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P.O. Box 73244   Metairie, LA  70033                      Phone: (504) 467-2532          Fax:  (504) 464-7552

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The Civil War
 Confederate Artifacts


1409 - CHIMBORAZO MILITARY HOSPITAL, RICHMOND, VA, Medical implements excavated in the 1950's from a trash site near Building #3 Chimborazo Hospital site in Richmond, VA. Thermoplastic enema tips of various sizes. An extremely large hospital facility constructed after the outbreak of war and first opened 17 October 1861. It was on land bounded by the present streets of Clay on the north, 30th on the west, 34th on the east, and the bottom of the hill on the south. The Richmond National Battlefield Park building stands in about the middle of the old hospital grounds. Named for the hill on which it was located which was named after Mount Chimborazo in Ecuador. Chimborazo was one of the largest of all military hospitals up to its time. Normal occupancy was about 3,000. It had about 120 buildings in all. Those for patients were divided into five divisions. It had its own ice house, soup house, bakery, soap factory, etc., operated its own farms, beef and goat herds, canal trading boat. Divisions were designated for Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, Maryland, at the beginning, but names varied at different periods. Medical staff about 45. Had natural springs. It claimed to have handled 17,000 wounded cases. Dr. James B. McCaw, surgeon-in-chief. Operated by Federal occupation forces for several weeks. [From Confederate Military Hospitals in Richmond by Robert W. Waitt, Jr., Official Publication #22 Richmond Civil War Centennial committee, Richmond, Virginia 1964.] [a] 2.75" straight tip, very fine......................................................$30.00    [b] 4.25" straight tip, very fine.................................$35.00    [c] 5.25" slight curved, very fine.................................$40.00    [d] 6.50" curved, minor push......................................$35.00

SOLDIER'S ARTIFACTS FROM THE ARCHIVE OF J. A. JAMES PALMETTO SHARPSHOOTERS/BEAUREGARD'S BATTERY FERGUSON LIGHT ARTILLERY AND THOMAS E. JAMES 1ST SC STATE TROOPS

A small archive of artifacts that accompanied the letters of these two brothers from South Carolina we will soon offer. It is more likely that these belonged to J. A. James as he spent time in a hospital near Atlanta in 1864.

1411 - CLAY PIPE WITH EFFIGY OF LEWIS CASS, 2" ceramic pipe, well used but in exceptional condition. Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 - June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. During his long political career, Cass served as a governor of the Michigan Territory, an American ambassador, a U.S. Senator representing Michigan, and co-founder as well as first Masonic Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Michigan. He was the losing nominee of the Democratic Party for president in 1848. Cass was nationally famous as a leading spokesman for the controversial Doctrine of Popular Sovereignty, which would have allowed voters in the territories to determine whether to make slavery legal instead of having Congress decide. Hairline solid fissure....................................................$65.00


1412 - CERAMIC PIPE
, 2" female figure head, well used, blackened, chip at top edge, actually tied together with twine to continue usage..............................
$50.00



1413 - SOAPSTONE TRADE PIPE
, 2" upright bowl and typical trade style, dark brown finish, hairline solid fissure.........................................
$75.00


1414 - SOLDIER'S HOUSEWIFE
, hand-made leather square shaped "housewife" contains some buttons and coarse thread wrapped around a piece of wood. Hand-stitched locally made pouch, very fine.............................................
$95.00



1416 - HAND MADE BONE RING WITH A PALMETTO TREE DESIGN
, carved bone finger ring with an engraved "Palmetto Tree" highlighted by some ochre tint, very fine........................................................
$175.00


1417- HAND MADE BONE RING
, hand-made bone ring with a floral design pattern, flat head crown, very fine..........................................
$125.00

1418 - LARGE BONE TOOTHBRUSH HANDLE, 7" slightly curved handle, lovely patina to the bone, very fine..........................................$65.00


1419 - A GROUP OF CARVED NUTS AND PEACH STONES
, 4 items, 2 peach stone carved into small baskets, another hickory nut carved into a basket shape, and one carved pecan shell also in a small basket. All very fine, lot of 4 pieces.............................................
$80.00

1421 - CORN COB MESSAGE CONTAINER, 2" hollowed out into a cylinder that contain a message, lovely dark brown patina to the cob, fine............................................$49.00


THE LAST CONFEDERATE BATTERY PROTECTING NEW ORLEANS FROM FARRAGUT'S FLEET, 32# SOLID SHOT RECOVERED FROM THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER IN 1985

1424 - On April 25th, 1862, Admiral David Farragut's fleet steamed by the Confederate Battery at Chalmette below the city. After several busts from the Chalmette battery at the lead ship, the Confederates abandoned the battery as resistance was futile against such superior odds. The admiral sent a landing party to the fortifications and spiked 12 - 32# cannon and one 11" mortar. It is documented that the unfired cannon balls were thrown in the river adjacent to the fortifications. In 1985 while the river was being dredged and the dredged material dumped on private land in Chalmette, a local bottle hunter received permission to hunt the silt. 36 - 32# solid balls were recovered. The last of the balls were sold in 2000 [lot of 11] to a Baton Rouge collector. This example is the last he will sell [keeping one example]. The ball's surface is in excellent condition being encased in the mud of the Mississippi for over 100 years. The ball will come from a letter of provenance from the last owner attesting that he purchased then from the original finder in 1985. A great historic item! Buyer pays exact Fed Ex Ground charges..........................................................$550.00


100809 - TEXAS SILVER STAR, 5/8" - .75", silver TEXAS star used on a kepi or blouse, excavated at Port Hudson, LA [1863], hand-made star created by a soldier, RARE.....................................................$250.00

11048 - MY CAVE LIFE IN VICKSBURG WITH LETTERS OF TRIAL AND TRAVEL BY A LADY, in 1864, D. Appleton and Company of New York published a Volume entitled My Cave Life in Vicksburg, with Letters of Trial and Travel. By a Lady, 196 pages, hardbound, 1st edition. The lady was Mary Ann Loughbourough, the wife of a Confederate officer, and the account she wrote is the most thorough and vivid picture we have of cave life in the besieged city. The cover is very good, tight, some trifle fading to the fabric, interior. Very fine. A classic account of the living conditions of the civilians of Vicksburg during the long siege living underground in caves. Fine overall...................................................SOLD

11065 - JEFFERSON DAVIS SIGNATURE, Davis' signature on a card, "JEFFERSON DAVIS" in lavender ink. A nice fully signed autograph with Davis signing with a full "Jefferson Davis." Fine.....................................................$550.00

11066 - SOUTHERN CROSS OF HONOR, JOHN C. MUNN, 2ND AND 3RD NORTH CAROLINA LIGHT ARTILLERY, Two piece medal with Munn's initials J. C. M. inscribed on the bar. Munn served in the 2nd and 3rd North Carolina Light Artillery and enlisted on November 11th, 1863 as a Private from Brunswick County. Cross comes with a 1926 UCV badge Wilmington, NC [silk ribbon un-sattached]. Very fine.....................................................SOLD


THE LAST CONFEDERATE NATIONAL FLAG REMOVED FROM THE CONFEDERATE CAPITOL IN RICHMOND, APRIL 4TH, 1864

9013 - John O. Foster was a Methodist minister attached to the 24th Army Corps and is said to have preached the first sermon following the fall of Richmond, April 4th, 1865. Foster landed at City Point on April 2nd, 1865 at 2 PM and upon his arrival helped tend to the wounded from both sides that had arrived by train nearby. Foster also had the opportunity to watch the bombardment of Petersburg. That evening Foster watched Richmond burn, and was later given a pass to enter the city. On April 3rd or 4th, Foster, undoubtedly the first Union Chaplain in the City, was given a section of the enormous Confederate flag which flew over the Confederate State House. On April 5th, his diary states he visited the Confederate Treasury. He noted: "Promises to pay [bonds] in ton lots - told help yourselves - Did so...". Foster obtained as many varieties of bonds and Confederate money as he could and glued the sections of the Confederate flag he had obtained onto them. A label was later affixed to one section stating:  "Confederate money valuable as curios, pieces of flag floating over Capitol at Richmond on day of capitulation." Foster then preached under guard at the Presbyterian Church to an audience composed of mostly liberated slaves. The flag remnant above is from the flag taken from the Confederate Capitol with the edge turned to show a portion of a Confederate bond or banknote Foster removed from the Treasury and glued thereon. 11" X 14", double matted in gray and crimson red trim, shrink wrapped and ready to frame. A new Mora attractive design to this popular display.  NOW...................................................................$200.00/unframed  Custom framed.................................................................$255.00/framed



72203 - MISSISSIPPI LARGE COAT BUTTON EXCAVATED NEAR RICHMOND
, A rare two piece local issue with shank, star surrounded by Mississippi, dark green patina, usual ground action, button better that photo, no pushes of any kind........................................
SOLD

52815 - CONFEDERATE EGG SHAPED VARIETY, Mullinax #136, 55mm X 89mm, CS with Oval, die struck no fill, continuous iron wire belt hooks made from telegraph wire soldered on the back, 95% of hooks remain which is unusual for this light wire. Some professional restoration. A typical Western front manufactured buckle. The buckle has a nice appearance. Excavated in SW Louisiana. A nice inexpensive example at only............$1,495.00


1104 - SOLID CAST CONFEDERATE BLOCK I INFANTRY BUTTON
, local issue, large coat issue, with shank, excavated Vicksburg, Mississippi, Albert CS-184, 23mm. A near perfect example with a deep green patina, much scarcer than 2 piece varieties............................................
$150.00


1105 - CONFEDERATE ARTILLERY BUTTON
, CS-102A3, large coat issue, iron backed with complete shank, no b/m, nice sharp face with no pushes, some oxidation on iron back, sharp "A", rare......................................................
$225.00


72032 - SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS RIBBON, 1.5" X 6.0", reunion of the SCV, 10th Reunion ribbon, blue imprint, camp 705, Bristol, VA, September 21st, 1905, cream silk with some age stains, but solid..................................................$110.00

CANNON SHOT FROM THE LAST CONFEDERATE BATTERY THAT DEFENDED NEW ORLEANS, APRIL 1862

3226 - CHALMETTE BATTERY, NEW ORLEANS, LA THE LAST BATTERY TO FIRE ON FARRAGUT'S FLEET AS IT STEAMED TO ANCHOR AT NEW ORLEANS, APRIL 25TH, 1862, 32# solid shot. When Farragut's fleet approached the Chalmette Confederate artillery on April 25th, 1862 the battery opened up on the closest ship the Cayuga. As Commander George Perkins of the Cayuga recalls below how the Confederates in the battery tricked the Cayuga in coming close to shore only to be hit many times and withdrew. Perkins states that two heavy men-of-war the Pensacola and the Hartford moved into position and made quick work of the battery. The Confederates knowing they were overmatched spiked the guns and retreated. Naval reports show that a landing party inspected the battery and discarded shot into the river. In the 1990's, a dredge boat working close to shore brought a number of these 32# solid shot to the surface with the sludge from the bottom. A bottle digger heard the shot falling into dump trucks and followed the truck to a landfill and recovered several of these balls. Confederates records show that the battery contained a number of 32# cannon. Years ago we purchased three or four of these balls and quickly sold three. This one we have been keeping for ourselves for years but it is time to find it a new home. Buyer pays actual FED EX ground charges. Commander Perkins of the Cayuga recalls: "There were two more fortifications still between us and New Orleans, called the Chalmette batteries, but Captain Bailey thought they could not be of much account, and that we had best push on. When we arrived in sight of these batteries, no flag floated over them, and there was not a man to be seen--nothing but the guns which seemed abandoned. In fact though, there were a lot of treacherous rascals concealed in these batteries, and when we had come close enough to make them feel sure they could sink us, they opened a heavy fire. We gave them back as well as we could, but they were too much for one gunboat; so after getting hit fourteen times, and the shot and shell striking all about us, we decided not to advance any further until some of our ships came up. Soon we had the Hartford on one side and the Pensacola on the other, and then the rebel battery was silenced very quickly." A great relic of the Capture of New Orleans in April 1862, nice surfaces, very minor porosity, visible seam..............................................................$695.00


BATTLE OF SHILOH CAPTURED CONFEDERATE FLAG

D-40 THE BATTLE OF SHILOH, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing was fought April 6-7, 1862, in southwestern Tennessee. A Union army under Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant had moved via the Tennessee River deep into Tennessee and was encamped principally at Pittsburg Landing on the west bank of the river. Confederate forces under Generals Albert Sidney Johnston and P. G. T. Beauregard launched a surprise attack on Grant there. On the first day of the battle, the Confederates struck with the intention of driving the Union defenders away from the river and into the swamps of Owl Creek to the west, hoping to defeat Grant's Army of the Tennessee before the anticipated arrival of Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell's Army of the Ohio. The Confederate battle lines became confused during the fierce fighting, and Grant's men instead fell back to the northeast, in the direction of Pittsburg Landing. A position on a slightly sunken road, nicknamed the "Hornet's Nest", defended by the men of Brig. Gens. Benjamin M. Prentiss's and W. H. L. Wallace's divisions provided critical time for the rest of the Union line to stabilize under the protection of numerous artillery batteries. The Confederates were forced to retreat form the bloodiest battle in United States history up to that time. 11" X 14" display, double matted, ready to frame. Includes a small remnant of the flag fragment shown above. A rare relic from the Battle of Shiloh...................$295.00/unframed Framed.............................................$350.00 Certificate of authenticity included

WOOD SALVAGED FROM THE CUMBERLAND AND THE VIRGINIA

D-41, The Cumberland sailed into Hampton Roads and took up station as a blockader. She served as one several ships of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron until 8 March 1862. The sloop-of-war engaged Confederate forces in several minor actions in Hampton Roads and captured many small ships in the harbor. Additionally, the Cumberland was a part of the expedition that captured the forts at Cape Hatteras. Cumberland was rammed and sunk in an engagement known as the first day of the Battle of Hampton Roads between the two ships is considered to be a turning point in the history of world naval affairs as it showed the advantage of steam powered, armored ships over sail powered wooden hulled ships. It should be noted that because of the Cumberland, Virginia lost two of her guns, her ram, and suffered some internal damage. Congress later recognized that the Cumberland did more damage to Virginia than the U.S. Navy's ironclad Monitor, which did battle with Virginia the next day. The wood fragment to the left originated from the Cumberland and the fragment on the right from the Virginia. 11" X 14" double matted and ready to frame..................$295.00/unframed. Framed.......................................$350.00 Certificate of authenticity included


General Robert E. Lee

8270 - FABRIC FROM A CHAIR BELONGING TO ROBERT E. LEE GIVEN TO HIS GODCHILD, the fabric in this display originated from a chair that originally covered a chair belonging to Robert E. Lee. It was found in an old envelope noted, "General Robert E. Lee, button and material from his rocking chair which he presented to his friend Stanton...Grosse Isle." The Stanton mentioned was the fifth son of General Henry Stanton who served with Lee in the Mexican War, Robert Lee Stanton [1842 - 1932]. Robert Lee Stanton was named after Robert E. Lee and was his Godchild. He moved to Grosse Isle, Michigan in 1880 and became a farmer. The chair in the photo is not the chair that this fabric originated from. 11" x 14", gray mat with red trim. Fabric is displayed in a small magnified box and includes certificate of authenticity. We only have eight to sell. Unframed................................$250.00

8271 - WOOD SALVAGED FROM THE C.S.S. VIRGINIA, ALSO KNOWN AS THE MERRIMACK THAT FOUGHT THE IRONCLAD MONITOR, MARCH 9TH, 1862, the CSS Virginia was the first steam-powered ironclad warship of the Confederate States Navy, built during the first year of the American Civil War; she was constructed as a casemate ironclad using the raised and cut down hull of the scuttled USS Merrimack. Virginia was one of the participants in the Battle of Hampton Roads, opposing the Union's USS Monitor in March, 1862. The battle is chiefly significant in naval history as the first battle between ironclads. Prior to that encounter on March 9th, the Virginia had sunk the Cumberland and the Congress on the previous day before the arrival of the Monitor. The fight between the two ironclads was basically a draw and the Virginia moved back into her port. With the capture of Norfolk, her Captain Catesby ap Roger Jones was ordered to destroy her rather than allow her to be captured which he did on May 11th, 1862 after her guns had been removed for future use. Starting around 1883, numerous souvenirs, made from recently salvaged iron and wood raised from Virginia's sunken hulk, found a ready and willing market among eastern seaboard residents who remembered the historic first battle between ironclads. Known examples still exist today, being held in both public and private collections, rarely coming up for public auction. The specimen of wood from the Virginia in this display came from an old collection of relics including those of the Virginia. 11" X 14", double matted in gray and red, certificate of authenticity included............................................................$250.00


THE FALL OF RICHMOND, APRIL 1865

8036 - FABRIC FROM THE CHAIR OF JEFFERSON DAVIS, the period note that was attached to this souvenir fabric remnant attests that it was removed from the Presidential chair of Jefferson Davis in the Confederate House of Representatives on April 3rd, 1865 as Union troops and support forces entered the city. The note is written by George D. Murray and states, "A piece of the covering of the Pres. Chair in the House of Representatives taken at the time of occupation of Richmond by the Union troops, April 3rd, 1865 by George D. Murray." Federal records show a George D. Murray, Co. F, 5th Connecticut Volunteers. As the 5th did not pass through the City until later in the month, either Murray was detached from his unit and entered the city with another unit or was one of the many civilian participants who entered the city with the advancing troops such as Sutlers, Sanitary Commission workers, and Doctors. Since the fabric originated from a Connecticut Estate sale which contained other war souvenirs, we feel it is more likely that this George D. Murray was from the 5th Connecticut Infantry and not a civilian entering Richmond.

A remnant from the flag removed from the Capital Building - John O. Foster was a Methodist minister attached to the 24th Army Corps and is said to have preached the first sermon following the fall of Richmond, April 4th, 1865. Foster landed at City Point on April 2nd, 1865 at 2 PM and upon his arrival helped tend to the wounded from both sides that had arrived by train nearby. Foster also had the opportunity to watch the bombardment of Petersburg. That evening Foster watched Richmond burn, and was later given a pass to enter the city. On April 3rd or 4th, Foster, undoubtedly the first Union chaplain in the City, was given a section of the enormous Confederate flag which flew over the Confederate State House. On April 5th, his diary states he visited the Confederate Treasury. He noted: "Promises to pay [bonds] in ton lots - told help yourselves - Did so...". Foster obtained as many varieties of bonds and Confederate money as he could and glued the sections of the Confederate flag he had obtained onto them. A label was later affixed to one section stating: "Confederate money valuable as curios, pieces of flag floating over Capitol at Richmond on day of capitulation." Foster then preached under guard at the Presbyterian Church to an audience composed of mostly liberated slaves. The flag remnant above is from the flag taken from the Confederate Capitol with the edge turned to show a portion of a Confederate bond or banknote Foster removed from the Treasury and glued thereon. 

Both items attractively presented in an 11" X 14" double matted format in gray with red trim. A copy photograph of the Confederate capital in Richmond is included. We have only 9 of these displays for sale. Display ships with documentation and certificate of authenticity. Unframed [shipped shrink wrapped]........................................$395.00       Custom Framed.............$450.00



11094 - EXCAVATED NEAR SOUTH MOUNTAIN, [ANTIETAM]
, 6 pound solid shot Confederate made with obvious seams throughout. Nice surfaces. A really nice example of Confederate made ordnance.....................................
$265.00

1060 - COLONEL JOHN JACOB SEIBELS, COLONEL OF THE 6TH ALABAMA INFANTRY REGIMENT, a beautiful hand carved replica razor that Seibels carved from a piece of wood from one of the early battlefields in which the 6th Alabama participated. 6.5" carved from a piece of hardwood and nicely stained. Carved in the hand is "Col. J.J. Seibels 6th Ala. Reg. Vol". Obtained from a direct descendant of Seibels. Seibels was a wood carver and this was probably carved while in the field. Seibels formed the 6th Alabama and served as commander from its inception until May of 1862. After serving at Corinth, the unit moved to Northern Virginia and fought at all major battles such as Manassas, Yorktown, Seven Pines, Seven Days. The razor has small brass pins to make it functional in opening and closing. Nice rosewood finish..............................................................$450.00

3103 - FINE TWO PIECE CS BUCKLE DUG IN LOUISIANA, Manufactured by Leech & Rigdon, Memphis, TN. CS Tongue and Wreath design. Dug at a camp site in St. Landry Parish, LA on the banks of Bayou Bourbeux near Grand Coteau, LA. The Battle at Bayou Bourbeux was fought on November 2/3, 1863 during the Teche Campaign where the 2nd Brigade of Walker's Texas Brigade consisting of the 11th & 14th Texas Infantry, the 28th and 6th Texas Cavalry fought a Union force that included the 1st Louisiana Cavalry (Union). It is quite probably that this buckle was worn by a Texas soldier. The right belt loop is slightly bent back due to being bent by the weight of the sword on the belt. The finder of the buckle in January 2008 reported that both pieces were found no more than 18" apart on a slope on the bayou bank, a nice example found in Louisiana...............................................$2,575.00


3237 - BATTLE OF SHILOH, 3.5", Confederate usage foreign made bayonet scabbard tip, excavated near Shiloh. Very fine details.................................$28.00

3238 - BATTLE OF SHILOH, 3.0", Confederate made sheet iron bayonet scabbard tip, rolled steel design, oxidized but very solid, tough to find intact due to the iron construction...........................................$30.00

3239 - BATTLE OF SHILOH, 2.5", Confederate made rolled brass bayonet tip, nice surfaces. Very fine........................................$32.00

3240 - BATTLE OF CORINTH, 2", Confederate made bowie or Sheffield scabbard tip, rolled brass design. Fine......................................$28.00

3241 - BATTLE OF CORINTH, 2.5", Confederate made brass unfinished bayonet tip, crude roll design with unfinished edge. Very fine...................$35.00


Fabric from the Chair of President Jefferson Davis taken during the Fall of the City of Richmond, April 3rd, 1865

The period note that was attached to this souvenir fabric remnant attests that it was removed from the Presidential chair of Jefferson Davis in the Confederate House of Representatives on April 3rd, 1865 as Union troops and support forces entered the city. The note is written by George D. Murray and states, "A piece of the covering of the Pres. Chair in the House of Representatives taken at the time of occupation of Richmond by the Union troops, April 3rd, 1865 by George D. Murray." Federal records show a George D. Murray, Co. F, 5th Connecticut Volunteers. As the 5th did not pass through the City until later in the month, either Murray was detached from his unit and entered the city with another unit or was one of the many civilian participants who entered the City with the advancing troops such as Sutlers, Sanitary Commission workers, and Doctors. Since the fabric originated from a Connecticut Estate sale which contained other war souvenirs, we feel it is more likely that this George D. Murray was from the 5th Connecticut Infantry and not a civilian in Richmond.

11" X 14" - 3 dimension display, Gray mat with Florentine gold trim. Fabric is housed in a magnified box. We have 16 to sell in total. The display comes with a certificate of authenticity. A wonderful relic from the last days of the Confederacy with excellent provenance. Price is for and unframed display..................................$250.00        Custom framed....................$300.00

**Please note that the thickness of this display requires a deep frame of 3/4". The magnified box is 1.5" X 1.5".


THE 1861 NEW ORLEANS HALF DOLLAR

The majority of the United States half dollars that were struck in New Orleans during the year 1861, were struck under CONFEDERATE authority after the mint was captured after secession by the State of Louisiana. Of the over 2 million struck in 1861, only 330,000 were struck under US authority. Half Dollars were struck into 1862 until the existing dies broke down and silver bullion stocks disappeared. We have several examples of this popular coin in stock at present.

1861 NEW ORLEANS HALF DOLLAR, Liberty seated on obverse, large eagle with spread wings with mint mark "0" below eagle. (a) very fine..........................$175.00        (b) VF - EF.......................$195.00        (c) EF - AU....................................$295.00        (d) Fine CSA die break before the 6..............................$195.00


Confederate Blockade Runners of the Civil War 1861-1865

Soon after the beginning of the Naval Blockade of the South, the birth of the "Blockade Runners" allowed precious supplies to be brought into Southern ports by these fast and sleek ships. The life of a blockade runner was often short dodging Union blockaders and dangerous coastlines. These relics originate from wrecks of four Confederate blockade runners.

814 - THE STONO, The STONO had been the Federal ship ISAAC SMITH which was captured January 30th, 1863 on the Stono River near Charleston and refitted as a blockade runner. She ran aground on June 5th, 1863 off Fort Moultrie trying to escape Charleston Harbor: (a) 1/4" lead sheathing from her powder magazine.....................................$20.00     (b) Copper hull sheathing with nail......................................$20.00           BOTH..................$35.00

815 - THE MINHO, The MINHO ran aground and was destroyed while trying to enter Charleston on October 2nd, 1862 after being shelled by the Union blockader FLAMBEAU: (a) Lead lining material that was inside the Enfield rifle cases.............................$20.00     (b) English Enfield percussion caps (3).........................................$10.00     (c) Enfield bullet made in London with original wooden plug sealed in wax for preservation............................$45.00     ALL THREE................................$60.00

816 - THE GEORGIANA, The GEORGIANA was chased ashore and destroyed by the Union blockader WISSAHICKON on March 18th, 1863 off Long Island, SC while trying to enter Charleston Harbor: (a) English brass pins and ceramic buttons............................$15.00     
(b) shard of pottery...................................$15.00     BOTH................................$25.00

817 - THE NASHVILLE, The NASHVILLE was destroyed by the Union Monitor MONTAUK in the Ogeechee River off Fort McAllister, GA on February 28th, 1863: (a) Coal from her boilers...........................................$10.00     (b) Clump of Pine resin...........................$10.00 (cargo shipped in casks)     (c) Specimen of charred cotton from the cotton bales put on deck to protect the ship from cannon fire..................................$10.00     ALL THREE..........$25.00

820 - TEXAS EXCAVATED SILVER STAR, Acamp made silver star, 3/4" excavated at Camp Brazoria, TX. Used as a hat pin on a kepi. As usual crude design.........................$250.00



CONFEDERATE OLD ENGLISH I INFANTRY BUTTON
, Coat, CS #177. 2 piece with border, Isaac Campbell, London. Nice brown patina with shank, English I on lined field, excavated...........................................................
$195.00

THE LAST CONFEDERATE NATIONAL FLAG, John O. Foster was a Methodist minister attached to the 24th Army Corps and is said to have preached the first sermon following the fall of Richmond, April 4th, 1865. Foster landed at City Point on April 2nd, 1865 at 2 PM and upon his arrival helped tend to the wounded from both sides that had arrived by train nearby. Foster also had the opportunity to watch the bombardment of Petersburg. That evening Foster watched Richmond burn, and was later given a pass to enter the city. On April 3rd or 4th, Foster, undoubtedly the first Union chaplain in the city, was given a section of the enormous Confederate flag which flew over the Confederate State House. On April 5th, his diary states, he visited the Confederate Treasury. He noted: "Promises to pay [bonds] in ton lots -- told help yourselves -- did so...". Foster obtained as many varieties of bonds and Confederate money as he could and glued the sections of the Confederate flag he obtained onto them. A label was later affixed to one section stating: "Confederate money valuable as curios, pieces of flag floating over Capital at Richmond on day of capitulation". Foster then preached under guard at the Presbyterian Church to an audience composed of mostly liberated slaves. The flag remnant above is from the flag taken from the Confederate Capitol with the edge turned to show a portion of a Confederate bond or banknote Foster removed from the Treasury and glued thereon. The photo shows the missing Confederate flag and nearby is the flag of the United States that had been hoisted up by Union soldiers. A truly historic relic. Sold unframed, 11"X14".................................................................$295.00

CONFEDERATE BATTLE FLAG OF FORT MORGAN, BATTLE OF MOBILE BAY, The Battle of Mobile Bay was a naval battle fought on August 5th, 1864. Commanding the Union forces was Admiral David Farragut, while Admiral Franklin Buchanan led the Confederate fleet. The battle took place off the coast of Alabama, at the mouth of Mobile Bay, which was defended by two Confederate forts, Fort Morgan, and Fort Gaines, and by a torpedo field (in modern terms, a minefield) that created a single narrow channel for blockade runners to enter and exit the bay. The biggest challenge for Farragut was entering the bay. With eighteen vessels, he commanded far greater firepower than the Confederate fleet of four. The Union fleet suffered the first major loss when the USS Tecumseh was critically damaged by an exploding torpedo after it wandered into the field. Within three minutes, the vessel was completely submerged. 94 men went down with the ship. Under fire from both the Confederate fleet and Fort Morgan, Farragut had to choose between retreating or risking the minefield. He then issued his famous order, "Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!". Farragut took his flagship through the minefield safely, followed by the rest of the fleet. When Union fleet reached the bay, they defeated the Confederate flotilla led by the giant ironclad CSS Tennessee. Buchanan surrendered to Farragut aboard the USS Hartford. After several weeks of bombardment from land and sea resulting in severe damage to Fort Morgan with the citadel being burned and the walls severely damaged by shot and shell, the Confederate Commander General Page surrendered Fort Morgan on August 23rd, 1864 to Federal forces. This flag relic came from a small section of the Confederate flag shot down over Fort Morgan and retrieved by Fleet Surgeon James C. Palmer upon entry into the Fort by Union forces and is authenticated by his note seen on the accompanying certificate. 11" X 14", unframed............................................................$350.00

THE OLD LIBBY PRISON IN RICHMOND, VA, Libby Prison was built in 1845 by John Enders in Richmond, VA and was used as a warehouse. It was located at Carey and 18th Street and the James River. In March, 1862, it was used as a military prison by the Confederate Government. In 1864, a group of over 100 Union Officers attempted an escape. Over half made their way to freedom. After the war, the building was dismantled in 1889 and shipped ot Chicago to be used for a Civil War Museum. In 1898, it was again dismantled and a large portion sold to an Indiana farmer who built a stock barn with the timbers and brick. In 1963, the building was torn down and sold to Charles Mercer of Spencer, Indiana who intended to build a museum with the materials. In 1995, the materials were sold to Rod Wampler of Gosport, Indiana where they lay until sold at auction in October, 2006. The majority of the materials are being returned to Virginia where they will be re-constructed at a famous Civil War museum. This small section of tide water cypress originated from a beam from the Libby Prison materials. One photo shows Libby as a Confederate prison. The Confederate commandant stands in a rare pose in front of the building. The other view is the reconstructed Libby Prison interior in Chicago when it was a museum showing the cypress beams. 11"X14", unframed..............................................$100.00

CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUNNERS OF THE CIVIL WAR 1861-1865, Soon after the beginning of the Naval Blockade of the South, the birth of the "Blockade Runners" allowed precious supplies to be brought into Southern ports by these fast and sleek ships. The relics below are from the "Georgiana" and "Minho" which sank off the South Carolina coast. The "Georgiana" sank trying to enter Charleston in March 1863. The "Minho" sank off Sullivan's Island in October 1862. From the "Georgiana" are ceramic buttons and pins destined for the homes of the South, and from the "Minho" are brass percussion caps and a British Enfield bullet with the original wooden plug intended for the use of Confederate troops. Displayed in a 5" X 7" Riker box...........................................................$85.00

THE FALL OF PORT HUDSON, LA - 1863, The fortifications at Port Hudson, LA protected the river artillery batteries that menaced the Union warships on the Mississippi River and stretched nearly 4 1/2 miles. The Union siege began on May 23rd, 1863 when 30,000 men under General Nathanial Banks surrounded the 6800 Confederates. Two furious attacks were made on May 27th and June 14th, 1863. During these attacks, Black regiments made their first assault on Confederate lines and distinguished themselves. General Franklin Gardner held out in spite of a lack of ammunition and food, but decided to surrender his garrison when the news of Vicksburg's surrender on July 4th, 1863 reached him. On July 9th, 1863, Gardner surrendered his garrison and the Mississippi was finally open. Below from left to right is a Union button excavated near Port Hudson as well as two different bullets from the Port Hudson area.............................................................$75.00

VICKSBURG CAPTURED 1863, Vicksburg's capture was a huge blow to the Confederacy as the position of the City on the Mississippi River allowed whoever occupied to the City to control the Mississippi River. The campaign to capture Vicksburg began in 1862 by bombardment from the Mississippi River and continued into 1863 when Grant led an army south and finally surrounded the City after a siege that forced both civilians and soldiers into caves for safety with little food and some resorted to eating rats to survive. Finally General Pemberton surrendered to Grant on July 4th, 1863. From left to right: a Union Army button and two different bullets, all recovered from the Vicksburg Campaign battle sites. The map is a copy from the May 23rd, 1863 edition of the Philadelphia Inquirer showing the Military movements around Vicksburg just before the final attack by Grant. When Port Hudson fell within a few days after Vicksburg, the entire Mississippi was opened to both civilian and military traffic again....................................................$75.00

All displays sold unframed, but framing is available at an extra charge and a nominal fee.
Displays shipped shrink-wrapped otherwise!


3233 - CONFEDERATE HOSPITAL CRUTCH FROM FLORENCE, ALABAMA, 7.5" X 50" single stem walking crutch with 7.5" arm brace with the original linen wrappings still on the crutch. Originated from a house in Florence, AL on Wood Street that was used as a Confederate hospital during the war. Just purchased from a Tennessee Doctor's collection of medical items. Crutch stem has been carved from a larger branch by hand. Extremely rare Southern medical item.............................SOLD

3234 - CONFEDERATE MEDICAL WOODEN CANTEEN, 7" x 8" wooden barrel canteen with two iron rings. 1.5" spout carved wooden platform, dual openings with original stoppers with iron carrying handle. Original "orange" painted finish mostly intact. A smaller version of the larger ones carried on ambulances. Military canteens were often painted solid colors for identification back to the Revolutionary Period. This one found in Crump, Tennessee. Just purchased from a Tennessee Doctor's medical collection. Great Tennessee item..........................................SOLD

819 - TEXAS EXCAVATED SILVER STAR, A camp made silver star, 3/4" excavated at Port Hudson, LA. Used as a small hat pin on a kepi. Nice patina..............................SOLD

821 - CONFEDERATE SOLDIER'S IDED WALLET, 2" X 4" leather front pocket wallet. Well used and ided in ink to James A. Blick 1864(James A. Blick, 4th Sergt. 5th VA Cavalry). Originated from Petersburg, VA area. Nice VA Cavalry ided item..........................................SOLD

11097 - EXCAVATED NEAR FREDERICKSBURG, tin scabbard, Confederate made for a Bowie knife found near Fredericksburg, VA. 9" in length, flattened but complete showing the crude seam on the verso..................................SOLD

2271 - IDENTIFIED KNIFE TO A MEMBER OF THE 1ST TEXAS INFANTRY, A MEMBER OF THE FAMOUS HOOD'S BRIGADE, 19" blade, 24" overall. Spanish style wooden handle with brass guard and fittings. Two thirds of the original double stitched scabbard accompanies the knife missing the throat. Old linen cloth label states the owner to have been "M. C. Noble Texas". Lt. M. C. Noble was a Company F, 1st Texas Infantry, Woodsville Rifles, which was part of Hood's Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia and later in the Army of the Tennessee. The blade and handle is in excellent condition and is typical of the array of knives used by Texas soldiers with a Spanish influence from nearby Mexico. This had just come out of the "backwoods" and is a new find. The 1st Texas Infantry was one of the core regiments in "Hood's Texas Brigade", arguably the most celebrated infantry brigade in the Confederate Army. It was the only Texas unit in Gen'l Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. The 1st Texas was recruited largely from East Texas in April 1861 after the opening shots of the War Between the States, and was the only regiment in the Confederate Army comprised of twelve companies. The regulations called for ten. All of the companies made their way piecemeal to Virginia in the spring and summer of 1861. Later that fall with the arrival of the 4th and 5th Texas, the 1st Texas and its Colonel, Louis Trezevan Wigfall, (being promoted to brigadier-general), was assigned to the new Texas Brigade. The tree regiments were brigaded together for the first time on November 13, 1861, when the 4th and 5th joined the 1st at Dumfries, VA, roughly 25 miles south of Washington City. Thus the frontier Texans, who were admired as the best riders and riflemen in the army, began their almost matchless and unsurpassed march across the pages of history. The 1st Texas Infantry, nicknamed the "Ragged Old First," experienced its day of glory in the cornfield at Sharpsburg, MD on September 17, 1862, suffering 82% casualties - the highest of any regiment North or South during the war. A great knife and scabbard from a great unit.....................................SOLD

111000 JEFFERSON C. DAVIS, A specimen of his hair encapsulated in a small gold frame. A colored print of Davis seated. Overall 12" X 18", in a gold frame. Accompanied by a Butterfield & Butterfield provenance certificate as to the origin of the hair specimen. Just purchased from a New Orleans estate sale..................................SOLD

61001- TEXAS CAVALRY BUTTON BY T. MILLER, T. Miller of Houston. 1 piece cast Texas locally made Cavalry large coat button recently found near Brazos, TX. Face is excellent with some gold gilt remaining within the lines surrounding the large C. The known casting flaw Miller had in some cavalry buttons is evident with the pin-hole size gap to the right of the "C". Guaranteed to be authentic to the Civil War and not a Miller post-War edition. Extremely Rare..................................................SOLD

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