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The Civil War
Civil War Navy


5168 - CAPTAIN JOHN A. WINSLOW, CAPTAIN OF THE KEARSARGE, Rear Admiral John Ancrum Winslow (19 November 1811 - 29 September 1873) was an officer in the United States Navy during the Mexican-American War and the American Civil War. He was in command of the steam sloop of war USS Kearsarge during her historic 1864 action off Cherbourg, France with the Confederate sea raider CSS Alabama. His signature that he dates the day the Kearsarge sunk the Alabama off the French coast, June 19th, 1864. "Jn. A. Winslow Captain of the Kearsarge June 19th, 1864" in bold ink. Rare as such......................................................$325.00

5169 - ADMIRAL DAVID FARRAGUT, David Glasgow Farragut (July 5, 1801 - August 14, 1870) was a flag officer of the United States Navy during the American Civil War. He was the first Rear Admiral, Vice Admiral, and Admiral in the United States Navy. He is remembered in popular culture for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay (which he won), usually paraphrased as: "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!" by U.S. Navy tradition, previously led the attack on the forts below New Orleans, Gulf Blockading Squadron Commander, his signature, "D. G. Farragut Vice Admiral,"...........................................................$295.00

5170 - ADMIRAL JOHN DAHLGREN, John Adolphus Bernard Dahlgren (November 13, 1809 - July 12, 1870) was a United States Navy leader. He headed the Union Navy's ordnance department during the American Civil War and designed several different kinds of guns and cannons that were considered part of the reason the Union won the war. For these achievements, Dahlgren became known as the "father of American naval ordnance." He reached the rank of rear admiral. His signature on imprinted form "South Atlantic Squadron, Flag Ship Philadelphia, "J. Dahlgren R. Admiral, Commanding S. Atlantic Squadron, Charleston, March 29th, 1865.".........................................................$165.00

6013 - CAPTAIN PERCIVAL DRAYTON AUTOGRAPHED DOCUMENT, August 1st, 1865, 8" X 10". Printed orders for 2nd Class Engineer George P. Hunt to be detached from the USS "Octorora". Hunt had previously served on the USS "Metacoment" at the Battle of Mobile Bay where Drayton was one of Farragut's staff officers. This document was signed only three days before Drayton's death. Very fine.....................................................$125.00

6017 - GIDEON WELLES, SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, LINCOLN ADMINISTRATION AUTOGRAPH, Navy Department, August 23rd, 1861, appointment of George P. Hunt as 3rd Asst. Engineer assigned to the USS Rhode Island. 8" X 10" signed by Welles. Hunt later served on the "Metacomet" at Mobile Bay in 1864 and participated on the run past Fort Morgan with Farragut. Also signed on the verso by Commander Samuel Breese who had outstanding service in the Mexican War.................................................$150.00


3251 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET, East Port, Alabama, March 18th, 1865. Two page letter to his wife by John Haggerty and engineer on the USS Carondelet. He relates in part...he refers to family matters and states that he has sent $10 to her as well as a photo of the boat, states that he has sent letters to his two children and has not heard back from them. Family matters continues. John Haggerty. USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition...................$75.00

3254 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET, East Port, AL., April 24th, 1865. Four pages in ink to his wife by John Haggerty an engineer on the USS Carondelet. He relates in part...A gunboat came up with a convoy this morning with the mail aboard, there has been a problem with the mail as of late, the Rebels are about played out, any soldier or sailor who says anything about Abe Lincoln is punished severely...a still tongue makes a wise head...They will head to Mound City for repairs and will probably stay on the Mississippi River...John Haggerty...USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition............................................$125.00

3257 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET,  May 18th, 1865, off Paducah, KY. 4 pages in ink by John Haggerty to his wife. He relates in part...The largest mail has come today, there are five letters from you and a newspaper, I just had a photo taken for my sister ashore, he is tired of the scolding letters his wife Margaret has been sending, if you can't send peaceful letters send none! I feel bad enough about being away from home without these letters...John Haggerty. While most letters from home were loving during the war to soldiers, obviously his wife's letters were just the contrary. USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition...................$75.00

3258 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET, Off Paducah, KY, May 20th, 1865. 4 large pages in ink by John Haggerty an engineer on the USS Carondelet. He relates to his wife in part...Had Negroes scrubbing the engine room, states that the last letter he had received was the first one in a long time that made him happy as the previous scolding letters she had sent him made him near crazy being so far away from home, describes the activities on the ship, they do not drill anymore, there are boats loaded with Rebel soldiers bringing them home and he wonders when he will go home, he goes in details about her scolding letters in the past to him, more on family matters, John Haggerty. A good newsy letter giving insight that all letters from home during the war were not loving letter. USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition...................$85.00


7702 - ADMIRAL ANDREW FOOTE, Carte de Viste with no imprint but from life, full standing pose of Foote in uniform. When the American Civil War began in 1861, Foote quickly enlisted in the Union Navy. From 1861 to 1862, Foote commanded the Mississippi River Squadron with distinction, organizing and leading the gunboat Flotilla in the capture of Forts Henry, Donelson, and Island No. 10. He received the thanks of Congress for his actions at these three battles. Foote was wounded in action at Fort Donelson. Later in 1862, Foote was promoted to Rear Admiral. [3] In 1863, on his way to take command of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, he suddenly died. His untimely death in New York shocked the nation. [7] He was interred at Grove Street Cemetery in New Haven. Very fine...............$150.00

7703 - COMMANDER CHARLES WILKES, Carte de Viste by Black of Boston, waist up pose in uniform. On November 8, 1861, while commanding the USS San Jacinto in the Caribbean, Wilkes boarded the British mail steamer Trent and arrested James Mason and John Slidell, Confederate envoys enroute to England. His actions were clearly a violation of international law, and the "Trent Affair" aroused British indignation, but Wilkes was generally applauded in the North. He later commanded the James River Flotilla, the Potomac Flotilla, and the West Indian Squadron before being recalled in 1863 and court-martialed in April 1864 for insubordination and disobedience of orders. He was convicted and sentenced to a public reprimand and three year's suspension (later reduced to one year). Wilkes retired from the Navy in 1866. Sharp from life photo, light tone..........................................$150.00


The Correspondence of Engineer George P. Hunt, US Navy
In the Year 1864
"U.S.S. Metacomet"

Engineer George P. Hunt served in the US Navy from 1861-1887 on numerous ships. His tour on the "Metacomet" in 1864-1865 was highlighted by the action at Mobile Bay but between stations at Mobile his ship went on numerous cruises in search of blockade runners in the Gulf of Mexico. His letters are well written and extremely descriptive. Each letter comes with a copy photo of Hunt.


5270 - CHASING A BLOCKADE RUNNER OFF THE TEXAS COAST
, USS Metacomet, January 1st, 1864. 4 pages in ink by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part, have sent views from New Orleans and Key West, view of the fort and others...have left New Orleans to carry the monitor "Milwaukee" to Mobile, then we sailed down the coast (west) and hit a gale en route like a "north westerner" with bitter cold, vessel pitching and rolling with 2-3 feet of water on the deck, all hatches secured, impossible to stand on the deck without lashing yourself to something. During the gale, we spotted a schooner that might be a blockade runner but due to the heavy seas we did not dare to turn around and chase her, we were disappointed we let a prize go through our fingers however about 3 PM the winds and seas moderated and we turned to chase him and caught him. It was laden with sugar and coffee from Vera Cruz to New Orleans. But since it was 200 miles off course, the papers funny, the Captain condemned her (as a blockade runner), the prize would mean 1/3 of a years pay for Hunt. The capture happened about 85 miles from Galveston, TX. Describes having turkey aboard the past holidays, but some were so seasick they had to dine on "salt horse". A well written letter describing a blockade runner being captured................$250.00

5273 - THE NEAR DESTRUCTION OF THE METACOMET IN THE GULF OF MEXICO DURING BLOCKADE DUTY, USS Metacomet, Mississippi River, February 22nd, 1864. 4 page letter in ink by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates a story of near disaster, in part..."We have been at sea since 6 AM on the 18th and hit a gale that blew us for 38 hours. The second night the seas being so high and the "Metacomet" shallow and flat bottomed, we rolled like a tub and did not steer in the heavy sea, First one way than another way, sometimes sideways like a crab. Several engineers became sick and could not do their duty and could not be trusted with a watch so we had double duty. Had six hours on and six hours off no time really to eat or sleep. After two days, I came to the conclusion that they had played sick long enough and I insisted they take their watches separate from one another. We had set up a small sail to keep the vessel steady in the wind, but away went the masts overboard and then our rudder chains broke and we lay in a trough until we could rig another steering apparatus. Sometimes we were covered with 15-18' of water (waves). Leakage occurred due to the collision and 20" of water built up in the ship so pumps worked to rid the water from the ship. Last night we passed Forts St. Philip and Jackson (on the Mississippi) with the distance to New Orleans being 26 miles with a 5 knot current against us. Please excuse the writing as the vessel is shaking. A great letter dealing with the perils of sudden gales that occur in the Gulf......................................................$175.00

5275 - REBEL STEAMERS RUN THE BLOCKADE AT MOBILE, ONE GETS AGROUND, BUT WE CANNOT ATTACK IT, IF FARRAGUT WERE HERE IT WOULD BE DIFFERENT, Metacomet off Mobile, April 12th, 1864. 8 pages in ink, with stamped postal cover postmarked New Orleans, written by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part..."Your letter received has gotten me out of the blues. Yesterday two large steamers came on in right under our noses and both escaped. One Clyde built steamer, the other American made. The first a side-wheel steamer, double smokestacks and a little larger than the "Cumberland". They ran along the shore about 3/4 miles from the fort and became aground. We ran up to the flagship "Oneida" and asked permission to go up and shell her before the Confederates could get her off but we were told to go back to our station by the Senior Officer. We had to watch the Rebs bring up steamers and barges to lighten her and she got off by noon. There are 11 vessels now blockading here. The "Itasca", Pinola", "Oneida", "Ossippee", and another lying out to sea. The "Penguin", "Albatros", "Genesee" lay nearer the shore. The "Conemaugh" is in the Secesh Channel. He feels they are stationed in the main ship channel where nothing happens because they are on a black list. The "Pembina" and the "Seminole" lay below us. He remarks about better lookouts on several ships would have prevented the escape and forced them back out to sea. "We could have had a jolly good chase." At daylight, we saw a splendid American made steamer with double smokestacks, side wheels, about 1800-2000 tons, the "Austin" of Havana in the same Secesh channel about 1 1/2 miles from the fort aground. The flag officer would not let me do anything to prevent them from coming with their steamers to tow her off. She got off safe in the afternoon. There are about 40 steamers laying in Nassau waiting to run the blockade. It is provocative to say that if Farragut was here something would have been done. Little is being done to prevent them from running in her. The Rebs may want a few more English rifles and cannon, a few more Whitworth rifles or Brook's cannon which may be mounted in Fort Morgan to greet our ironclads. Says Farragut is in New Orleans. Expects a few more steamers to try to run the blockade when the moon goes down around 1 AM. A great letter regarding blockade running into Mobile just as the fleet was gathering for an attack on the forts.....................................................$350.00

5277 - BLOCKADE RUNNERS GET IN AGAIN, SENT OUT BOATS TO SCOUT THE REBEL FLEET, THE TENNESSEE AND BALTIC LAY AWAITING OUR FLEET BUT THEY MAY ATTACK FIRST, May 21st, 1864, Saturday night [off Mobile], 12 pages in ink by Engineer George P. Hunt on board the USS Metacomet. He relates in part, He has lost a trusted friend McMurray in the "Chenango Affair" who was a 2nd Engineer. He feels that they are being "Blacklisted" doing too much or too little, then overlooked by the authorities. In our case were posted in a very dangerous place and as a gale approached our Captain concluded to enter the sound as the barometer fell rapidly. Captain Jenkins of the "Richmond" sent a boat in after us and gave us the most disagreeable station for 21 days. Close attention needs to be paid to our boilers. News of Grant near Richmond. Last Saturday, a steamer ran out successfully but discovered by our picket boat. But we had problems with signals and she escaped. The "Itasca" lay close to the shore and it was to intercept her and drive her back out in the channel as they always run in close to shore. The "Itasca" got her cable caught on her propeller and signaled "Assistance I need". But at the same time one boat signaled red & white instead of white and red. The confusion allowed the steamer to escape safe while we all attached her running out. The Admiral [Farragut] just arrived on the "Hartford". We go to Pensacola for a few days for coaling. Everyone is scared here about the rebel rams. A deserter came in and reported that they were going to attack our fleet with two gunboats and two rams. Sunday, describes fishing trip nearby where they caught over 600 fish snapper and catfish, most 12-13 pounds fish but some up to 60 pounds with our lines. We also caught a 1000 pound shark and when opened it had several cats and dogs inside! The shark struck one man on deck with his tail and he went head over heels. We are laying now facing Fort Morgan and we can see Fort Gaines and Powell. I believe they are evacuating Fort Powell and laying obstruction in the channel. Reports say there are about 6 miles of batteries after passing Fort Morgan and 50 torpedoes; there was a great storm the other night as we almost lost the picket boats as the rolling seas made it difficult to come along side of us. To remain out would have resulted in being driven to shore and captured as the shore is lined with cavalry scouts watching for blockage runners. We succeeded in picking them up but one man suffered a broken leg getting out of a boat. We sent a boat to Dauphin Isle to watch the Bay for rams and ironclads. They saw two, the "Tennessee" and the "Baltic" ironclad rams and the "Selma" and the "Gaines: gunboats." Captain Leroy has made over $100,000 on a prize the "Desoto" captured. I suppose he does not care much for attacking them now. An excellent letter on the affairs in Mobile Bay in late May where blockade runners still came into Mobile quite easily much to the chagrin of Hunt and his ship seeming being out of the action for one reason or another on a "blacklist"...............................................$395.00

5279 - THE METACOMET CAPTURES THE CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUNNER DONEGEL, Metacomet, off Mobile, June 26th, 1864. 4 pages in ink to Miss Earnes by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...He has just returned from Pensacola [coaling] and he thanks her for the copy of the Proclamation [Emancipation Proclamation]. By now you will have learned of the capture of the "Donegal" [blockade runner by the Metacomet], hopefully we will be successful in getting some more out of the sea. The "Denbigh" ran out after the capture of the "Donegal", some said the "Metacomet" was on a wild goose chase but the "D" was the fastest blockade runner which we caught now they feel that they must watch for us. The next night we discovered the "Denbigh" running in close to shore and we drove her out to sea but it ran through our mist and escaped. The captain of the "Donegal" had ran the "Oreto" [old name for the "Florida"] in and out of Mobile and also headed the party who captured the "Fly Boston" and ran her into Mobile a short time ago. He is now in Fort Pickens and he has tried to bribe them into letting him escape. He said that there was a large amount of gold and silver on the "Donegal" and that was the richest prize yet captured. Two of our officers went to see him to try and find out something. I sent a box of cigars back on the "Union", the only thing I got off that ship. Describes the horrible hospital in Pensacola, common sea rations, no ice, no fruit, no attendants except one nigger boy, about 15 officers there suffering from diarrhea and dysentery, chills and fever. They are tormented to death by and fleas and mosquitoes at night. Some have been there for two years. I visited the hospital and decided I would rather stay on board my ship. [Page 5 is small 3" X 4" blue paper written on both sides where he adds], Tuesday night. A lively time, we stood for the Flagship "Hartford" after maneuvering the fleet again and firing at targets. The Admiral and his staff came aboard as he wanted a good at the Rebel fleet started underway so we ran closed and rounded the fort. There most formidable craft is kind half like the "Atlanta" and half "Merrimac" built as ram. Three guns on either side, the one aft is heavy English gun. The Rebs are at a loss to make of our affair. An excellent letter describing the capture of a blockade runner and after a closer look at the "Tennessee" gives a vivid description of the Confederate ram................................................$395.00

5289 - THEY ARE WAITING FOR THE BLOCKADE RUNNER, DENBIGH, Key West [Florida], November 29th [1864]. Two pages letter in ink from Engineer George P. Hunt of the USS Metacomet. He relates in part, We just arrived after a stormy night and leave in the morning for Havana in wait for the "Denbigh" [blockade runner] that is expected from Galveston, will not know when he will be able to write again as he does not know if he will go with the next prize steamer [he hopes to be sent north with the next captured blockade runner they catch]. If you see anything about the old "Metacomet" boys save it for me, asks that Miss Eames send some candy for him to friends as he has not time to go ashore. Hunt's ship was laying in wait for the blockade runner Denbigh that was known to be heading for Havana from Galveston. The Denbigh that was known to be heading for Havana from Galveston. The Denbigh was run aground on Bird Key, Galveston Bay on May 25th, 1865 and burned by Union blockaders the next morning. Comes with a stamped envelope addressed to Miss C [Cornelia] Eames in Brooklyn, NY. A well written letter by Hunt...................................................$195.00

5292 - ANCHORED OFF THE TEXAS COAST, LOW ON COAL, BLOCKADE RUNNERS LEAVING GALVESTON, Sabine Pass, TX, January 31st, 1865 [aboard the Metacomet]. 4 pages in ink to Miss Eames from Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...The Admiral passes here on his return from the Rio Grande. The mail boat has just brought papers with the news of the capture of Fort Fisher, good for Porter but Butler has gotten himself in dispute. Wishes he could have been at that spot and seen the grand fleet [the one that captured Fort Fisher]. It seems that our luck has played out. We went to Galveston for coal but due to high seas we could not get any and do not have enough to get to New Orleans. When we left Galveston looking for coal there were a number of steamers there ready to run out, one a large cotton steamer laying by the city. He wants to be examined for the upgrade rank of first engineer but fears he may have to wait until he goes north. Word is that the "double enders" may return north. He does not want to leave the "Metacomet" now as everything is working to his satisfaction [engines]. He states that he did not see any ladies in New Orleans well enough to give them his card. I hope to write you some good news from the Campechy Banks, noted on February they are still in anchor at Sabine Pass. The "Metacomet" is awaiting coal in Sabine Pass while the blockade runners apparently are moving out of Galveston with cotton. He hopes to be off the Texas-Mexican coast soon ready to intercept one bound for Havana...Letter comes with a stamped cover postmarked NEW ORLEANS Feb. 6th, '65.....................................................$195.00

5293 - THE METACOMET CAPTURES TWO BLOCKADE RUNNERS, OTHERS ESCAPE FROM GALVESTON, THE REBELS AT MOBILE SEND OUT TORPEDO BOATS, BUILDING UP THE FORTIFICATIONS FOR THE EXPECTED ATTACK, Steamer "Metacomet", Mobile Bay, February 26th, 1865. 10 1/2 pages in ink to Miss Eames by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...We are back anchored near the city [Mobile] and the prospects of a fight or an evacuation as good as months ago. Mentions a fellow friend and sailor who were in a naval fight in an ironclad that burst a gun. I must tell you of our late capture of the "Lily" [not Lily of the Valley] and the "Sea Witch". We captured the "Lily" lying off Galveston waiting for night. She had "gunny bags" and salt and we took her to Sabine Pass. We have sent the "Sea Witch" to New Orleans. Steamers are running in and out of Galveston when they choose. Two nights before we arrived at Galveston two ran out, one got aground but got off. When we got to Galveston, we received orders to return to New Orleans. We traveled with the "Bienville" who was also returning for repair to New Orleans. The officers of the "Bienville" did not think we could keep up with them. We left for New Orleans and soon were 3 1/2 miles ahead of the "B" when we saw two schooners 10 miles distant and on out course. We chased them and "spake" both [hailed both] while the "Bienville" kept on her way. But by the next day we caught up with her as we crossed the bar and beat the "Bienville" to the city of New Orleans. The "Sciota" has just arrived with news that several Mississippi steamers have brought troops from New Orleans [to Mobile] but I do not think an attack is probable. Queried the Chief Engineer about his pending examination and was told to ask for a weeks leave to take it, news from Charleston that the Rebels have evacuated the city. Everybody here has torpedoes on the brain.  The Rebs have two torpedo boats ready to come out and blow somebody up. They rammed the "Octorara" the other night but the torpedo did not explode. Small pox was very prevalent in New Orleans and now has shown up among out troops in Fort Morgan. We have a great many troops there preparing for an attack. General Granger has gone to New Orleans and Rear Admiral Thatcher is in command of the squadron. General Thomas is approaching Montgomery in route for Mobile. I suspect when he gets closer we will have an attack. Sherman has done well and the loss of Charleston is a severe blow to the Confederacy. He does not understand why it is taking so long to attack Mobile or Galveston. He feels that it could be taken with less a force than needed to blockade the cities. Gives details on the sale of the cotton and the blockade runner "Susana" and feels both sold too cheap. Confederate prisoners have been put to work on the fortifications and General Granger has returned. The Confederates had put our men [prisoners] at work on their fortifications so we did the same. A steamer blew up after leaving New Orleans but no appearance of a Rebel attack. The Rebs are receiving reinforcements and building batteries in range of where we lay now. A well detailed letter mentioning the capture of two blockade runners off Galveston, new of the Rebels at Mobile still being aggressive with their torpedo boats, fortifying their position at Mobile for the impending Union attack, comes with a stamped cover postmarked NEW ORLEANS. A well written letter by Hunt.................................................$395.00

5297 - THE ASSASSINATION OF LINCOLN NEWS REACHED MOBILE, RARE COMMENTS ABOUT REPRISALS AGAINST COPPERHEADS AND SECESSIONISTS WHO CHEER LINCOLN'S DEATH, THE DESTRUCTION OF THE CSS WEBB BELOW NEW ORLEANS, USS "Metacomet", May 1st, 1865, Mobile Bay. 12 page letter in ink to Miss Eames from Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...He writes about the surrender of Mobile and thanks her for the papers that she sent on the Capture of Richmond. We fired a salute of 100 guns on the glorious news. He mentioned the Admiral returning from Pensacola with the dreadful news for Washington [Assassination of Lincoln]. On the ship only one man rejoiced at the nation's calamity and if it was not for the Provost Marshal he would have been tied to a lamp post [hung]. General Banks came down on a steamer from Cairo to New Orleans and he made a speech at Baton Rouge and an Illinois Copperhead shouted at him that it was good news [Lincoln's death] he fell dead pierced by 15 bullets. In New Orleans, the same thing occurred when five secessionists or copperheads shouted it was good that the "rail splitter" was dead and the Colored troops would have to return to their masters and the Colored troops shot them. I did not believe the first reports but at last came the confirmation of the assassination of the President but also the brutal murder of Secretary Seward. Who shall be found to take their places? One account says he is still alive. He lauds the diplomatic skills of Seward during the war. Nothing is said who are the assassins but he believes they will be found and this will unite the north. I don't know much about the abilities of Johnson as President but Lincoln seemed to have every confidence in him. If the copperheads had anything to do with this no mercy should be shown to them. President Lincoln has won for himself a name that will exist forever whether a Republican or Liberal Government shall endure. He was simple, warm hearted, honest, and generous to a fault. This Republican President has been cut down in the midst of his glory where can we find a fit successor? The Union will live but oh had he lived enough to have realized the success of his great mission. What the policy of President Johnson towards the rebellious states the leaders will find top their cost that the tenderness of Abraham Lincoln forms no part of Andrew Johnson's character. May 5th [1865], He thanks her for all the papers received. The news has arrived of the arrest of some of the conspirators and the shooting of Booth. He should have been taken alive as his punishment was too light. There is news of the surrender of Dick Taylor; we leave here in a few days on the flagship of Admiral Thatcher for Galveston. Discusses going ashore in Mobile and Pensacola. Wants to take his exam on advancement. News has arrived of the capture of Jefferson Davis at Raleigh. News or rumors persist that General Canby will head for Mexico with 50,000 troops. He describes the destruction of the Rebel ram "Webb" below New Orleans. The "Webb" was bottled up on the Red River and escaped two steamers, the monitor "Manhattan" and "Tennessee" and headed down the Mississippi with over 300 bales of cotton aboard commanded by Lt. Reed of some notoriety [Tacony & Chesapeake fame]. They were trying to run the blockade. The telegraph wires were cut from the Red River and no one in New Orleans knew she was coming but 15 minutes before she passed the gunboats. They fired but she did not return fire. Our shots struck in the city and in Algiers across the river. The tugboat "Hollybock" started after her firing at her, the telegraph wires were cut also below the city. She would have made it to sea but fortunately the "Richmond" had left here the day before and was steaming up the river, and seeing the chase, stopped and rolled out her 11 nine inch guns and waited until she could deliver a broadside that would have sunk her but they instead ran her ashore. Some ran off in the swamp, others set her afire but they caught most of them. The vessel was burnt up. So much for the ram "Webb". A wonderful descriptive letter of the after effects of the Assassination of Lincoln in the South and the feelings Hunt had for the slain President. Much more on Hunt's activities as an engineer on the "Metacomet", and a nice account of one of the last naval encounters on the Mississippi River being the destruction of the "Webb" by the "Richmond"...........................................$595.00

5298 - SORROW AT THE DEATH OF LINCOLN, WISHED HE COULD BE AT THE FUNERAL IN NEW YORK, Sunday night 7:30, [May 8th, 1865]. Two page letter to Miss Eames from Engineer George P. Hunt of the USS Metacomet. He relates to her...I did not go ashore today [in Mobile] but the Captain and officers have been in the city for a week. I have been reading your papers [newspapers that related to the funeral of Lincoln in New York], he wished he could have been in New York as it must have been a mournful sight. I would have given almost anything for the privilege to have seen him one more time [Lincoln]. It is gratifying to see that the country has so well appreciated the man and to show so much sympathy for his loss, who would have thought that three years ago. He asks her to buy him a good photograph of him. He is very specific for her not to rush and buy any photo but to take her time and select a really good one. Mentions that the steamer "Glascoe" being the mail steamer has sunk and the cause is not known. An interesting letter regarding the funeral of Lincoln in New York, comes with a cover dated May 8th [1865].................$200.00

6000 - NAVAL POLITICS IN MOBILE, HIS CAPTAIN WAS CLEARED OF CHARGES IN A COURT MARTIAL BUT IS ON THE BLACK LIST, "Metacomet" Mobile, AL, June 24th, 1865. Four page letter in ink to Miss Eames by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...Boats are going north but not the "Metacomet". His Captain seems to be afraid to come north afraid to face what his next assignment will be as he faced charges at a court martial which were not sustained and he will be on the "black list". Mentions an incident where he almost caused a tip over of a boat that carried the Admiral [Thatcher]. The Captain pleaded sickness as the cause of my actions. I hope I do not see the Gulf for 7-8 years as the heat is terrible as well as the mosquitoes. The 4th of July will soon be here and I shall be in Mobile. We shall fire a salute for the Admiral and Jeff Davis is down. He encloses a Confederate bill for Johnny. Hunt is about to conclude his tour of duty at the Mobile station and gives more insight his Captain is unpopular with the local naval authorities have made it through a court martial. Comes with a nice MOBILE postmarked stamped cover................................................$165.00

6001 - ENGINEER HUNT IS TRANSFERRED TO THE OCTORARO AND WILL BE GOING HOME, "OCTORARO", Mobile, AL, June 28th, 1865. One page letter in ink to Miss Eames from Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates...Not to write to him again until she hears from him as he has joined the "Octoraro" today and she is expected to go north soon. I applied to go north on a ship and yesterday I received the unexpected news of this new assignment. He is hearing rumors about going home and he hopes to arrive home safe and if he does so he will consider himself very lucky. Comes with a nice MOBILE postmarked stamped cover. The "Octoraro" was another ship that had been in Mobile in Farragut's Fleet..................$100.00


6004 - THE JUANITA, Ossippee Class screw steam sloop, commissioned 1862, searched for the CSS Tallahassee, attacked Fort Fisher twice, captured several Confederate blockade runners (5). A 3" X 4" photo taken of the "Juanita" after the war as so noted......................................................$295.00

ADMIRAL DANIEL AMMEN, In 1861-62, he commanded the gunboat Seneca in the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. His bravery was conspicuous in the Battle of Port Royal, November 7, 1861. Later, under Samuel F. Dupont's command, he took part in all the operations on the coasts of Georgia and Florida. In the engagements with Fort McAllister, March 3, 1863, and with Fort Sumter, April 7, 1863, he commanded the monitor Patapsco. In the attacks on Fort Fischer, in December 1864, and January 1865, he was commissioned captain of the Mohican July 26, 1866. He was promoted to Rear Admiral in 1877, and was retired June 4, 1878.

6005 - AUTOGRAPH DOCUMENT SIGNED BY ADMIRAL DANIEL AMMEN, July 12th, 1876, 8" X 14", pre-printed and filled in documents assigning Engineer George P. Hunt on the USS Wyandotte. Also signed by Commander L. Blakeley Creighton, Hunt was on the USS Metacomet during the attack on Mobile Bay on August 5th, 1864. Very fine. Two Civil War Naval autographs...........................................$75.00

6006 - AUTOGRAPH DOCUMENT SIGNED BY ADMIRAL DANIEL AMMEN, April 20th, 1876, Washington, 8" X 14", pre-printed and filled in document detailing Engineer George P. Hunt to the USS Wyandotte in place of another Engineer. Also signed by Commander T.H. Stevens. Hunt served on the Metacomet during the attack on Mobile in August 1864. Very fine.........................................$75.00

6007 - AUTOGRAPH DOCUMENT SIGNED BY ADMIRAL DANIEL AMMEN, April 20th, 1876, Washington, 8" X 14", pre-printed and filled in document detailing Engineer George P. Hunt to the USS Wyandotte in place of another Engineer. Also signed by Commander T.H. Stevens. Hunt served on the Metacomet during the attack on Mobile in August 1864. Very fine..........................................$75.00

6008 - AUTOGRAPH DOCUMENT SIGNED BY ADMIRAL DANIEL AMMEN, February 4th, 1875 signed by Ammen informing Engineer George P. Hunt to report for permanent assignment on the USS "Tennessee", Hunt had served throughout the Civil War in the Navy and took part in the attack on Mobile in August 1864 on the USS "Metacomet". Very fine....................$75.00

6009 - AUTOGRAPH DOCUMENT SIGNED BY ADMIRAL DANIEL AMMEN, December 22nd, 1875, one page letter 8" X 10" signed by Ammen informing Engineer George P. Hunt that he is awaiting orders from the date he arrives home. Hunt had served throughout the Civil War and participated on the attack of Mobile in August 1864 on the USS "Metacomet". Very fine...........................................$75.00

6010 - AUTOGRAPH DOCUMENT SIGNED BY ADMIRAL DANIEL AMMEN, February 23rd, 1877. Admiral Ammen grants a leave of 30 days to Engineer George Hunt who had been serving on the USS "Tennessee". Hunt had served throughout the Civil War in the Navy and last served in that war on the USS "Metacomet": which took place in the attack on Mobile in August 1864. Very fine...................................................$75.00

6011 - ADMIRAL CHARLES STEEDMAN AND COMMANDER W.D. WHITING, 8" X 10", letter March 1st, 1871, Navy Yard at Boston, ordering Engineer George P. Hunt to duty on the "Worchester". Steedman and Whiting had extensive Civil War careers. Steedman, captained several ships including the Ticonderoga, and Whiting was a Lt. Commander later a Commodore. Hunt had served throughout the Civil War and was on the USS "Metacomet" at the Battle of Mobile Bay. Steedman signs this document twice and Whiting once. Very fine........................................................$65.00

6012 - ADMIRAL CHARLES STEEDMAND AND COMMANDER W.D. WHITING, 8" X 14", letter July 24th, 1871, ordering Engineer George P. Hunt to duty and to report to Rear Admiral Steedman at Boston. Steedman and Whiting had extensive Civil War careers. Steedmen captained several ships including the "Ticonderoga", and Whiting was a Lt. Commander later a Commodore. Hunt had served throughout the Civil War and was on the USS "Metacomet" at the Battle of Mobile Bay. Steedman signs this document twice and Whiting once. Very fine...............................................$65.00

PERCIVAL DRAYTON, In the fall of 1861, Commander Drayton was placed in command of the gunboat Pocahontas, in which he participated in the capture of Port Royal, South Carolina. His brother Thomas F. Drayton, a graduate of West Point and classmate of Jefferson Davis, was a general of the Confederate army and commanded the forts destroyed in this engagement. Percival Drayton became commanding officer of the sloop of war Pawnee and was active in inshore operations in the waters of South Carolina, Georgia and northern Florida through the summer of 1862. He was promoted to Captain in July of that year. In September 1862, he was given command of the ironclad Passaic, overseeing her outfitting and working with John Ericsson to improve elements of monitor design. Drayton commanded his ship in attacks on Forts McAllister and Sumter in March and April 1863, experiences that reinforced his opinion concerning the limitations of the monitor type when fighting against well-defended fortifications. Captain Drayton's next assignment was a Superintendent of Ordnance at the New York Navy Yard. In December 1863, he began a year as Fleet Captain to the commander of the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, Rear Admiral David Glasgow Farragut. Also commanding the squadron flagship, the big sloop of war Hartford, he took part in the August 1864 Battle of Mobile Bay and the following operations within Mobile Bay. Appointed Chief of the Bureau of Navigation in late April 1865, Drayton was taken sick and died at Washington DC on 4 August 1865.  

6013 - CAPTAIN PERCIVAL DRAYTON AUTOGRAPHED DOCUMENT, August 1st, 1865, 8" X 10". Printed orders for 2nd Class Engineer George P. Hunt to be detached from the USS 'Octorora". Hunt had previously served on the USS "Metacomet" at the Battle of Mobile Bay where Drayton was one of Farragut's staff officers. This document was signed only three days before Drayton's death. Very fine.............................................$125.00

ADMIRAL R.W. MEADE, He was commissioned a Lieutenant, U.S.N, 1858 and was assigned to duty as an ordnance instructor to the receiving ship USS Ohio, Boston, 1861. He was promoted ot Lieutenant Commander in 1862, and was in command of the ship USS Louisville on the Mississippi River, 1862; head of the Steamship Department, Naval Academy, 1865-68; commissioned Commander, 1868; prepared Manual of the Boat Exercises of the Naval Academy, 1868; promoted to Captain, 1880; Commandant, Washington Navy Yard, 1887-90; promoted to Commodore, 1892; Naval Representative at the World Columbian Exposition, Chicago; promoted to Rear Admiral, 1894, in command of the North Atlantic Squadron.

6014 - AUTOGRAPH OF ADMIRAL R.W. MEADE, Navy Dept. letterhead Washington, 1883, 8" X 10" orders to report for Special Assignment on the "Experimental Board", George P. Hunt, Engineer. Hunt participated in The Battle of Mobile Bay in 1864 on the "USS Metacomet"......................................................$75.00

REAR ADMIRAL CHARLES H. BELL, (August 15, 1798 - February 19, 1875) was an officer in the United States Navy who served during the War of 1812, the First Barbary War, and the American Civil War. Born in New York, Bell served as a midshipman on Lake Ontario. Later, Bell served on the Macedonian, under the command of Stephen Decatur, against Algiers. In 1839, the Brig. Dolphin, under his command, ascended an African river and compelled a native chief to pay for goods that had been taken from a U.S. vessel. In the 1840's, he commanded U.S. Navy ships in the suppression of the slave trade. He captured three slavers off the African coast, one of them transporting more than 900 slaves. His commands included the Constellation in 1855, and the Norfolk Naval Shipyard from 30 April 1859 to 1 August 1860. At the beginning of the Civil War he was in command of the Mediterranean Squadron of the U.S. Navy, but he received command of the Pacific Squadron in 1861, which he held for three years. He was promoted to commodore on July 16, 1862, and in 1864 was transferred to the command of ships serving on the James River in Virginia. He was promoted to Rear Admiral on July 25, 1866. He retired in 1868 after serving for three years as Commander of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. He died in New Brunswick, New Jersey in 1875.

6015 - AUTOGRAPH OF REAR ADMIRAL CHARLES H. BELL, Navy Dept. Letterhead, August 18th, 1866. Appointment of Engineer George P. Hunt as 1st Asst. Engineer in the US Navy being appointed by the President and approved by the Senate. Hunt had previously served on the "Metacomet" at the Battle of Mobile Bay under Farragut, printed signature of Gideon Welles...............................................$85.00

JOHN RODGERS, was promoted to Captain 16 July 1862 and took command of the ironclad monitor Weehawken. After successfully navigating her from Brooklyn to Charleston through the same storm that sank the USS Monitor, he distinguished himself during the attack on Fort Sumter in May 1863, and in capturing the Confederate ram Atlanta on June 17, 1863. The latter service won him the Thanks of Congress and promotion to Commodore. Unfortunately, this was his last active service in the Civil War. After recovering from an illness, he took command of the ironclad monitor Dictator. Design and construction problems with that vessel kept him occupied for the remainder of the war, though he earnestly desired a more active post.

6016 - AUTOGRAPH OF COMMANDER JOHN RODGERS, Bureau of Navigation, May 29th, 1869. 8" X 13" orders for George P. Hunt to report to Commander John Rodgers at Boston, MA. Hunt has previously served on the USS "Metacomet" at Mobile Bay. Uncommon autograph...........................................$85.00

6017 - GIDEON WELLES, SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, LINCOLN ADMINISTRATION AUTOGRAPH, Navy Department, August 23rd, 1861, appointment of George P. Hunt as 3rd Asst. Engineer assigned to the USS Rhode Island. 8" X 10" signed by Welles. Hunt later served on the "Metacomet" at Mobile Bay in 1864 and participated on the run past Fort Morgan with Farragut. Also signed on the verso by Commander Samuel Breese who had outstanding service in the Mexican War...................................$150.00

2025 - NAVAL LETTER AND SAILOR'S WALLET, Letter written by William H. Allen from the USS Tritonia at Mobile on October 26th, 1865. Four pages in ink from Allen who was 3rd Asst. Engineer (1864) to his mother discussing two model boats he had completed but had broke the model of the gunboat...he describes the "Bark" he had completed and was sending it home with a Navy revolver. He instructs his Mother how to finish off the rigging with a sharp scissors and to inquire as to having carriage painter paint the boat. He gives specific instructions as to the painted required as well as emblems to be added. The Tritonia had been in the West Gulf Blocking fleet and was guarding the rivers and outlets for marauders who were along the coast just after the war ended. The letter comes with Allen's large fold over leather wallet with an old note "This wallet belonged to William H. Allen at the time he was in the Civil War on Farragut's flagship." HARTFORD. Allen had served on the Hartford during the Mobile Campaign. Interesting letter and accompanying wallet with cover postmarked MOBILE. 3 items......................................................$295.00

5290 - ADMIRALS PEIRCE CROSBY AND HENRY THATCHER, West Blockading Squadron, Flag Ship Estrella off Mobile, June 26th, 1865. 8" X 10", partly printed and filled in transfer of 2nd Engineer George P. Hunt from the "Metacomet" to the USS "Octarara". Thatcher was acting Rear Admiral when Farragut was absent from the fleet and was in command of naval actions capturing Mobile a few months before. Crosby was in command of the "Metacomet" at that time. Two important figures in Civil War Naval history. Very fine.........................................................$225.00

ADMIRAL PEIRCE CROSBY (16 January 1824 - 15 June 1899) was an Admiral in the United States Navy, whose active duty career included service in the Mexican-American War and the Civil War. During April - October 1861, as the Civil War ran through its first half year, Crosby served in the sloop of war Cumberland and briefly commanded the new gunboat Pembina. He went to the Gulf of Mexico as Commanding Officer of the gunboat Pinola at the beginning of 1862. In Pinola, assisted by Itaska, he broke the chain barrier across the Mississippi to make possible the passage upriver of Flag Officer David Farragut's squadron, and the capture of New Orleans. For two years beginning in November 1862, Crosby helped enforce the blockade of the Confederacy's East Coast as Commanding Officer of the steamers Sangamon, Florida, and Keystone State, and as Fleet Captain of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. He finished the war in the Gulf, commanding the gunboat Metacomet, and took part in clearing mines from Mobile Bay.

ADMIRAL HENRY KNOX THATCHER, From September 1863 until January 1865, Thatcher served with the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, then became commander of the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, directing the successful effort to capture Mobile, AL in the weeks preceding the war's end in April 1865. He remained in command in the Gulf of Mexico until May 1866, then as a Rear Admiral was placed in command of the North Pacific Squadron. Though officially retired in May 1868, when he reached the age of 62. Thatcher served as Port Admiral at Portsmouth, NH in 1869-1870. Rear Admiral Henry K. Thatcher died at Boston, MA on 5 April 1880.

5291 - GIDEON WELLES, Letter dated July 30th, 1861 and signed by Gideon Welles, Lincoln's Secretary of the Navy appointed George P. Hunt as 3rd Asst. Engineer on the USS Rhode Island. 2 pages 7" X 9", docketed on the verso by Commander Samuel Breese, who had an outstanding naval record especially in the Mexican War. Hunt later served on the USS Metacomet at Mobile Bay..........................................$150.00

5293 - GIDEON WELLES, Printed form letter, 8" X 10", June 1st, 1861. Orders to report immediately to Captain Samuel Breese for examination for the position of Engineer in the US Navy. Hunt later served on the "Metacomet" at Mobile Bay. Docketed by Commander Samuel Breese who had a distinguished naval career especially in the Mexican War. Very fine............................................................$150.00

5294 - GIDEON WELLES AND ADMIRAL HIRAM PAULDING, October 29th, 1862, 8" X 10" letter signed by Gideon Welles on the front and docketed by Paulding on the verso detaching 3rd Asst. Engineer George P. Hunt from the "Dakota" and giving him a medical leave of absence. Hunt had just completed a tour in the Gulf Blockade Squadron and had taken ill at Key West. Welles with the Secretary of the Navy and Paulding was a navy veteran from the War of 1812 through the Mexican War. Very fine......................................$165.00

5295 - GIDEON WELLES AND COMMANDER WILLIAM RADFORD OF THE CUMBERLAND, December 1st, 1862, 8" X 10" printed Navy Department form filled in ordering Engineer George P. Hunt to assist in boiler experiments in the Navy yard in New York. Signed by Welles as Secretary of the Navy and Commander William Radford. Radford was born in Fincastle, VA and entered the U. S. Navy during 1825. He commanded the landing party from Warren which captured the Mexican warship Malek Adhel at Mazatlan and took part in other Pacific coast operations of the Mexican War. During the Civil War, he commanded the ill-fated Cumberland but was on board the frigate Roanoke as a member of a Court of enquiry when his ship was attacked by the Confederate casemate ram Virginia. Captain Radford subsequently commanded the armored ship New Ironsides during Union attacks on Fort Fisher in December 1864 and in January 1865. Promoted Rear Admiral in 1866, he commanded the European squadron during 1869 and 1870. Rear Admiral Radford died at Washington, DC. Engineer Hunt later served at Mobile Bay on the Metacomet.....................................$195.00

5296 - GIDEON WELLES AND ADMIRAL HIRAM PAULDING, January 10th, 1863, 8" X 10" letter signed by Gideon Welles as Secretary of the Navy and Admiral Hiram Paulding permission granted to 3rd Engineer George P. Hunt to present himself for an examination (for 2nd Asst. Engineer), Paulding was a Navy veteran of the War of 1812 and the Mexican War. Hunt later served on the Metacomet at Mobile Bay....................................................$165.00

5297 - GIDEON WELLES AND COMMANDER JOHN C. HOWELL AND WILLIAM RADFORD, February 26th, 1863, 8" X 10" on Navy Dept. letterhead ordering George P. Hunt to report for duty on the Iron Clad Lehigh. Signed by Gideon Welles as Secretary of the Navy and Commander John C. Howell and docketed by Commander William Radford. Radford was born in Fincastle, VA and entered the U.S. Navy during 1825. He commanded the landing party from Warren which captured the Mexican warship Malek Adhel at Mazatlan and took part in other Pacific coast operations of the Mexican War. During the Civil War, he commanded the ill-fated Cumberland but was on board the frigate Roanoke as a member of a Court of enquiry when his ship was attacked by the Confederate casemate ram Virginia. Captain Radford subsequently commanded the armored ship New Ironsides during Union attacks on Fort Fisher in December 1864 and in January 1865. Promoted Rear Admiral in 1866, he commanded the European squadron during 1869 and 1870. Rear Admiral John C. Howell was born in Philadelphia, PA on 24 November 1819. He was appointed midshipman on 9 June 1836 and served in the Mediterranean, East India, Home and other squadrons. During the Civil War, he served on USS Minnesota at the Battle of Hatteras Inlet and was actively employed in the East Gulf and North Atlantic Blockading Squadrons. Engineer Hunt later served at Mobile Bay on the Metacomet..............................................$195.00

5298 - GIDEON WELLES, PEIRCE CROSBY, JOHN HOWELL, AND JOHN B. MONTGOMERY, 8" X 10" letter signed by Gideon Welles as Secretary of the Navy directing Engineer George P. Hunt to report to the US Steam frigate Niagara from the Lehigh dated May 20th, 1863 from the Navy Department. Also signed by three future Admirals:

Peirce Crosby - He went to the Gulf of Mexico as Commanding Officer of the gunboat Pinola at the beginning of 1862. In Pinola, assisted by Itaska, he broke the chain barrier across the Mississippi to make possible the passage upriver of Flag Officer David Farragut's squadron, and the capture of New Orleans. For two years beginning in November 1862, Crosby helped enforce the blockade of the Confederacy's East Coast as Commanding Officer of the steamers Sangamon, Florida, and Keystone State and as Fleet Captain of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. He finished the war in the Gulf, commanding the gunboat Metacomet and took part in clearing mines from Mobile Bay.

John C. Howell - Rear Admiral John C. Howell was born in Philadelphia, PA on 24 November 1819. He was appointed midshipman on 9 June 1836 and served in the Mediterranean, East India, Home and other squadrons. During the Civil War, he served on USS Minnesota at the Battle of Hatteras Inlet and was actively employed in the East Gulf and North Atlantic. Howell signs this twice.

John B. Montgomery - In early June 1846, Montgomery and the ship he commanded, the Portsmouth, arrived in San Francisco Bay then part of the Mexican province of Alta California. As a result, Montgomery was involved, albeit as a witness only, in the events of the Bear Flag Revolt in which foreign residents, mostly American revolted against the Mexican authorities. As a naval representative of the U.S. Government, he was approached by representatives of the Revolt, by representatives of the Mexican provincial government and by other representatives of the U.S. On June 16, 1846, Montgomery sent a mission to Sonoma to investigate the conditions there following the Revolt. On July 9, 1846, Montgomery and his detachment from the Portsmouth raised the American flag over the plaza in the town of Yerba Buena, whose name was changed to San Francisco, CA in 1847. At his direction, Lt. Joseph W. Revere also lowered California's famous Bear Flag flying at Sonoma, CA, north of San Francisco Bay and raised the U.S. Flag. The lowered Bear Flag ended up in Montgomery's possession and in 1848, he delivered it to naval authorities in Boston. Ultimately, in 1855, the flag was returned to California.

An outstanding Naval document signed by The Secretary of the Navy and three veteran Navy officers dating back to the War of 1812 and the Mexican War........................................$325.00

5299 - ADMIRAL FRANCIS GREGORY, ADMIRAL JOHN B. MONTGOMERY, Printed and filled in orders dated September 5th, 1863 for Engineer George P. Hunt to report to Admiral Gregory from the "Niagara". Short notes and signed by Gregory twice and Montgomery once. ADMIRAL FRANCIS GREGORY: In March 1809, he was transferred to the Gulf Squadron at New Orleans. While serving in Vesuvius and as Captain of Gun Boat 162, Gregory participated in the capture of an English brig smuggling slaves into New Orleans and three Spanish pirate ships. During the War of 1812, he served on Lake Ontario under Commodore Isaac Chauncey and participated in attacks on Toronto, Kingston, and Fort George. In August 1814, Gregory was captured by the British; refused parole, he was sent to England and remained there until June 1815. Gregory was appointed a Captain in 1838 -- sailed to the Gulf of Mexico, where he commanded North Carolina and Raritan and served in the blockade of the Mexican coast during the Mexican-American War. After the Mexican War, Gregory commanded the squadron off the African coast, with Portsmouth as his flagship, until June 1851. Returning to the United States, he became Commandant of the Boston Navy Yard in May 1852 and served there through February 1856. His subsequent retirement ended a Navy career that had spanned nearly 50 years.

John B. Montgomery - In early June 1846, Montgomery and the ship he commanded, the Portsmouth, arrived in San Francisco Bay, then part of the Mexican province of Alta California. As a result, Montgomery was involved, albeit as a witness only, in the events of the Bear Flag Revolt in which foreign residents, mostly American revolted against the Mexican authorities. As a naval representative of the U.S. Government, he was approached by representatives of the Revolt, by representatives of the Mexican provincial government and by other representatives of the U.S. On June 16, 1846, Montgomery sent a mission to Sonoma to investigate the conditions there, following the Revolt. On July 9, 1846, Montgomery and his detachment from the Portsmouth raised the American flag over the plaza in the town of Yerba Buena, whose name was changed to San Francisco, CA in 1847. At his direction, Lt. Joseph W. Revere also lowered California's famous Bear Flag flying at Sonoma, California, north of San Francisco Bay and raised the U.S. Flag. The lowered Bear Flag ended up in Montgomery's possession and in 1848, he delivered it to naval authorities in Boston. Ultimately, in 1855, the flag was returned to California. A great combination of two important naval figures of the Early 19th Century. Hunt later transferred to the USS Metacomet which led the attack on Mobile Bay with the Hartford in August 1864. Very fine.........................................$200.00



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