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Coins of The Ancient World

 

 COINS OF THE BIBLE

1000 - GAUL, Nemausus, Augustus, with Agrippa. 27 BC-AD 14. ∆ Dupondius (25mm, 12.30 g, 6h). Struck AD 10-14. Heads of Agrippa, wearing combined rostral crown and laurel wreath, and Augustus, laureate, back to back/Crocodile right, chained to palm frond with wreath at top; two palm fronds at base. RPC I 525; RIC I 159. Near VF, green patina. Succeeded Julius Caesar after numerous conflicts with his peers including Marc Anthony and the step father of Augustus. Agrippa was a close friend, son-in-law, and lieutenant to Augustus and was responsible for the construction of some of the most beautiful buildings in the history of Rome and for important military victories, most notably at the Battle of Actium against the forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra. As a result of these victories, Octavian became the first Roman Emperor, adopting the name of Augustus. Agrippa assisted Augustus in making Rome a city of marble and renovating aqueducts to give all Romans, from every social class, access to the highest quality public services. Augustus was emperor when Jesus was born.......................................................$195.00

1001 - AUGUSTUS, BC 27 - Died AD 14. ∆ Dupondius (23mm, 10.61 g, 7h). Rome mint. Struck under Tiberius, circa AD 22/3-30. Radiate head left/Altar. RIC I 81 (Tiberius). Very fine, warm brown surfaces. The reign of Augustus initiated an era of relative peace known as the Pax Romana (The Roman Peace). Despite continuous wars of imperial expansion on the Empire's frontiers and one year-long civil war over the imperial succession, the Roman world was largely free from large-scale conflict for more than two centuries. Augustus dramatically enlarged the Empire, annexing Egypt, Dalmatia, Pannonia, Noricum, and Raetia, expanded possessions in Africa, expanded into Germania, and completed the conquest of Hispania. Beyond the frontiers, he secured the Empire with a buffer region of client states, and made peace with the Parthian Empire through diplomacy. He reformed the Roman system of taxation, developed networks of roads with an official courier system, established a standing army, established the Praetorian Guard, created official police and fire-fighting services for Rome, and rebuilt much of the city during his reign. Emperor at the birth of Christ. Very fine............................$395.00

1002 - TIBERIUS, AD 14-37.∆ as (25mm, 9.97 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 36-27. Laureate head left/ Rudder; banded globe behind. RIC I 64. Ruler of the Roman Emperor during the life of Christ. Tiberius who succeeded Augustus, died in 37AD and Jesus ministry began around 29-30AD. It is possible that Tiberius heard about Jesus, although, since Jesus was executed as a common criminal, contrary to Roman law (since Pilate himself admitted he had done no crime worthy of death), Pilate may have wished to suppress knowledge of this event. It is doubtful whether each and every execution would have been reported to the emperor, since the Romans executed thousands in this manner. There were also a number of other rabbis and teachers in Jesus'time, as well as before and after Him. Since Jesus Himself made it clear that 'my kingdom is not of this world'. It is possible nothing was reported about Him. Certainly Tiberius would have been notified of anything significant. It is debatable whether Jesus would have interested the Romans from their perspective. The Bible states that Jesus did hold mup a coin with the portrait of the Emperor and tell his follows 'give what is due to the King and give what is due to God to God.'......................................................ON HOLD

1003 - CALIGULA AD 37-41, Bronze AS, Bust of Caligula facing to the left, Reverse: Seated figure of the Roman goddess Vesta seated left S.C. to either side. Very fine, nice green patina. While persecution of the Christians in Rome did not really begin until the rule of Nero, Caligula, who was mad, supported Agrippa in Judea who martyred St. James. One of the most cruelest of the 12 Caesars and was finally murdered. Fine..........................................$175.00

1004 - PONTIUS PILATE, AD 26-36AD, Judean Procurator under Tiberius, ∆ Prutah dated RY [31/32 AD, Lituus/date within wreath. Hendin 1343, very nice as these are all sand cast and always crude, Pontios PÓl„tos] was the fifth prefect of the Roman province of Judaea, from AD 26-36. He served under Emperor Tiberius, and is best known for presiding over the trial of Jesus and ordering his crucifixion. In all four gospel accounts, Pilate lobbies for Jesus to be spared his eventual fate of execution, and acquiesces only when the crowd refused to relent. He thus seeks to avoid personal responsibility for the death of Jesus. In the Gospel of Matthew, Pilate washes his hands to show that he was not responsible for the execution of Jesus and reluctantly sends him to his death. The Gospel of Mark, depicting Jesus as innocent of plotting against the Roman Empire portrays Pilate as reluctant to execute Jesus. In the Gospel of Luke, Pilate not only agrees that Jesus did not conspire against Rome, but Herod Antipas, the Tetrarch of Galilee, also finds nothing treasonable in Jesus' actions. In the Gospel of John, Pilate states "I find no guilt in him [Jesus]," and he asks the Jews if Jesus should be released from custody. For type very fine...........................................$150.00

1005 - PONTIUS PILATE, AD 26-36AD, Judean Procurator under Tiberius, ∆ Prutah, Hendon 1341, Simpulum/three grain ears very nice as these are all sand cast and always crude, Pontios PÓÓl„tos) was the fifth prefect of the Roman province of Judaea, from AD 26-36. He served under Emperor Tiberius, and is best known for presiding over the trial of Jesus and ordering his crucifixion. In all four gospel accounts, Pilate lobbies for Jesus to be spared his eventual fate of execution, and acquiesces only when the crowd refused to relent. He thus seeks to avoid personal responsibility for the death of Jesus. In the Gospel of Matthew, Pilate washes his hands to show that he was not responsible for the execution of Jesus and reluctantly sends him to his death. The Gospel of Mark, depicting Jesus as innocent of plotting against the Roman Empire, portrays Pilate as reluctant to execute Jesus. In the Gospel of Luke, Pilate not only agrees that Jesus did not conspire against Rome, but Herod Antipas, the Tetrarch of Galilee, also finds nothing treasonable in Jesus' actions. In the Gospel of John, Pilate states "I find no guilt in him [Jesus]," and he asks the Jews if Jesus should be released from custody. For type, Fine to very fine......................................................$135.00

1006 - AGRIPPA, AD 37-41, Bronze prutah, struck 41/42 AD, umbrella like canopy with fringe, three ears of barley between two leaves. Judean procurator under Caligula. St. James' death is about eleven years after the martyrdom of Stephen, probably about A.D. 41-42. Agrippa may have been motivated toward this persecution by zealous Pharisees (like Paul) who sought to suppress the Jews who taught that Jesus was resurrected from the dead. It even appears that the people of Jerusalem no longer support the Jewish Christians. Hendin 1343itherington makes this point: the city of Jerusalem has "turned against" the Jewish church (Acts, 386). Hendin #553. Fine.........................................................$60.00

1007 - NERO, AD 54-68. ∆ As (24mm, 6.68 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck circa AD 64. Radiate head right/Genius standing left, sacrificing from patera over lighted altar and holding cornucopia; I (mark of value) in exergue. RIC I 215; WCN 276. Very fine, green patina. The Apostle and first "Bishop of Rome," Peter, was imprisoned, tortured, and crucified in Rome in 64 CE under the Roman emperor, Nero. Some scholars set the date at October 13, 64 CE. The earliest documented mention of Peter's death is in a letter from Clement, bishop of Rome (AD 88-97), to the Corinthians. It is in "The Acts of Peter" (2nd Century CE), that we find the story of Peter being crucified upside-down, supposedly at Peter's request, because was "unworthy to die in the same manner as my Lord"........................................................$395.00

1008 - NERO, AD 54-68, Billion tetradrachm struck at Alexandria, Egypt. Bust of Nero with radiate crown, Rev: Bust of Apollo, Greek legends. Nice tone, very fine. BMC 144, the Apostle and first "Bishop of Rome", Peter, was imprisoned, tortured, and crucified in Rome in 64 CE under the Roman emperor, Nero. Some scholars set the date at October 13, 64 CE. The earliest documented mention of Peter's death is in a letter from Clement, bishop of Rome (AD 88-97), to the Corinthians. It is in "The Acts of Peter" (2nd Century CE), that we find the story of Peter being crucified upside-down, supposedly at Peter's request, because was "unworthy to die in the same manner as my Lord"..................................................$195.00

1009 - NERO, AD 54-68, Billion Tetradrachm, bust of Nero with radiate crown, Rev: the Greek God Serapis right, KON #170, nicely toned, struck at Alexandria, Egypt year LIA, The Apostle and first "Bishop of Rome", Peter, was imprisoned, tortured, and crucified in Rome in 64 CE under the Roman emperor, Nero. Some scholars set the date at October 13, 64 CE. The earliest documented mention of Peter's death is in a letter from Clement, bishop of Rome (AD 88-97), to the Corinthians. It is in "The Acts of Peter" (2nd Century CE), that we find the story of Peter being crucified upside-down, supposedly at Peter's request, because was "unworthy to die in the same manner as my Lord".......................................................................$195.00

1010 - DOMITIAN, AD 81-96, Bronze As, Bust of Domitian right, Reverse: Minerva standing holds a thunderbolt and spear, RIC [Titus 169]. The emperor Domitian, who was naturally inclined to cruelty, first slew his brother, and then raised the second persecution against the Christians. In his rage he put to death some of the Roman senators, some through malice; and others to confiscate their estates. He then commanded all the lineage of David be put to death. Amont the numerous martyrs that suffered during this persecution was Simeon, bishop of Jerusalem, who was crucified; and St. John, who was boiled in oil, and afterward banished to Patmos. Flavia, the daughter of a Roman senator, was likewise banished to Pontus; and a law was made, "That no Christian, once brought before the tribunal, should be exempted from punishment without renouncing his religion." A variety of fabricated tales were, during this reign, composed in order to injure the Christians. Such was the infatuation of the pagans, that, if famine, pestilence, or earthquakes afflicted any of the Roman provinces, it was laid upon the Christians. These persecutions among the Christians increased the number of informers and many, for the sake of gain, swore away the lives of the innocent. Another hardship was, that, when and Christians were brought before the magistrates, a test oath was proposed, when, if they refused to take it, death was pronounced against them; and if they confessed themselves Christians, the sentence was the same. Nice bold portrait of Domitian.........................................$145.00


1011 - VESPASIAN
, 69-79 AD, silver denarius, bust of Vespasian facing right, reverse female seated to left, slightly of center, nice portrait. It was during his reign that Jerusalem wasa destroyed by the Roman army under his son Titus. Vespasian was the first Roman Emperor to die of natural causes. Near fine...............................................
$49.00

1012 - CONSTANTINE THE GREAT, 306-337 AD, bronze follis, bust of Constantine, Rev: Genius standing. Nice portrait in mailed bust. Constantine is regarded as the first Christian Emperor. Constantine was the first emperor to stop Christian persecutions and to legalize Christianity along with all other religions and cults in the Roman Empire. In February 313, Constantine met with Licinius in Milan, where they developed the Edict of Milan. The edict stated that Christians should be allowed to follow the faith without oppression. This removed penalties for professing Christianity, under which many had been martyred previously, and returned confiscated Church property. The edict protected from religious persecution not only Christians but all religions, allowing anyone to worship whichever deity they chose. A similar edict had been issued in 311 by Galerius, then senior emperor of the Tetrarchy; Galerius' edict granted Christians the right to practice their religion but did not restore any property to them. The Edict of Milan included several clauses which stated that all confiscated churches would be returned as well as other provisions for previously persecuted Christians. Very fine, large flan.........................................$45.00, another very fine, some reverse green deposits from soil, sharp portrait

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