facing left. Sumner was an American politician and senator from Massachusetts. As an academic lawyer and a powerful orator, Sumner was the leader of the antislavery forces in Massachusetts and a leader of the Radical Republicans in the United States Senate during the American Civil War working to destroy the Confederacy, free all the slaves, and keep on good terms with Europe. During Reconstruction, he fought to minimize the power of the ex-Confederates and guarantee equal rights to the freedmen. In 1856, a South Carolina Congressman, Democrat Preston Brooks, nearly killed Sumner on the Senate floor two days after Sumner delivered an intensely anti-slavery speech called "The Crime against Kansas." In the speech, Sumner characterized the attacker's cousin South Carolina Senator Andrew Butler, a Democrat, as a pimp for slavery. The episode played a major role in the coming of the Civil War. Very scarce card is crisp, scarce pose. RARE.....................$225.00

9205 - GEORGE WILLIAM CURTIS, ANTI SLAVERY ADVOCATE, PUBLISHER, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Appleton of NY. Waist up pose facing right. In 1855, he married Anna Shaw, daughter of abolitionist Francis Shaw and sister of Robert Gould Shaw of the famed 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was involved in the founding of the Republican Party, and made his first important speech on the questions of the day at Wesleyan University in 1856; he engaged actively in John C. Fremont's presidential campaign of that year (the Republican campaign headquarters were located not far from his Staten Island home), and was soon recognized not only as an effective public speaker, but also as one of the ablest, most high-minded, and most trustworthy leaders of public opinion. In 1862, George William Curtis delivered his "Doctrine of Liberty" address to the Phi beta Kappa Society at Harvard, on behalf of President Lincoln, who was encouraging support for the Emancipation Proclamation. As a Republican, he spoke in favor of African American equality and civil rights. Very fine..............................................$75.00

9208 - WILLIAM ELLERY CHANNING, UNUSUAL ABOLITIONIST OF THE EARLY 19TH CENTURY, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Smith of Boston. Large bust pose from an oil painting. Unitarian Minister, Channing addressed the topic of slavery, although he was never an ardent abolitionist. Channing wrote a book in 1835, entitled, "SLAVERY" James Munroe and Company, publisher. Channing, however, has been described as a "romantic racist" in "Black Abolitionism: A Quest for Human Dignity" by Beverly Eileen Mitchell (133-38). He held a common American belief about the inferiority of African people and slaves and held a belief that once freed, Africans would need overseers. The overseers (largely former slave masters) were necessary because the slaves would lapse into laziness. Furthermore, he did not join the abolitionist movement because he did not agree with their of conducting themselves, and he felt that voluntary associations limited a person's autonomy. Therefore, he often chose to remain separate from organizations and reform movements. This middle position characterized his attitude about most questions, although his eloquence and strong influence on the religious world incurred the enmity of many extremists. Channing had an enormous influence over the religious (and social) life of New England, and America, in the nineteenth century. Towards the end of his life Channing embraced immediate abolitionism. His evolving view of abolitionism was fostered by the success of British abolition in the British West Indies in 1834 and the lack of the expected social and economic upheaval in the post-emancipated Caribbean. Fine, slavery related......................................................$59.00


82305 - NEW ORLEANS, THE ORLEANS GAZETTE, March 11th, 1819 , 2 pages, a long article in defense of General Jackson for the congressional criticism he was receiving in Washington for his execution of Seminole Indian prisoners during the late Seminole War in Florida. The article gives insight to the same thing General Anthony Wayne did during the late Revolutionary War when he executed Indians who were taken prisoner after an attack on Savannah in 1782 and received no reprimand from the Continental Congress. An ad for the sale of the Negro boy GEORGE who was taken in a legal suit and offered for sale, other Negro sales, the ratification of the Chickasaw Treaty which benefited the University of North Carolina, an early Mississippi River steamboat ad. The earliest New Orleans paper that you will see on today's market. Fine, trivial archival repair crisp and fresh paper..............................................$175.00


82306 - NEW ORLEANS, LE COURIER DE LA LOUISIANE
, August 23rd, 1834, four large pages. A rare bi-lingual paper with the first two pages on French with the same data repeated in English on page 3/4. Large folio edition, 20" X 24". The largest slavery illustrated ads you will ever see with the illustrations of slaves near 1" in height. Early steamboats on the Mississippi River, plantation news, an excellent insight on the city of New Orleans in the mid 1830's. Very fine.......................................................
$125.00



2100 - TENNESSEE SLAVE OWNER GEORGE WASHINGTON GORDON
, cabinet card by Bingham of Memphis, TN. Gordon [not the CSA General] owned a hot springs resort in Georgia before the war as well as a plantation in Tennessee. See items 9304 - 06 in our black history section for slave related letters he authored. Later in life, he lived in Memphis on a farm named Boxwood. A scarce photo of a slave owner of the 1850's. This cabinet was probably made from an earlier ambrotype taken when Gordon was younger. Very fine, old ID on verso..............................................................$75.00

8000 - SAMUEL J. MAY, ABOLITIONIST, In 1830, May happened to meet and create a strong friendship with William Lloyd Garrison, which pushed him into the abolitionist movement. Although his abolitionist views alienated his family, friends, and other clergymen, he remained true to his beliefs. He helped Garrison found the New England Anti-Slavery Society, the American Anti-Slavery Society, and the New England Non-Resistance Society, in addition to working for the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society. He served as one of the writers for the constitutions of some of these societies, and as a lecturer and general agent for the New England Slavery Society. Fighting for racial equality and better schools, May defended Prudence Crandall in the 1830s as residents of Canterbury, Connecticut fought her decision to close the school she ran for white girls and open it solely to young black ladies. This experience caused him to abandon his support for the colonization movement. He became pastor of the Unitarian Church of the Messiah of Syracuse, New York in 1845, serving until 1868. He fought the Fugitive Slave Law of the 1850s by making announcements during his sermons of fugitive slaves in the area and took collections on their behalf, as well as aiding escaped slaves along the Underground Railroad. As a prominent abolitionist in the city, May, with the help of many Liberty Party members, including Gerritt Smith and Samuel Ringgold Ward, planned and successfully executed the rescue of Jerry McHenry, a man arrested as a fugitive slave, from the police. In addition to fighting for the abolition of slavery, he fought for the equality of free blacks in his congregations by allowing them to sit in the front as opposed to the segregated  rear pews. This act resulted in his reproach by white congregation members and also in his quitting some of his parishes. These actions, particularly late in the 1850s and immediately after President Lincoln was elected in 1860, led abolitionism's opponents to violently attack May as well as burn him in effigy. A large clipped signature in ink...................................................$45.00

8001 - PARKER PILLSBURY, ABOLITIONIST, was an American minister and advocate for abolition and women's rights. Pillsbury was born in Hamilton, Massachusetts. He moved to Henniker, New Hampshire where he later farmed and worked as a wagoner. With the encouragement of his local Congregational church, Pillsbury entered Gilmanton Theological Seminary in 1835, graduating in 1839. He studied an additional year at Andover, and there came under the influence of social reformer John A. Collins, before accepting a church in Loudon, New Hampshire. His work in the ministry suffered after her made a number of sharp attacks on the churches' complicity with slavery. His Congregational license to preach was revoked in 1840. However Pillsbury became active in the ecumenical Free Religious Association and preached to its societies in New York, Ohio, and Michigan. Pillsbury's dislike of slavery led him into active writing and lecturing for the abolitionist movement and other progressive social reform issues. He became a lecturing agent for the New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and American antislavery societies, and held these posts for over two decades. He edited the Concord (N. H.) Herald of Freedom in 1840, and again in 1845 and 1846. In 1854, he served as an emissary from the American Anti-Slavery Society to Great Britain, Pillsbury lectured widely on abolition and social reform, often in the company of fellow abolitionist Stephen Symonds Foster. He earned a reputation for successfully dealing with hostile crowds through nonresistance tactics. His support for nonresistance led to service on the executive committee of the New Hampshire Non-Resistance Society. Consequently, Pillsbury was not an active supporter of the Union war effort. However, he did applaud Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation and defended the actions of John Brown after the raid on Harpers Ferry. In 1865, Pillsbury broke with longtime associate William Lloyd Garrison over the need for continued activity by the American Anti-Slavery Society. He edited the National Anti-Slavery Standard in 1866. Pillsbury helped to draft the constitution of the feminist American Equal Rights Association in 1865, and served as vice-president of the New Hampshire Woman suffrage Association. With feminist Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Pillsbury served as co-editor for the women's rights newsletter The Revolution, founded in 1868. Pillsbury completed his abolition memoirs, Acts of the Anti-Slavery Apostles, in 1883. His nephew, Albert E. Pillsbury, drafted the bylaws of the NAACP. Scarce...clipped signature in ink..............................................$45.00

8002 - PARSON W. G. BROWNLOW, was an American newspaper editor, minister, and politician. He served as Governor of Tennessee from 1865 to 1869 and as a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1869 to 1875. He rose to prominence in the 1840s as editor of the Whig, a polemical newspaper that promoted Whig Party ideals and opposed secession in the years leading up to the Civil War. Brownlow's uncompromising and radical viewpoints made him one of the most divisive figures in Tennessee political history and one of the most controversial politicians of the Reconstruction-era South. Beginning his career as a Methodist circuit rider in the 1820s, Brownlow was both censured and praised by his superiors for his vicious verbal debates with rival missionaries of other persuasions. As a newspaper editor, he was notorious for his relentless personal attacks against his religious and political opponents, sometimes to the point of being physically assaulted. At the same time, he was building a large base of fiercely loyal subscribers. As a result of his persistent opposition to secession after the outbreak of the Civil War, he was jailed in December 1861, and was subsequently forced into exile in the North. As governor he adopted the stance of the Radical Republicans and spent much of his term opposing the policies of his longtime political foe Andrew Johnson. His gubernatorial policies, which have been described as both autocratic and progressive, helped Tennessee became the first former Confederate state to be readmitted to the Union after the War Brownlow's policy of disenfranchising ex-Confederates and enfranchising former slaves fueled the rise of the Ku Klux Klan in the late 1860. His ideas on slavery changed over the years first endorsing slavery and then to a denunciation of slavery. Clipped signature in ink with closing from a letter...................................................................$45.00

8003 - SALE OF A SLAVE WOMAN BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA 1844, a manuscript bill of sale executed at Baton Rouge, LA. October 15th, 1844, listing the sake of the Negro woman named SOPHIE aged about 38 years for the sum of $500. The seller warrants the said slave sound body and mind, a slave for life, and free from all the vices and maladies proscribed by law. James A. Michattow had acknowledged receipt of the funds from William Mark the buyer. 4" X 7", light tone, overall fine.........................................................SOLD

8004 - THE HIRE OF SLAVES FOR SIX YEARS AT A TIME, 8" X 10" manuscript, February 27th, 1856, manuscript receipt for payment received by May Hale for the hire of the Negro woman EASTER for six years for $600 and the Negro girl SARAH for three years for $75.00. The former was for years 1850 - 55, and the later for 1853 - 55. Included was a deduction for "support of children for the years 1850 - 55. William G. Hale was a plantation owner in Desoto Parish Louisiana who owned 50 slaves in 1860. He was obviously hiring these slave women from a relative and levying a charge for the support of their children. Very unusual slave content as slaves were rarely hired for so long a time period, on blue paper, very fine..........................................SOLD

8005 - THE BLACKSMITH ELIJAH WAS SOLD IN LOUISIANA, 6" X 8" manuscript, March 17th, 1858, a bill of sale detailing the sale to Hill & Markham of Baton Rouge, LA, the Negro "Blacksmith" named ELIJAH for the sum of $1800 cash, aged about 25 years of age and the slave was warranted to be sound in body and mind and free from all maladies proscribed by law. John Hill started an iron foundry in partnership with Mr. J. William Markham at the foot of North Street in Baton Rouge at the age of twenty-four (1848). When the State of Louisiana was building a state capitol building in Baton Rouge in 1855, the John Hill Foundry was selected to cast the 1575 foot long cast iron fence, designed by architect James H. Dakin, which surrounds the building. Hill made cannonballs for the Confederacy in his foundry after Louisiana seceded. After Baton Rouge was captured by the North in May 1862 during the American Civil War, John Hill's home was commandeered to be used as quarters for officers. He obtained permission from Admiral David Farragut, aboard his flagship, USS Hartford, to move his family across the Mississippi River to West Baton Rouge Parish. The Hill family took refuge along with two other families in the small "hut" of a Mr. Watson near the plantation of Abraham Lobdell. His industrial properties in Baton Rouge were destroyed by Northern forces in 1862. Although most structures north of North Street were burned by the Union forces, the John Hill mansion survived because it was used as the Union headquarters. After the war, he purchased a bankrupt plantation which he named HOMESTEAD PLANTATION and engaged in the planting of sugar cane in West Baton Rouge Parish. Blue paper, stains, overall fine with good manuscript...................SOLD

8006 - LARGE DETAILED BILL OF SALE FOR THE NEGRO BOY NAMED DAN, EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH, LOUISIANA, June 7th, 1853. A large 8" X 13" manuscript bill of sale for the Negro boy named DAN of black color aged about 17 years old that was sold for the sum of $800 to William Markham of Baton Rouge. The seller guarantees the seller that the slave was free from all vices and defects and against claims of others. The $800 was paid "cash in hand." Markham was in partnership with John Hill in an iron foundry that manufactured cannon shot for the Confederacy early in the War. Blue paper, light age stains, very bold and an attractive manuscript.....................................................$275.00

8007 - THE SALE OF A CERTAIN MALE SLAVE NAMED BILL SCOTT, February 25th, 1858, Carroll Parish, Louisiana. Huge 8" X 13" manuscript bill of sale that details the sale of the Negro man named BILL SCOTT aged about 24 years of age sold with full guarantees as regard to his title and also in every respect, only as a runaway, and warrants against all other vices and maladies prescribed by the laws of the state with the purchase price being $1000 based on a note payable the first day of March 1859 with 8% interest at Baton Rouge. The wife of the seller then claims that she relinquishes her claim on the slave in favor of the sale. The sale was passed at the town of Provenance, Parish of Carroll. A very unusual sale document involving mortgages and ownership rights of a married couple. 2 pages, blue paper, light age stains.......................SOLD

8010 - WALLACE OF DARK COLOR SOLD IN ASSUMPTION PARISH, LOUISIANA 1849, 8" X 10" manuscript, March 15th, 1849, Assumption Parish, LA. A Negro man named WALLACE of dark color aged 19 years was sold for $850. He was to be a "slave for life" and was warranted to be free from all the vices and maladies proscribed by state law and the title to Wallace was guaranteed to all the heirs of the purchaser Whitmell Pugh. He moved from LA to North Carolina, and then he entered UNC. He worked as an accountant. He married William Anne Thompson on 8-16-1831. Upon the death of his father, he returned to LA to superintend the plantation and to settle the estate. He was Speaker of the House of Louisiana. He sold his father's plantation, and in the spring of 1835 he purchased Woodlawn Plantation construction of Woodlawn had begun in 1836 Woodlawn stood for over 100 years, being razed in 1946. He died at "Woodlawn" Plantation and was buried in the Woodlawn cemetery, Assumption Parish, LA. The Pugh family owned many South Louisiana plantations, WALLACE probably worked on Woodlawn Plantation...............................SOLD




8011 - NINE NEGROES SOLD IN PERRY COUNTY, ALABAMA IN 1832
, January 16th, 1832, 8" X 13" slave bill of sale for nine named Negro slaves that were sold for $2900. Named were: SAM about 32 years old, SUSAN about 30 years old, WASHINGTON about 14 years old, BOB about 12 years old, PETER about 10 years old, HESTDAY about 8 years old, BETSY about 6 years old, HIRAM about 4 years old, and ARCHER about 2 years old. All were guaranteed to be healthy and sound and the right of title guaranteed. A very interesting bill of sale that probably was a mother, father and their seven children. Large manuscript, quite farmable.....................
SOLD



8012 - LARGE NEW ORLEANS BILL OF SALE PRINTED FOR A MOTHER AND HER TWO CHILDREN
, December 18th, 1855, 8" X 13" large two page slave bill of sale listing the details of the sale of the "negress COMFORT aged about 23 years and her two children named LOUISA aged two and a half and a son ROBERT about one month for the sum of $1200. All were warranted to be free from all the vices and maladies proscribed by law. William Markham of Baton Rouge, LA was the purchaser and William Massey of New Orleans was the seller. There are many more details on the sale included. Large bold type heading "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, STATE OF LOUISIANA," on blue paper, some trivial age spots, paper firm, a scarcer pre-printed variety of slave bill of sale, light stains.....................................
$295.00

8013 - A PLANTATION OWNER DIES AND HIS POSSESSIONS ARE LISTED FOR THE PROBATE OF HIS ESTATE INCLUDING TWO NEGRO FEMALE SLAVES, 4 large pages 8" X 13" in manuscript, Parish of Concordia, Louisiana, January 24th, 182. John Houston had died and his possessions on his plantation were catalogued and submitted to the probate judge Robert Ogden. This is a very interesting document describing in minute detail the items found on a plantation in Louisiana in the early 19th Century. Listed first were the Negro woman slave named LETTY valued at $400, then the Negro woman slave MARY valued at $350 - then follows the livestock listed by head count and variety...60 head of horned cattle valued at $300, 18 additional acquired from another estate settlement from James Houston - probably his brother, 10 horses listed by variety, mares, filly, bay, etc., then Oxen were listed, geese, and so on. Plantation implements were then catalogued and valued, plows, chains, whips, etc.; then household items such as beds, churns, etc. In conclusion the debts of the deceased are listed to be deducted from the value of the assets. The conclusion is written on page four as to the results of the appraisal. This was obviously a small plantation farm with no male slaves listed. In many cases small farms hired male slaves when field work was needed and just maintained household female servants. Quite interesting and bold manuscript. Very fine.................................................................$195.00


61514 - A RARE ILLUSTRATED BILLHEAD FROM THE FAMOUS ST. CHARLES HOTEL IN NEW ORLEANS WHERE THOUSANDS OF SLAVES WERE SOLD UNDER THE ROTUNDA, On the corner of St. Louis and Chartres streets in 1838, the St. Louis hotel opened. It was also called the City Exchange Hotel. Two years later it burned down but was quickly rebuilt. The main entrance to the hotel led into the exchange, a beautiful domed rotunda where every afternoon between noon and 3 p.m. the auctions were held. In this elegant hotel, the center of Creole society before the Civil War, was located perhaps the most infamous of the slave auction blocks. There was more than one. In 1842, George Buckingham reported walking through the rotunda. The auctioneers, he said, "were" endeavoring to drown every voice but his own...One was selling pictures and dwelling on their merits; another was disposing of some slaves. These consisted of an unhappy family who wee all exposed to the hammer at the same time. Their good qualities were enumerated in English and in French, and their persons were carefully examined by intending purchasers, among whom they were ultimately disposed of, chiefly to Creole buyers; the husband at 750 dollars, the wife at $550, and the children at $220 each." Slaves were sold on this spot at the old St. Louis hotel, which had also served as the state Capitol and the site of Carnival balls. The hotel was on St. Louis between Chartres and Royal streets. The Rotunda dome was destroyed by fire in 1851. The hotel was damaged in a 1915 storm and it was demolished two years later. 4.5" X 6.5" illustrated bill dated January 8th, 1850, ST. CHARLES HOTEL, NEW ORLEANS, to the left is a engraving of the hotel showing the famous Rotunda dome, payment received from a Mrs. Marr for 6 days lodging, engraved by Rawdon, Wright and Hatch of New Orleans the famous firm that engraved the first US postage stamp in 1847.  A splendid example from one of the largest slave auction sites in antebellum New Orleans. Very fine........................$150.00


RELICS FROM A LOUISIANA PLANTATION FOUND NEAR SLAVE QUARTERS

The following items were found on lands that were once Monroe Plantation in Ascension Parish, Louisiana. Found years ago before a present day subdivision covered the site, these mostly religious relics were found in the vicinity of the slave cabins. Today one of the original ten large slave cabins still exists and is incorporated into a fine restaurant called the Cabin. Monroe Plantation dates back to the 1830's. It was in close proximity to Houmas House Plantation which still exists and is a wonderful place to visit and enjoy Louisiana cuisine, both adjoin the Mississippi River. In the late 19th Century, Monroe Plantation still existed and was one of the seven plantations owned by William Porcher Miles who was one of the largest producers of sugar in the state. These simple crosses would be the type worn by plantation slaves as the plantation owners in that area were mostly Roman Catholic and many of the slaves followed their owner's religious beliefs.



2704 - BRASS CROSS
, 41mm, solid brass cross, black ebony wood inlay missing in two small arms, excavated Monroe Plantation, Ascension Parish, LA in the vicinity of the slave cabins, LA c. 1840 - 60, ex-Schaffer Collection...............................
$125.00


2706 - RELIC FIGURE OF CHRIST FROM A LARGER CRUCIFIX AND A TOP PORTION OF BRASS RING
, 2 items, brass figure of Christ, 33mm, slightly bent, top portion of a brass ring, crude workmanship. Round ball-like center, excavated Monroe Plantation, Ascension Parish, LA. in the vicinity of the slave cabins, LA c. 1840 - 60, ex-Schaffer Collection. The pair of items..............................................
SOLD


2901 - 13 NAMED SLAVES INCLUDED IN A MISSISSIPPI INVENTORY, Warren County, Mississippi. Undated but manuscript and paper dates 1830's. Two 8" X 13" pages in bold brown ink, a listing of the assets of the estate of H. R. Whitaker deceased. The inventory list 13 named slaves and their values at $9,100 in an estate valued at $10,259.50. Slaves named were AARON, JOSEPH, BENJAMIN, MATTHEW, RICHARD, CONFORT, CAROLINE, MARY, JAMES, LITTLE BENJAMIN, POLLY, CHARLOTTE, WILLIS, among the other items are hand irons [pair], along with sheep, cattle, horses, large manuscript, very fine. All slaves on page one for display................................................................$275.00

2903 - COLUMBIA COUNTY, ARKANSAS, 19 SLAVES DIVIDED AMONG EIGHT HEIRS, 8" X 21", manuscript, January 4th, 1859, 19 named slaves were divided up into eight lots or eight named heirs due to the death of the owner per the probable court. Slaves named were MARY, ESQUIRE, JERRY, JUICE, LITTLE JANE, BROTHER, ADALINE, TERRY, GREEN, TAB, ROSE, BENJAMIN, HALL, GILBERT, NELSON, HENRY, REBECCA, AND AMANDA, the total value of the slaves was $11,250. A beautiful document in bold and handsome manuscript. Very fine................................................SOLD

2907 - LOUISIANA BILL OF SALE AS WELL AS A MORTGAGE ON THE SALE OF THE NEGRO MAN ELI, May 27th, 1854, DeSoto Parish, Louisiana, two large blue pages of manuscript 8" X 13", William Deloach of the Parish of DeSoto has purchased from Louisiana Short the wife of W. W. Deloach for the full sum of $600 the, Negro man ELI, a man of black complexion, about 26 years of age and a slave for life and to remain in her title until the mortgage is paid off. The interest was 8% and a unpaid debt could result in seizure by the Sheriff. A must unusual bill of sale between a husband and his  wife in northwest Louisiana in cotton growing country. Very fine, bold manuscript..................................................$295.00

2909 - SEIZURE OF SLAVES OF 29 NAMED NEGRO SLAVES INCLUDING ONE NAMED ANDREW JACKSON AND DAVID CROCKETT, RED RIVER COUNTY, TEXAS, 5 large 8" X 13" manuscript pages on blue paper attached by a silk ribbon. Clarksville, Texas, November 7th, 1848. Samuel Turner was being sued for the sum of $13,567.51 and damages by Williame Sambeth. The slaves involved in settling this debt were listed by name, age, and valued individually. Those listed were BOB AT $700, BEN AT $400, MORGANAT $550.00, TUMSHA AT $600, PHILIS AT $400, ALSEY AT $350, HARRIETT AT $400, JOSHUA AT $500, MARIA AT $400, BILLY AT $500, PHILIS AT $500, ANTHONY AT $600, SALLY AND CHILD AT $650, OTHO AT $375, LUCY AT $250, DAVID CROCKET AT $330, EDMUND AT $400, CATA AND CHILD AT $600, BOSTON AT $205, CHARLES AT $500, CATY AT $570, ANDY JACKSON AT $250, MOSLEY AT $650, PLEASANT AT $800, EMELINE AT $550, MARY AT $400, GEORGE AT $765, AND GEORGE AT $250. Signed by the Sheriff of the County, many more intricate details on the seizure of the mentioned slaves. Very fine.............................................................SOLD


A COLLECTION OF PHOTOS OF THE SLAVE CHILDREN OF NEW ORLEANS AND THE REDEEMED SLAVE FANNY VIRGINIA CASSEOPIA LAWRENCE



5053 - ROSA, A SLAVE GIRL FROM NEW ORLEANS
, Carte de Visite by Paxton of New York, a profile of young Rosa [Rosina Downs] facing to the left. One of the approximately 22 views published of the "Slave Children of New Orleans" used to generate funds for the education of Colored children in the Department of the Gulf. Photo fine, some trim to bottom border.............................................
$175.00


5055 - ROSA, CHARLEY, AND REBECCA, SLAVE CHILDREN FROM NEW ORLEANS
, Carte de Visite by Paxton of NY, Charley Taylor, Rosina Downs, and Rebecca Huger pose wrapped in an huge American flag. View #9 by Paxton. These light colored children were billed as the "redeemed slave children from New Orleans" and proceeds from the slave of the photos used for the education of blacks in the Department of the Gulf. Choice condition. One of the most desirable of the series, a notation denotes the flag as "our protection". Very fine..................................................
$295.00


5060 - FANNIE VIRGINIA CASSEOPIA LAWRENCE, A REDEEMED SLAVE CHILD
, Carte de Visite by J. W. Black of Boston, 5 year old Fannie posing barefoot in front of photo studio prop. Fanny Virginia Cassiopeia Lawrence, had been discovered 'sore and tattered and unclean' by a nurse tending Union soldiers in Fairfax, Virginia, who adopted Fanny as her own (Catherine S. Lawrence). She was baptized by Henry Ward Beecher in Plymouth Church in Brooklyn in May 1863. She was an octoroon being only 1/8th black and her image was sold to raise funds for the further redemption of other similar slave children. Photo very fine, slight tipping to top corners. Scarce pose...............................................
$200.00

5061 - A VIRGINIA SLAVE CHILD IN 1863, Carte de Visite by Van Dorn of Brooklyn, FANNIE VIRGINIA CASSEOPIA LAWRENCE, A REDEEMED SLAVE CHILD, a full standing view in a fine dress. Fannie had been discovered 'sore and tattered and unclean' by a nurse tending Union soldiers in Fairfax, Virginia, who adopted Fanny as her own (Catharine S. Lawrence). She was baptized by Henry Ward Beecher in Plymouth Church in Brooklyn in May 1863. She was an octoroon being only 1/8th black and her image was sold to raise funds for the further redemption of other similar slave children. Very fine.....................................$200.00


5063 - FANNIE VIRGINIA CASSEOPIA LAWRENCE, A REDEEMED SLAVE CHILD
, Carte de Visite by Kellogg Bros. Hartford, CT, 5 year old Fannie posing hat in hand in front of a photo studio prop. Fanny Virginia Cassiopeia Lawrence, had been discovered 'sore and tattered and unclean' by a nurse tending Union soldiers in Fairfax, Virginia, who adopted Fanny as her own (Catharine S. Lawrence). She was baptized by Henry Ward Beecher in Plymouth Church in Brooklyn in May 1863. She was an octoroon being only 1/8th black and her image was sold to raise funds for the further redemption of other similar slave children. Choice. Scarce pose.............................
$225.00


5064 - FANNIE VIRGINIA CASSEOPIA LAWRENCE, A REDEEMED SLAVE CHILD
,  Carte de Visite by Black of Boston, 5 year old Fannie posing in front of a photo studio prop in a fine dress and bonnet. Fanny Virginia Cassiopeia Lawrence, had been discovered 'sore and tattered and unclean' by a nurse tending Union soldiers in Fairfax, Virginia, who adopted Fanny as her own (Catharine S. Lawrence). She was baptized by Henry Ward Beecher in Plymouth Church in Brooklyn in May 1863. She was an octoroon being only 1/8th black and her image was sold to raise funds for the further redemption of other similar slave children. Choice. Scarce pose.............................
$245.00


5066 - FANNIE VIRGINIA CASSEOPIA LAWRENCE, A REDEEMED SLAVE CHILD
, Carte de Visite by Kellogg Bros. of Hartford, CT., 5 year old Fannie posing in a fine dress and bonnet playing a toy drum. Fanny Virginia Cassiopeia Lawrence, had been discovered 'sore and tattered and unclean' by a nurse tending Union soldiers in Fairfax, Virginia, who adopted Fanny as her own (Catharine S. Lawrence). She was baptized by Henry Ward Beecher in Plymouth Church in Brooklyn in May 1863. She was an octoroon being only 1/8th black and her image was sold to raise funds for the further redemption of other similar slave children. Choice. Scarce pose..............................
$245.00

5067 - FANNIE VIRGINIA CASSEOPIA LAWRENCE, A REDEEMED SLAVE CHILD, Carte de Visite by Black of Boston, 5 year old Fannie posing in a fine dress and holding a hoop Fanny Virginia Cassiopeia Lawrence, had been discovered 'sore and tattered and unclean' by a nurse tending Union soldiers in Fairfax, Virginia, who adopted Fanny as her own (Catharine S. Lawrence). She was baptized by Henry Ward Beecher in Plymouth Church in Brooklyn in May 1863. She was an octoroon being only 1/8th black and her image was sold to raise funds for the further redemption of other similar slave children. Bottom corners slightly rounded. Scarce pose......................................................$225.00


5014 - A PERIOD PHOTOGRAPH OF STONE PLANTATION, MONTGOMERY, AL, BUILT 1852, photo by Tresslar of Montgomery, AL. c. 1880 vintage photo. Five massive columns adorn the front portico. The two-story brick masonry house, fronted by a monumental Doric hexastyle portico, was built circa 1852 by Barton Warren Stone. He was born on March 24, 1800, the son of Warren Henley Stone of Poynton Manor in Charles County, Maryland and Martha Bedell of North Carolina. His parents established a plantation, "Magnolia Crest," in Lowndes County in the 1830's. It still survives a few miles west of this plantation. Barton Stone's plantation house, known to his family simply as the "Home Place," was one of three plantation houses that he owned. His other two houses were "Duck Pond" and "Prairie Place." By 1860 he owned 83 slaves and 5,000 acres (2,000 ha) in Montgomery County, with an additional 2,000 acres in Autauga County. Very fine..............................SOLD

AN INTERESTING COLLECTION OF MISSISSIPPI TAX RECEIPTS FOR SLAVES AND PROPERTY

4012 - 1837 MISSISSIPPI TAXES ON LANDS AND SLAVES, Warren County, MS, Taxes for the year 1837 for 320 acres of land and 15 SLAVES owned by R. Newman's Estate, taxes totaling $25.15. 3" X 7" imprinted receipt, very fine.......................................$95.00

4013 - 1845 TAX RECEIPT, SHOWING A SPACE FOR SLAVES TO BE ENTERED AS TAXABLE PROPERTY, Natchez, MS [although not noted as such], imprinted check-sized tax receipts with spaces for watches, clocks, cattle, pleasure carriages, and acres of land to be taxed. These are marked for land only with a space was left for SLAVES and so printed, ornate border, crisp and fresh paper, have several........................................SOLD

A RARE EARLY STATEHOOD TEXAS NEWSPAPER - SLAVE RELATED

1849 - TEXAS STATE GAZETTE, Austin, Texas, March 30th, 1850, 8 pages. Masthead of a female on a cotton bale. The legislature acts on relief for POW's in the Mexican War, a very long speech by Daniel Webster discussing the issue of slavery in the new territories, numerous large columns devoted to this speech, illustrated slave runaway ad regarding the capture of the slave named PETER about 18 years of age of mulatto color who had run away from his mistress a Mrs. Tanner in Chaneyville, LA. Crisp paper, minor blems, scarce early Texas paper...................................................$85.00

1850 - TEXAS STATE GAZETTE, Austin, Texas, May 18th, 1850. Masthead of a female on a cotton bale, 8 pages. Terrible news from Laredo on the Rio Grande, the Comanche attack settlers, Lt. Hudson of the 1st Infantry killed, the government has neglected the area, discusses the treaty with Mexico where the US was supposed to curtail the Indians to prevent them from going into Mexico and assailing Mexicans, a discussion on the boundary of the US and Mexico being the Rio Grande, a slave named ABRAM of copper color aged about 40 years of age ran away riding a sorrel mare mule and took a American saddle with him. Very fine, scarce paper....................................................$95.00


9300 - A FATHER SELLS HIS FOUR CHILDREN HIS SLAVES FOR DOLLAR BUT RETAINS RIGHTS ON THEIR USE AND WILL STILL RECEIVE PROCEEDS FROM THEIR USE AND INCREASES, 8" X 14" manuscript two pages, Butler County, Alabama, July 26th, 1846, N. R. Lewis has crafted this unusual bill of sale selling his eight named slaves to his four named children for the sum of one dollar. ABRAM aged 47 years, AMANDA a girl about 6 years old, ARUTHSIA a girl about 16 years old, CAROLINE a girl of eighteen, HENRY a boy about 9 years old, LOUISA, PRISCILLA a girl about 14 years old, and THOMAS [ALIAS TOM] a boy about 11 years old were sold to the four children along with their increases. In reading the terms it was apparent that the father wanted to keep the slaves together as possibly ABRAM was the father of the mentioned younger slaves. Many more details and terms of the sale looking in the future when the oldest daughter reached the age of 21 and details if she died before that time with specifics on the ownership of the slaves among the other children [three male heirs]. well written, light staining, trifle fold archival repair. RARE content. Very good........................................$225.00

9301 - PAYMENTS FOR THE HIRE OF NAMED SLAVES PAID TO A GUARDIAN, LOUISIANA, 1859, Ouachita Parish, Louisiana, May 3rd, 1859, 8" X 13" manuscript accounting of payments for slaves belonging to a woman who had married paying the husband of the woman or the hire of the slaves. Details of slave hire as far back as 1851 listing funds that were paid to Amanda Nunn's husband, Joseph A. Cook. Anthony Smith had been the guardian of the young woman prior to her marriage. The boy JOHN was hired out in 1851 and $100 was paid to Joseph Cook in 1852 by Smith, the girl ELLEN was hired out for the sum of $600 in the year 1851 and the money was paid to Joseph Cook in 1852. The affidavit continues describing shares of the [cotton] crop of 1851 as well as her share of six Negroes. Smith attests that a total of $770.52 was paid to Joseph Cook and that he has lost or mislaid the receipts. Interesting content, blue paper, well written in dark brown ink..............................................$110.00

WAR DATED ISSUES OF THE FAMOUS LIBERATOR

12250 - The Liberator was published for many years before the War and was known as a strong voice in the anti-Slave movement. thus issues in the 1840's and 1850's are usually available to collectors. Civil War years of the Liberator are very scarce and cover not only the early years before Emancipation but important news about newly freed slaves in the Sough and the organization and successes of Black troops in the Union Army. As a bonus, the masthead showing the transition from slavery to freedom is magnificent. Published by William Lloyd Garrison in New York this historic paper is very rare in the Civil War years. We have a number of copies from 1862-64 in fine to very fine condition available..........$69.95/each           $125.00 for two


7500 - A RARE LOUISIANA BILL OF SALE OF A YOUNG MOTHER AND CHILD, Parish of Orleans, Louisiana, November 15th, 1858, 3 large 8" X 13", pre-printed and filled-in bill of sale detailing the sale of the Negro girl ROSETTA aged about 20 years of age and her child GEORGE about 8 years of age sold to John Roberts for the sum of $1000. Louis Desire Lepaulmier of the Parish of Jefferson sells as the vendor the said slaves which he guarantees to be free from the vices and maladies proscribed by the laws of the state. The bill of sale continues on describing the previous seller of the slave ROSETTA as Philippe Druum of the City of New Orleans on December 7th, 1857. The child GEORGE was born after that first sale. Blue paper, very fine, actually describes two sales of the slave ROSETTA.....................................SOLD

7504 - THE SALE OF THE SLAVE AARON, December 1, 1859, 2+ 8" X 13" pages in attractive manuscript. Parish of New Orleans [New Orleans]. James Roberts of the Parish of Jefferson purchased the Negro man AARON for the sum of $1500. He was described as being of griff color and about 22 years of age, 5'4" in height. The vendor selling the slave was William Bybee of Barren County, Kentucky. The bill of sale states that Bybee had purchased the slave from Joseph Noble of Jefferson County, Mississippi which took place at Union County, Mississippi on October 17th, 1859. The slave was warranted to be free of the vices and maladies proscribed by the State. William Bybee of Barren County, KY, was a livestock trader, land speculator, and farmer. Obviously since Bybee had bought Aaron from a Mississippi man, he was also a slave trader selling the slave in New Orleans as there were many itinerant slave traders moving around the delta area buying and selling slaves. Very fine and interesting content................................................SOLD





7120 - A SUPERB VIEW OF THE SLAVE CHILDREN OF NEW ORLEANS
, Carte de Visite, Paxson of New York. A mint condition card of Rosa, Charley, and Rebecca wrapped in an American flag. On the verso is the notation that the photos were being sold for the benefit of the colored children in the Department of the Gulf under the command of General Banks. The actual names of the mulatto children were Rosina Downs, Charles Taylor, and Rebecca Huger. Superb condition...................................................
$375.00

6194 - SLAVES ARE DIVIDED UP IN LOTS IN MISSISSIPPI TO SETTLE AN ESTATE, 16 IN TOTAL LISTED BY NAME AND VALUE, Hancock County, Mississippi, August 4th, 1859. 4 large legal pages in manuscript along with a separate 8" X 13" manuscript document shown as Exhibit B describing in detail the division of the slaves. A total of 5 pages to the document. John W. Ross had died and his estate was divided up among descendants. Commissioners were appointed to appraise and divide up the Negro slaves. The claimants were described by the judge proceeding on the division. The first three pages are very detailed on how the division was to take place and how the division was to go forward with an affirmation of all to the division on page 4. Exhibit B outlines the division in 4 separate lots. Lot #1 to Evander Ross, PHYLLIS at $1000, EMALINE and CHILD at $850, and STEVE at $1000 for an aggregate of $2850, Lot #2, to Julia Ross, JOHN at $700, SARAH at $1000, GEORGE at $375, and BILL at $700 totaling $2775; Lot #3, to Charles A. Ross, DICK at $1400, SAM at $500, MARY at $500, and SCYE at $650 totaling $3050; Lot #4, to Susan A. Johnson, ROBERT at $1000, GENE at $850, ANN at $800, LIMS at $300 totaling $2950. Well written and in choice condition, the group................................................................$225.00

6195 - A NEGRO FAMILY OF THREE IS ORDERED SOLD TO SATISFY THE DEBT OF THE ESTATE, December 30th, 1841, Hinds County, Mississippi, 8" X 13" manuscript. The document is a legal petition to sell the assets of an estate as funds on hand of $418 are not enough to cover the outstanding claims on the estate amounting at present to $748 and $159. It has been determined that it is necessary to sell the slaves to satisfy the debts. The slaves consisted of the Negro woman CELIA, her husband TOM, and their young girl named MARY. Joshua Riley the administrator of the estate is petitioning the court in Hinds County to allow the sale. Well written in attractive manuscript. It would be interesting to know if all were sold as a family or separated..............................$125.00


4171 - AN OVERSEER SIGNS FOR HIS PAY IN 1852, 2" X 7" manuscript receipt for $144 being the amount Stephen Hargrove received from William G. Hale for services as an overseer for eight months and 20 days based on a salary of $200 per year. WILLIAM GEORGE HALE was born on July 5, 1810 and died on February 2, 1883. He was the son of Jehee Hale and Mary Woods. He operated a cotton plantation near Selma, AL. He moved to Desoto Parish, Louisiana in 1850 from Perry County, Alabama arriving on February 4, 1850 by boat at Fortson with his family. In Alabama, he was a member of Union Church. George was the brother of Middleton Hale. In 1860, William G. Hale owned 50 slaves. Hale operated a cotton plantation by this time in Louisiana near Mansfield, LA. Well written...........................................$75.00

4172 - LISTING OF PROPERTY IN 1853 INCLUDING NEGROES, 5" X 7", manuscript, 2 male Negroes are listed at $1800, 4 female Negroes at $2000, 4 small Negroes at $100, also listed are a buggy and a horse at $250. WILLIAM GEORGE HALE was born on July 5, 1810 and died on February 2, 1883. He was the son of Jehee Hale and Mary Woods. He operated a cotton plantation near Selma, AL. He moved to Desoto Parish, Louisiana in 1850 from Perry County, Alabama arriving on February 4, 1850 by boat at Fortson with his family. In Alabama, he was a member of the Ocmulgee Baptist Church and in Louisiana he was a constituting member of Union Church. George was the brother of Middleton Hale. Unsigned but from the William Hale papers, Mansfield. LA. Very good....................................................$75.00

4173 - SEND THE FUNDS BY THE FIRST FREE NEGRO YOU MEET, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, July 14th, 1828, two page letter 11" X 14" by John Brown Jr. to Gabriel Benson in Perry County, Alabama directing him to send some funds due him by another man and saying "when collected send by the first Free Negro that you meet." Gabriel Benson, was born 1771 in Virginia, and in 1818, Gabriel moved to Perry County, Alabama. Gabriel died in there in 1838 and Rosanna his wife in 1844. Gabriel was a planter, tax collector, sheriff and justice of the peace. Gabriel's father was also named William and a native born Virginian who moved to South Carolina shortly before the Revolutionary War. The elder William was a captain during the Revolution and died in Charleston, South Carolina. His wife was Eleanor Kay Blunt, born in Maryland and the daughter of William Blunt, born 1762 in North Carolina. Extremely interesting content looking to send a free Negro to deliver funds in Antebellum Alabama. Fine............................................................SOLD

THE JIM CROW ERA IN THE SOUTH, NEW ORLEANS, 1891

4175 - THE MASCOT, NEW ORLEANS, AUGUST 9TH, 1891, 8 pages 10" X 14", the MASCOT was a sensationalist newspaper published in New Orleans, Louisiana, in the 1880's and 1890's. Filled with political and satirical cartoons this issue takes issue with a [Mohonk] convention in Boston conferring about the situation of the Negroes and describing the organizers as "feminine men and masculine women" with the Negroes best be left alone. Another article headlines "Another Negro Outrage" as the article reports on a young white girl being subjected to an attempted rape in broad daylight and her screams brought a crippled Negro to her aid who had stopped the attack - the paper did offer thanks to that Negro. Other articles about actions of the Police those are not complementary. Numerous merchants' ads of the day. Large cartoon on cover dealing with the attempted development of a 3rd Party in Louisiana. Complete issue, some blems here and there, overall very good. A scarce periodical......................................................................$49.00

4117 - CONFEDERATE ERA, HATS AND RUSSET SHOES BOUGHT FOR SLAVES, February 1861, Invoice dated at New Orleans C. E. Cate and Company Shoe Stores, listing 26 pair of Men's Russet shoes and one dozen wool hats sold to W. G. Hale a plantation owner in Desoto Parish Louisiana. Cate's billhead stated that he was a depot for custom made Plantation work ditching boots. Slave Shoes - Dewing and Edmands commenced the shoe making business in 1835, making only russet brogans and course thick boots designed especially for the southern trade. In 1837 to increase and facilitate their trade they established a shoe and boot manufacturing in Mobile, AL. They had a large trade with planters along the Alabama and Tombigbee rivers, furnishing boots and shoes for their slaves, many of whom had feet of enormous size. On the large size shoe were often marked Tom, Pete, Sam and Joe, it seems the large size shoes were made up north and sent back south. Other russet style shoes were simple rawhide shoes. In 1860 Hale owned 50 slaves. From "I Was a Slave Plantation Life" - Master Tom made us wear shoes because there were so many snags and stumps that made our feet sore. They were red russet shoes (made of rawhide). I'll never forget them. At first, they were so stiff that we could hardly bear to wear them. By the price of these shoes there were probably the simple rawhide ones that wrapped around their feet. Fine................................................................$65.00

3122 - SHARECROPPERS IN LOUISIANA, 1871, William G. Hale, a cotton plantation owner in Desoto Parish, Louisiana lists the purchases he has made with Dubois & Douglas and for expenses in running his plantation. 3 pages 8" X 14", including expenses for ex-slaves now sharecroppers on the plantation. Several ex-slaves are listed listing the plantation for foodstuffs for them and what they were paid for picking cotton. Some are listed by one name only still, some had two names, ie: MIKES, JERRY, EDWARD HUGHES, JIM COOPER, WILLIAM, MARTHA, JESSEE, COLUMBUS, ETC. The expenses for cotton picking lists Negro crews listed by "Squad"...ie LET'S SQUAD 900#, $157.75. In 1860, William Hale owned 50 slaves and after the war and emancipation many stayed on as sharecroppers. Very fine...............................................SOLD




2200 - THE UNION BANK OF LOUISIANA SUES TO RECOVER A DEBT AND THE COURT ORDERS FIVE ADULT SLAVES SOLD ALONG WITH FOUR CHILDREN
, 8" X 14", manuscript on blue paper, East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, May 17th, 1852. The Union Bank is owed $1750 plus interest for an un-paid debt and the court orders slaves sold to satisfy the debt. The following slaves are listed: SARAH ABOUT 20 YEARS, PEGGY AGED 35 YEARS, ROS AGED 20 YEARS, BETSY AGED 16 YEARS, ANN AGED 50 YEARS AND THE CHILDREN, ALALINDA, MILLY, JOHN, AND MARY. All written on one page ideal for display, very fine.............................................................
SOLD

2201 - A WIFE SUES HER HUSBAND FOR THE POSSESSION OF A SLAVE WOMAN, HER CHILDREN AND MONEY DUE TO THE EMBARRASSMENT TO HER BY THE AFFAIRS OF HER HUSBAND, St. Helena Parish, LA, November 26th, 1842, 2 pages, 8" X 14" in manuscript. Elizabeth McClendon and her husband John Van are involved in a court procedure where the wife is suing her husband [or now ex-husband] for the Negress ASIA AND HER INCREASES, and the sun of $2200. The court awarded the wife the Negro slaves ASIA AGED 35, AND HER CHILDREN, HARRIETT AGED 5 YEARS, ROBERT AGED 3, AND ALPHA AGED 4 MONTHS OLD plus $400 with legal mortgage since 1822 that had been in control by her husband. The separation of property was probably in preparation for a legal termination of the marriage. Extremely rare content. Fine, written in excellent manuscript...........................................................$225.00


2202 - THE COURT ORDERS THE SHERIFF TO SEIZE NEGRO SLAVES FROM A DISHONORED HUSBAND THAT WERE AWARDED TO A WIFE BY THE COURT
, 8" X 14" manuscript dated December 24th, 1842, St. Helena Parish, LA. Due to the recent court decision in favor of Elizabeth McClendon, the judge orders her husband John Van to turn over to her the following Negro slaves; ASIA AGED 35, AND HER CHILDREN, HARRIETT AGED 5 YEARS, ROBERT AGED 3, AND ALPHA AGED 4 MONTHS OLD. The court order provides that if the husband does not turn over the said slaves in three days, they are to be seized by the sheriff and delivered to Elizabeth McClendon. The wife had sued the husband for a separation of property due to her husband's affairs which were an embarrassment to her. Well written, firm paper, small nick in right margin, otherwise fine......................................
SOLD


2204 - A GRIFF MAN LINDSEY IS SOLD IN LOUISIANA - A SLAVE FOR LIFE
, August 15th, 1849, 3 pages 8" X 13" in nice manuscript detailing the sale of the Negro man LINDSEY aged 58 for the sum of $510, and was warranted to be a slave for life and free from all the maladies and vices prescribed by law. This very detailed bill of sale was done as the result of the seller owning money and the sale was made to clear that debt. Page 1 and 2 detail the sale and circumstances of the forced sale, page 3 is actually a separated document written September 16th, 1848 acknowledging that the debt was paid in full and money turned over to the claimant owed the money from the seller of the slave. The sale of the slave LINDSEY is mentioned in the second document. "Griff" was a term used for a mulatto Negro whose skin color was more of a tan than black. Quite unusual, very fine......................................
$250.00



2205 - THE SLAVE GIRL RACHAEL OF GRIFF COLOR SOLD AT AUCTION
, 4 pages in manuscript, March 27th, 1848, St. Helena Parish, LA. Due to the death of a couple living in the said Parish the court had ordered the sale of property including the SLAVE GIRL NAMED RACHAEL AGED 17 OF GRIFF COLOR sold for the sum of $812 with terms allowed with cash down and the balance due in 1 - 2 years. She was sold after the "Crying of many different bids" for which the sale was made to apparently two relatives of the deceased from Desoto Parish, LA. An extremely detailed account of the auction sale and transfer of ownership of the girl RACHAEL. The document is well written and the paper is crisp, minor archival repairs very trivial. Very fine.........................................................
$275.00

A SLAVE DEALER BRINGING SLAVES TO LOUISIANA

2206 - THE SLAVE DEALER JOHN M. ROSS AND COMPANY SELLS A SLAVE BOY IN LOUISIANA, 2 pages in manuscript, 8" X 13", Bill of Sale dated March 29th, 1857 detailing the sale of the Negro boy named PHIL aged about 15 years of a dark complexion sold by JOHN M. ROSS AND COMPANY FROM THE DISTRICT OF YORK, STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, for the sum of $1300. The said slave was guaranteed to be a "slave for life" and warranted against the vices and maladies prescribed by the State of Louisiana. Well written on cream paper, Parish of St. Helena, Town of Greensburg. Ross & Company was one of the many traveling slave dealers that moved slaves from the east coast to the mid section of the south to satisfy the demands of plantations in Louisiana and Mississippi. This town was in the middle of the old Florida Parishes surrounded by plantations and was a good area for a slave merchant to bring slaves for sale. A very uncommon bill of sale from a slave dealer, very fine.................................................................SOLD




2207 - THREE SLAVES ARE HIRED OUT IN MISSISSIPPI FOR THE YEAR 1847 THAT BELONGED TO AN ESTATE
, April 8th, 1848, 8" X 10" in nice manuscript. The following slaves were hired out for the year 1847 from a Mississippi Estate; ANACA AN HER TWO CHILDREN JERRY AND CHARLOTTE for $180, DAPHNEY AND HER TWO CHILDREN for $87 BERRY AND ISAAC, PHILIS AND HER FAMILY, ADAM, ALFRED, AND CAROLINE for $40. The valuation was made for the heirs of the estate, Claiborne County, Mississippi, 10 slaves listed by name, very fine............................................
$95.00

2208 - HUGE NEW ORLEANS TRANSFER OF A SLAVE WOMAN, 10" X 16", pre-printed and filled in conveyance of the slave woman named SYLVIA AGED 25 by an Andrew Jackson to Josiah Chambers of Rapides Parish, LA. This multi-paged slave transfer [4 pages] details the transfer of the said slave and guarantees her to be a slave for life in the new ownership of Chambers. The documents detail the rights of the wife of Jackson in the matter. No money value was assigned to SYLVIA so it must be assumed that the "sale" as it was described was the result of a debt of Jackson to Chambers. The latter owed over 300 slaves in Rapides Parish in 1860 on two plantations. Blue paper, paper is mint condition; ink a wee bit light in spots but a huge STATE OF LOUISIANA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA masthead January 23rd, 1856, unusual "slave sale," fine..........................................................SOLD

2209 - THE WIFE OF JOSIAS CHAMBERS DIES AND HER ESTATE EVALUATED INCLUDING NUMEROUS SLAVES, OAKLAND PLANTATION, Parish of Rapides, account of the appraisal May 9th, 1823 written by the notary in 1832, 2 large manuscript pages 8" X 14", the estate of Eliza Chambers wife of Josias Chambers who owned Oakland Plantation in Rapides Parish, LA was appraised as such property listed: NEGRO WOMAN NAMED LUCKY AND HER FIVE CHILDREN, JIM, WILLEY, ELLEN, PRINCE AND SALLY, appraised at $1400, NEGRO BOY SAMBO APPRAISED AT $350, a feather bed and furniture valued at $30, additional lands acquired 90 acres at $10 acre, NEGRO MAN SQUIRE AND HIS WIFE BECK valued at $700, woman MINT valued at $450, woman MILLY and boy child MARTIN valued at $500, woman GRACE and boy child HAL valued at $500, Negro man BILL and wife POLLY valued at $900, Negro man BOB and wife PHOEBE and three children HANNAH, BILL, AND JUNCH, VALUED AT $1500, Negro man SIMON and wife PATRICIA valued at $1000, 40 sheep, 4 horses, wagons, oxen, two guns, saddles, watches, etc. 23 named slaves, choice condition in beautiful manuscript...................................................$295.00


21405 - A PLANTATION OWNER ASSESSES HIS TAXABLE PROPERTY IN 1863 INCLUDING 177 SLAVES, July 22nd, 1853, one page in manuscript 8" X 10" on blue paper written by Josiah Chambers of Rapides Parish, Louisiana who owned Oakland Plantation and later Hard Times Plantation [1855]. Chambers describes his lands on both sides of Bayou Robert near the Red River amounting to over 2000 acres. He lists the male and female slaves in quantity by age...22 men between the age of 25 and 63...40 men from 10 to 25 years...34 females between 10 and 25 years...the total exceeds 175 slaves. He continues on listing horses, cattle and mules and then lists the crops produced on the plantation...300 hogs of sugar, 612 barrels of molasses, 90 bales of cotton, and 12,000 bushels of corn. in addenda he lists 151 acres of additional piney woods on the north side of the Red River. A rare report on the production of a southern plantation. Chambers owned 336 slaves on all his properties by 1860. Well written in dark brown ink, very good.............................................$195.00

21406 - HUGE PRE-PRINTED BILL OF SALE FROM NEW ORLEANS IN 1835 OF THREE SLAVES, STATE OF LOUISIANA, CITY OF NEW ORLEANS, May 22nd, 1835, two huge pages on one 10" X 16" leaf on white laid paper. Pre-printed and filled-in. Deed/bill of sale for three slaves sold by Thomas Poindexter of Charleston to Josiah Chambers of the Parish of Rapides in Louisiana. The three slaves were PETER A NEGRO OF 17 OR 18 YEARS VALUED AT $1000, SAM A NEGRO OF 15 YEARS VALUED AT $800, AND CAREY A NEGRO OF 14 YEARS VALUED AT $850. All were guaranteed from all vices and maladies prescribed by law. The purchase price of $2650.00 was paid by an agreed draft payable January 1st, 1836. An attractive impressed seal validates the bill of sale. At the time Josiah Chambers owned 6000 acres in Rapides Parish and owned Oakland Plantation. His son Josiah Chambers would inherit these lands and at the time of the Civil War own 10,000 acres and owned 336 slaves by 1860. Choice condition........................................SOLD

21409 - TAXES PAID ON PLANTATION PROPERTY TO THE CONFEDERATE STATES IN 1864, 2.5" X 4.5", pre-printed and filled in on both sides, District of Rapides, October 8th, 1864, Alexandria, LA. Received of Josiah Chambers, $8711.14 for lands and property. Chambers owned 10,000 acres of plantation lands at the start of the war including Hard Times and Oakland Plantation. Fine.......................................................$75.00

21410 - LETTER TO A PLANTATION OWNER AFTER ARRIVING IN NEW ORLEANS BY STEAMBOAT, Dated February 8th, 1862, addressed to Josiah Chambers at Hard Times Plantation, Rapides Parish, LA by Charles D. Elgee. He writes, "We have just arrived after a stormy but not uncomfortable passage down. Mary is getting very well and I hope and believe now in a fair way to recover. I have no time to write further today. My father goes up the first of the ensuing week. To Josiah Chambers Esq. Hard Times Plantation, Rapides." Charles LeDoux Elgee was the son-in-law of Josiah Chambers and died in Alexandria, Louisiana, on November 13, 1864, and soon after his widow was married to Captain Charles M. Fauntleroy, a native of Virginia. Mary Eliza Chambers was the daughter of Josiah Chambers...........................................................$55.00



4007 - A FREE WOMAN OF COLOR
, Carte de Visite by Reed of Worcester, Mass. A great photo of a obviously Free woman of color taken in Massachusetts. The CDV is definitely Civil War vintage. A rather plump black woman dressed in a checkered print dress, she appears to have a white bandana on her head [blends in with the background]. Very sharp and attractive.............................................SOLD



THE NEW ENGLAND LOYAL PUBLICATION SOCIETY 1863-64

A COLLECTION OF BROADSIDES THAT REPORTED ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE NEGRO SLAVE TO FREEDOM AFTER EMANCIPATION AND THE SUCCESS OF THE BLACK TROOPS IN THE UNION ARMY

The New England Loyal Publication Society was founded in 1863, during a time when the Union Army had suffered many reverses in the Civil War. The purpose of is society was to bolster public support for the Union effort, by disseminating pro-Union news articles and editorials to newspapers around the country. This Society provided civilians an opportunity to support the war effort. In the first months, this group read newspapers to identify particularly useful articles and editorials blasting Copperheads, or Southern sympathizers and particularly reported positive news on the newly emancipated Negroes and the success of the newly formed Negro regiments in the Union Army. They would then contact the editors--before the type had been broken up--and request that additional copies of that particular item by printed. These items would then be distributed to Union soldiers or to newspapers. As the war progressed, the society began to write and publish their own broadsides, which included contributions from well-known persons such as Robert Dale Owen. Thus collection includes many articles on the emancipated blacks and well as actions of Negro troops. DUE TO THE SIZE OF OUR SCANNER SOME ARE CROPPED...ALL HAVE BORDERS

11031 - SUPPORT FOR THE AIDING OF NEGRO TROOPS IN THE US ARMY LOCATED IN MARYLAND AND OTHER LOYAL STATES, THE NEW ENGLAND LOYAL PUBLICATION SOCIETY, October 20th, 1863, #130, 9.25" X 12", 1 page broadside, a reprint in this broadside of news that Honorable Joseph Holt of Kentucky has put forth the proposal that Negroes from Maryland and other free states giving bounties to free colored men or giving payment to owners who free their slaves for military duty. Judge Holt is convinced the Negroes make excellent soldiers and the prejudice of allowing them to be soldiers is rapidly giving away. This attitude is contrary to Democrats and "Copperheads". Victories at the polls over the Copperheads in Pennsylvania and Ohio, military victories at Gettysburg and Vicksburg lauded. News from the south that confidence that the Confederacy will ever win is waning. Very fine, an excellent account of the positive feeling for freed slave troops is gaining momentum...................................................$150.00

11032 - A SLAVE STATE CONVENTION IN THE NORTH, AN ADDRESS TO THOSE IN THE SOUTH WHO WISH TO ELIMINATE SLAVERY IN THOSE SOUTHERN STATES, THE NEW ENGLAND LOYAL PUBLICATION SOCIETY, October 22nd, 1863, #131, 9.25" X 13", 1 page broadside. Dedicated to the Slave State Convention being held in Louisville, KY. By delegates from Southern slave states who are in favor of the deliverance of those states from slavery. This is an address to the friends of freedom in the slave states discussing the long war and that the government must so to enforce the words of the Emancipation Proclamation and signed by the prominent anti-slavery Southerners such as B. Gratz Brown, S. H. Boyd, Benjamin Logan, James Lindsay, and others. The broadside served as an invitation for all freedom loving citizens to meet at the upcoming convention on January 1st, 1864. A RARE BROADSIDE, very fine............................................................$200.00

11033 - A PICTURE OF SLAVERY DRAWN FROM THE DECISIONS IN SOUTHERN COURTS, THE MARRIAGE OF SLAVE IS AN IDLE CEMMONY-CHILDREN ILLEGITIMATE, HUNTING OF SLAVES WITH DOGS IS LAWFUL, THE NEW ENGLAND LOYAL PUBLICATION SOCIETY, October 26th, 1863, #132, 9.25" X 14", 1 page broadside. Part II on a discourse on the rulings in Southern courts that gave the Negro slave no rights and treated Xthem as sub-human in many rulings. A ruling that marriage between slaves are not valid and children are not legitimate, children of freed slaves cannot inherit their father's property, adultery with a slave's wife is no excuse for murder of an overseer, no wrong was found by a Southern court when a ten year old Negro girl was raped, an emancipation in a will was overturned by a southern judge giving an entire estate to while relative after the emancipated slave was left the estate as the son of the planter in Louisiana, much more on the decisions of Southern courts dealing with slave related cases. RARE content, very fine...............................................$200.00

11036 - PLANTATIONS LEASED BY THE GOVERNMENT IN MISSISSIPPI TREATING THE NEGRO WORKERS WITH HUMANITY, PAY WAGES, RESTRICTION ON THE TREATMENT OF THE EX SLAVES, THE SOLUTION TO THE NEGRO QUESTION, THE NEW ENGLAND LOYAL PUBLICATION SOCIETY, December 18th, 1863, #147, 9.25" X 14", 1 page broadside. A long report on the leasing of Mississippi plantations, putting the ex-slaves to work with wages paid and other benefits, restrictions on child labor, and much more. The successes of the Negro troops in battle have been proven at Port Hudson and at Fort Wagner, more are enlisted every day in all parts of the loyal states as well as in subjugated areas of the south. A RARE COLORED TROOP BROADSIDE, very fine small corner tip restored.........................................................$200.00

11037 - AN ENDORSEMENT OF LINCOLN IN THE UPCOMING ELECTION, THE NEW OPPOSITION OF SLAVERY IN THE SOUTH, THE CATHOLIC CHURCH AND SLAVERY, THE NEW ENGLAND LOYAL PUBLICATION SOCIETY, January 23rd, 1864, #158, 9.25" X 14", 1 page broadside. The broadside professes the positive side of the re-election of Abraham Lincoln in the upcoming 1864 election, the change in philosophy in the south by many now opposing slavery and the blindness of many northerners to the evils of the continuing of a slave society even though they have never directly benefited from slavery, an interesting commentary on the policies of the Catholic Church in condemning slavery by historic details given by the author. More on the gradual emancipation of blacks which is necessary to prepare them for freedom, details of this necessary process. A very large broadside. Very fine.................................................$200.00

3133 - A BILL OF SALE FOR AN UNSOUND NEGRO MAN NAMED GRANVILLE
, 8" X 13", pre-printed and filled in bill of sale for the Negro man named GRANVILLE who was noted as "UNSOUND" and was to be sold for the small sum of $85.38 being sold to settle the estate of Ann Smith. The bottom of the large bill of sale is not completed with just the day noted "tenth" with no year, month, and signatures. In all probability the slave was too old or ill to be sold and the sale was not completed to Isabelle Johnson. Bold State of South Carolina masthead. Very fine, a very unusual non transaction.........................................
$275.00

71310 - THE SALE OF THE NEGRO MAN PAUL IN DESOTO PARISH, LA IN 1857, 1 September 16th, 1857, 1-page 8" X 10", the sale of the Negro man named PAUL aged about 50 years to Eli Best and Thomas Lester for the sum of $290 by John J. Bradley and said Bradley has given all rights to said slave. This slave must have been slightly infirmed as the norm for a slave of that age in 1857 would have been $500. Well written and from a scarce North Louisiana Parish............................................$275.00


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3143 - 140 NEGRO SLAVES ON A SOUTH CAROLINA LOW COUNTRY RICE PLANTATION, Two large 8" X 13", pre-printed and filled-in pages detailing the taxes due for the year 1815 for Frederick Fraser of the Parish of St. Helena District of Beaufort in South Carolina. Fraser owned a large rice plantation for years in that area. He paid taxes on over 1600 acres of land and on 140 Negro slaves at $1.00 each, dated the 28th of March, 1816 for taxes paid for 1815.  Signed twice by Frederick Fraser, fine.....................................$250.00


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10183 - SEVEN NAMED SLAVES TO BE INCLUDED IN THE INVENTORY OF A WOMAN WHO DIED WITHOUT A WILL, JEFFERSON COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, 1855, July 31st, 1855, Jefferson County, MS, 3 large legal pages in beautiful manuscript. A lengthy petition to the court to add to the inventory of the deceased woman 7 named slaves who were in her possession when she died so the total estate can be sold and the proceeds distributed to the rightful heirs. Included were the following Negro slaves: EDMUND AGED 60 YEARS, SARAH ABOUT 30 YEARS, LEWIS ABOUT 12 YEARS OF AGE, AMANDA ABOUT 8 YEARS, CHARLOTTE ABOUT ONE YEAR, ROSE ABOUT 3 YEARS, AND CORA ABOUT 2 YEARS-THE CHILDREN OF THE NEGRO WOMAN SARAH. It would appear that either Edmund was the father of Sarah's children or perhaps the father had died or been sold. Well written and extremely interesting content with several family members [heirs] involved in bringing the petition to the court. Choice condition..........................................$225.00

10185 - 61ST PA OFFICER'S PAY VOUCHER THAT INCLUDES HIS BLACK SERVANT, 2nd Lt. R. [Robert] Kennedy, Co. B, 61st PA was paid for several days of service in January 1865 which also listed his black servant JAMES GARTER. 10" X 16", pre-printed and filled-in. At this time the 61st PA was at the siege of Petersburg and had participated in near all the major battles with the Army of the Potomac. Lt. Robert Kennedy served with the 61st PA from 1861-65. Choice condition......................................................$75.00

10186 - 107TH PA OFFICER'S PAY VOUCHER WHICH INCLUDED HIS BLACK SERVANT, Lt. James B. Thomas, Adj. 107th PA Vol. His pay for $463.14 for service from September through December 1864. 10" X 16" pre-printed and filled-in. His black servant DEMPSEY RILEY was listed [dependant]. During this time the 107th was involved in numerous engagements near Petersburg. Reconnaissance toward Dinwiddie Court House September 15. Boynton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. Warren's Raid to Hicksford December 7-12. Prior to that it served in the Army of the Potomac with distinction. Choice condition...............................................$75.00

10187 - 16TH MAINE, OFFICER'S PAY VOUCHER WHICH INCLUDED HIS BLACK SERVANT, 10"  X 16" pre-printed and filled-in. Captain Robert Plummer Company E, 16th Maine is paid $150.22 for his pay for the month of March 1865. Also included as a dependant listed is his black servant ABRAHAM BROWN. The 16th Maine at this time was at Petersburg and had served with distinction at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, among others. Very fine.....................................................$75.00

10190 - 30TH USCT MAJOR PAID FOR DUTY WITH HIS TWO BLACK SERVANTS LISTED AS DEPENDANTS, 10" X 16" pre-printed and filled-in pay voucher for Major Arthur J. Smith, dated February 1st, 1865 for his service dating back October to November 1864. His pay was $151.33. His two black servants were listed as BEN EMORY AND PHILIP GALE. Ben was listed at 4'6" in height. SERVICE OF THE 30TH USCT-Campaign from the Rapidan to the James River, VA, May-June 1864. Guard trains of the Army, of the Potomac through the Wilderness and to Petersburg. Before Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16 to December 7, 1864. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30. Weldon Railroad August 18-21. Poplar Grove Church, September 29-October 1. Boynton Plank Road, Hatcher's Run, October 27-28. 1st Expedition to Fort Fisher, N.C., December 7-27. 2nd Expedition to Fort Fisher, N.C., January 7-15, 1865. Bombardment of Fort Fisher January 13-15. Assault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Sugar Loaf Hill January 19. Federal Point February 11. Fort Anderson February 18-20. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Northeast Ferry February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Kinston and Goldsboro March 6-21. Action Cox's Bridge March 23-24. Advance on Raleigh April 9-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army, duty at various points in North Carolina till December. Mustered out December 10, 1865. Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 48 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 177 Enlisted men by disease. Total 225. Smith had previously served in the 71st PA and had been captured at Balls Bluff. Paper is crisp, old fold repair not affecting any text.............................................SOLD

10192 - SALE OF THREE SLAVES AND PROPERTY IN CARROLL PARISH, LOUISIANA CANCELLED, 3 huge 8" X 14" manuscript pages written on blue watermarked paper detailing the initial sale of 476 acres of land north of the Red River and three named Negro men. ABRAM AGED 35, SOLOMON AGED 28, AND RUFUS AGED 32, Henry Ledbetter and purchased the property described from Walter Anderson, both of Carroll Parish, LA and Ledbetter was unable to fulfill the obligations of the first bill of sale. An arbitrator arranged the sale to be rescinded and this document served as a title of ownership for the property including the three Negro men back to Walter Anderson. Since the first bill of sale had been filed this document in effect cancelled the sale and first bill of sale and in essence was a title or new bill of transfer. Quite unusual and quite detailed in scope. Beautiful manuscript. Light gray paper...................................................$275.00

10193 - THE SALE OF THE NEGRO BOY MILES IN LOUISIANA DATED THE DAY BEFORE LOUISIANA SECEDED FROM THE UNION, January 25th, 1861, 2 large legal pages in manuscript on gray paper. St. Helena Parish, Louisiana, the sale of the NEGRO BOY NAMED MILES AGES ABOUT 27 OF YELLOW COLOR SOLD FOR THE SUM OF $200. Cash in hand giving Lafayette Harrell of St. Helena Parish full title and outlining the warrantees guaranteed to the purchaser by Eli Harrell of Livingston Parish. The low selling price of $200 was probably due to the buyer and seller being relatives. Very fine.................................$295.00


THE GREAT EMANCIPATORS OF THE SLAVES

9100 - With the passage of the 13th Amendment in 1865, Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation decree of 1863 was legally the law of the land. Charles Sumner and Schuyler Colfax were important advocates of this law being passed granting freedom from slavery to all in America. Throughout the war, Sumner had been the special champion of blacks, being the most vigorous advocate of emancipation, of enlisting blacks in the Union army, and of the establishment of the Freedmen's Bureau. As one of the Radical Republican leaders in the post-war Senate, Sumner fought to provide equal civil and voting rights for the freedmen on the grounds that "consent of the governed" was a basic principle of American republicanism and in order to keep ex-Confederates from gaining political offices and undoing the North's victory in the Civil War. Schuyler Colfax was an energetic opponent of slavery. In 1862, following the electoral defeat of House Speaker Galusha Grow, Colfax was elected Speaker of the House. During his term as Speaker, he announced the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment in 1865 after working diligently for the necessary votes for Lincoln to secure passage in the House. Strands of hair from Abraham Lincoln, Charles Sumner, and Schuyler Colfax. These strands came from locks of hair collected by Mrs. Caroline Wright, the wife of Indiana Governor Joseph A. Wright. Mrs. Wright collected hair of political figure during the latter half of the 19th Century and these were given to her after Lincoln's inauguration in 1865 as a token of friendship between the Wrights and the Lincolns. These relics passed through the Wright family until sold with other items at Christie's auction house in 1992. In 2002, these relics were again sold by Christie's as a part of the Forbes Collection (Lot #121). A description of the lot is attached to this certificate. This display is 11" X 14", double matted in scarlet suede with gold Florentine trim. Sold unframed [shrink wrapped ready to frame]...................................................$375.00/unframed    Custom framed in 3/4" burnished gold wooden frame............................$430.00/framed


71304 - THE LISTING OF SEVEN NAMED SLAVES IN THE ESTATE OF R. H. VAUGHN, 1 page 8" X 10" manuscript on blue paper dated February 18th, 1859, no dateline but from Mississippi, 7 named slaves are listed with their appraisal value to the estate, listed are HUBBARD, PARIS, JULIA, VIERA, CLANCY, AND TOM, the total of the appraisement was $700, the appraisal was signed by three individuals. Based on this being 1859, the appraisal was very low at $700 possibly designed for an inter-family sale. A nice presentation to frame. Very fine and in nice manuscript...............................................$165.00

71307 - AN ESTATE IS SUED FOR MEDICAL BILLS INCLUDING 2 NEGROES, 8" X 10" manuscript with an attached pre-printed and filled-in Jefferson County, Mississippi document suing the estate of William Griffing for unpaid medical bills dated January 3rd, 1854. Various visits to the Griffings are listed including for 2 Negroes and some of his children. It was no uncommon for unpaid estate debts to be brought to suit until the possessions of the deceased were sold by an administrator and outstanding debts paid. 2 item, very fine..............................................$75.00

71309 - A RECEIPT FOR AN OVERSEER OF A PLANTATION FOR THE YEAR 1850, 3" X 7", $228.44 was paid L. Stelham for his services as an overseer on the plantation of J. B. Sugg for the year 1850. Not datelined but Mississippi in origin. Very fine............................$75.00

71311 - NUMEROUS SLAVES HIRED OUT FROM AN ESTATE BY THE ADMINISTRATOR WITH EXCELLENT DESCRIPTIONS OF ANY DEFECTS THE SLAVE HAD, 8" X 10", manuscript, Vicksburg, Mississippi, April 20th, 1844, Thomas P. Hardaway, the administrator of the estate of Julius J. Hite records the amount due the estate for the hire of Negro slaves in 1844 and hired too. Some listed were: OLD DAVY AND RHODA, ISABELLE AND TWO CHILDREN, FANNY, ANNA, NERO, PATRICK, MERRICK, NINA, NANCY AND THREE CHILDREN, RICK, ROSE AND TWO CHILDREN, JACK, PATRICIA AND TWO CHILDREN, DICK A CRIPPLE, SOLOMON-SICKLY, CHARLES - HAS ONLY ONE HAND, HARRIET, RHODA [SMALL], LUCY SICKLY, COLEMAN [SMALL], VICTORIA, SAM [SMALL]. The amount due for each hire is listed, interesting commentary with the word small meaning a young child but not an infant-those are just listed as "children". Well written, very fine..........................................................SOLD

71312 - A DOCTOR BILLS THE ESTATE OF JUNIUS AMIS FOR TREATING NEGROES, December 24th, 1856, 5" X 8" manuscript, not datelined but from Mississippi, Dr. C. J. Mitchell bills the estate of Junius Amis for 12 months of treatments to the Negro slaves owned by Amis...Jan. 29 visit Negro woman $5.00, June 4th night visit for an old woman $10.00, ditto on the 5th and 6th and 7th of June, on June 17th and 18th two children were visited for $5.00 each visit, on August 6th Penny and others were treated for $5 and again on June 9th, then 60 days of treatment was given to John for $50, very fine.........................................$65.00

71314 - A GUARDIAN OF MINOR CHILDREN LIST FIVE NEGRO SLAVES THAT THEY OWN, 5" X 7" manuscript, from Mississippi, undated but manuscript lends to the 1830's. James Own was the guardian of Gadi and Tobias Owen and was most probably their uncle. He lists five slaves that belong to the children SAM, PRISS, NED, MARY, and MANUAL, large manuscript boldly written, fine....................................................$75.00


4051 - THE HIRE OF NEGROES FOR 1851, 1852, 1853, 4 pages, 8" X 13", December 12th, 1853, the trial settlement of the estate of Lemuel Skinner listing all the payments and receipts for those years. In 1850, HENRY and JANE were hired out for $223.00, in 1851 HENRY and JANE were hired out for $240.00, in 1852, and HENRY, JANE, and CALVIN were hired out for $282, some small edge fissures, well written.............................................$95.00

4052 - THE NEGRO HARRY LISTED AS BEING NOT SOLD IN A ESTATE SALE, 8" X 13", undated but c. 1840, a long listing of plantation items sold and to whom, geese, mules, hogs, calves, bed and bedding, a wood clock, cradle, a rifle gun, steers, etc. and the NEGRO HARRY who for some unknown reason was not included in the sale and not part of the total of goods sold. Well written, origin Alabama..........................................$75.00

4053 - THE SALE OF A NEGRO IN 1849, 2 large legal pages 8" X 13", February 1850, a listing of the sale of a Negro for $421.50 in January 1849 with additional interest received in the amount of $19.60. Complied by the administrator of the estate for the deceased Peter F. Flourney, small ink burn away from the above data, origin Alabama...........................$65.00

4054 - A YOUNG BOY IS LEFT A NEGRO, Alabama, August 8th, 1847, 8" X 13", a writ of guarantee is requested for Wingate Boggan as his grandson was left a Negro boy in an estate by Solomon Boggan. Many more details about the estate case. Written in attractive peacock blue ink. Very fine.............................................$65.00

4056 - HIS PART OF A DIVIDED ESTATE INCLUDING A NEGRO, 5" X 7" manuscript, October 6th, 1848, Hiram Miller signs a receipt acknowledging that he received $172.15 in behalf of Isaac Knowles being his share of his wife's property formerly belonging to Jeremiah Kyser deceased with M. B. Kyser being the administrator of the estate. The property was described as "land and a Negro belonging to Jeremiah Kyser." Written in blue peacock ink, origin Alabama, attractive, fine..............................................$59.00

4057 - HIS PART OF A DIVIDED ESTATE INCLUDING A NEGRO, 5" X 7" manuscript, October 18th, 1847, Henry Bizzell signs a receipt acknowledging that he received $40 in part payment of his share of the sale of the property belonging to the deceased Jeremiah Kyser. The property was described as "land and a Negro belonging to Jeremiah Kyser" which had been sold for distribution to heirs. 5" X 7", blue paper, dark ink, origin Alabama.............$59.00

4058 - HIS PART OF A DIVIDED ESTATE INCLUDING A NEGRO, 5" X 7" manuscript, June 22nd, 1847, Henry Bizzell signs a receipt acknowledging that he received $135 in lieu of his share of the sale of the property belonging to the deceased Jeremiah Kyser. The property was described as "land and a Negro belonging to Jeremiah Kyser" which had been sold for distribution to heirs. 5" X 7", blue paper, dark ink, origin Alabama..........................$59.00

4059 - HE COLLECTS HIS WIFE'S SHARE OF AN ESTATE THAT INCLUDED THE SALE OF A NEGRO BOY AND LAND, September 8th, 1847, 5" X 7", manuscript detailing the receipt of $172.15 being his wife's share of the proceeds of the sale of a Negro boy and land owned by Jeremiah Kyser. Origin Alabama, attractive peacock blue ink, fine..............................$59.00

4060 - A GUARDIAN RECEIVES THE MONEY DUE A MINOR AFTER THE DEATH OF HIS FATHER, September 8th, 1847 [Alabama], 5" X 7" receipt signed for the minor child Jeremiah Kyser in the amount of $140 in payment resulting from the sale of land and a NEGRO BOY NAMED JOHN belonging to the estate of Jeremiah Kyser [Sr.] deceased. John Privort was the guardian signer of the document, fine........................................$85.00

4061 - A GUARDIAN RECEIVES THE MONEY DUE A MINOR AFTER THE DEATH OF HIS FATHER, October 18th, 1847 [Alabama], 5" X 7' receipt signed for the minor child Jeremiah Kyser in the amount of $30 in part payment resulting from the sale of land and a Negro belonging to the estate of Jeremiah Kyser [Sr.] deceased. John Privort was the guardian signer of the document, fine................................................$59.00

4062 - THE SALE OF THE PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF J. J. HAWTHORN IN ALABAMA IN 1856, January 16th, 1856, three pages of property sold and purchased by who and the price paid for it as verified by this administrator's accounting. Sold were rifles, saddle bags, a road wagon, cows, mules, horses, tools, household goods. Noted, although light are the Negro slaves LINDSEY, RANSOM, AMANDA, LOUISA, STEPHEN, MARTHA and CHILD. Although the slave entry is light but readable, thus only...........................$69.00

4063 - AN INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF LUCY ERWIN, April 14th, 1851 [Alabama], 8" X 10", at her death Lucy Erwin had $91 in cash, one NEGRO GIRL, a mare, a bed and bed stand, and a pair of saddle bags, also included were several debts owed her and noted to the side whether the administrator would be able to collect them ["good, doubtful"] fine.................................................$69.00

4064 - A HIRE OF NEGROES FOR THE YEARS 1840 - 1844, BILL WAS NOTED AS BEING HIRED OUT FOR 4 YEARS, undated but last listing is 1844, Alabama origin. A listing of the amount received for the hire of Negroes by Aleda Christian noted by year as well as the interest incurred for obviously no payment of the hire charges. The years 1840-44 are listed by year. At the bottom, it is noted that BILL was hired out in 1839 for $89.42, 1840 $211.46, 1841 for $136.66, and 1843 for $87.85. Fine........................................$75.00

4066 - THREE NAMED NEGROES HIRED OUT IN THE YEAR 1837, 5" X 7", three Negro slaves were hired out in the year 1837 that belonged to the estate of James Ritchie for the sum of $768.50. JOE was hired to A. Stevenson, DAVE was hired out to T. Dean, and BILL was hired out to W. Andrews. Wilcox County, Alabama, noted on back is testimony that the information on the hire was correct. February 20th, 1837. Fine.......................................$85.00

4068 - FINAL SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE OF LEMUEL SKINNER INCLUDING THE HIRE OF THREE NAMED SLAVES FOR THE YEARS 1854, 1855, AND 1856, May 14th, 1860, three legal pages 8" X 13" detailing the final accounting by the administrator of the estate of Lemuel Skinner by James Calley. The slaves HENRY, JANE, and CALVIN has been hired out for the years 1854, 1855, and 1856. The total received for each year's hire is notated as well as interest accrued for the debt incurred by the hirer of the slaves. Each year the amount of hire changed slightly by slave. JANE was hired out for $100 for the year 1854, $77 for the year 1855, and $100 for the year 1856. Possibly he was ill or gave birth during the year. The slave CALVIN's rate of hire increased from $40 to $64 over the years suggesting that he was a boy in 1854 and his value increased as he matured. HENRY'S rate was consistent during the three year period at $150 - $156 per year. Very good, very detailed accounting. Origin Alabama..............................................$125.00

4069 - A PROMISSORY NOTE FOR THE HIRE OF A NEGRO, January 1st, 1850. A promissory note for $255 promising to pay the guardian of Maria Slatter in January 1st, 1851 for use of a Negro for the year 1850. On the verso, the payment was noted in 1851, origin Alabama. Very good............................................$59.00

4071 - BUTTONS FROM THE SLAVE TRADER THOMAS PORTER, button S manufactured for the slave trader Thomas Porter who sold slaves in the Caribbean area during the turn of the 19th Century. These buttons originated in Antigua, British West Indies and was produced in London. The name Porter may have been a Anglo version of Porteous as there was a French family who ran slave ships in the 18th Century. There have been reports of these buttons being found off the Georgia coast and supposition is that these were worn by his slaves prior to sale. Have two varieties available: [a] brass large T. P. on face.......................$85.00 [b] Pewter T. Porter on face.........................................$55.00 both buttons show some effects of sea water

4072 - VIRGINIA SLAVERY 1815, Wythe County, VA. April 1st, 1815. 7" X 9" manuscript describing the property owned by Joseph Evans having a farm of 312 acres and a dwelling house of wood and half stone being 20" X 30" and other improvements such as a spring house and kitchen and a "still house". Also included were two slaves, 2 males under 12 years of age and one between 12 and 50 year old, valued at $1000 with the entire property valued at $5000. Very fine.....................................$85.00

4074 - MISSISSIPPI POLL TAX RECEIPTS, a poll or head tax is one imposed equally on all adults at the time of voting and is not affected by property ownership or income. The poll tax was used in the South during and after Reconstruction as a means of circumventing the 14th Amendment and denying civil rights to blacks. This form of taxation gradually fell out of favor in the South in the mid-20th Century, but it was not until the adoption of the 24th Amendment that poll taxes were made illegal as a prerequisite for voting in federal elections. That same prohibition was later extended to all elections. We have several for Jackson County, MS dated from 1948-62. WHITE and COLORED is printed on the form with the notation checked appropriately. The cost to vote was $2.00 which figured on inflation today would have been the equivalent to near $20.00 then. This would have obviously deterred many poor whites and blacks from casting a vote especially if there were several elections in a calendar year. Very good, some age and light stains, each...........................................$15.00



12242 - THE SALE OF THE NEGRO WOMAN NAMED MARY JANE OF BLACK COLOR
, 8" X 13", Carroll Parish, Louisiana, May 2nd, 1857. One large page in manuscript on blue lined linen paper. A bill of sale executed by Hardy B. Herring selling for the sum of $1075 cash in hand paid by James Berry a certain Negro woman named MARY ANN, black color aged 26 years and a SLAVE FOR LIFE and guaranteed to be free from all maladies prescribed by law. Written in beautiful manuscript, excellent condition........................................
$375.00



12243 - A SALE OF THE NEGRO WOMAN BETSY OF DARK COPPER COMPLEXION, SIGNED BY FUTURE CONFEDERATE OFFICERS
, 8" X 13", manuscript bill of sate dated July 8th, 1858, Parish of Carroll, Louisiana. Josiah and John H. Flournoy sold to Robert B. Jones the Negro woman BETSY AGED ABOUT 32 YEARS OF DARK COPPER COMPLEXION, the same inherited by us from our brother Robert Flourney and we guarantee her to be a SLAVE FOR LIFE. Written on blue paper and signed by future Confederate officers from Louisiana. Field F. Montgomery, Captain 14th LA Vol., James W. Daraughon, 31st LA Colonel, POW and paroled at Vicksburg, J. H. Flournoy, Sergt. 17th Louisiana, captured and paroled at Vicksburg [biographies included]. Very fine................................
$395.00

12244 - TWO RARE TEXAS BILL OF SALES, ONE PAYING FOR A SLAVE WITH ANOTHER SALE, EXTREMELY RARE, 2 slave bill of sales, [a] 8" X 13" manuscript bill of sale dated January 12th, 1848 [Marshall, Texas un-datelined] attesting to the sale to Lewis Moore for the sum of $620 THE NEGRO BOY NAMED SAM AGED ABOUT 14 YEARS sold by the administrator of the estate of John Hudson, deceased, by Thompson M. Rector. [b] bill of sale 4.5" X 7" dated October 7th, 1850 where Lewis Moore trades the Negro boy SAM, aged about 13 in payment for WILLIS a Negro slave about 35 years of age. The smaller 'trade' bill of sale is tipped onto the earlier bill of sale along with a 1961 note as follows: "The above receipts show two transactions involving a young Negro slave. In the first transaction he was purchased for $620 and in the second he was traded for a 35 year old Negro man. These papers were given to me in January 1961 by Mr. Drew Moore of Marshall, Texas, grandson of the above named Lewis Moore." It is interesting to note that the age of the young Negro in 1850 was less than the original bill of sale but not surprising as many slave sales estimate the age of the slave sold. Wile attached, these could be easily separated without damage but really need to be kept together with the provenance. This is the first "trade" bill of sale I can remember ever offering................................$575.00/the pair

12248 - A RARE ANTI-SLAVE PAPER FROM OHIO, The Anti-Slavery Bugle, Salem, Ohio, August 22nd, 1845. 4 pages, 14" X 20", The Anti-Slavery Bugle was an abolitionist newspaper published from June 20, 1845 to May 4, 1861. The Anti-Slavery Bugle was first published in New-Lisbon (later renamed Lisbon), Ohio and moved shortly after five issues to Salem, Ohio. Salem was home to many Quaker families and an active station of the Underground Railroad, providing the paper with more subscribers. James Barnay was the publisher of the paper and received support from the Anti-Slavery Society, such as Abby Kelley. This allowed the paper to continue to be in circulation for 18 years and was shipped to other states including Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, and Wisconsin. The paper stated its goal in the first issue. "Our mission is a great and glorious one. It is to preach deliverance to the captive, and the opening of the prison door to them that are bound; to hasten in the day when 'liberty shall be proclaimed throughout all the land, unto all inhabitants thereof." Later, the paper expanded its mission from Anti-Slavery to include the Women's Right Movement. It ran letters and speeches such as Sojourner Truth's "Ain't I a Woman." The outrage about the war with Mexico [Mexico had abolished slavery earlier], front page story of considerable length on the attempt to free Virginia slaves into Ohio and the attack into Ohio by slaveholders to regain their slaves, a mob kills a max due to his complexion in Indianapolis, Frederick Douglas on the horrors of slavery. Crisp paper, small chip at spine unaffecting text.......................................$65.00


1029 - THE NEGRO MAN JOHN OF BLACK COMPLEXION SOLD IN 1853, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, Bayou Sara, Louisiana, February 1st, 1853, 8" X 13", two pages in beautiful manuscript. Jonathan Thomas sold for the sum of $1250 to Sarah Hilburn both residents of said Parish one Negro slave named JOHN of black complexion aged 24 years and to be considered a "Slave for life" and the seller warrants the title for life and said slave is free from all vices, diseases, and maladies proscribed by the State of Louisiana. Well written on blue un-lined paper in very dark and bold ink. Extremely fine condition...................................$325.00

1033 - THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF HASTINGS DICK LEAVING 32 NAMED SLAVES TO FAMILY MEMBERS IN 1848, Lauren County, South Carolina, 4 large 8" X 13" manuscript pages detailing the will of Hastings Dick which included the allotment of 32 named slaves to members of his family, those included were: BERRY, QUINTON, ELVIRA, JIMMY, EASTER, HARRY, FAVE, JOE BRADDOCK, BILL, ALLISON, MATILDA, HENRY, JIM, JIMMY, AMELINE, MILLY, SALLY, DICK, JOE, BEN, PAUL, LOUIS, CHANEY, VAN, GEORGE, MOSLEY, PETER AND JOHN. Well written and very detailed as to those who would inherit various slaves.................................................$195.00

1036 - THE PROPERTY OF JESSE WRIGHT, NINE NEGRO SLAVES LISTED WITH THEIR VALUES AND AGES, WARREN COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, April 22, 1842, two large pages 8" X 13", [one page pre-printed and filled-in]. The estate of Jesse Wright was detailed and property valued prior to the allotment of property to heirs. Listed were:  JO AGED 55 VALUED AT $400, SOPHIA AGED 27 VALUED AT $600, JIM AGED 25, HENRY AGED 2 YEARS AND AN INFANT $900, STEPHEN AGED 10 YEARS VALUED AT $400, SARAH AGED 8 YEARS VALUED AT $300, ISAAC AGED 25 VALUED AT $650, ANNE AGED 20 VALUED AT $700, AND ANTHONY AGED 25 VALUED AT $700. Well written in dark blue ink, very fine..................................................$195.00

1040 - CONFEDERATE ERA SLAVE HIRE IN TEXAS 1861, Fannin County, Texas, June 28th, 1861, 1 large page in manuscript 8" X 13", a guardian of the estate involving a minor listss the indebtedness the estate owes and six named slaves belonging to the estate and the value they were hired out for in the era 1860...listed are JOHN AT $75, BERRY AT $50, RACHEL AT $75, MARIA AT $20, MARY AT $10, AND ANN showing no monetary rental fee. The document states that not all the rental due the minor had been collected. The low rentals shown on some Negroes were probably due to old age or some infirmities. Signed M. W. Bledsoe who was one of the early Texas settlers at Fort Lyday in Fannin County who came from Tennessee. Fort Leday was manned by 85 rangers to protect the area from Indian attacks. Later he was Sheriff of Fannin County. Written on fine blue paper.................SOLD

SLAVERY IN NEW ORLEANS


1050 -
By 1850 New Orleans was the Queen City of the South and shipping by steamboat allowed millions of tons of cotton and other foodstuffs to pass through the Port of New Orleans. The rich Mississippi River delta was home for hundreds of plantations that used slave labor to product crops. Thus New Orleans became one of the busiest cities for the slave trade as thousands of slaves were shipped into New Orleans from parts north and east to satisfy the demands for labor along the river. Numerous auction companies specialized in slave sales and slaves were sold singularly as well as whole plantations consisting of up to several hundred slaves at a time. At that time New Orleans had numerous newspapers that consistently had advertisements for the sale and auction of slaves as well as the hire of slaves, and of course ads for the recovery of runaway slaves which was quite common. Many ads boasted of the talents of the slaves such as mechanics and boilermakers. Household slaves were quite in demand in the city especially trained seamstresses, cooks, and nannies for local families. It should be mentioned that many slaves imported into New Orleans for sale from other parts of the South suffered greatly due to the Yellow Fever epidemics that were prevalent in the Louisiana climate during the summer months due to a lack of resistance to that disease especially during the 1840's and 1850's. Irregardless slaves were constantly brought in for sale in the City.

We have a grouping of New Orleans newspapers that range from 1848 through the 1850's mainly the scarce New Orleans Crescent as well as the New Orleans Delta. All are complete papers, mostly four pages, some 8 [Sundays]. All have slave ads from individual sale offerings to auction sales of multiple slaves. Condition is very good with some usual foxing, spine irregularity [removed from bound volumes], but all complete issues. Besides the slave ads there are numerous steamboat ads, shipping ads, and the news of the day in the Crescent City. We retail these from $35 - $40 each.

A mixed group of 10 issues.............................................$249.95 [less than $25 per issue]
A mixed group of 20 issues
.............................................$399.95 [less than $20 per issue]
A mixed group of 50 issues
.............................................$895.00 [less than $18 per issue]
A mixed group of 100 issues
........................................$1,495.00 [less than $15 per issue]

Mylar holders available at an extra charge

1053 - A LOUISIANA MAN SELLS THE SLAVE TOM HE HAD INHERITED, CONFEDERATE ERA 1862, 8" X 13" manuscript, Parish of St. Helena, January 13th, 1862, Thomas Andrews sells to James Andrews the Negro man named TOM aged about 25 years of age that he had inherited in a lot from the estate of Elisha Andrews deceased for the sum of $1200 cash. The Negro slave was "A slave for life" and said purchaser was entitled to all rights of the named slave TOM. In all probability these two men were brothers. Extremely fine condition and in excellent manuscript...................................................$350.00


1280 - A NEGRO FAMILY SOLD IN KENTUCKY, 8" X 10" in bold manuscript, Mercer County, Kentucky, September 19th, 1833. The following Negro slaves are described as being sold to Matthew Bacon for the sum of $1,624, CHARLOTTE and her "youngest girl child", also her other children ANNY, ALEY, OBEDIAH, FLOYD AND MILES, all were guaranteed to be free of all claims in the future, all sold by Edward Worthington. It is obvious that the youngest girl child must have been an infant as she was unnamed in the bill of sale. Very fine..........................................................SOLD

121819 - A VALUATION OF A BOND OF THREE NAMED SLAVES, No place but manuscript, 1.5" X 6", ink...I value the Negroes for which the within bond is given to try the right of property at the following values to wit SAMPSON at $800, CHARLES at $700, MARY at $500, October 16th, 1852. Well written........................................$45.00

121823 - BILL OF EXCHANGE FOR NEGRO SLAVES, ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, VA, 1849, two large 8" X 14" pages in manuscript detailing all his successors and in regard to the sale and distribution of proceeds for the slave woman MARY aged about 35 years and her son WILLIAM aged about 13. Quite detailed. Light age tone to the edge, minor blems, otherwise very good..................................................$125.00

80500 - PRO-SLAVERY BOOK OWNED AND SIGNED BY A SOUTH CAROLINA COLONEL WHO SIGNED THE ORDINANCE OF SECESSION, 319 pages, "AMERICAN SLAVERY DISTINGUISHED FROM THE SLAVERY OF ENGLISH THEORISTS AND JUSTIFIED BY THE LAW OF NATURE," hard cover, by Rev. Samuel Seabury, Mason Brothers, NY, 1861. A rare volume signed by Robert N. Gourdin on a blank fly, his bookmark on inside cover. Gourdin signed the South Carolina Ordinance of Secession in December 1860. He was also chairman of "The 1860 Association of Charleston" that published secessionist pamphlets. Both boards intact, wear on boards at spine and back edge, pages inside fine, a rare book in itself with an important autograph who late in the war became a Confederate Colonel.........................................$395.00



4051 - TWO LARGE AUCTION SLAVES OF NEGROES IN NEW ORLEANS
, February 21st, 1855, The New Orleans Delta. 4 large folio sized pages. Two large auction sale of Negroes, one listing 60 named slaves listed by age and specialty, captioned VERY CHOICE SUGAR PLANTATION HANDS, another for 24 Negro slaves captioned VERY YOUNG SUGAR FIELD HANDS, listed by name, age, specialty. Both sales were to be conducted by J. A. Beard & Co., of New Orleans. There are several "Runaway slave ads with small illustrations of run-a-way slaves, steamboat ads including one for the Natchez. Some listed with as follows: LEWIS aged 47, a good carpenter and sugar maker, a trusty and superior subject, SAMBO aged 42, a good field hand and kettle hand, useful in a sugar house. Families are listed in groups. Very fine....................................................
$65.00


61504 - HUGE SLAVE ADS
, Le Courrier De La Louisiane, two large folio pages in French July 2nd, 1834, New Orleans, LA. Large woodcuts of Negro men and women describing slaves that had run away from their masters, 12 large ads on both pages describing the slave by description as well as the owner including the rewards offered for each. The early paper is in very fine condition, the largest slave illustrations we have seen on any Southern newspaper.................................................
$100.00

61506 - NEGROES FOR SALE, The Daily True Delta, New Orleans, LA, December 6th, 1860, 8 large folio pages. A nice front page grouping of Slave sale ads with small illustrations of Negro slaves, one large ad for 15 named slaves, 9 other ads for the sale of slaves by numerous slave merchants in the city. The back page is nearly 75% of illustrated steamboat ads. A scarce very late New Orleans paper that was published only weeks before Louisiana seceded from the Union. This issue includes political comments as well as news of the soon to secede Southern state. There is a front page legal notice that had been outlined in brown ink that has been strengthened with archival tape to prevent separation, otherwise very good. A wealth of pre-war and slave information..............................................$65.00

61507 - WILLIAM SING PAYS TAXES ON 11 SLAVES IN RUSSELL COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN 1815, 6" X 7", manuscript accounting of the taxes due William Sing who had a farm in Russell County, VA. The assessment describes his property as the size of his house on 295 acres with 11 slaves. The 11 slaves were described as follows: Males, 1 over 50 years, 2 between 12 and 40 years, 2 under 12 years. Females: 1 over 50 years, 3 between 12 and 50 years, 2 under 12 years of age. The total bill was $39.00 for the property and slaves. Quite early for Virginia [1815]......................................................$125.00


42927 - ANNA E. DICKINSON, ABOLITIONIST, Carte de Viste. By Anthony, from life facing left. Anna Elizabeth Dickinson (October 28, 1842 - October 22, 1932) was an American orator and lecturer. An advocate for the abolition of slavery and for women's suffrage, as well as a gifted teacher, Dickinson was the first woman to speak before the United States Congress. A gifted speaker at a very young age, she aided the Republican Party in the hard-fought 1863 elections and significantly influenced the distribution of political power in the Union just prior to the Civil War. Before the American Civil War, she gave impassioned speeches on abolition; during the war she toured the country speaking on the war and other issues. In 1862, Garrison asked Dickinson to deliver a series of lectures sponsored by the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society, talks helped foment the abolitionist movement in the state prior to President Abraham Lincoln's issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation. Her intensity, youth, and passion created a stir of attention from the media, as well as from other abolitionists such as Lucretia Mott. During the 1863 elections, Dickinson campaigned for several Republican candidates in New York, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, and Connecticut, speaking eloquently and powerfully in support of the Radical Republicans' anti-slavery platform and for the preservation of the Union. Audiences came away impressed by the power of her convictions, which included occasional attacks on Lincoln for being too moderate. An audience of over 5,000 hailed her in New York City when she spoke there on behalf of Republican candidates. She earned a standing ovation in 1864 for an impassioned speech on the floor of the United States House of Representatives. She broadened her political views to include strong opinions on the rights of blacks. She also lectured on Reconstruction, Women's Rights, and Temperance......................................$115.00

34027 - NEGRO EFFIGY PIPE, Civil War era, 2" X 1.5", with 6" wooden stem, white bisque with traits of normal gray-black age tone, effigy of a male Negro, very fine, great for display with the original wooden stem...............................................$135.00

31703 - LOUISIANA SUGAR SYRUP LABELS, 5" X 6", Longwood Plantations, East Baton Rouge Parish, LA. Pure Syrup Cane labels. Original early 20th Century syrup can labels. Quite attractive with Mammy holding a plate of steaming pancakes. Mint condition. I have seen reproductions of similar early food items in Southern gift shops at $5 - $7 each. A lot of 10 authentic pieces............................................................$50.00


20902 - 1832, FAYETTE COUNTY, GA, A NEGRO BOY SOLD AFTER HENRY KITE DIES, 8" X 13", 1831 Fayette County, GA, 2 pages. Henry Kite dies and his property is sold to satisfy heirs by the clerk William McBride, 92 different entries of household and plantation goods are listed sold including a NEGRO BOY SOLD TO NOAH KITE FOR THE SUM OF $382.25. Very fine..............................................$85.00

20903 - ELSEY AND HER CHILD JIM SOLD, 6" X 5.5", January 20th, 1827. Slave Bill of sale for the Negro woman named Elsey and her child Jim were sold for the sum of $380,000 to James Akins. The sales were warranted against all claims by the seller John L. Williams. Although a place is not shown Akins was from Chambers County, AL. Some edge stains not affecting the manuscript, trifle light in a spot. Very good..................................$150.00

20906 - THE SLAVE JAIMUS SOLD FOR $575.00, 4" X 5.5", August 13th, 1834. John Eatman sells James Akins the Negro boy named JAIMUS for the sum of $575. The slave was described as being about 18 years of age. Very good..................................$125.00

29008 - THE SALE OF THE NEGRO MAN HARRY, 2.5" X 6.5", December 6th, 1841. A small but well-written slave bill of sale DETAILING THE SALE OF THE NEGRO MAN HARRY sold to James Akins for the sum of $275.00. The sale was made by the Sheriff William Beason. Sales by Sheriffs were usually as a result of court sanctioned sales involving estates or to satisfy a debt ordered by the court. Very fine.........................................$95.00


12244 - TAKING CARE OF SICK NEGROES, January 1st, 1857. Small manuscript receipt, un datelined, as a receipt to the estate of R.H. Gregg for services provided Negro saves providing a midwife for Clarissa and May and taking care of sick Negroes. Manuscript 4.5" X 5.5", bottom corner missing only affecting the notation of cents in the total bill. Also noted was boarding and clothing for a Negro woman. Very good.........................................$55.00

12246 - EARLY VIRGINIA SLAVERY, 6.5" X 7", manuscript listing of property owned by Robert Craig Jr. as of April 1st, 1815. His assets are listed as a farm on Wolf Creek in Washington County of 440 acres with a two story house, 21" X 17", also with some property near Main Street in Abington, VA. Also 8 slaves described as follows: 1 male between 12 and 50 years valued at $250, 3 males under 12 valued at $600, 1 female between 12 and 50 valued at $350, 3 females under 12 valued at $400. Light age tone, written on thick laid paper.............................................................$125.00

12247 - MOVING HIS NEGROES TO MISSISSIPPI, October 2nd, 1835. Folded letter sheet hand-carried to Mr. Thomas Hunt in Memphis, TN by a Mr. Webster by John Pollock of Gooch, Kentucky. The carrier, Mr. Webster is on his way to Mississippi with his lady. He had already sent his Negroes there last Spring. He wants his Nephew to write him and let him know how he likes it in Memphis. Mentions several individuals he must see there. Fine..................................................................$49.00


71153 - TWO PLANTATION OWNERS ARE SUED FOR NON PAYMENT ON A MORTGAGE OF 44 NAMED NEGROES SOLD IN MISSISSIPPI IN 1821, 2+ large legal pages on manuscript directed to the Sheriff of Warren County, Mississippi by officials in Adams County, Mississippi, dated April 17th, 1826. The petitioner Sinclair Gervais of Adams County petitioned the Sheriff of Warren County, Mississippi. To order Elbert Head and Samuel Davis post a security bond of $20,000 to protect him from the defendants selling or otherwise disposing of the 44 Negroes named in the mortgage claim which was in default. Named in the document were the Negro slaves: TOM, TOMA, JOHN, GEORGE, BEN, FRAZIER, EPHRAM, OLD QUOCOO, STEPHEN, MINTY, SISMARY, CAINIS, NANNY, SALLY PHILLIS, CELIA, NELLY, SALLY, DOLLY, CLARISA, FANNY, QUOCOO, MILLY, DELPH, juveniles listed were SALLY, HARRY SIMON, JACK, BOB, DECK, CATE, EVELINA, ELSY, BILL, JOHN, VIOLETE, PHILIP, NELL, JOSHUA, JOHN, NANCY, SINAY, RILEY, AND JACOB. The Sheriff was to receive the bond but if not received he was requested to take possession of the named slaves to avoid loss of the slaves by sale or other means. Two plus pages 8" X 13", light mellow yellow aging to the paper, strong manuscript. Several of the slaves still retained African names as being first generation slaves imported into the US before the embargo of 1808 [ie OLD QUOCOO]. The number of slaves involved in this writ probably represented all the slaves on  a plantation owned by both defendants. A huge number of slaves listed...................................................$275.00

4050 - MEDICATIONS DIRECTED TOWARDS PLANTATION OWNERS TO KEEP THEIR FAITHFUL SERVANTS HEALTHY AND FREE FROM DISEASES
, The New Orleans Daily Delta, March 13th, 1855. 4 pages folio size, a large advertisement with small vignettes of Negro slaves promoting the use of several medications offered by the Washington Remedies of New Orleans to plantation owners in order to cure and safeguard the health of their "faithful servants". Washington Salve, the Washington Purifier, Washington's Rheumatic Ointment, the Washington Internal Remedy, all geared to relieve disease and existing conditions that would hinder a worker from performing his duties on the plantation. Sold by a Creole named Micklejohn at #28 St. Louis Street, New Orleans. Also is an auction ad for 174 named Sugar and Cotton plantation slaves to be sold to the highest bidder at auction in New Orleans. Other slave and plantation references in this fine issue. Illustrated Steamboat ads, and more about Antebellum New Orleans. This is the first ad directed at medicines for plantation slaves we have seen. Paper is crisp and fresh, just a trifle edge tear which has been nicely mended..................................
$95.00

4052 - OVER 250 NAMED SLAVES AT AUCTION IN NEW ORLEANS, The New Orleans Daily Delta, February 24th, 1855. Four page folio issue newspaper. Three separate ads by the auctioneer J. A. Beard of New Orleans offering for sale three groups of Negro slaves; auction #1 lists 174 slaves, Auction #2 lists 24 named slaves, and Auction #3 lists 60 named slaves. All slaves are listed by name, age, and specialty they are trained for. These are generally described as "Field hands" ideal for the many sugar and cotton plantations in the area, other ads for runaway slaves with rewards offered. One of the largest listing of slaves at auction we have seen in a newspaper. Very fine....................................................$95.00 [1 in stock]

4053 - SLAVES FOR SALE, RUNAWAY SLAVES - REWARDS OFFERED FOR THEIR CAPTURE AND RETURN, The New Orleans Daily Delta and The New Orleans Daily Crescent, Issues of 1855 various dates, all have good slavery content, illustrated ads for the sale and for the capture of runaway slaves, steamboat ads.....................$35.00/each [5 different at $30.00/each, 10 at $25.00/each, 25 at $20.00/each]

SPECIAL OFFER

4054 - SLAVES FOR SALE, RUNAWAY SLAVES - REWARD OFFERED FOR THEIR CAPTURE AND RETURN, The New Orleans Daily Delta and The New Orleans Daily Crescent, issues 1852 - 55, complete issues. We have gone through our stock of slave related newspapers and have pulled out what we consider culls. Some have staining, some have an ad cut out, some have been torn [splits all pieces there], some have a close left spine with edge chips. With a little time and archival tape these would be quite salable or a wealth of information for the serious collector of slave era materials. We will only ship complete papers so there will be none with missing pages. They just will need a little TLC! We just don't have the time to restore these for sale, some may have some restoration already done............................................................$95.00 [10 complete papers as described above]


8280 - SLAVES IN AN ESTATE, REPUBLIC OF TEXAS, 8" X 14" manuscript, Colorado County, Texas, January 29th, 1844. A very detailed description of funds due in probate after a death of the owners of the Negro slaves PETER and CRANEY. Nice "Republic of Texas" heading. One page manuscript in dark brown ink, tiny fissure at seam restored. Scarce Republic of Texas slavery item.............................................$150.00

8170 - SLAVERY IN COLONIAL MARYLAND, Cob Neck, (Maryland), February 13th, 1773. 5" X 6" manuscript note written by John Lancaster to Hugh Gardner advising him that William Diggers of Charles Town (Maryland) wants one of his Negroes from his quarters at Charles Town to bring some items to said Gardner. Lancaster was a prominent citizen of Cob Neck and Charles Town was an important supply center for the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Very fine, early Colonial slave related item.....................................................$175.00

71001 - GEORGIA SLAVE BILL OF SALE, Washington County, GA, 4.5" X 6.5", November 23rd, 1854. Manuscript bill of sale for the full payment for the slave man named DICK for $81 and was warranted against any claim whatsoever. For such a low sum Dick may have been advanced in age as male slaves of that period in prime condition brought over $600 when sold. Very fine...................................SOLD

71002 - PORT GIBSON, MS, TAXES LEVIED ON EIGHT SLAVES, 5.5" X 6.5". Pre-printed receipt showing numerous taxable items such as Bowie knives and dirks, Free Negroes, sword canes, etc. This particular one is dated at Port Gibson, MS, March 24th, 1859 showing $10.40 paid for the tax on eight slaves. Very fine...................................$110.00

71006 - SLAVES CARRYING COTTON, OVERSEER IN FIELD, $10, Central Bank of Alabama, Montgomery, AL. Washington to right, large TEN red overprint, one of the best of the slave vignette notes which such a large scene. Very good to fine..........................................SOLD

71007 - SLAVE OVERSEER ON HORSEBACK, SLAVES PICKING COTTON IN FIELD, The State of Alabama, $5, 1864, Montgomery, AL. Large green FIVE overprint, one of the most popular slave vignette notes. Crisp, uncirculated, choice.....................................................$150.00

71008 - NEGRO HOEING COTTON IN FIELD, 50 Cents, State of Mississippi, 1864, red 50 CTS overprint. Crisp, very fine...................................SOLD


6500 - RECEIPT FOR DOCTORING A NEGRO, 2" X 7", manuscript receipt dated December 31st, 1850 and signed by Dr. H.P. Sanders for payment of $18.50 for the "Doctoring of a Negro" paid by R.W. Graham, guardian of William Whittey. The amount due was for balance due so the "doctoring" must have been over a period of time....................................$45.00

6502 - TEXAS SLAVE HIRE, Freestone County, TX, 2.5" X 7", manuscript receipt detailing the hire of the Negro boy BEN for $109.33 for six months and a half running from the first day of last February. The agreement was signed by M. Bateman dated September 17th, 1855......................................................SOLD

6503 - A DOCTOR BILLS FOR TREATING A SLAVE AND FOR MEDICINES, Claiborne County, MS, February 11th, 1832. 8" X 13", manuscript with details of the probate listing this as a liability to the Estate.  The estate of William Parks is billed for the treatment to the Negro SAM, including powders and pills provided in April 1831 for a total of $12.00 due. Very fine..............................................$75.00

6507 - BILL OS SALE FOR A NEARSIGHTED SLAVE IN TEXAS, June 25th, 1859, Ellis County, TX, 8" X 13". Manuscript bill of sale for the sale of the slave GEORGE about 35 years of age and a Slave for Life for the sum of $1000 and was warranted to be sound of body and mind except for near sightedness in the eyes. A nice large bill of sale on light gray paper.........................................SOLD

6510 - A SALE OF A SLAVE IN KENTUCKY IN 1831, Franklin County, KY. September 5th, 1831, 6.5" X 9.5". Francis Major of Franklin County, KY has sold for the sum of $284.00. The Negro woman named ANN who was 26 or 27 years of age and was warranted to be free from all claims. Fine...............................$195.00

6022 - DOCTOR'S BILLS FOR VISITING NEGROES IN ARKANSAS, 1842, Two documents, [a] 6" X 18", [b] 6" X 10". A very detailed bill for medical services for the family of Mrs. Susan Fischer and her slaves by Dr. James Fleece with the bill starting in 1839 and continuing until 1840. The bill was being turned over to the court and was verified by the Justice of the Peace in April 1842 of Boyle County, Arkansas. Dr. Fleece lists numerous visits to the family treating both family members and Negroes, shows charges for pills administered, obstetrics operation. On September 20th, he records a visit "visit N[egro] boy $1.00 with an additional charge of $1 for a possible bleeding. On April 10th, he visited a N [egro] woman at a charge of $1.30. On May 29, a visit to a N [egro] woman at a charge of $1.50. An on August 27th, there was a $1.00 charge for visiting Negroes. There are probably 50 plus entries with his last visit in September 1840. A massive amount of medical information.............................$85.00

6515 - $700 WAS UNPAID ON THE NEGRO BOY ALBERT IN MOBILE, AL 1859, Mobile, AL, March 23rd, 1859. TWO documents [a] 8" X 10", [b] 3 pages 8" X 13", all manuscripts describing the sale in 1855 of the Negro boy ALBERT who was sold for $950 and the amount due on the sale was $700 which remained unpaid. Both are legal depositions taken by the commissioner detailing the history of the sale. An attractive applied notary paper seal on the last page. Quite a bit of detailed information provided. Paper is fresh and attractive.......................................$275.00

6517 - ARKANSAS PROBATE OF 19 SLAVES AND MEDICAL EXPENSES FROM THE MAYBERRY ESTATE, PRAIRIE COUNTY, ARKANSAS, Two documents [a] 3 large 8" X 13" manuscript pages describing the inventory and personal property of James Mayfield deceased dated May 1859 in Prairie County, Arkansas listing 19 named slaves by age on page one, along with 70 head of cattle, 250 hogs, 3 horses, 6 mules, 63 sheep, corn, 2 wagons, guns, etc. along with notes owed by the estate. Some of the slaves listed were KIT AGED 32, BOYLE 27, LIEGE 18, TAYLOR 12, MARY 1, ALLY 65, MARY 65, HANNAH 40, LEWIS 24, SARAH 23, BUR 14, ABY WHITE 5, ADELADE 13, BILL 23, EMILY 24, AMY 32, CAROLINE 16, CHANCEY 45, AND TAYLOR 12. [b] an extensive list of visits to both the family of James Mayberry and his slaves [many named by name in the bill] for a period of six months. Two fine associated documents showing how an estate was evaluated, bills to the estate listed, and assets listed of the estate. Well written. Both documents.........................................$295.00


2801 - 26 NAMED NEGRO SLAVES SOLD AND FIGURED AT AN AVERAGE PRICE OF $569.23, January 1st, 1854. 8" X 10" two pages in manuscript detailing the sale of 26 named Negroes with the payment received noted on the verso by the seller. W.H. Hanckel sold the named Negroes to E.F. McElhaney (Charleston, SC). 21 were sold at $12,600, 2 at $1600, and 3 at $200. The total price of $14,800 was divided by 26 with an average cost of $569.23. Some mentioned were SCYLLA AND HER CHILDREN, SAM, ABRAHAM, MARTHA, AND TOM, OTHERS WERE ABBY AND HER CHILDREN JOHNNY, MOLLY, LOVEY AND HER CHILD RAYMOND, DORAH, HANNAH, GEORGE, KATY HIS WIFE, WILEY, HENRY, ISHMAD, ROSE, GLASCOW, DANIEL, ADELINE HIS WIFE, GEORGE, CHARLOTTE HIS WIFE AND SOLOMON. Not datelined, but records show this transaction was done at Charleston, SC. Very fine...........................................$295.00


2806 - CHARLESTON BILL OF SALE FOR THE NEGRO MAN NAMED WILL
, October 21st, 1858. 8" x 14" two large pre-printed and filled in pages detailing the sale of the Negro man WILL to David Lamb by Benjamin Gist for $642.66 with the terms of payment outlined. Bold STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA masthead, huge and bold manuscript. Benjamin Gist was a member of the famous Gist family of Charleston. Very fine...................................
$450.00



2821 - A HUGE SALE OF 31 NAMED SLAVES
, St. Bartholomew Parish, SC (Colleton County), near Charleston, October 13th, 1853. 8" X 15" manuscript detailing the sale of 31 named slaves by Dr. Alexander Fraser to James O'Hear and Emmanuel Weitsell for the sum of $15,000. Some slaves listed are: NEPTUNE, PRINCE, LANDON, NELLY, EDY, JANE, JUDY, HAGER, AFFEY, EVE, PEGGY, CHARMONT, CAESAR, HANNAH, PHILLIS, AUBA, LUCY, FRANK, ISAAC, SALLY, CHARLES, BEN, SAM, AND MORE...Alexander Fraser was a member of an Old Low Country family. Extremely well written in large script, some old tape stains to verso that shows somewhat on the obverse, some archival repairs to verso. Blue paper seal, overall very good..........................................
$450.00

2832 - JOHN PICKERPACK DIES, HIS SLAVES AND OTHER PROPERTY IS ORDERED SOLD, July 21st, 1857. Two pages 8" X 14" in bold manuscript. John Pickerpack of the Spartanburg District in South Carolina and all his property is ordered sold by the court. His slave MARIA, all his furniture, horses, carriage, and cow were ordered sold at private sale or auction as well as the slaves LYDIA, CAROLINE, AND PHILIP. Terms were to be one-half in cash and nine months the balance would be due so to generate enough funds to pay off existing debts. In excellent condition......................................$195.00

2835 - SLAVERY IN CHARLESTON IN 1846-1847, The Charleston Courier. Complete 4 page issue, large folio sized printed at the end of the Mexican War with ads for selling slaves, runaway slaves, etc. A great view of life in Antebellum Charleston. Very fine..................$35.00


3130 - BILL OF SALE FOR THE NEGRO MAN MARCH
, Charleston, SC, June 3rd, 1834. 8" X 13", "MARCH was sold for the sum of $500 by Caroline Woods to Peter K. Colburn of Charleston, SC, STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA masthead, printed by W. Riley of 110 Church Street of Charleston, SC. Pre-printed and filled-in, light green paper seal. Very fine......................................................
SOLD

3144 - CAPTAIN FREDERICK FRASER PAYS TAXES ON HIS RICE PLANTATION AND FOR 20 NEGROES, 7" X 8", dated 1788, a bold manuscript detailing the taxes paid on rice lands, and pine forest lands along with 20 Negroes owned by Captain Frederick Fraser, a plantation owner near Hilton Head, SC. Really well written in bold brown ink................$175.00

3145 - 1787 TAXES PAID ON HIS PLANTATION AND 21 NEGROES BY CAPTAIN FREDERICK FRASER, 7" X 8" manuscript, Prince William Parish (South Carolina) taxes paid in pounds for 21 Negroes and 1269 acres of property including 100 acres in rice cultivation. Fraser was a plantation owner near Hilton Head. Fine, early South Carolina plantation tax assessment, Prince William Parish was a 18th Century designation for an election district in the Low Country near Beaufort, SC...............................................$175.00

3146 - REVOLUTIONARY WAR HERO PAYS TAXES ON HIS 32 SLAVES, 5" X 6", accounting taxes paid for 32 slaves and lands owned by Daniel de Saussure for the year 1792. Daniel de Saussure was captured by the British and imprisoned by the British. The 32 slaves are listed by name on the verso of the document. An interesting Charleston document although not noted as such involving the famous de Saussure family of Charleston. Fine...........................................................SOLD

3147 - SLAVE BILL OF SALE, MONROE COUNTY MISSISSIPPI 1847, SALE OF MARY, April 16th, 1847. 7" X 8" manuscript bill of sale for the Negro girl named MARY about 25 years of age for the sum of $362.50 purchased by Lucy Higgason with the title to said Negro girl warranted by the seller Philip McNary. Fine.........................................$165.00

3148 - BILL OF SALE FOR THE NEGRO WOMAN NAMED BETSY, December 10th, 1855. 3.5" X 6.5" manuscript bill of sale showing payment of $650 for the purchase of the Negro woman named BETSY aged about 36 years old. Purchased by John Higgason (of Monroe County, MS, un datelined), on gray paper....................................$150.00

3151 - A SLAVE PURCHASED AND THEN OWNERSHIP RIGHTS TRANSFERRED THE FOLLOWING YEAR, BILL OF SALE AND TRANSFER FOR THE NEGRO MAN SQUIRE, November 22nd, 1851. 4.5" X 6" manuscript detailing the sale of the Negro man SQUIRE about 40 years old to Wyatt Moye for the sum of $612.50. The slave was warranted to be sound and a slave for life, dated at Tishomingo County [Mississippi]. On the verso of the bill of sale is a bill of transfer dated January 31st, 1852 at Monroe County, MS for the Negro man SQUIRE to Lucy M. Higgason by Wyatt Moye. An unusual document with the slave's ownership changing twice in two months. Fine......................................$175.00

3153 - A SLAVE SOLD THAT IS SLIGHTLY DEAF, BILL OF SALE FOR THE NEGRO WOMAN VICY, July 24th, 1851. 4" X 6", manuscript bill of sale for the Negro woman VICY for the sum of $300 sold to J. Higgason [John Higgason of Monroe County, MS]. VICY was warranted to be sound of mind and body except a slight deafness. Fine.......................$165.00

3155 - AUTHORIZATION TO SELL THREE NAMED SLAVES, 6" X 6.5" manuscript in bold pencil authorizing his executor to sell the slaves JULIAN, PAULINE, AND RACHEL and to secure the proceeds in a lot and home for Eliza Sigwold and her children and at her death the property shall belong to her children. Bold large pencil manuscript probably as a draft of parts of his will by the husband [unnamed], undated but manuscript style in the 1850's, from a group of Mississippi papers. Very fine........................................$95.00


2028 - EARLY NEW ORLEANS NEWSPAPER WITH HUGE SLAVE ADS IN BOTH FRENCH AND ENGLISH, The "Courier: New Orleans, LA", April 9th, 1834. Four large folio sized pages with two being in English and two in French (duplicating the news). This particular issue has one column of twelve illustrated slave ads with the Negro figure of a Negro man or Negro woman illustrating each ad. The ads gave rewards for the capture/return of runaway slaves or a notice of a runaway being brought to jail. For example, an ad for a runaway reads, "10 Reward the Negro girl DOLEY AGED ABOUT 22 YEARS, COMMON SIZE, BLACK SKIN, PRETTY FACE, WELL MADE, HAS A SCAR ON HER FOREHEAD AND LOOKS SICKLY. It is supposed that she went off with her husband Anthony who belongs to Mr. O. Davis. The said slave absented herself yesterday morning. Captains of vessels and others are requested not to harbor her under penalty of law." The Courier during this period had the largest woodcuts for slave ads we have ever seen. Completed four page issue, as usual dis-bound at seam, paper crisp and firm, a rare early New Orleans paper.......................................................$125.00

2029 - 30 SLAVES LEFT TO OGLETHORPE UNIVERSITY IN GEORGIA BY A MISSISSIPPI LANDOWNER, An archive of documents regarding a legacy of 30 slaves left to the University by James Allen of Kemper County, MS in 1857. Kemper's will (copy included) left the Negroes at his death to his wife Margaret who was not to dispose or sell any of the Negroes and at her death the legacy of 30 Negroes were to be left to Oglethorpe University in Milledgeville, GA. Apparently at her death heirs of James Allen contested the will. The archive includes a certificate signed by Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown with a copy of the 1835 Charter of the University as well as an 1852 amendment adding trustees to the board. There are documents appointing an attorney to handle the claim for the University, other documents giving details by the board on how to acquire and handle the legacy of Negroes, and other information regarding the naming of trustees including Governor Joseph E. Brown and Alexander H. Stephens, future Vice President of the Confederacy. Included is a letter from the nephew of James Allen's wife asking for information on the possible purchase of the negroes which he says he knows well...9 total manuscripts, several multi-paged, all ink. Oglethorpe University was chartered in 1835 and operated until the Civil War when its buildings were used as barracks. It reopened in 1870 and closed in 1872. It was re-chartered in 1913 and operates today as one of the finest Liberal Arts Colleges and is located in Atlanta. It is interesting to speculate what happened in this case as the documents range from 1857-61. In one document, it is mentioned that the university may settle for just half the legacy of slaves. In the will Allen states that he does not want the Negroes sold. Yet the nephew's interest to buy the Negroes was entertained by the trustees. Whether the Negroes remained in Mississippi after being sold or were transferred to Georgia, it is unknown, but with the end of the war, the value of the legacy was worthless to all concerned with the abolition of slavery, 9 items...................................................SOLD


110500 - LARGE CIVIL WAR ERA LOUISIANA SLAVE BILL OF SALE, January 29th, 1862, St. Helena Parish, Louisiana. 8" X 14", pre-printed and filled-in, detailing the slave of the Negro woman named ROSE of black color and about 40 years of age and her child named MARY about four of "griff" color. Both were warranted to be sound and "Slaves for life". This large document actually is three pages in length on gray paper. Both were sold for the sum of $1,200. Bill of sales during this Confederate period are quite scarce as at this time Louisiana was entirely in the hands of the Confederacy. Overall fine to very fine...........................$395.00


110604 - SOLD IN CONFEDERATE HELD NORTH LOUISIANA IN 1863, THE SLAVE JERRY
, August 20th, 1863, Desoto Parish, Louisiana. Three pages 8" X 14", pre-printed and filled-in. A rare late Confederate era Louisiana bill of sale from the Parish of Desoto in Northern Louisiana still in Confederate control detailing the sale of the Negro man JERRY aged about 23 years old of dark complexion sold for the amount of $1,350 to be paid for the mentioned slave. Choice condition and Slave sales this late are rare..........................
$425.00

110606 - THE QUESTION OF OWNERSHIP OF SLAVES IN GEORGIA, June 4th, 1853, Upson County, Georgia. Four large pages of questions to be directed at a witness in a case involving the ownership slaves at the death of Bath Wyche. 11 questions regarding her estate including the Negroes, also attached is a pre-printed Upson County court document regarding the upcoming trial. Very fine.........................................$89.00

110607 - SLAVES ORDERED TO BE SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, December 10th, 1859, Greensboro, Louisiana. 8" X 11, pre-printed and filled-in order to sell at PUBLIC AUCTION the Negro slaves MARTHA aged 28 and her two children GEORGE aged about 7 years and NELSON or BOWIE aged 1 year. The terms of the sale were outlined with due notice to be made in advertisements according to law, Parish of St. Helena, LA. The sale was forced by the need to settle secession of an estate in the Parish mentioned. Very fine......................$275.00

110608 - APPRAISAL OF 16 SLAVES WHO HAVE PERISHED, PORT GIBSON, MISSISSIPPI, April 18th, 1846, Claiborne County, Mississippi. 1 page 8" X 14" in beautiful manuscript. A listing of 16 named slaves and their values who had died since the appraisement of the estate in question. The purpose of the document to re-evaluate the estate with the value of the slaves who had died being cut in half. Some named were AMY, HARRIET, KEZIAH, LEVIN, MARGARETE, CAROLINE, ADAM, PATSEY, etc. Quite an unusual slavery document with so many slaves dying. It was during this period that yellow fever epidemics had hit the Gulf Coast killing both slaves and whites alike. Very fine............................................$245.00


A SET OF SLAVE LEG SHACKLES EARLY 18TH CENTURY

82803 - EARLY STYLE EXCAVATED SLAVE SHACKLES, locally made with a crude locking mechanism on one side, typical clasping ankle ring on the other. Massive hand-made links, 3.5" rings with 13" of chain links. The locking mechanism has been rusted in such a fashion you can see the inside of the lever lock. Overall, very decent for a dug example and the style of the 1830's - 40's................$495.00

300 - THE BUGLE, ANTI-SLAVERY NEWSPAPER, Salem, OH, 1846. 4 page issues, early anti-Slavery newspaper that condemned the United States for its attack on Mexico since Mexico had previously outlawed slavery and current thought was that pro-slavery elements looking for more slave states in the West through a conquest of Mexico. Very fine, have a few in stock...........................................$45.00/each

305 - VIRGINIA SLAVERY, 4" X 5.5", pre-printed and manuscript, Halifax County, VA. Tax bill marked paid for 5 slaves and 100 acres of land, dated 1854. Marked paid in the amount of $6.82. Very fine.................................$79.00

307 - VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI TAX ON 27 SLAVES, 4.5" X 6.0", pre-printed and filled in. Taxes for the year 1856 dated at Vicksburg. "Bowie knives" is printed on the receipt - the only tax receipt in the South that listed "Bowie Knives". Printed on light gray paper, crisp paper....................................................$115.00

SALE OF 75 SLAVES AND A SUGAR PLANTATION 1860

309 - HUGE SLAVE SALE OF 75 SLAVES LISTED BY NAME, AGE, AND OCCUPATIONAL SKILL. A SUGAR PLANTATION IS UP FOR AUCTION WITH ALL PROPERTIES INCLUDING SLAVES, The New Orleans Daily Delta, March 8th, 1860, 6 total pages. On page three is the huge listing of slaves for sale and a sugar plantation on the East Bank of the Mississippi River above New Orleans in St. Charles Parish, LA. The lands to be sold represented 2,000 arpents and the sugar mill, plantation stores, house, NEGRO cabins were to be sold. 75 named Negro slaves are listed. Some listed were EDMOND DOSEY, American negro, aged 26, field hand, JEAN BAPTISTE, Creole Negro man, aged 27, field hand, ABRAHAM, American mullatto boy, aged 34, blacksmith, BERNARD, African Negro, aged 65, ostler (feet burnt). These descriptions go on and on giving distinctive names unique to New Orleans such as "Creole Negro", "copper in color", mullatto, and more. There is one example of a child "3 months old" being sold. An interesting insight into the Negro trade in New Orleans just before the Civil War in 1860. The paper is firm with some edge tears (restored). Last page missing (ad content), but the six pages contain many other individual illustrated slave ads and another small auction of five slaves. These huge slave ad papers are rare to find so detailed with so many slaves at auction......................................$165.00     Another issue, March 4th, 1860, complete paper, one ad removed 2" X 2", archival sealed, otherwise in very fine condition............................$225.00

314 - BILL OF SALE FOR LEA AND HER CHILD, August 27th, 1791, 8" X 10", manuscript bill of sale for 100 pounds describing Lea as about 18 years of age along with her child as being warranted against all claims. These slaves were sold in the State of North Carolina. Written in light brown ink, some trifle fold restoration on verso. Written on one side for nice display. A scarce pre 1800 Slave Bill of Sale...................................$275.00

315 - LIST OF PLANTATION ITEMS SOLD AT THE DEATH OF SAMUEL KERR INCLUDING A NOTE ON A HIRED NEGRO, 4 pages, 8" X 14" manuscript describing the properties sold from the estate in March 1826 (Guilford County, North Carolina). Lists the person the property was sold to...includes all sorts of plantation goods including animals and land. The Black Boy (BOB) was hired out for 12 months and should be delivered back when called for to his owner William Carr. A massive interesting document. Dark brown ink..............................................$150.00

316 - WILL OF NATHANIAL KERR LEAVING HIS PROPERTY AND SLAVES TO HIS FAMILY MEMBERS, 8" X 14", two large pages in manuscript being the draft copy of Nathanial Kerr's will (from Guilford County, NC), undated, but manuscript and associated documents that accompanied put this as being written about 1825...to his wife he left WILL and CHARLOTTE, to one daughter he leaves the Negro woman JEAN, to his son William he leaves the Negro man BOB...he divides up all his property and accounts receivable notes among his children. It is interesting to note on the back of these large pages are all his math calculations on figuring up his divisions. An interesting insight on family estate planning in the 1820's. Fine..........................................$175.00

317 - A BREAKDOWN OF PROPERTY FINALLY GIVEN TO HIS RELATIVES BY NATHANIAL KERR, 2 pages, 8" X 10" manuscript written for the attorney finalizing the division of his property, undated but manuscript appears to be late 1820's (Guilford County, NC)...William and Charlotte given to his widow along with horses and household goods, BOB is willed to William Kerr. A great deal of information is included satisfying the will of Nathanial Kerr, much math computations on the verso of the two distinct documents by the attorney. Both items...........................................$145.00

318 - THE HIRE OF THE NEGRO MAN RANDOLPH, Halifax County, VA. 4" X 8" on blue paper, manuscript promissory note dated January 6th, 1857 promising to pay $90 for the hire for the year 1857, the negro man RANDOLPH and the said Negro is to be furnished with the usual clothing..............................................$75.00

319 - HE WILL GIVE UP THE SLAVES, December 25th, 1858. One page letter from Nancy Hunt regarding her son JOHN stating that since he cannot come home as planned, he must give up his Negroes which had been given to him...he will give a deed of release to her for the slaves so she can have them outright or have her raise money through them---hire them out. Interesting content written in Virginia.......................................$89.00

326 - RECONSTRUCTION IN TEXAS, April 28th, 1867, Ellis County, TX. Four page letter in ink from H. Smart to ex-Confederate General Benjamin Hill of Tennessee dealing with his life on post-War Texas. He laments on having FREEDMEN (freed slaves) living on his Texas property and describes his attempt to grow cotton, but he says "tried to grow cotton, but my Freedmen proved a failure". More on his ranch and farming in Texas................................$75.00

327 - CONFEDERATE VIRGINIA HIRE OF A SLAVE, November 23rd, 1863. 3.5" X 6", receipt for the hire of the Negro boy SAM for $15 by E.H.H. Blick of the Petersburg, VA area. Brown ink on cream paper, very good............................................$60.00

329 - CONFEDERATE VIRGINIA LEDGER PAGES MENTIONING THE HIRE OF SLAVES, Two manuscript ledger pages 5" X 7", January - February, 1864 listing expenses including two mentions of expenses for slave hire. From Blick Family Archives near Petersburg, VA. Written on brown necessity paper (low quality due to a paper shortage). Very good....................$65.00

335 - A CHAPLAIN IN THE 1ST LOUISIANA VOL. IN CHARGE OF NEGROES, 10" X 20", pre-printed and filled-in pay voucher for Chaplain Samuel M. Kingston of the 1st Louisiana Vol. dated April 30th, 1863. His pay voucher signed for $236.60 with a large note on the voucher. "I certify that I saw the order detaching Chaplain S.M. Kingston, 1st Louisiana Vol. in charge of Negroes at Brashear City, LA." At that time, the 1st Louisiana was between Brashear City and Port Hudson, LA. Just before the main offensive move on that Confederate fortress, rare Chaplain's voucher who was put in charge of Negroes probably for fortification construction. Very fine..........................................$150.00

339 - A UNITED STATES COLORED TROOP OFFICER RECEIVES HIS PAY AND AN ALLOWANCE FOR HIS BLACK SERVANT, January 5th, 1856, 8" X 14". Pre-printed and filled-in voucher paying Lt. H.C. Burnett of the 115th United States Colored Troops and his "Negro servant H. Clay Boyd". Described as being yellow in complexion for services in December 1864. That Colored troop unit served on the attack on Petersburg and Richmond. Mint condition. Interesting to see black servants serving white officers in a colored troop unit...................................................SOLD

341 - EARLY RICHMOND, VA BILL OF SALE IN 1828, Richmond, VA, September 5th, 1828. 5.5" X 6.5" manuscript bill of sale for the Negro slave named JOHN for the sum of $210 and said slave was warranted to be healthy and sound. Quite an early bill of sale from Richmond, VA. Very fine................................................$185.00

346 - EXTREMELY RARE BLACK RELATED NEGRO LETTER SHEET, "Oh! Massa, Jeff dis Sesesh fever will kill de Nigger", Negro lying in a bed, grieving Negro woman behind, character of Jeff Davis dispensing medicine...4 page letter written from Thomas C. Supler, 42nd Ohio (Garfield regiment) describing his trip down the Scioto River in Ohio on the steamboat Piketon (on the steamboat rolls 1862-64) on his way with other troops southward towards the Big Sandy River. Written February 1862, he is about 15 miles from Plantville about 50 miles from Piketon. The river has risen and trees and logs are floating, but they may have to stop and wait for the river to go down for the safety of the boat...the rest of the soldiers are in another boat, says they will have a large force when they get to Piketon. The papers tell of great victories. Supler travelled with the 42nd to Vicksburg and then to Louisiana where he died in October, 1863. References show that 5 of these letter sheets are known (W-995). Extremely rare Negro caricature.............................................$350.00



348 - SLAVE CABINS IN LOUISIANA
, Stereo by Thomas Lilienthal of New Orleans. An excellent view of Negro cabins on a sugar plantation in Louisiana. Two rows of wooden cabins facing one another. Very fine..................
SOLD

349 - NEGROES PICKING COTTON, Stereo by Havens of Savannah, GA. Close up view of a Negro woman picking cotton and putting it into a sack. Orange mount, fine..................$125.00

350 - THE SLAVE TRADE, The slave trade between Africa and the Western Hemisphere flourished until the early 19th Century when many European countries outlawed slave commerce. Importation of slaves was prohibited in the United States after 1807 and slave traders such as Jim Bowie brought in slaves through Texas and through the thin net of Navy ships patrolling the US coast. The three artifacts below date from the early 19th Century and are relics from the slavery era. (a) button manufactured for the slave trader Thomas Porter who sold slaves in the Caribbean area during the turn of the 19th Century. This button originated in Antigua, British West Indies and was produced in London. The name Porter may have been a Anglo version of Porteous as there was a French family who ran slave ships in the 18th Century. There has been reports of these buttons being found off the Georgia coast and supposition is that these were worn by his slaves prior to sale. (b) striated Venetian glass beads imported for the slave trade in Africa during the late 18th and early 19th Century. These were particularly popular due to the colorful patterns in the glass. Similar beads have been excavated in New Orleans in "Congo Square" where the slaves were allowed to socialize on Sundays. (c) burned cotton taken from the wreck of the Confederate blockade runner "Nashville" which was sunk by the Union iron clad Montauk in 1863. This is definitely slave produced cotton on the way to England in exchange for arms for the Confederate government. Displayed in a 5"X7" Riker box...................................................................$95.00

352 - COTTON PICKING IN FULL BLAST, Stereo by Kilburn, Littleton, NH. Post-war card showing about six Negroes busily picking cotton. Very fine................................$58.00


360 - THE SLAVE BEADS OF WEST AFRICA, Millefiori, large colorful beads manufactured in Murano, Italy, 19th Century. Multi-colored strands of colorful glass from 1/2" to 3/4" in length make up these necklaces of 20". Specimens of these beads have been excavated in Southern sites where slaves habituated (New Orleans in particular). These beads have become known as "slave beads" as they were traded in West Africa. Stunning colors. Have three beautiful sets..............................................$100.00/each

THE EARLY SLAVE TRADE IN THE SOUTH

361 - NEW ORLEANS COURIER, ISSUE OF 1829-31, Large two page paper, English and French. Huge Slavery ads with vignette of runaway slave carrying clothes on a pole. These are the largest slave ad vignettes we have seen in Antebellum papers. These early New Orleans papers are very rare, printed in a period where French was spoken as common as English. We just have five issues for sale.......................................................$125.00/each


 

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