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The Civil War
Confederate Carte De Visites
 


7506 - GENERAL A. P. HILL, Carte de Visite, a larger than normal format view of Hill in Confederate uniform. No back imprint but from life and quite attractive. Ambrose Powell Hill, Jr. (November 9, 1825 - April 2, 1865), was a career U.S. Army officer in the Mexican-American War and Seminole Wars and a Confederate general in the American Civil War. He gained early fame as the commander of the "Light Division" in the Seven Days Battles and became one of Stonewall Jackson's ablest subordinates, distinguishing himself in the 1862 battles of Cedar Mountain, Second Bull Run, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. Following Jackson's death in May 1863 at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Hill was promoted to lieutenant general and commanded the Third Corps of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, which he led in the Gettysburg Campaign and the fall campaigns of 1863. His command of the corps in 1864-65 was interrupted on multiple occasions by illness, from which he did not return until just before the end of the war, when he was killed during the Union Army offensive at the Third Battle of Petersburg..............................................$295.00






7123 - GENERAL A. P. HILL
, Carte de Visite, no imprint. A great quality photo of Hill with a huge bust pose that is seldom seen in the Anthony vintage photographs with those being a much smaller view of Hill. The card came from a Confederate album with many rare images. Period inscription on the verso. One of the nicest Hills we have handled...................................................
SOLD




7124 - GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE
, Carte de Visite, no imprint. A large view of Lee facing slightly to the left in uniform. Nice photographic quality. An attractive 1863 pose in the field in uniform. While no imprint came from a Confederate album of high resolution images without imprints. Excellent detail. On the verso are old brown glue stains which in no way us transferred to the front of the card. A huge bust pose much larger than the usual Anthony views of the same pose............................................................
$350.00



7125 - GENERAL J. E. B. STUART
, Carte de Visite, no imprint. A large bust view of Jeb Stuart facing forward in uniform. Although the card has no imprint, the image quality is excellent as it came from a Confederate album which contained numerous high quality images with back marks. The card has some shadows to the right of the image that appear to be in the original negative that in no way impair Stuart's image. On the verso are traces of old brown glue stains that do not impair the card's appeal on the obverse. An unusually large image of Stuart.......................................................
$450.00






7126 - GENERAL JOHN B. FLOYD, VIRGINIA
, Carte de Visite by Allen & Horton of Boston. A truly photographic view Confederate General John B. Floyd and Governor of Virginia. US Secretary of War, Confederate General, and Governor of Virginia. A rare photographic pose as most seen are copy photos are engraving quality, some trim to bottom of card, otherwise choice..................................................
$175.00






7127 - JEFFERSON DAVIS
, Carte de Visite by Gurney, NY. A very scarce and unusual pose of Davis taken as Secretary of War of the United States, later President of the Confederate States. Imprisoned at the end of the War but never tried. Rare and very fine...............
$225.00










7128 - GENERAL JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON
, Carte de Visite by Anthony. Taken by Brady at the close of the war, Johnston seated in civilian coat gazing to the left. Near mint condition in superb condition. One of several poses Brady took of Johnston in his studio in late 1865...........................................................
SOLD








7129 - GENERAL P. G. T. BEAUREGARD
, Carte de Visite by Matthew Brady on the Brady card. A vignette pose of Beauregard facing left. Taken by Brady at his studio at the end of the war, choice and superb..........................................................
$275.00


7130 - GENERAL P. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Carte de Visite by Mathhew Brady with no imprint however, a pose of Beauregard facing left from the waist up. Taken by Brady at his studio at the end of the war. Choice and superb. Although these is no Brady imprint but taken by Brady at the same seating......................................................................$245.00





7131 - JEFFERSON DAVIS
, Cabinet card of Jefferson Davis, no imprint but truly photographic. Taken in the years, 1870 - 75, nice quality image...........................................................
$395.00


790 - THOMAS J. "STONEWALL JACKSON", from life Carte de Visite, no imprint. Taken in Winchester, November 1862 attributed to Nathaniel Routzahn. Excellent facial detail. A variation of the waist up pose taken by him showing the "crooked" button. On the verso is a pair of unused 10 Cent Confederate stamps [Scott #11]. Issued in 1864. Light green. Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson gazes straight ahead in this photograph made in November 1862. Jackson sat for this portrait in Nathaniel Routzahn's photographic studio in Winchester. When Jackson first arrived for the sitting he was missing a button on his uniform jacket, so the general took off his jacket and sewed one on himself -- albeit crookedly. The misaligned button was the fourth one down on the general's left. A minister who accompanied him to the sitting joked that while Jackson could successfully track down and destroy enemy forces, he was unable to perform the simple task of sewing on a button in a straight line. Six months later, Jackson was accidentally wounded by his own men during the Battle of Chancellorsville, had his left arm amputated, and then died after developing pneumonia. A very rare photo seldom seen on the market............................................................$1,975.00

791 - STONEWALL JACKSON'S GRAVE, Lexington, VA. Post 1866 pose of women surrounding the tombstone, gentleman to left. Albumen is damaged to the far left affecting the gentleman standing but the remainder of the scene is quite bright and sharp. No imprint to the CDV. In spite of the albumen damage well worth..................................................$150.00


6130 - BRIG. GENERAL MATTHEW C. BUTLER, SOUTH CAROLINA, Carte de visite. Salt print of Butler wearing a brigadier generals collar on his old tunic worn as Colonel of the 2nd South Carolina Cavalry and noted as being taken post September 1864. Profile pose facing right as seen on page 150 "The Confederate General." During the Civil War in the Confederate Army Butler served in the cavalry in Hampton's Legion, attaining Captain, June 12, 1861 and then Major in July 21, 1861. He then joined the 2nd South Carolina Cavalry as Colonel, August 22, 1862. In many major actions with Hampton's Legion and the 2nd SC Cavalry, he lost his right foot at Brandy Station to rifle fire. He later attained the rank of Brigadier General in February 1864 and was thereafter referred to as "General Butler" in the postwar period. Later he served as a Major General in the Spanish-American War. A rare image of Butler. Excellent quality for a salt print...........................SOLD

6023 - GENERAL WILLIAM BARKSDALE, KILLED AT GETTYSBURG, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view in civilian attire. No uniformed pose of Barksdale is known to exist. Brig. Gen. W. Barksdale, C.S.A. is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H. T. Anthony, New York. Excellent quality with nice rich tones. Scarce and very desirable. (1821 - 63) after attending the University of Nashville, and studying law, he became the editor of the Columbus, Mississippi Democrat. He served in the Mexican War as an enlisted man and officer, and was elected to Congress from Mississippi in 1852, where he vehemently upheld the cause of states' rights until his resignation upon the secession of Mississippi from the Union. Barksdale was at first appointed quartermaster general of Mississippi; then entered Confederate service as colonel of the 13th Mississippi Infantry, which he commanded at 1st Manassas. As a regimental commander and subsequently as a brigadier general, to rank from Aug. 12, 1862, he distinguished himself on all the early battlefields of the Army of Northern Virginia. At Fredericksburg, his Mississippians frustrated for hours the attempts of Ambrose E. Burnside's engineers to build their pontoon bridges across the Rappahannock. On July 2, 1863, during the second day's fighting at Gettysburg, Barksdale was mortally wounded leading his Mississippi Brigade, and died the next day within the Union lines. The nicest Barksdale I have ever handled as most are light with little contrast, sharp image. Rare.......................................................................$850.00

6024 - GENERAL JOHN HUNT MORGAN AND WIFE, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Seated view of Morgan wearing a kepi and a double breasted frock coat with rank of brigadier general. He poses with his legs crossed which show off his high black cavalry boots. Standing at his side is his 21 year old bride, Martha (Mattie) Ready, of Murfreesboro, TN, wearing a heavy overcoat. This view was taken in 1863 at the time of their wedding. Backmark: E & H. T. Anthony, New York. Period ink ID on the front mount, Brig. Gen. John H. Morgan, C.S.A, & wife. Excellent. (1825 - 64) saw action in the Mexican War. He organized the Lexington Rifles in 1857, and when the Civil War broke out, he led his command to join the Confederacy. From then until his death his exploits made him one of the legendary figures of the Confederacy. He was promoted to colonel of the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry on April 4, 1862, and brigadier general on December 11th. His series of raids into Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio earned him a vote of thanks from the Confederate Congress and the undying hatred of a large segment of the frightened Northern population. On his most famous raid north of the Ohio in 1863, he was captured near New Lisbon and imprisoned in the Ohio State Penitentiary with several of his officers. But no prison could hold the notorious Confederate raider as he soon escaped. On the night of September 3, 1864, while enroute to attack Union forces near Knoxville, he camped near Greenville, TN. Early the next morning he was surprised by a detachment of Union cavalry and was killed in the garden of the house where he had been sleeping Choice condition, near mint condition with great eye appeal........................................................$350.00

6025 - GENERAL NATHAN B. FORREST, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. Lt. Gen. N. B. Forrest, C.S.A is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E. & H. T. Anthony, New York. (1821 - 1877) a self made man with little formal education, he had acquired by the time of the Civil War a substantial fortune as a planter and slave dealer. He enlisted as a private in the 7th Tennessee Cavalry and raised and equipped at his own expense a battalion of mounted troops, of which he was elected lieutenant colonel in October 1861. As the war progressed, he took part in numerous engagements, and his fame as a cavalry commander became legendary and his exploits went unabated until the end of the war. Union General William T. Sherman was quoted as saying, " that devil Forrest must be hunted down and killed if it costs ten thousand lives and bankrupts the Federal Treasury." During the course of the Civil War, Forrest had 29 horses shot out from under him, killed or seriously maimed at least 30 enemy soldiers in hand to hand combat, and himself suffered 4 wounds. In April 1867, he was elected Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Clan. In 1868, he became President of the Selma, Marion & Memphis Railroad. One of the nicest Anthony examples we have ever handled, excellent contrast and near mint condition.....................................................................$750.00


4001 - CONFEDERATE SURGEON H. GRIFFIN, SURGEON OF THE 50TH VIRGINIA, Carte de Visite by Appleton of NY, 3/4 standing pose in his major's uniform of a Confederate Surgeon with the emblem MS within a wreath on his kepi. Black trimmed cuffs and collar. He enlisted on 11/17/1861 as a Surgeon. On 11/17/1861, he was commissioned into Field & Staff CS. He was transferred out on 1/25/1862. On 1/25/1862, he was commissioned into Field & Staff VA 50th Infantry, (date and method of discharge not given). He was listed as: POW, 2/16/1862 Fort Donelson, TN. Ordered to treat men 3/4/1862 Indianapolis, IN (Ordered to treat men of the 50th), Confined 4/9/1862 Johnson's Island, OH, released 6/23/1862 (place not stated) unconditionally released 7/23/1862 Washington, DC (unconditionally released), issued pay 7/25/1862 (place not stated), (no further record). Identified Confederate surgeons are impossible to fine as nice as this one........................................................SOLD



4002A - GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE
, Carte de Visite by Sarony of NY. A variation of the photo taken by Julian Vannerson in Richmond in early 1864 of Lee in uniform. This pose was sent through the Federal blockade to Europe and was used by Edward Valentine as the model for his statuette of Lee. [See Hopkins pg. 50]. This photo being a smaller version of that photo and published after Lee's death in 1870. Any variation of this pose is very scarce. Great contrast...................................................................
$495.00


3200 - CAPTAIN AUGUSTUS P. PIPER, Carte de Visite, 39th Battalion of VA Cavalry, Company H. Bust pose in frock coat [resembling one A. P. Hill wore]. Old ID on verso "Capt. A. P. Piper, Newberry, SC." Back mark of Clinedist's Gallery, Staunton, VA. Also known as Richardson's Battalion of Scouts, Guides, and Couriers was organized in two companies, later increased to four. It was attached to General HQ, Army of Northern VA and served as Robert E. Lee's personal cavalry command. It participated in every cavalry battle Lee was present from Fredericksburg to Appomattox. On April 9th, 1865, it contained 1 officer and 80 men. Very fine..................................$495.00

3202 - MATTHEW FONTAINE MAURY, CS NAVY, Carte de Visite by Anderson of Richmond, VA. Seated pose with notations on verso that the photo was posed by Edward V. Valentine, the famous sculpture artist. In 1825 at age 19, Maury joined the United States Navy as a midshipman on board the frigate USS Brandywine. Almost immediately he began to study the seas and record methods of navigation. When a leg injury left him unfit for sea duty, Maury devoted his time to the study of navigation, meteorology, winds, and currents. he became Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Observatory and head of the Depot of Charts and Instruments. Here, Maury studied thousands of ships' logs and charts. He published the Wind and Current Chart of the North Atlantic, which showed sailors how to use the ocean's currents and winds to their advantage and drastically reduced the length of ocean voyages. Maury's uniform system of recording oceanographic data was adopted by navies and merchant marines around the world and was used to develop charts for all the major trade routes. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Maury, a Virginian, resigned his commission as a US Navy commander and joined the Confederacy. He spent the war in the South, as well as aboard in Great Britain, Ireland, and France. He helped acquire a ship, CSS Georgia, for the Confederacy while also advocating stopping the war in America among several European Nations. Following the war, Maury accepted a teaching position at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, VA. He died at his V. M. I home in Lexington in 1873 after completing an exhausting state-to-state lecture tour on national and international weather forecasting on land. He had also completed his book on his Geological Survey of Virginia and a new series of georgraphy for young people. I have never seen this photo before, near mint condition..................................................................$495.00




3203 - JEFFERSON DAVIS
, Carte de Visite by Durani & Murer of Paris. A very unusual pose of Jefferson Davis that appears to be just at the beginning of the War. Near mint condition, an exceptional card of the President of the Confederacy, first image we have had of Davis in this pose.........................................................
$250.00




3204 - LEROY POPE WALKER
, Carte de Visite by Anthony. Bust pose of Walker, Secretary of War of the Confederacy, later Davis appointed him a Brigadier General and he served in Mobile and Montgomery, later a military judge. Very fine, quite uncommon..................
$225.00

3205 - GENERAL ALEXANDER P. STEWART, Carte de Visite by Turner & Cohen of New Orleans. Bust pose in Confederate uniform. Stewart accepted a commission as major in the artillery of the Tennessee Militia on may 17. Shortly afterwards he enter the Confederate Army on August 15 as a major of artillery. Stewart was appointed a brigadier general on November 8 and assigned to command the 2nd brigade, 2nd division, Columbus District, of the Confederate Department No. Two (the precursor to the Dept. of Tennessee). Stewart held this position from November 16 until that December, when his brigade was transferred to the Department's First Geographical Division until February 1862. His brigade was then briefly added to  John P. McCown's division in the Department until it joined the Army of Mississippi on April 1. Stewart's brigade was added to the Army of Mississippi's First Corps, under the command of Maj. Gen. Leonidas Polk. He was promoted to divisional command and to major general on June 2, 1863, and he participated in the Tullahoma Campaign that summer. He was in action at the Battle of Marietta in June. He was appointed temporary Lieutenant General on June 23, 1864, and led the Third Corps at the Battle of Ezra Church, where he was wounded in the forehead on July 28. Stewart continued to lead the Third Corps during the Franklin-Nashville Campaign in the fall of 1864, participating in the Second Battle of Franklin that November and the Battle of Franklin that November and the Battle of Nashville in December. What was left of the Army of Tennessee was sent east and fought in the Carolinas Campaign in 1865, once again under the command of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, who placed the Army of Tennessee (by this time fewer than 5,000 men) under the command of Lt. Gen. Alexander P. Stewart. The Army was surrendered on April 26 and Stewart was paroled at Greensboro, NC on May 1. A very rare card, the 2nd we have ever handled. This card we bought recently again after selling it 30 years ago. Very fine.............................$1,500.00

3206 - THE PORT OF LA HAVRE FRANCE, USED BY CONFEDERATE SHIPS DURING THE CIVIL WAR, Carte de Visite, from life no b/m. A view of several ships at the Port of La Havre France with a steamer in the distance sailing off with smoke bellowing from her stacks, very sharp, Civil Vintage photograph, Very fine. It is suspected that the "Alabama" had intended to leave Cherbourg for La Havre for repairs in private docks but was blocked by the Kearsarge. With little choice the Alabama left port and encountered the Kearsarge. She was sunk in battle by the USS Kearsarge in June 1864 at the Battle of Cherbourg outside the port of Cherbourg, France.........................................................$250.00




3207 - ADMIRAL RAPHAEL SEMMES
, Carte de Visite by Anthony/NY. Bust pose of Semmes slightly facing to the right. Commander of the "Alabama". He lost his ship in a battle with the USS Kearsarge in June 1864 off the French coast. Very fine, fresh card..............................................
SOLD

 

3208 - THE KEARSARGE SINKING THE ALABAMA, Carte de Visite no b/m, a very descriptive view of the Kearsarge steaming past the half sunk Alabama with the Rebel flag still flying, quite detailed. Tips of card very slightly tipped, otherwise very fine. The Alabama was sunk off Cherbourg, France in June 1864 with Semmes being plucked from the sea and rescued and brought to England...............................................$175.00

3209 - THE KEARSARGE AND THE ALABAMA, Carte de Visite by Frederick Jones of London. A wonderful view of the sinking Alabama, the Kearsarge, and the British ship that rescued Semmes and part of his crew from the sea by the British yacht Deerhound. As Alabama sank, the injured Semmes threw his sword into the sea, depriving Kearsage's commander Captain John Ancrum Winslow of the traditional surrender ceremony of having it handed over to him as victor. Kearsarge rescued the majority of the survivors, but 41 of Alabama's officers and crew, including Semmes, were rescued by the private British yacht Deerhound, while the Kearsarge stood off to recover her rescue boats as the Alabama sank. Captain Winslow was forced to stand by helplessly and watch Deerhound spirit away to England his much sought after adversary, Captain Semmes and his surviving shipmates. Noted on the card "Painted by Capt. T. W. Anderson, Published & Photo by Frederic Jones. Very fine.............................................................SOLD


3213 - ALEXANDER STEPHENS, VICE PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERACY, AUTOGRAPHED
, Carte de Visite of Stephens seated with his arm on a chair, glasses in his lap by John Golden & Co. Washington. A photo taken in Washington after his release from Fort Warren in Boston Harbor where he was held for five months after his capture in May of 1865. A very rare pose. Boldly autographed in ink on the bottom of the card. Extremely rare signed photo so close to the end of the war as most signed photos of him are later cabinets at an advanced age. Choice condition.......................................................
$1,350.00


21316 - GENERAL JOE WHEELER, Carte de Visite seated pose from life in Confederate uniform facing left, no imprint, Joseph Wheeler (September 10, 1836 - January 25, 1906). He has the rare distinction of serving as a general during war time for two opposing forces: first as a noted cavalry general in the Confederate States Army in the 1860's during the American Civil War, and later as a general in the United States Army during both the Spanish-American War and Philippine-American War near the turn-of-the-twentieth-century. For much of the Civil War, he served as the senior cavalry general in the Army of Tennessee and fought in most of its battles in the Western Theater..................................................$495.00




21317 - GENERAL RICHARD EWELL
, Carte de Visite by Anthony. Bust pose from life in Confederate uniform, had extensive service in the Army of Northern VA. Seven Days, wounded at Groveton, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, surrendered at Sayler's Creek, crisp and fresh card..........................................................
SOLD


21318 - GENERAL WILLIAM RUFFIN COX
, Carte de Visite from life by Giers of Nashville. Bust pose in Confederate uniform. With North Carolina's secession and the outbreak of the Civil War in early 1861, Cox raised and outfitted the "Ellis Artillery Company." He soon afterwards raised an infantry company and was appointed as the major of the 2nd North Carolina by Governor Ellis. He fought in the Battle of Antietam, and was given a promotion to lieutenant colonel, as he and the officer previously holding that rank were promoted with the death of the regiment's first colonel, Charles C. Tew, in that battle. Not long afterwards, the new colonel resigned and Cox assumed command of the veteran regiment. He was formally commissioned as the colonel of the 2nd North Carolina in March 1863. In May of that year, Cox was wounded three times in the fighting at the Battle of Chancellorsville. Despite his painful wounds, he stayed in command until late in the fighting when exhaustion forced him to retire to a field hospital to be treated. Missing the Gettysburg Campaign due to his injuries, Cox did not return to the field until the fall of 1863. While temporarily in command of Ramseur's Brigade because the general was on leave to get married, Cox was wounded in the face and right shoulder early in the battle of Kelly's Ford on November 7, 1863. Shipped to the hospital in Richmond, the wound resulted in a 40-day furlough to recuperate. [Source: Compiled Service Records in National Archives for William R. Cox, Colonel, 2nd North Carolina Infantry]. He fought with distinction at the battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Court House, being personally commended by General Robert E. Lee for bravery in fighting on May 12. Not long afterwards, he was assigned command of a brigade of North Carolina Infantry, despite being junior in rank to other colonels in the brigade. He led his troops at the Battle of Cold Harbor and then accompanied the Army of the Valley under Maj. Gen. Jubal Early in the Shenandoah Valley. At the Battle of Monocacy, Cox's brigade played a prominent role in the day-long fighting. Returning to the Army of Northern Virginia, Cox served in the trench defenses during the Siege of Petersburg, including the counterattack of Confederate forces on the Union's Fort Stedman. Promoted to brigadier general, Cox led a division during the final year of the war, including the Appomattox Campaign. He surrendered his men to the Federal army at Appomattox Court House in April 1865 and returned home. During the course of the war, he survived a total of eleven wounds. Extremely rare and the first example we have ever offered and I only know of only one other in a collection..........................................
SOLD

21319 - GENERAL LOUIS WIGFALL, Carte de Visite by Fredericks, NY. Louis Trezevant Wigfall (April 21, 1816 - February 18, 1874) was an American politician from Texas who served as a member of the Texas Legislature, United States, Senate, and Confederate Senate. Wigfall was among a group of leading secessionists known as Fire-Eaters, advocating the preservation and expansion of an aristocratic agricultural society based on slave labor. He briefly served as a Confederate Brigadier General of the Texas Brigade at the outset of the American Civil War before taking his seat in the Confederate Senate. Wigfall's reputation for oratory and hard-drinking, along with a combative nature and high-minded sense of personal honor made him one of the more imposing political figures of his time. In the days leading up to the start of hostilities, Wigfall advocated an attack on Fort Sumter and Fort Pickens in Florida to prompt Virginia and other upper southern states to join the Confederacy. He arrived in Charleston, South Carolina, as the siege of Fort Sumter commenced. According to diarist Mary Chesnut, he was the only "thoroughly happy person I see." While serving as an aide to General Beauregard during the bombardment of Fort Sumter, and without authorization, he rowed a skiff out to the island fort and demanded its surrender from Major Robert Anderson. The incident was widely reported in the newspapers furthering his celebrity, but the story redacted the important detail that Wigfall had not spoken to Beauregard in two days. When the authorized emissaries arrived at the fort, they were dismayed upon learning that Wigfall had granted terms to Anderson which Beauregard had already rejected......................................................................$225.00

21320 - GENERAL NATHAN BEDFORD FORREST, Carte de Visite by Anthony. Bust pose facing in Confederate uniform. A cavalry and military commander in the war, Forrest is one of the war's most unusual figures. Less educated than many of his fellow officers, Forrest had already amassed a fortune as a planter, real estate investor, and slave trader before the war. He was one of the few officers in either army to enlist as a private and be promoted to general officer and division commander by the end of the war. Although Forrest lacked formal military education, he had a gift for strategy and tactics. He created and established new doctrines for mobile forces, earning the nickname The Wizard of the Saddle. Forrest was accused of war crimes at the Battle of Fort Pillow for allowing forces under his command to conduct a massacre upon hundreds of black Union Army and white Southern Unionist prisoners. Union Major General William T. Sherman investigated the allegations and did not charge Forrest with any improprieties. In their postwar writings, Confederate President Jefferson Davis and General Robert E. Lee both expressed their belief that the Confederate high command had failed to fully utilize Forrest's talents. Better than average contrast for this pose. Immensely popular..............................................................SOLD

21322 - GOVERNOR ZEBULON VANCE, NORTH CAROLINA, Carte de Visite from life by Watson of Raleigh, NC, by the time the ordinance of secession had passed in May 1861, Vance was a captain stationed in Raleigh, commanding a company known as the "Rough and Ready Guards," part of the Fourteenth North Carolina Regiment. That August, Vance was elected Colonel of the Twenty-sixth North Carolina. The Twenty-sixth engaged in battle in New Bern in March 1862, where Vance conducted an orderly retreat. Vance also led the Twenty-sixth at Richmond. The Twenty-sixth was ultimately destroyed at the Battle of Gettysburg, losing more than 700 of its original 800 members, though Vance at that time was no longer in military service. In September 1862, Vance won the gubernatorial election. In the Confederacy Vance was a major proponent of individual rights and local self-government, often putting him at odds with the Confederate government of Jefferson Davis. For example, North Carolina was the only state to observe the right of habeas corpus and keep its courts fully functional during the war. Also, Vance refused to allow supplies smuggled into North Carolina by blockade runners to be given to other states until North Carolinians had their share. Vance's work for the aid and morale of the people, especially in mitigating the harsh Confederate conscription practices, inspired the nickname "War Governor of the South." Vance was re-elected in 1864. On May 29, 1865, William Woods Holden was appointed Governor by President Andrew Johnson. Rare with the Raleigh imprint..........................................................SOLD

21323 - GENERAL CADMUS WILCOX, Carte de Visite in Confederate uniform, no imprint, Wilcox and his command participated in the Battle of Gettysburg in the summer of 1863. On the battle's second day, July 2, his charge against a weakened Union line was met (and held off) by a suicidal brave countercharge from the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. On the third day of the battle, during Pickett's Charge, his brigade served as support on the right flank of the division of his West Point classmate, Maj. Gen. George Pickett. Heavy Union artillery fire, particularly from those guns on Cemetery Ridge under the command of Lt. Col. Freeman McGilvery, readily broke up Wilcox's assault, who ordered the brigade to withdraw. With the death of Dorsey Pender at Gettysburg, Wilcox was promoted to major general on August 3, 1862, and assigned command of Pender's division in Hill's Third Corps. Wilcox's new command consisted of Lane's North Carolina brigade, Thomas's Georgia brigade, McGowan's South Carolina brigade, and Scales's North Carolina brigade. For the rest of the war, Wilcox's Division saw heavy fighting, from the Overland Campaign through Appomattox Court House. During the final days of the Siege of Petersburg in 1865, Wilcox's last-ditch stand on April 2 at Fort Gregg helped delay the Union forces long enough for Longstreet to maneuver into position to cover the army's retreat to the west. Fine, trifle tone................................................SOLD

21324 - COLONEL JAMES W. STARNES, 4TH TENNESSEE CAVALRY, KIA, FORREST BRIGADE COMMANDER, 1817 - 1863, Carte de Visite by J. H. Van Stavorens-Nashville, TN. Facing pose in his Colonel's uniform. During the Mexican War, he served as asst. surgeon of the 1st Tennessee Infantry. He married Mary Christina Rudder on April 19, 1849 and they had five children. When the Civil War broke out he raised a company of cavalry in Williamson County, TN. He was later promoted to Colonel of the 4th Tennessee Cavalry, CSA. By 1863, Dr. Starnes was the commander of a brigade of Forrest's Cavalry and led it in action in Forrest's Brentwood Raid, in the fights around Franklin and the successful pursuit of Streight's raiders in Alabama. During the Tullahoma Campaign, on June 28, 1863, he was mortally wounded by a sharpshooter at Bobo's Crossroads, located between Tullahoma and Manchester. He was taken to the home of A. Y. Smith in Tullahoma where he died. Written in pencil on verso "Genl. Stearns." See Allardice page 255. He remarks that he was called "General" in a book on the Starnes Family. A watercolor/charcoal can be found of him on the internet. Some age tone, small blemish to the top gold border trim but not trimmed or stained. Extremely rare Forrest Brigade commander.................................................................$795.00

21325 - GOVERNOR BERIAH MAGOFFEN, CIVIL WAR GOVERNOR OF KENTUCKY, Carte de Visite by Frederick's of NY, dated 1861, seated pose facing slightly left. Beriah Magoffin (April 18, 1815 - February 28, 1885) was the 21st Governor of Kentucky, serving during the early part of the Civil War. Personally, Magoffin adhered to a states' rights position, including the right of a state to secede from the Union, and he sympathized with the Confederate cause. Nevertheless, when the Kentucky General Assembly adopted a position of neutrality in the war, Magoffin ardently held to it, refusing calls for aid from both the Union and Confederate governments. In special elections held in June 1861, Unionists captured nine of Kentucky's ten congressional seats and obtained two-thirds majorities in both houses of the state legislature. Despite Magoffin's strict adherence to the policy of neutrality, the Unionist legislature did not trust him and routinely overrode his vetoes. Unable to provide effective leadership due to a hostile legislature, Magoffin agreed to resign as governor Linn Boyd had died in office, and Magoffin refused to allow Speaker of the Senate John F. Fisk to succeed him as governor. Accordingly, Fisk resigned and the Kentucky Senate elected Magoffin's choice, James F. Robinson, as speaker. Magoffin then resigned, Robinson ascended to the governorship, and Fisk was re-elected as Speaker of the Senate. A very scarce war period pose seldom seen and most available are years later. Scarce, good quality some wear to mount.....................................................................SOLD

21326 - JOHN SLIDELL, Carte de Visite by Fredericks, bust pose. Slidell, from Louisiana, accepted a diplomatic appointment to represent the Confederacy in France. John Slidell was one of the two CSA diplomats involved in the Trent Affair in November 1861. After having been appointed the Confederate States of America's commissioner to France in September, 1861, he ran the blockade from Charleston, South Carolina, with James Murray Mason of Virginia. They then set sail from Havana on the British mail boat steamer RMS Trent, but were intercepted by the U.S. Navy while en route and taken into captivity at Fort Warren in Boston. Due to public outcry and that of the British they were released. Very fine..............................$85.00





21327 - GENERAL JOHN PEMBERTON
, Carte de Visite by Anthony. Bust pose in uniform, surrendered Vicksburg to Grant July 3rd, 1863 after a long siege by land and by sea, staining to left, quite reasonable................
SOLD




21328 - GENERAL A. P. HILL
, Carte de Visite in Confederate uniform, no imprint, oval albumen in an ornate gold decorative border, light age tone but a nice clear image. Ambrose Powell Hill, Jr. (November 9, 1825 - April 2, 1865) was a career U.S. Army officer in the Mexican-American War and Seminole Wars and a Confederate general in the American Civil War. He gained early fame as the commander of the "Light Division" in the Seven Days Battles and became one of Stonewall Jackson's ablest subordinates, distinguishing himself in the 1862 battles of Cedar Mountain, Second Bull Run, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. Following Jackson's death in May 1863 at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Hill was promoted to lieutenant general and commanded the Third Corps of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, which he led in the Gettysburg Campaign and the fall campaigns of 1863. His command of the corps in 1864-65 was interrupted on multiple occasions by illness, from which he did not return until just before the end of the war, when he was killed during the Union Army offensive at the Third Battle of Petersburg. Some age tone tips of card lightly trimmed...................................................
SOLD

21329 - MAJOR JOHN PELHAM, Carte de Visite in uniform, no imprint. John Pelham (September 7, 1838 - March 17, 1863) was an artillery officer who served with the Confederate cavalry under J. E. B. Stuart during the American Civil War. Dubbed "The Gallant Pelham" for his military prowess and personal courage, Pelham revolutionized the usage of light artillery as a mobile arm of the cavalry. Pelham was involved in every major military engagement of Stuart's cavalry from the First Battle of Bull Run to Kelly's Ford, more than 60 encounters. He particularly distinguished himself as the Chief of Stuart's Artillery in the Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg) and Battle of Fredericksburg. At Sharpsburg, Pelham's guns, positioned on a rise known as Nicodemus Hill, repeatedly harassed the Flanks of oncoming Union lines, causing numerous casualties and breaking up battle formations. Lt. Gen. Stonewall Jackson said of him in his report on the battle, "It is really extraordinary to find such nerve and genius in a mere boy. With a Pelham on each flank I believe I could whip the world." At Fredericksburg, Pelham's guns, positioned well in advance of the main Confederate lines, held up the entire flank of the Union Army of the Potomac for several hours, enabling the Confederates to repel a series of strong attacks. General Robert E. Lee commended Pelham in  his official report for "unflinching courage" while under direct fire from multiple Union batteries. Pelham was, at the time, commanding only two guns that were in service, but with those batteries for a time enfiladed the entire advancing Federal lines of battle. At Kelly's Ford on March 17, 1863, Pelham participated in a cavalry charge, his artillery not being engaged. Standing up in his stirrups, he urged his men to "Press forward, press forward to glory and victory." Not long afterward, he was struck in the head by a fragment of an exploding Federal artillery shell. He was carried six miles from the battlefield to Culpepper Courthouse, and died the following morning without having regained consciousness. Stuart said of his death, in a general order to the rest of his division. First example we have had in years..........................................$895.00


4005 - GENERAL W. N. R. BEALL, Carte de Visite by Gurney of NY. Seated pose in Confederate uniform, Brigadier General William Nelson Rector Beall (1825 - 1883) was the commander of all Confederate Army forces at Port Hudson from around 1 September 1862 until General Franklin Gardner assumed command in late December, 1862. He then was placed in command of the left of the Confederate defenses, and at the time of the May 27th battle, he was in command of the defenses in the center of the line which included the Priest Cap. Around the 1st of September, 1862, Beall was placed in command of the Confederate forces at Port Hudson, and although General Frank Gardner subsequently assumed chief command, General Beall and his brigade continued to be important factors in the gallant defense of the post until its surrender. On July 9th, the post was surrendered, and the men were then paroled and some of them, including General Beall, were never exchanged. General Beall was first imprisoned on Johnson's Island Prison Camp in Ohio. In 1864, Beall was appointed as a Confederate agent for the purpose of supplying Confederate prisoners of war and paroled for this purpose. Beall established an office in New York, New York and sold cotton allowed through the Union blockade of southern ports. The proceeds of these sales were used to purchase clothing and blankets for Confederate prisoners in northern prison camps. Beall was released on 2 August 1865. He moved to St. Louis, Missouri and engaged in business as a general commission merchant. Taken in New York upon his release; on the verso, 25th Feb. 1865............................................................................$695.00

The following photos are believed to originally belong to the family of George Washington Custis Lee. All were in one album that mainly had Miley of Lexington, Virginia backmarks

4011 - MARY CUSTIS LEE SIGNED CARTE DE VISITE, Carte de Visite no imprint. A Virginian, Mary Randolph Custis was the granddaughter of George Washington. She married Robert E. Lee in 1831 and they had seven children. Custis Lee never recovered from the loss of her family home and her George Washington memorabilia to the Union Army. Outliving her husband and two of her daughters, Mrs. Lee poses at the M. Miley studio in Lexington, Virginia, circa 1870. The photo is toned, signed at bottom in ink "Mary Custis Lee". The signature is clear but not bold. Slight bottom trim to card...................................................................SOLD

4012 - GEORGE WASHINGTON CUSTIS LEE SIGNED CARTE DE VISITE, Carte de Visite by Miley of Lexington, VA. George Washington Custis Lee (September 16, 1832 - February 18, 1913), also known as Custis Lee, was the eldest son of Robert E. Lee and Mary Anna Custis Lee. His grandfather--George Washington Custis--was the step-grandson and adopted son of George Washington. He served as a Confederate general in the American Civil War, primarily as an aide-de-camp to President Jefferson Davis, and succeeded his father as president of Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia, c 1870 photo of Lee signed in ink, some light spots, age tone to photo................................................SOLD


4014 - WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY
, Carte de Visite by Boude & Miley, Lexington, VA. A view of the campus taken c. 1869-70 by Michael Miley. Photo has age tone but clear and distinct details to the columned buildings. Very scarce..............................
$350.00

4015 - THE LEE HOUSE AT WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY, Carte de Visite by M. Miley of Lexington, VA, a cir 1869-70 view of the house built for Lee and his family in 1865 by the university when he accepted the role of President of the university. Age tone, card is creased. A rare photograph in spite of the mentioned defects...........................................$200.00

4016 - THE FAMILY BURIAL PLOT OF STONEWALL JACKSON AND HIS FAMILY AT LEXINGTON, VA, Carte de Visite, blind stamp Boude & Miley, Lexington, VA. A cir 1869-70 photograph of the family plot where Thomas J. Stonewall Jackson is buried minus his arm surrounded by an iron fence. The location of the burial is Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Virginia. Some age tone, a very rare image........................$450.00

4017 - COLONEL MONTFORT STOKES, 1ST NORTH CAROLINA, Born on October 6, 1810, at Morne Rouge, Wilkes County, N.C. According to descendants he was born with the name Algernon Sydney Stokes, but he changed his first name to Montfort in honor of his father who fought in the Revolutionary War, and was a U.S. Senator and Governor of North Carolina. The younger Stokes attended the U.S. Military Academy and was a midshipman in the U.S. Navy from 1829-39. He later fought as a major in the Mexican War. He served as captain of the Wilkes County Guards, and was commissioned colonel of the 1st North Carolina Infantry, on May 16, 1861. He was mortally wounded in action on June 26, 1862, in the battle of Mechanicsville, VA, and died in a Richmond hospital on July 8, 1862. He was known as a splendid officer who always was prepared. Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Superb seated view of the bespectacled Stokes wearing a double breasted Confederate frock coat and holding his sword. No imprint. Corners of the mount are very slightly trimmed. Extremely desirable Confederate image. Rare, very fine....................................................................$895.00


4019 - CAPTAIN ALEXANDER R. CHISOLM
, Captain Alexander R. Chisolm: (1834-1910) born in Beaufort, South Carolina. He attended Columbia University. He served as General P.G.T. Beauregard's aide-de-camp, from 1861-65. He signed an oath of allegiance to the U.S. Government at Charleston, S.C. on September 23, 1865. After the war, he was engaged in the publishing business. Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 X 4 1/4 card. Bust view wearing double breasted Confederate uniform coat with rank of captain on his collar. Hand tinted in color. No imprint. Light age toning.............................................
$895.00

4020 - GENERAL DANIEL H. HILL, (1821-89) He graduated in the West Point class of 1842, and fought in the Mexican War earning two brevets for gallantry. He was the brother-in-law of legendary Confederate General Stonewall Jackson. Before the Civil War, he served as superintendent of the North Carolina Military Institute. At the outbreak of the war, he became Colonel of the 1st North Carolina Infantry. Soon afterwards he was appointed general, and on June 8, 1861, won the first land battle of the war at Big Bethel Church, VA. He fought with distinction at Yorktown, Williamsburg, the Seven Days battles, 2nd Manassas, South Mountain and Sharpsburg. While the Army of Northern Virginia was invading Pennsylvania and fighting at Gettysburg. D. H. Hill defended Richmond and was promoted to lieutenant general on July 11, 1863. He then fought with the Army of Tennessee, commanding a corps at Chickamauga. In 1864, he served at Petersburg, and ended the war fighting under General J. E. Johnston in the 1865 Carolina campaign carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Chest up view wearing double breasted Confederate uniform coat. No imprint. Minor age toning and wear. Very nice image with great clarity and contrast. Extremely rare...............................................................SOLD

4021 - GENERAL FRANKLIN GARDNER, (1823-73) Graduated in the West Point class of 1843. He fought in the Mexican War earning two brevets (Monterey & Cerro Gordo) for gallantry. He was appointed lieutenant colonel in the Regular Confederate Army in early 1861. Commanded a cavalry brigade at the battle of Shiloh, and was promoted to brigadier general, April 11, 1862. During Bragg's invasion of Kentucky, he commanded a brigade in Polk's corps. Gardner was placed in command of the Mississippi River stronghold, at Port Hudson, LA, which he was forced to surrender in July 1863. After his exchange in August 1864, he served in Mississippi under General Dick Taylor. Gardner spent his post war years on his plantation in Vermillionville, now Lafayette, Louisiana, where he died on April 29, 1873. Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view in Confederate general's uniform, in an oval format within a gold medallion frame. Backmark: Ben Oppenheimer, Photograph Gallery, 56 Dauphin St.., Mobile. Light age toning and wear. Very sharp image. This view shows a very vibrant looking General Gardner and was taken prior to his capture at Port Hudson in July 1863 and before his incarceration in a Yankee prison which took a noticeable, physical toll on him. Very rare. This is the first General Gardner image that I've encountered with a Mobile imprint.....................................SOLD

4022 - GENERAL JOHN BELL HOOD, (1831-79) Graduated in the West Point class of 1853. He resigned his U.S. Army commission on April 17, 1861, and thereafter distinguished himself on many Civil War battlefields as a regimental, brigade, division and army commander. The hard fighting Hood saw action in the Virginia peninsular campaign, 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, he was severely wounded at Gettysburg, lost a leg at Chickamauga, and later fought at Atlanta, Franklin and Nashville. He died of yellow fever at New Orleans, LA, together with his wife and one of their children, on Aug. 30, 1879. Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view in Confederate uniform. Backmark: S. T. Blessing, No. 24, Chartres St. New Orleans. Light age toning and wear with some light staining along the left edge. Subject has nice rich tones. A very desirable imprint New Orleans imprint.........................................................SOLD

4023 - GENERAL JAMES B. GORDON, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph. Bust view in Confederate uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: Vannerson & Jones, Photographers, Richmond, VA. Sharp image. This view was taken by Vannerson & Jones in Richmond, sometime between September 1862 and May 1864. This is one of only two known war time views of Gordon (1822-64) command, assigning the 1st North Carolina Cavalry to the brigade of General Wade Hampton. Gordon and the regiment served with great distinction throughout the major campaigns and cavalry raids during the summer and fall of 1862. In the 2nd Manassas campaign, in the battle of Sharpsburg, and in Stuart's Dumfries raid, Gordon exhibited conspicuous gallantry, intelligence and leadership, and was fast earning a reputation as a superb combat officer and someone destined for promotion. The greatest cavalry battle of the war took place at Brandy Station, VA., on June 9, 1862, and Hampton's brigade fought savagely. The North Carolinians were engaged in the thick of the fighting, crushing a Yankee brigade. On July 3rd at Gettysburg, the 1st North Carolina Cavalry once again fought gallantly, with Gordon assuming command of the regiment during the battle. During the Confederate retreat from Gettysburg, Stuart's cavalry protected the army's rear, and at Hagerstown, MD., on July 5th , Gordon led his regiment and part of the 5th North Carolina Cavalry, in a counterattack that routed the brigade of General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick. On September 28, 1863, Gordon was promoted to rank of brigadier general, and assigned to command the North Carolina Brigade; consisting of the 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 5th cavalry regiments. Within days, he led his command in the Bristoe Campaign, and although he was wounded on October 13th at Auburn Mill, VA., he refused to relinquish command. Six days later at Buckland, VA., Gordon again distinguished himself. During the Mine Run Campaign in November, he had a horse shot out from under him in an action near Parker's Store. He then led his brigade in the 1864 Overland Campaign. When General Phil Sheridan's cavalry made a raid towards Richmond, Stuart's cavalry intercepted them north of the city. General James B. Gordon fell mortally wounded on May 12, 1864, near Meadow Bridge, and died in Richmond 6 days later. His remains were returned to his native North Carolina for burial in Wilkesborough. Gordon was one of a handful of non-Virginians in General J. E. B. Stuart's cavalry corps who had distinguished himself. He performed very capably at every level of command, serving with honor and gallantry, and his loss was deeply felt in the cavalry corps of the Army of Northern Virginia. Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 3 1/4 card. Card is trimmed. Bust view in Confederate uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: Vannerson & Jones, Photographers, Richmond, VA. Sharp image. This view was taken by Vannerson & Jones in Richmond, sometime between September 1862 and May 1864. This is one of only two known war time views of Gordon. An extremely rare carte de visite! Small blemish on card at top border..............................SOLD

4023 - JEFFERSON DAVIS, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 X 3 7/8 card. Mount is slightly trimmed. Standing view of Jefferson Davis posing with his hands on the back of a cushioned studio chair. Imprint on the front mount: entered according to the Act of Congress in the District Court of Virginia, July 8, 1867, by D. H. Anderson. Backmark: Anderson & CO, Richmond, VA. Light age toning and wear. This image was taken in Richmond just after Jefferson Davis was released from confinement at Fortress Monroe. You can see the wear on the gaunt face of the rail thin Davis after suffering the fall of the Confederacy and two years of harsh imprisonment at the hands of the Union authorities. It is a very rare view.............................................................$450.00

4023A - GENERAL SIMON BUCKNER SIGNED CARTE DE VISITE, Carte de Visite by new Orleans Photographic Co., bust pose in Confederate uniform. Buckner accepted a commission in the Confederate Army after declining a similar commission to the Union Army. In 1862, he accepted Ulysses S. Grant's demand for an "unconditional surrender" at the Battle of Fort Donelson. He was the first Confederate general to surrender an army in the war. He participated in Braxton Bragg's failed invasion of Kentucky and near the end of the war became chief of staff to Edmund Kirby Smith in the Trans-Mississippi Department. CDV autographed on the verso to Mrs. Pugh with compliments, S. B. Buckner Lt. Gen. CSA, New Orleans, June 23rd, 1866. The card has been trimmed to fit into an album not affecting the photo or signature. Otherwise fine..............................................................SOLD



4026 - YOUNG REBEL OFFICER TAKEN IN MEMPHIS
, Carte de Visite taken by Y. Day of Memphis, TN. J. F. Coonley Photographer, a seated pose of a young Rebel officer wearing a frock coat with double buttons and his kepi lies on a nearby table. Very fine, scarce Western front photographer.........................................................
$295.00



100822 - GENERAL SAMUEL COOPER, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Jones of Richmond, VA. Profile posed facing left from life. The card has age tone but a rare from life pose of Cooper. Quite a scarce view.............$125.00

 

11049 - GENERAL JOSEPH FINNEGAN, Carte de Visite by E & T Anthony. Waist up pose in Confederate uniform. In April 1862, Finnegan assumed command of Middle and East Florida from Brigadier General P. G. T. Beauregard began rushing reinforcements to Finnegan. Some Finnegan detractors believe he did little more to contribute to the Confederate victory at Olustee than to shuttle troops forward to General Alfred H. Colquitt of Georgia, whom they credit for thwarting the Federal advance. They point out that Finnegan was quickly relieved of his command over the state troops, replaced by Major General James Patton Anderson. But this change in command was necessary as Finnegan was ordered to lead the "Florida Brigade" in the Army of Northern Virginia. And, he performed with excellence in that capacity until near the end of the war. Confederate officials became aware of a build-up of Federal troops in the occupied city of Jacksonville. As Florida was a vital supply route and source of beef to the other southern states, they could not allow it to fall completely into Union hands. On February 20, 1864, Finnegan stopped a Federal advance from Jacksonville under General Truman Seymour that was intent upon capturing the state capitol at Tallahassee. Their two armies clashed at the Battle of Olustee, where Finnegan's men defeated the Union Army and forced them to flee back beyond the Saint John's River. Critics have faulted Finnegan for failing to exploit his victory by pursuing his retreating enemy, contenting himself by salvaging their arms and ammunition from the battlefield. But, his victory was one rare bright spot in an otherwise gloomy year for the dying Confederacy. A rare FLORIDA General. From life pose in Confederate uniform from the waist up, choice.......................SOLD




11050 - GENERAL CUSTIS LEE
, Carte de Visite, son of Robert E. Lee. Bust pose in Confederate uniform. While this card has no backmark [has a revenue stamp]. It resembles nearly exactly the Vannerson pose of Custis Lee which we have handled many times before. Quite nice and half the price of a Vannerson card...............................................
SOLD

11052 - GENERAL MANSFIELD LOVELL, Carte de Visite by Anthony, (October 20, 1822 - June 1, 1884) was a major general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. As military commander of New Orleans when the city unexpectedly fell to the Union Navy in 1862, Lovell was fiercely criticized by local citizens for failing to predict a naval invasion. The Confederate government also heaped blame on him, to deflect attention from their own error in leaving so few troops to defend the city. He then commanded an infantry division under Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn at the Second Battle of Corinth in Mississippi. He was later relieved of command as a consequence of his poor performance at New Orleans. Stung by this reprimand, he demanded a court of inquiry, which met in April 1863 and declared him innocent of charges of incompetence. However, he was not given any assignments for the rest of the Civil War. Beautiful seated pose in Confederate uniform from life, choice.....................$495.00

11053 - GENERAL JOSEPH WHEELER, Carte de Visite by Brady, (September 10, 1836 - January 25, 1906) was an American military commander and politician. He has the rare distinction of serving as a general during war time for two opposing forces: first as a noted cavalry general in the Confederate States Army in the 1860s during the American Civil War, and later as a general in the United States Army during both the Spanish-American War and Philippine-American War near the turn-of-the-twentieth-century. For much of the Civil War, he served as the senior cavalry general in the Army of Tennessee and fought in most of its battles in the Western Theater. Between the Civil War and the Spanish-American War, Wheeler served multiple terms as a United States Representative from the State of Alabama. Nice seated pose in Confederate uniform from life, choice........................................................$795.00

11055 - GENERAL BENJAMIN HUGER, Carte de Visite by Anthony, (November 22, 1805 - December 7, 1877) was a career United States Army ordnance officer who fought with distinction during the Mexican-American War. He also served as a Confederate general officer during the American Civil War, noted for his controversial performances while in charge of Norfolk, Virginia, and during the 1862 Peninsula Campaign. Relieved of field duty, he would spend most of the remainder of the conflict in staff positions in the Trans-Mississippi Department, where he performed well. Following combat service on the Virginia Peninsula in 1862, Huger was assigned to be assistant Inspector General of artillery and ordnance for the Army of Northern Virginia. He held this post from his relief on June 12 until August, when he was sent to the Confederate Trans-Mississippi Department. Huger was made the department's inspector of artillery and ordnance on August 26, and then was promoted to command of all ordnance within the department in July 1863. This position Huger held until the end of the American Civil War in 1865, when he surrendered along with Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith and the rest of the Confederate Trans-Mississippi forces. Huger was paroled from Shreveport, Louisiana, on June 12 of that same year and returned to civilian life. A choice card from life in Confederate uniform from the waist up, very scarce................................................$595.00

11056 - GENERAL P. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Carte de Visite by Brady, (May 28, 1818 - February 20, 1893) was a Louisiana-born American military officer, politician, inventor, writer, civil servant, and the first prominent general of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. Today he is commonly referred to as P. G. T. Beauregard, but he rarely used his first name as an adult. He signed correspondence as G. T. Beauregard. Trained as a civil engineer at the United States Military Academy, Beauregard served with distinction as an engineer in the Mexican-American War. Following a brief appointment at West Point in 1861, after the South seceded he resigned from the US Army and became the first Confederate brigadier general. He commanded the defenses of Charleston, South Carolina, at the start of the Civil War at Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861. Three months later he won the First Battle of Bull Run near Manassas, Virginia. Beauregard commanded armies in the Western Theater, including at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee, and the Siege of Corinth in northern Mississippi. He returned to Charleston and defended it in 1863 from repeated naval and land attacks by Union forces. His greatest achievement was saving the important industrial city of Petersburg, Virginia in June 1864, and thus the nearby Confederate capital of Richmond, from assaults by overwhelmingly superior Union Army forces. But, his influence over Confederate strategy was lessened by his poor professional relationships with President Jefferson Davis and other senior generals and officials. In April 1865, Beauregard and his commander, General Joseph E. Johnston, convinced Davis and the remaining cabinet members that the war needed to end. Johnston surrendered most of the remaining armies of the Confederacy, including Beauregard and his men, to Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman. Waist up pose in Confederate uniform from life, scarce Brady imprint. Very fine.............................................................$525.00

11057 - GENERAL W. F. ROONEY LEE, Carte de Visite. Bust pose in Confederate uniform from life. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Lee was commissioned as a captain in the Confederate Army cavalry and was soon promoted to major. He initially served in western Virginia under the command of Brig. Gen. William Loring during 1861 and early 1862. He was assigned to the command of Maj. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, where he was promoted to lieutenant colonel, and later as colonel of the 9th Virginia Cavalry. After the Battle of South Mountain, Lee was promoted to brigadier general . He fought at Antietam under the command of Brig. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee, his cousin. He commanded the 3rd Brigade of Stuart's Cavalry Division at the Battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. He was wounded during combat at Brandy Station at the beginning of the Gettysburg Campaign and was captured by Union forces at Hickory Hill, Virginia, two weeks later, while recuperating. He was shipped to New York State, where he was held as a prisoner of war until returned to the Confederate Army on February 25, 1864. He was exchanged for the Confederate captive, Union Brig. Gen. Neal S. Dow. In April, Lee was promoted to major general and commanded a division in the Cavalry Corps during the breakout from Petersburg and the retreat of his father's army in the Campaign. By the end of the war, Rooney Lee had risen to second-in-command of the Confederate cavalry. He surrendered along with his father at Appomattox Court House. Nice card......................$275.00

11058 - GENERAL JUBAL EARLY, Carte de Visite by Anthony (November 3, 1816 - March 2, 1894) was a lawyer and Confederate general in the American Civil War. He served under Stonewall Jackson and then Robert E. Lee for almost the entire war, rising from regimental command to lieutenant general and the command of an infantry corps in the Army of Northern Virginia. He was the Confederate commander in key battles of the Valley Campaigns of 1864, including a daring raid to the outskirts of Washington, D.C. The articles written by him for the Southern Historical Society in the 1870s established the Lost Cause point of view as a long-lasting literary and cultural phenomenon. Bust pose in Confederate uniform from life, choice card..............................................................SOLD

11059 - COMMANDER JOHN NEWLAND MAFFITT, Carte de Visite, seated pose of Maffitt in uniform, no imprint but from life (February 22, 1819 - May 15, 1886) was an officer in the Confederate States Navy who was nicknamed the "Prince of Privateers" due to his remarkable success as a blockade runner and commerce raider in the U.S. Civil War. On August 17, 1862, he became the first commanding officer of the cruiser CSS Florida, taking her through a difficult outfitting period during which most of the ship's company was stricken with yellow fever. While in port in Cuba, Commander Maffitt himself contracted the disease. In this condition, Maffitt sailed Florida from Cárdenas, Cuba to Mobile, Alabama. With the way into Mobile Bay blocked by Union warships, Florida braved a hail of projectiles from the blockaders and raced through them to anchor beneath the guns of Fort Morgan. The bombardment from the blockaders was severe and the damage to Florida was so great that Maffitt did not return to sea for more than three months. To prevent his escape, the Union Navy increased the blockading force near Mobile. Having taken stores and gun accessories the ship lacked, along with added crew members, Maffitt waited for a violent storm before setting out on January 16, 1863. He used trickery to lose six pursuing blockaders. After coaling at Nassau, Bahamas, Florida spent 6 months off North and South America and in the West Indies, with calls at neutral ports, all the while making captures and eluding the large Federal squadron pursuing her. It was during this period that he acquired the nickname "Prince of Privateers" (which was somewhat inaccurate, since he was a naval officer and not an actual privateer). Maffitt was promoted to the rank of Commander in May 1863 "for gallant and meritorious conduct in command of the steam sloop Florida." Ill health due to the lingering effects of yellow fever forced him to relinquish command of Florida at Brest, France on February 12, 1864. In the summer of 1864, after returning to the Confederate States, Maffitt was given command of the ironclad ram CSS Albemarle. Under Maffitt's command, Albemarle dominated the Roanoke River and the approaches to Plymouth,  North Carolina throughout the summer. In September, he was given command of the blockade runner CSS Owl. On October 3, Owl escaped to sea from Wilmington; the blockaders wounded her captain and several crewmen but 9 shots failed to stop them, and Owl arrived in Bermuda on October 24 with a large and valuable cargo of cotton. Maffitt made several more successful runs through the Union blockade in Owl before the war ended. During his service to the Confederacy, Maffitt repeatedly ran the blockade to carry needed supplies and captured and destroyed more than seventy prizes worth $10 to $15 million. This pose is usually published by Fredericks. While the care does not have an imprint it has the quality of a Fredericks' card. Very fine..............................................................$250.00


11060 - PRESIDENT JEFFERSON DAVIS
, Carte de Visite by Anthony, Mexican War service leading Mississippi troops, Secretary of War, President of the Confederate States throughout the Civil War. One of the views taken by Brady in 1858 with Davis with his hand on a book staring slightly towards the camera, fine...........................................
SOLD




11061 - PRESIDENT JEFFERSON DAVIS
, Carte de Visite, no imprint, Mexican War service leading Mississippi troops, Secretary of War, President of the Confederate States throughout the Civil War. One of the views taken by Brady in 1858 with Davis with his hand on a book staring way away from the camera, fine...................................................
$225.00

11063 - GENERAL JOHN C. PEMBERTON, Carte de Visite, no imprint (August 10, 1814 - July 13, 1881), was a career United States Army officer who fought in the Seminole Wars and with distinction during the Mexican-American War. He also served as a Confederate general during the American Civil War, noted for his defeat and surrender in the critical Siege of Vicksburg in the summer of 1863. On October 10, 1862, Pemberton was promoted to the rank of lieutenant general, and assigned to defend the fortress city of Vicksburg to Grant on July 3rd, 1863. Later he commanded artillery in the defense of Richmond and later surrendered in North Carolina. An unusually CDV nice from life image of Pemberton who is never seen in an actual Confederate uniform. Those that are on the market are contrived by an artist in the Anthony studio. This one is the nicest one we have ever offered. Crystal sharp, choice...........................................................$650.00

11064 - GENERAL FITZ HUGH LEE, Carte de Visite by Vannerson and Jones of Richmond (November 19, 1835 - April 28, 1905) was a Confederate cavalry general in the American Civil War, the 40th Governor of Virginia, diplomat, and United States Army general in the Spanish-American War. He was the son of Sydney Smith Lee, a captain in the Confederate States Navy, and the nephew of General Robert E. Lee. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel of the 1st Virginia Cavalry in August 1861, serving under Colonel J. E. B. Stuart. Lee became colonel of the regiment in March 1862 and was promoted to brigadier general on July 24, 1862. During the Northern Virginia Campaign, Lee received notoriety by arriving late for a concentration of cavalry, which allowed Federal cavalry to raid Stuart's headquarters and capture his famous plumed hat and cape. However, during the subsequent Confederate raid on Catlett's Station, he captured the headquarters tent and dress uniform of Union Maj. Gen. John Pope. Lee gave Pope's coat to Stuart as compensation for the hat he had lost. Lee performed well in the Maryland Campaign of 1862, covering the Confederate infantry's withdrawal from South Mountain, delaying the Union Army advance to Sharpsburg, Maryland, before the Battle of Antietam, and covering his army's re-crossing of the Potomac River into Virginia. He conducted the cavalry action of Kelly's Ford (March 17, 1863) with skill and success, where his 400 troopers captured 150 men and horses with a loss of only 14 men. In the Battle of Chancellorsville in May 1863, Lee's reconnaissance found that the Union Army's right flank was "in the air", which allowed the successful flanking attack by Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, a movement led by Lee's cavalry. After Chancellorsville, Lee was incapacitated by inflammatory rheumatism, missing a month of action, which included the significant cavalry operations at the Battle of Brandy Station. He recovered in time to lead a brigade in Jeb Stuart's ride around the Union Army in the early days of the Gettysburg Campaign, with his most significant contribution being at the Battle of Carlisle. During the Battle of Gettysburg, his brigade fought unsuccessfully in the action at East Cavalry Field. Stuart's report singled out no officer in his command for praise except Fitz Lee, who he said was "one of the finest cavalry leaders on the continent, and richly [entitled] to promotion." Lee was promoted to major general on August 3, 1863. In the Overland and Petersburg campaigns of 1864, he was constantly employed as a divisional commander under Stuart, and after Stuart's death, under Maj. Gen. Wade Hampton. Hampton, who had been Lee's peer for much of the war, was promoted to replace Stuart due to his seniority and greater level of experience; some observers at the time had cynically expected Robert E. Lee's nephew to receive the command. When General Hampton was sent to assist General Joseph E. Johnston in North Carolina, the command of the whole of Robert E. Lee's cavalry devolved upon Fitzhugh Lee on March 29, 1865, but the surrender at Appomattox followed quickly upon the opening of the campaign. Fitzhugh Lee himself led the last charge of the Confederates on April 9 that year at Farmville, Virginia. Large bust pose from life in Confederate uniform. Very fine.............................$350.00




7033 - GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE
, Carte de Viste by Brady, [Anthony/Brady imprint]. Taken in Washington by Brady in May 1869, slightly facing to the camera. Meredith states that this pose is probably the most eloquent of the poses taken by Brady at that sitting and has never been surpassed in simple honesty of the other poses of Lee. Very fine............................................
SOLD




7034 - JOHN HUNT MORGAN
, Carte de Viste by Elrod of Louisville, KY. Morgan as a Captain obviously taken from an ambrotype as a small tip of the gold mat shows. Excellent detail. Morgan is best known for Morgan's Raid when, in 1863, he and his men rode over 1,000 miles covering a region from Tennessee, up through Kentucky, into Indiana and on to southern Ohio. This would be the farthest north any uniformed Confederate troops penetrated during the war. Killed in Tennessee in 1864.....................................................
$225.00





7035 - PRESIDENT JEFFERSON DAVIS
, Carte de Viste by Jones & Vanerson of Richmond, bust pose as President of the Confederate States. Revenue stamp on verso, fine.............................................................
$395.00







7036 - JEFFERSON DAVIS
, Carte de Viste of Davis, no imprint, Davis wears a military uniform with two stars. This view was published by Fredericks in 1861 as the available image as the war started. Very fine.....................
$195.00


6180 - GENERAL W. H. F. ROONEY LEE, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose in Confederate uniform from life. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Lee was commissioned as a captain in the Confederate Army cavalry and was soon promoted to major. He initially served in western Virginia under the command of Brig. Gen. William Loring during 1861 and early 1862. He was assigned to the command of Maj. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, where he was promoted to lieutenant colonel, and later as colonel of the 9th Virginia Cavalry. After the Battle of South Mountain, Lee was promoted to brigadier general. He fought at Antietam under the command of Brig. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee, his cousin. He commanded the 3rd Brigade of Stuart's Cavalry Division at the Battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. He was wounded during combat at Brandy Station at the beginning of the Gettysburg Campaign and was captured by Union forces at Hickory Hill, Virginia, two weeks later, while recuperating. He was shipped to New York State, where he was held as a prisoner of war until returned to the Confederate Army on February 25, 1864. He was exchanged for the Confederate captive, Union Brig. Gen. Neal S. Dow. In April, Lee was promoted to major general and commanded a division in the Cavalry Corps during the breakout from Petersburg and the retreat of his father's army in the Campaign. By the end of the war, Rooney Lee had risen to second-in-command of the Confederate cavalry. He surrendered along with his father at Appomattox Court House. Nice card..............................................................$275.00

6181 - GENERAL A. P. HILL, Carte de Viste by Anthony. A very rare pose with an Anthony backmark, from life in Confederate uniform. Usually the Anthony cards portray a touched up bust pose of Hill. This example is a high quality image from life usually seen on Richmond back marked cards. Hill gained early fame as the commander of the "Light Division" in the Seven Days Battles and became one of Stonewall Jackson's ablest subordinates, distinguishing himself in the 1862 battles of Cedar Mountain, Second Bull Run, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. Following Jackson's death in May 1863 at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Hill was promoted to lieutenant general and commanded the Third Corps of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, which led in the Gettysburg Campaign and the fall campaigns of 1863. His command of the corps in 1864-65 was interrupted on multiple occasions by illness, from which he did not return until just before the end of the war, when he was killed during the Union Army offensive at the Third Battle of Petersburg. Choice condition, a very rare pose................................................................SOLD

6182 - GENERAL WILLIAM HARDEE, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Pose of Hardee standing with sword, hat in hand. At the Battle of Perryville in October 1862, Hardee commanded the Left Wing of Bragg's army. In his arguably most successful battle, Stones River that December, his Second Corps launched a massive surprise assault that drove Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecran's army almost to defeat. After the Tullahoma Campaign, Hardee returned to Bragg's army after the Battle of Chickamauga, taking over the corps of Leonidas Polk at Chattanooga, Tennessee, besieging the Union Army there. At the Battle of Chattanooga in November 1863, Hardee's Corps of the Army of Tennessee was defeated when Union troops under Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas assaulted their seemingly impregnable defensive lines on Missionary Ridge. During the Atlanta Campaign after the Battle of Jonesboro in August and September, he requested a transfer and was sent to command the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. He opposed Sherman's March to the Sea as best he could with inadequate forces, eventually evacuating Savannah, Georgia on December 20. As Sherman turned north in the Carolinas Campaign, Hardee took part in the Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina, in March 1865, where his only son, 16-year-old Willie, was mortally wounded in a cavalry charge. In fact, Johnston's plan for Bentonville was for Hardee to engage one of Sherman's wings at Averasborough so that Johnston could deal with one wing piecemeal. The plan was unsuccessful. He surrendered along with Johnston to Sherman on April 26 at Durham Station. Nice card................................................SOLD

6183 - GENERAL ROGER HANSON, Carte de Viste by Anthony, 3/4 standing pose in Confederate uniform. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Kentucky remained neutral and stayed in the Union. Hanson was named as colonel of a regiment of Confederate troops he raised in Lexington, Kentucky. When President Abraham Lincoln sent Federal troops into Lexington Infantry were "orphaned" as they could never return home until Lexington fell to the Confederates (which did not occur). They were taken prisoner with the surrender of Fort Donelson. After being exchanged, Hanson was presented with a new horse by admiring friends. he rejoined the army and was promoted to brigadier general in December 1862, commanding his old regiment as well as the 4th, 6th, and 19th Kentucky Infantry regiments, the 41st Alabama regiment, and Cobb's Battery in Breckinridge's Division, Hardee's corps. In his first battle as a general, Hanson was severely wounded on January 2, 1863, during a charge at Murfreesboro (Stones River) when he was struck above the knee by the fuse of a spent artillery shell. His brother-in-law vainly tried to stop the bleeding. He died two days later at the age of 35. Choice card............................................$295.00

6184 - GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Waist up pose in Confederate uniform. Longstreet's talents as a general made significant contributions to the Confederate victories at Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg, and Chickamauga, in both offensive and defensive roles. He also performed strongly during the Seven Days Battles, the Battle of Antietam, and until he was seriously wounded, at the Battle of the Wilderness. His performance in a semiautonomous command during the Knoxville Campaign resulted in a Confederate defeat. His most controversial service was at the Battle of Gettysburg, where he disagreed with General Lee on the tactics to be employed and reluctantly supervised the disastrous infantry assault known as Pickett's Charge. Photo has excellent contrast for this Anthony pose. Corners slightly tipped...................................SOLD


6185 - GENERAL RICHARD EWELL
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Waist up pose in Confederate uniform. He achieved fame as a senior commander under Stonewall Jackson and Robert e. Lee and fought effectively through much of the war, but his legacy has been clouded by controversies over his actions at the Battle of Gettysburg and at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. A BEAUTIFUL CARD, choice...............................................
$225.00

6186 - GENERAL NATHAN B. FORREST, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose in Confederate uniform, a cavalry and military commander in officers, Forrest had already amassed a fortune as a planter, real estate investor, and slave trader before the war. He was one of the few officers in either army to enlist as a private and be promoted to general officer and division commander by the end of the war. Although Forrest lacked formal military education, he had a gift for strategy and tactics. He created and established new doctrines for mobile forces, earning the nickname The Wizard of the Saddle. Forrest was accused of war crimes at the Battle of Fort Pillow for allowing forces under his command to conduct a massacre upon hundreds of black Union Army and white Southern Unionist prisoners. Union Major General William T. Sherman investigated the allegations and did not charge Forrest with any improprieties. In their postwar writing, Confederate President Jefferson Davis and General Robert E. Lee both expressed their belief that the Confederate high command had failed to fully utilize Forrest's talents. A very nice card in choice condition, as nice as you will find in this Anthony pose..........................................................SOLD

6189 - GENERAL THOMAS ROSSER, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose from life in Confederate uniform. Rosser was commissioned a first lieutenant and became an instructor to the famed "Washington Artillery" of New Orleans. He commanded its Second Company at the First Battle of Manassas in July 1861. He commanded his battery during the Seven Days Battles of the Peninsula Campaign, and was severely wounded at Mechanicsville. He commanded the advance of J. E. B. Stuart's expedition to Catlett's Station, and was notable in the Second Battle of Bull Run, where captured Union commander John Pope's orderly and horses. During the fighting at Crampton's Gap at the Battle of South Mountain, his cavalry delayed the advance of William B. Franklin's VI Corps with help from John Pelham's artillery. At Antietam, his men screened Robert E. Lee's left flank. He was again badly wounded at the Battle of Kelly's Ford, where "the gallant" Pelham was killed. Rosser was disabled until the Gettysburg Campaign, where he commanded his regiment in the fighting at Hanover and the East Cavalry Field at Gettysburg. He was promoted to brigadier general of the "Laurel Brigade," which had gained fame under Turner Ashby. Rosser was yet again wounded at Trevilian Station, where his brigade captured a number of prisoners from former West Point classmate and close personal friend George Armstrong Custer. The Federal rout at Trevilian Station became known to the Confederate forces as the "Buckland Races." His brigade later gallantly fought against Philip Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley, and he efficiently commanded Fitzhugh Lee's division at Cedar Creek. A near MINT card, scarce.................................................................SOLD

6190 - GENERAL ALBERT PIKE, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose in his usual attire always seen. Pike was commissioned as a brigadier general on November 22, 1861, and given a command in the Indian Territory. With Gen. Ben McCulloch, Pike trained three Confederate regiments of Indian cavalry, most of whom belonged to the "civilized tribes", whose loyalty to the Confederacy was variable. Although initially victorious at the Battle of Pea Ridge (Elkhorn Tavern) in March, Pike's unit was defeated later in a counterattack, after falling into disarray. Also, as in the previous war, Pike came into conflict with his superior officers, at one point drafting a letter to Jefferson Davis complaining about his direct superior after Pea Ridge, Pike was faced with charges that his troops had scalped soldiers in the field. Maj. Gen. Thomas C. Hindman also charged Pike with mishandling of money and material, ordering his arrest. Both these charges were later found to be considerably lacking in evidence; nevertheless Pike, facing arrest, escaped into the hills of Arkansas, sending his resignation from the Confederate Army on July 12. He was at length arrested on November 3 under charges of insubordination and treason, and held briefly in Warren, Texas, but his resignation was accepted on November 11 and he was allowed to return to Arkansas. Light tone................................SOLD




51126 - JEFFERSON DAVIS AND HIS WIFE
, Carte de Viste by Howe of Columbus, Ohio. Davis stands at the side of his wife seated. This pose was taken in Montreal in 1867 after his release from prison. A very sharp image, a very nice and scarce card.......................................................
SOLD


32314 - GENERAL JEB STUART
, Carte de Viste by Anthony, seated pose with hat and sword, much better than average contrast, chip at top albumen totally unaffecting the image, otherwise a great example..............................................
SOLD



32315 - GENERAL BUSHROD JOHNSON
, Carte de Viste, bust pose in Confederate uniform which is very rare. Giers of Nashville, TN, trifle light........................
$595.00


22501 - GENERAL JOHN BELL HOOD, Carte de Viste probably done by Cook of Charleston. A large waist up format on light rose "blockade paper". Just an outstanding Hood and one of the best we have seen. This CDV one was in the famous "Charleston Album" that was discovered in Charleston in the late 1980's by R. E. Neville. This album had some of the finest quality Confederate CDV's ever on the market and we have sold several over the years from that album. The cardstock ranged from lemon yellow, rose to a pale blue - all card stock imported through the blockade and as such no imprint appeared on any of the CDV's from that album. This card has been in a private collection for years and still has noted dealer Howard Norton's pencil price on the verso [$2500]. The albumen has a very nice close up view of Hood..........................................................$1,350.00

22502 - GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET, Carte de Viste of Longstreet by Anthony/Brady, 3/4 standing pose in civilian attire with his hand in coat. One of the three Rebel chieftains that Andrew Johnson refused to pardon him and restore his rights, famous commander in the Army of Northern VA. An outstanding from life card pose probably taken by Brady in New York just after the War. Choice condition.................................................SOLD




12004
- GENERAL STONEWALL JACKSON
, Carte de Viste, no imprint. An excellent photo of Jackson facing right in uniform with great detail. Killed in May 1863 by friendly fire, unusually nice.............................................
$195.00




12005 - GENERAL JOHN B. HOOD
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Waist up pose of Hood in his Confederate uniform, early Anthony back mark. Exceptional detail, hard to find much better, Army the Tennessee commander, Tennessee and Atlanta campaigns..............................................
SOLD




9291 - JEFFERSON DAVIS
, Carte de Viste, no imprint. Bust facing slightly left taken from an image when he was Secretary of War. A very uncommon pose of Jefferson Davis. The card is very sharp and fresh, near mint......................
$125.00

 

9294 - GENERAL JOE E. JOHNSTON, Carte de Viste by Stanton & Butler, Baltimore, MD. Bust pose as General in Confederate uniform. Johnston is usually seen wearing a Colonel's uniform and this is a rare image with the scarce Baltimore back mark. Johnston's effectiveness in the Civil War was undercut by tensions with Confederate President Jefferson Davis, who often criticized him for a lack of aggressiveness, and victory eluded him in most campaigns he personally commanded. However, he was the senior Confederate commander at the First Battle of Bull Run in 1861, and his recognition of the important necessary actions, and prompt application of leadership in that victory is usually credited to his subordinate, P.G.T. Beauregard. He defended the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia, during the 1862 Peninsula Campaign, withdrawing under the pressure of a superior force under Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan, In his only offensive action during the campaign, he suffered a severe wound at the Battle of Seven Pines, after which he was replaced in command by his classmate at West Point, Robert E. Lee. In 1863, in command of the Department of the West, he was criticized for his actions and failures in the Vicksburg Campaign. In 1864, he fought against Union Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman in the Atlanta Campaign, but was relieved of command after withdrawing from northwest Georgia to the outskirts of the city. In the final days of the war, he was returned to command of the small remaining forces in the Carolinas Campaign and surrendered his armies to Sherman on April 26, 1865. A rare image as General seldom seen............................................................SOLD

9297 - GENERAL ROBERT RODES, Carte de Viste by E & T Anthony. Bust pose in Confederate uniform. In the Peninsula Campaign, Rodes was wounded in the arm at the Battle of Seven Pines. He recovered in time for Gen. Robert E. Lee's first invasion of the North, in September 1862, fighting at South Mountain and Antietam. At Antietam, he commanded one of two brigades that held out so long against the Union assault on the sunken road, or "Bloody Lane," at the center of the Confederate line, suffering heavy casualties. Rodes was lightly wounded by shell fragments. In the Battle of Chancellorsville, Rodes was a division commander in Stonewall Jackson's corps. He was the first division-level commander in Lee's army who had not graduated from West Point. Rodes led Jackson's devastating flank attack against the Union XI Corps on May 2, 1863. He was temporarily placed in command of the corps that night when Jackson was mortally wounded and Maj. Gen. A.P. Hill was also wounded. Hill immediately summoned the more senior officer Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart, and minutes later Rodes graciously ceded his battlefield command to him. Jackson on his deathbed recommended that Rodes be promoted to major general and this promotion be back-dated to be effective May 2. When Lee reorganized the Army of Northern Virginia to compensate for the loss of Jackson, Rodes joined the Second Corps under Richard Ewell. In the Battle of Gettysburg, on July 1, 1863, Rodes led the assault from Oak Hill against the right flank of the Union I Corps. Although he successfully routed the division of Maj. Gen. John C. Robinson and drove it back through the town, the attack was not as well coordinated or pursued as aggressively as his reputation would have implied. His division sat idle for the remaining two days of the battle. Rodes continued to fight with Ewell's corps through the 1864 Overland Campaign of Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. Ewell was replaced by Lt. Gen. Jubal Early, and the corps was sent by Lee to the Shenandoah Valley to draw Union forces away from Petersburg, in the Valley Campaigns of 1864. At Winchester, Rodes was struck in the back of his head by a Union shell fragment. He died on the field outside Winchester. Excellent contrast..................................................SOLD

9298 - GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE
, Carte de Viste by E & T Anthony. Seated pose of Lee in Confederate uniform. One of the six photos Matthew Brady took of Lee at his home in Richmond a week after the surrender at Appomattox. Lee stares away from Brady facing to the left in a profile pose. Commander in Chief of the Confederate Army. Excellent contrast and detail........................................
SOLD


9299 - GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE
, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Jones. The classic standing pose of Lee taken in 1863 wearing his formal dress uniform. A very rare and popular carte de viste published by Vannerson & Jones of Richmond. Much rarer than the same view by Anthony published later. Good contrast, very slight wear at corners.........................................
SOLD

9300 - GENERAL GEORGE PICKETT, Carte de Viste no imprint. Bust pose in Confederate uniform. Although no showing an imprint this particular pose is distinctive to the Richmond photographer Vannerson & Jones. George Edward Pickett (January 16, 25, or 28, 1825 - July 30, 1875) was a career United States Army officer who became a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He is best remembered for his participation in the futile and bloody assault at the Battle of Gettysburg that bears his name, Pickett's Charge. Photo has good contrast; light damp stain to right of bust, other trifle light stains as well a old glue stain on verso. An excellent value at.......................................................$495.00

9304 - GENERAL RICHARD GARNETT, Carte de Viste no imprint. Bust on uniform. During the Gettysburg Campaign, Garnett's brigade continued in the division of George Pickett and due to the order of march, did not reach the battlefield from Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, until late on the afternoon of July 2, 1863, missing the first two days of the Battle of Gettysburg. Pickett's division was assigned by Gen. Lee to lead a great assault on the Union's center on Cemetery Ridge on July 3. Garnett's brigade was in the front rank of Pickett's division, on the left, next to Brig. Gen. James L. Kemper's brigade. Garnett was in no shape to lead an infantry charge; he was suffering from fever and an injured leg when his horse kicked him and could not walk. But Garnett yearned to settle the record of his military dishonor from Kernstown, which the aborted court-martial could not. Despite protestations from other officers, Garnett insisted on leading his soldiers into battle on horseback, becoming a conspicuous target for Union riflemen prior to starting out toward the Union defenses on Cemetery Hill, Garnett conversed with Brig. Gen. Lewis Armistead, another of Pickett's brigade commanders, about the proposed charge. Garnett reportedly said: "This is a desperate thing to attempt" to which Armistead added his prediction that "the slaughter will be terrible." Garnett personally got within 20 yards of the "Angle" on Cemetery Ridge before he was killed, a bullet striking him in the head as he waved his hat to urge his men forward. His courier, Private Robert H. Irvine of the 19th Virginia, witnessed his death. Irvine's horse was hit and fell on Garnett, so the private pulled Garnett's body from underneath the animal and retrieved the general's watch, which he gave to the brigade adjutant. A very sharp image as nice an image of Garnett as you will find............................................................$450.00


81608 - GENERAL JUBAL EARLY, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Jones of Richmond, VA. Bust pose of Early in Confederate uniform. Jubal Anderson Early (November 3, 1816 - March 2, 1894) was a lawyer and Confederate general in the American Civil War. He served under Stonewall Jackson and then Robert E. Lee for almost the entire war, rising from regimental command to lieutenant general and the command of an infantry corps in the Army of Northern Virginia. He was the Confederate commander in key battles of the Valley Campaigns of 1864, including a daring raid to the outskirts of Washington, D.C. The articles written by him for the Southern Historical Society in the 1870's established the Lost Cause point of view as a long-lasting literary and cultural phenomenon...................................................................$695.00

81613 - GENERAL JOHN C. BRECKENRIDGE, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Jones of Richmond, VA. Bust pose in Confederate uniform. John Cabell Breckenridge (January 16, 1821 - May 17, 1875) was an American lawyer and politician. He served as a U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator from Kentucky and was the 14th Vice President of the United States (1857 - 1861), to date the youngest vice president in U.S. history, elected at age 35 and inaugurated at age 36. In the 1860 presidential election, he ran as one of two candidates of the fractured  Democratic Party, representing Southern Democrats. Breckinridge came in third place in the popular vote, behind winner Abraham Lincoln, a Republican, and Stephen Douglas, a Northern Democrat, but finished second in the Electoral College vote. Following the outbreak of the American Civil War, he served in the Confederate States Army as a general and commander of Confederate forces prior to the 1863 Siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana, and of the young Virginia Military Institute cadets, at the 1864 Battle of New Market in New Market, Virginia. He also served as the fifth and final Confederate Secretary of War. Fine......................................................SOLD

81615 - GENERAL STERLING PRICE, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Jones of Richmond, VA. Bust pose from life in Confederate uniform. Sterling Price (September 20, 1809 - September 29, 1867) was a lawyer, planter, and politician from the U.S. State of Missouri, who served as the 11th Governor of the state from 1853 to 1857. He also served as a United States Army brigadier general during the Mexican-American War, and a Confederate Army major general in the American Civil War. Price is best known for his victories in New Mexico and Chihuahua during the Mexican conflict, and for his losses at the Battles of Pea Ridge and Westport during the Civil War - the latter being the culmination of his ill-fated Missouri Campaign of 1864. Following the war, Price took his remaining troops to Mexico rather than surrender. A difficult card from life.........................................................$295.00


42929 - THOMAS MARSHALL OF KENTUCKY, Carte de Viste, noted as the "Eloquent son of Kentucky," no imprint from life photo taken from a daguerreotype. Nephew of John Marshall. Marshall attended the convention that drafted the 1830 Constitution of Virginia so that he could observe the debate among the delegates, which included his uncle John Marshall, John Randolph, James Madison, and James Monroe. Thereafter, he pursued politics, befriending Henry Clay and being elected to the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1832. While a member of the House, he distinguished himself by a report denouncing the doctrine of nullification, as proposed by the state of South Carolina to the several states. He moved to Louisville, Kentucky in 1833 and resumed his legal practice, but his practice was again interrupted by election to the Kentucky House of Representatives, where he served until 1836. In 1837, Marshall sought election to the U.S. House of Representative, but was defeated by incumbent William J. Graves. Embarrassed by the loss, he returned to Woodford County and was elected twice more to the state legislature, serving from 1838 to 1839. In 1841, he was elected a Whig to represent Kentucky's Tenth District in the U.S. House of Representatives. Although he was a frequent orator in that body, only two of his speeches were reported in the local newspapers owing to his admonition to reporters not to "pass on the public their infernal gibberish for my English". After publicly differing with Henry Clay on the issues of renewing the charter of the Second Bank of the United States and the annexation of Texas, he considered it futile to run for re-election in Clay's home district and declined to seek renomination to his seat in Congress. Marshall campaigned for James K. Polk, Clay's opponent in the 1844 presidential election. In 1845, he was again unsuccessful in his bid for a seat in Congress, losing to Garrett Davis. During the Mexican-American War, he served a captain of cavalry volunteers for a year. After returning from the war, Marshall unsuccessfully sought to be a delegate to the constitutional convention that drafted the 1850 Kentucky Constitution. He campaigned for Winfield Scott in the 1852 presidential election and was again elected to the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1854. He served a single term, which marked his last service in public office. Very fine......................................................................................................$79.00


31708 - HANDSOME SOUTH CAROLINA OFFICER
, Carte de Viste, salt print. A seated pose of a young South Carolina officer, unidentified, near mint condition. This attractive photo came from a Charleston album we purchased years ago, we sold it and have bought it back, no imprint...........................................
$395.00


1158 - GENERAL GEORGE WASHINGTON CUSTIS LEE, Carte de Viste, no imprint. Bust pose in uniform. Also known as Custis Lee, was the eldest son of Robert E. Lee and Mary Anna Custis Lee. He served as a Confederate general in the American Civil War, primarily as an aide-de-camp to President Jefferson Davis, and succeeded his father as president of Washington and Lee University in Lexington, VA. Very fine......................................................SOLD

1163 - GENERAL THOMAS DRAYTON, Carte de Viste, no imprint, from life bust pose. In 1862, Drayton was assigned command of an infantry brigade composed of the 15th South Carolina Infantry, the 3rd Battalion S.C. Inf. and three Georgia Infantry regiments, the 50th and 51st and Phillips' Georgia Legions, [7] which became part of the Right Wing of the Army of Northern Virginia under Lt. Gen. James Longstreet. Drayton's Brigade fought at the Second Battle of Manassas. Defending Fox's Gap at the Battle of South Mountain, Drayton suffered high casualties. His much depleted brigade also saw considerable action at Sharpsburg. His tactical abilities were at times questioned by his superiors, and he was finally removed from command. He was transferred to the Western Theater to command a brigade in Sterling Price's army in August 1863. During the final two years o the war, he mainly performed administrative duties in the Trans-Mississippi Theater, although he did briefly command a division in early 1864. Near mint crisp card..............$295.00

 

1164 - GENERAL FITZHUGH LEE, Carte de Viste, no imprint, from life bust pose in uniform. Lee performed well in the Maryland Campaign of 1862, covering the Confederate infantry' withdrawal from South Mountain, delaying the Union Army advance to Sharpsburg, Maryland, before the Battle of Antietam, and covering his army's recrossing of the Potomac River into Virginia. He conducted the cavalry action of Kelly's Ford (March 17, 1863) with skill and success, where his 400 troopers captured 150 men and horses with a loss of only 14 men. In the Battle of Chancellorsville in May 1863, Lee's reconnaissance found that the Union Army's right flank was "in the air", which allowed the successful flanking attack by Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, a movement led by Lee's cavalry. After Chancellorsville, Lee was incapacitated by inflammatory rheumatism, missing a month of action, which included the significant cavalry operations at the Battle of Brandy Station. He recovered in time to lead a brigade in Jeb Stuart's ride around the Union Army in the early days of the Gettysburg Campaign, with his most significant contribution being at the Battle of Carlisle. During the Battle of Gettysburg, his brigade fought unsuccessfully in the action at East Cavalry Field. Stuart's report singled out no officer in his command for praise except Fitz Lee, who he said was "one of the finest cavalry leaders on the continent, and richly [entitled] to promotion." Lee was promoted to major general on August 3, 1863. Near mint, crisp card, great contrast................................................$250.00

1165 - GENERAL A. P. HILL, Carte de Viste, no imprint, bust pose from life in uniform. Ambrose Powell Hill, Jr. (November 9, 1825 - April 2, 1865), was a career U.S. Army officer in the Mexican-American War and Seminole Wars and a Confederate general in the American Civil War. He gained early fame as the commander of "Hill's Light Division" in the Seven Days Battles and became one of Stonewall Jackson's ablest subordinates, distinguishing himself in the 1862 battles of Cedar Mountain, Second Bull Run, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. Following Jackson's death in May 1863 at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Hill was promoted to lieutenant general and commanded the Third Corps of Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, which he led in the Gettysburg Campaign and the fall campaigns of 1863. His command of the corps in 1864-65 was interrupted on multiple occasions by illness from which he did not return until just before the end of the war, when he was killed during the Union Army offensive at the Third Battle of Petersburg. Crisp card near mint...............................................SOLD

 

1167 - GENERAL STERLING PRICE, MISSOURI, Carte de Viste, no imprint, bust pose in uniform from life. Sterling Price (September 20, 1809 - September 29, 1867) was a lawyer, planter, and politician from the U.S. state of Missouri, who served as the 11th Governor of the state from 1853 to 1857. He also served as a United States Army brigadier general during the Mexican-American War, and a Confederate Army major general in the American Civil War. Price is best known for his victories in New Mexico and Chihuahua during the Mexican conflict, and for his losses at the Battles of Pea Ridge and Westport during the Civil War-the latter being the culmination of his ill-fated Missouri Campaign of 1864. Following the war, Price took his remaining troops to Mexico rather than surrender, unsuccessfully seeking service with the Emperor Maximillian there. He ultimately returned to Missouri, where he died in poverty and was buried in St. Louis. A bold photograph, great contrast.........................................................$175.00

 

1168 - GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET, Carte de Viste, no imprint, bust pose in uniform. James Longstreet (January 8, 1821 - January 2, 1904) was one of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War and the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his "Old War Horse". He served under Lee as a corps commander for many of the famous battles fought by the Army of Northern Virginia in the Eastern Theater, but also with Gen. Braxton Bragg in the Army of Tennessee in the Western Theater. Biographer and historian Jeffery D. Wert wrote that "Longstreet...was the finest corps commander in the Army of Northern Virginia; in fact, he was arguably the best corps commander in the conflict on either side." Very fine, crisp card........................................................................SOLD

 


1169 - GENERAL ALBERT SIDNEY JOHNSTON
, Carte de Viste, no imprint, bust pose in Federal uniform [usually seen pose]. Killed at the Battle of Shiloh. Very fine crisp card............................................................
$89.00

 

1170 - GENERAL FELIX ZOLLINCOFFER, Carte de Viste by Anthony, 3/4 standing pose in the usual Federal uniform. Killed at the Battle of Mill Springs. The southern bank of the Cumberland River at Mill Springs was a bluff and a strong defensive position, whereas the northern bank was low and flat. Zollicoffer chose to move most of his men to the north bank where they would be closer to nearby Union troops, incorrectly assuming that it was more defensible. Both Crittenden and Albert Sidney Johnston ordered Zollicoffer to relocate south of the river, but he could not comply--he had insufficient boats to cross the un fordable river quickly and was afraid his brigade would be caught by the enemy halfway across. Zollicoffer's men were routed from the field. Some accounts claim that Union Colonel Speed S. Fry shot Zollicoffer as the battle waned. He had inadvertently wandered into the Union position, thinking they were Confederate soldiers with his nearsightedness and the gathering darkness. He was struck several times by enemy bullets and soon died from his wounds. Very fine crisp card.................................................$125.00

 

1171 - GENERAL P. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Carte de Viste by Brady. Beauregard 2/3 standing with crossed arms, early war photo. Some tip trim, trifle light but still very clear.........................................................$49.00

 

1172 - GENERAL HARRY HAYES, Carte de Viste, embossed card with no imprint, cameo albumen of Hayes from life in uniform. Harry Thompson Hays (April 14, 1820 - August 21, 1876) was an American Army officer serving in the Mexican-American War and a general who served in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. Known as the "Louisiana Tigers", his brigade played a major role during the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863, where they ascended Cemetery Hill in the darkness and overran several artillery batteries before finally being driven off for lack of support. A crisp and fresh card.............................................................SOLD


4231 - GENERAL THOMAS J. JACKSON, CSA, Carte de Viste of Stonewall Jackson facing to the right, no back mark, very good quality image with nice details. A variation of the "Chancellorsville" photo which is the last photo taken of Jackson before his death at Chancellorsville in May 1863............................$250.00  

2242 - GENERAL D. A. WEISIGAR, Cabinet photo of Weisigar [albumen] laid down on scrapbook thick paper, overall 4.5" X 5.5", David Addison Weisiger saw first military action as in the Mexican War as a second lieutenant, Co. E, First Virginia Volunteers. He left the Army for private enterprise after the war, but remained captain of the Virginia militia and was officer of the day at the hanging of John Brown in 1859. He was on duty in Norfolk with the Fourth Virginia Battalion Militia as a major. He entered Confederate service as Colonel of the 12th Virginia Infantry May 9, 1861. His unit was stationed on the Lower Peninsula until the spring of 1862, when it was pulled into the Army of Northern Virginia, being placed into Gen. William Mahone's Brigade. The 12th Virginia fought at Seven Pines during the Seven Days Campaign and then participated at Second Manassas. Wounded in the latter battle, Weisiger was lucky to return to the army the following July. At the Wilderness, he took over Mahone's brigade with a temporary brigadier general rank to date May 31, 1864. His promotion was made permanent July 30, 1864, in recognition of his performance at the Battle of the Crater, where Weisiger and Mahone led the counterattack that led to the Confederate victory. Weisiger again was wounded in the fighting. Paroled at Appomattox April 9, 1865. Image is somewhat light, contemporary ID to bottom of image, priced accordingly....................................................$125.00

2243 - GENERAL THOMAS JORDAN, Cabinet albumen [4.5" X 5.5"] laid down on thick scrapbook paper, old contemporary ID on bottom of image, bust of Jordan facing left. On May 22, 1861, Jordan resigned from the U.S. Army and was commissioned as a captain in the fledgling Confederate Army. Promotion came rapidly, and by June 1861, he had become a lieutenant colonel and a staff officer, seeing duty at the First Battle of Manassas as a full colonel and chief of staff under P. G. T. Beauregard. He also was the army's adjutant general and accompanied President Jefferson Davis on a post-battle tour of the field. Jordan subsequently accompanied Beauregard to the Western Theater to Kentucky. During the advance from Corinth, Mississippi, into Tennessee. He rendered valuable service in preparing the men for the Battle of Shiloh, where he was conspicuous in efficiently managing the flow of orders to and from the various corps commanders and their respective staffs. For his actions at Shiloh, he was promoted to brigadier general on April 14, 1862, and served as chief of staff for General Braxton Bragg during his Kentucky Campaign. Borders of albumen somewhat toned, image fine......................................................................SOLD

2244 - GENERAL WILLIAM PRESTON, Albumen photo, overall 3.5" X 5.0", laid on a scrapbook page, facing pose of Preston. He served as lieutenant colonel of the 4th Kentucky Volunteers in the Mexican-American War (1846 - 1848). After the war, he was delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1849 and a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1850. Subsequently,, he served in the State Senate 1851 - 1853. He was elected as a Whig to the Thirty-second Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Humphrey Marshall and reelected to the Thirty-third Congress and served from December 6, 1852 to March 3, 1855. He stood again for another term in 1854 but was unsuccessful. President James Buchanan appointed Preston as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Spain in 1858. He resigned as ambassador in 1861 at the outbreak of the Civil War. Although his home state of Kentucky did not secede from the Union, Preston served in the Confederate Army and attained the rank of brigadier general. He was appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary from the Confederacy to Maximilian, Emperor of Mexico in 1864. Some blems in the original negative....................................................$125.00


2217 - GENERAL GEORGE T. ANDERSON, Cabinet sized albumen 4" X 6" that had been laid down on a scrapbook page, contemporary pencil ID at bottom. A view of Anderson taken post 1862 as Brigadier General. This image is on albumen paper with good details. Anderson became colonel of the 11th Georgia Infantry regiment but arrived too late to participate in the First Battle of Bull Run. He saw battle during the Peninsula Campaign at Yorktown and commanded a brigade during the Seven Days Battles, Second Bull Run, Turner's Gap, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. Anderson missed Chancellorsville being with the majority of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet's First Corps operating in southeastern Virginia. Longstreet's men rejoined the Army of Northern Virginia in time for the Gettysburg Campaign. Anderson fought around Devil's Den and the Wheatfield at Gettysburg, where he was wounded. He recuperated in the Charleston area while Longstreet's Corps went to Georgia. Anderson did not rejoin his men until the Siege of Knoxville. He saw heavy action in 1864 at the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, and the operations around Richmond and Petersburg. He surrendered with Lee at Appomattox Court House in April 1865............................................................................$200.00

2218 - GENERAL THOMAS TAYLOR, CSA, Cabinet photo of Taylor in Confederate uniform, card 4" X 6". A sharp view of Taylor facing. Kentucky General, excellent photo ass Brigadier General, Colonel of 1st Kentucky Infantry, Cumberland Gap, Vicksburg, Mobile. Excellent contrast..................................$295.00

2219 - GENERAL HARRY HAYS, CSA, 3.5" X 5.5" cabinet size albumen photograph laid on a scrapbook page, old contemporary pencil ID at bottom. Hays facing to the right in Confederate uniform. Hays was promoted to brigadier general on July 25, 1862 and assigned command of the First Louisiana Brigade, replacing Richard Taylor who had been promoted to major general and sent to the Western Theater. This brigade was known as the "Louisiana Tigers," having taken the name from the original battalion commanded by Roberdeau Wheat. Hays lost half of his unit a few months later at the Battle of Antietam. Despite reduced numbers, he continued to lead his brigade at Fredericksburg in December 1862 and Chancellorsivlle in May 1863. At the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863, after he had garrisoned the town, he directed his troops in a twilight assault on Cemetery Hill. The brigade stubbornly fought their way up the steep slope, and for a brief period of time held several Union guns there. However, as General Hays looked rearward, he was dismayed to see that no additional troops had been sent to his support. Reluctantly, and with casualties mounting, he ordered the remnant of his brigade to retire in the gathering darkness just as Federal reinforcements arrived to secure the heights. His brigade brought back several battle flags captured during the attack. Hays was briefly captured in November 1863, at Rappahannock Station, but escaped. In fierce fighting at the Battle of the Wilderness on May 5, 1864, he lost a third of his remaining men. Five days later, he was badly wounded by a shell fragment at Spotsylvania Court House. He never again served in the Army of Northern Virginia. Upon his recovery, he was transferred to the Trans -Mississippi, and then was assigned command in Louisiana.................................................$250.00

2124 - GENERAL ROGER HANSON, CSA, Carte de Viste Roger Weightman Hanson (August 27, 1827 - January 4, 1863) was a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. The commander of the famed "Orphan Brigade," he was mortally wounded at the Battle of Murfreesboro. He was nicknamed "Old Flintlock". Hanson was named as colonel of a regiment of Confederate troops he raised in Lexington, Kentucky. When President Abraham Lincoln sent Federal troops into Lexington and raised the U.S. flag over the city, Hanson and his 2nd Kentucky Infantry were "orphaned," as they could never return home until Lexington fell to the Confederates (which did not occur). They were taken prisoner with the surrender of Fort Donelson. After being exchanged, Hanson was presented with a new horse by admiring friends. He rejoined the army and was promoted to brigadier general in December 1862, commanding his old regiment as well as the 4th, 6th, and 19th Kentucky Infantry regiments, the 41st Alabama regiment, and Cobb's Battery in Breckinridge's division, Hardee's corps. In his first battle as a general, Hanson was severely wounded on January 2, 1863, during a charge at Murfreesboro (Stones River) when he was struck above the knee by the fuse of a spent artillery shell. His brother-in-law vainly tried to stop the bleeding. He died two days later at the age of 35, with his last words as "I die in a just cause, having done my duty." General Breckinridge remarked in his official report, "Endeared to his friends by his private virtues and to his command by the vigilance with which he guarded its interest and honor, he was, by the universal testimony of his military associates, one of the finest officers that adorned the service of the Confederate States." A nice 3/4 view of Hanson in uniform, no imprint but of excellent quality..............................................$375.00


11102 - GENERAL THOMAS DRAYTON, CDV by Fredericks of NY, bust pose in Confederate uniform. In 1862, Drayton was assigned command of an Infantry Brigade composed of the 15th South Carolina Infantry, the 3rd Battalion S.C. Inf. and three Georgia Infantry regiments, the 50th and 51st and Phillips' Georgia Legion [7], which became part of the Right Wing of the Army of Northern Virginia under Lt. Gen. James Longstreet. Drayton's Brigade fought at the Second Battle of Manassas. Defending Fox's Gap at the Battle of South Mountain. Drayton suffered high casualties. His much depleted brigade also saw considerable action at Sharpsburg. His tactical abilities were at times questioned by his superiors, and he was finally removed from command. He was transferred to the Western Theater to command a brigade in Sterling Price's army in August 1863. A nice crisp card, uncommon.......................................$295.00


9040 - GENERAL JOHN PEGRAM
, Carte de Viste, 3/4 pose in Confederate uniform with hand in coat. An unusual pose of Pegram who is usually seen as a head or short bust pose. Killed late in the War at Hatcher's Run. A scarcer pose than usually seen..........................
$450.00


50315 - BEAUTIFULLY SIGNED JEFFERSON DAVIS CARTE DE VISTE BY BINGHAM OF MEMPHIS, Carte de Viste by Bingham & Craver of Memphis, TN. A post war pose of Davis taken approximately 1869. In 1869, Davis became President of the Carolina Life Insurance Company in Memphis, Tennessee, where he resided at the Peabody Hotel. Upon Robert E. Lee's death in 1870, Davis presided over the memorial meeting in Richmond, Virginia. He turned down the opportunity to become the first president of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas (now Texas A & M University). In 1876, he traveled to England. This rare image is one of the very few known during that period just after the War. Seemingly only the 1861 view of Davis just before he became Confederate President and the very late Beauvior period photos seem to show up for sale. This was taken by Bingham & Carver of Memphis. Bingham had taken many photos of Confederate personages during the War including the wounded pose of N.B. Forrest. The signature of Davis is a full "Jefferson Davis" in dark brown ink. The card is crisp and fresh with just a trifle toning. Signed early photos during his post war years are non-existent. In comparing with post war signed Lee's which sell for $4000 in comparable condition, the Davis CDV is 20X scarcer to locate than a Lee in the same time frame............................................SOLD



2269 - GENERAL JOE E. JOHNSTON
, Carte de Viste. Early war pose of Johnston possibly by Confederate photographer as the style of card indicates (probably Tucker & Perkins - Georgia without paper label). Thus only....................................
$55.00

22611 - GENERAL E. KIRBY SMITH, Carte de Viste by Anthony. A large waist up pose of Smith in Confederate uniform. One of the best poses of Smith you will find. Commanded the Trans Mississippi Department. Buckner surrendered his command in New Orleans while Smith was in Texas leaving for Mexico................................$295.00

22613 - ADMIRAL RAPHAEL SEMMES, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Jones of Richmond, VA. Bust pose of Semmes in Confederate Navy uniform. Excellent quality card as well as photo. Commander of the Confederate Naval Raider, "ALABAMA", as nice as the last similar card we sold last year at $1250. A great value at.....................................SOLD


22614 - ADMIRAL RAPHAEL SEMMES
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Excellent bust pose facing to the left. Captain of the Confederate Raider "ALABAMA". Crisp card........................................................
$265.00

22616 - GENERAL BENJAMIN CHEATAM, Carte de Viste by S.T. Blessing of New Orleans, LA. Large from life photo of Cheatam in Confederate uniform, Army of the Tennessee from Shiloh to Atlanta. A very nice large photo of Cheatam, tips of card very slightly trimmed, otherwise fine..................................$265.00

22620 - GENERAL JUBAL EARLY, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose in Confederate uniform, took part in all engagements of the Army of Northern VA from 1862-64, later Winchester, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek. A crisp and "minty" card, scarce and popular...........................................$550.00


22628 - JEFFERSON DAVIS
, Carte de Viste by Brady. A nice photo of Davis postwar after his release from federal prison, c. 1870's. Ex-President of the Confederate States, fine..........................................
$200.00

22634 - COMMANDER MATHEW F. MAURY, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Seated pose at a desk, Maury, Matthew Fontaine (1806-73) naval officer and oceanographer, born near Fredericksburg, VA. During the Civil War, Maury joined the Confederate Navy, working on harbor defenses and traveling to England to obtain ships for the Confederacy. He is known primarily, however, for his earlier work as an author on scientific and technological subjects and as head of the U.S. Naval Observatory and Hydrographic Office (1854). His research on winds and currents resulted in great savings in sailing time between ports, and his The Physical Geography of the Sea (1855) laid the foundations of the modern science of oceanography. Good photo, tips slightly trimmed........................................$150.00


22638 - GENERAL JOHN MAGRUDER
, Carte de Viste. Standing pose of Magruder with hat and sword. Card has some trimming, good photo...............................
$65.00


22641 - GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE
, Carte de Viste. Early war pose in federal uniform, some lightness, but clear........................................
$45.00


22642 - GENERAL FELIX ZOLLINCOFFER
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Standing pose of Zollincoffer in pre-war uniform (from life war period photos of Zollincoffer are rare). Killed at Mills Springs, January 19th, 1862 from Tennessee. Nice photo, the card has been slightly trimmed........................................
$75.00


11202 - CONFEDERATE GENERAL P.G.T. BEAUREGARD, Carte de Viste by Washburn of New Orleans. A wonderful from life view of Beauregard in Confederate uniform signed boldly by Beauregard on the front of the card...G.T. Beauregard 1873. This was Beauregard's favorite pose and he often used it as his card of remembrance to the ladies he fancied in the City. Photographs of Beauregard in Confederate uniform are scarce as most of the mass produced images of him show him wearing Federal blues. Very fine and quite desirable..................................................SOLD


110402 - GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE
, Carte de Viste with revenue stamp on verso. Early post war view of Lee facing slightly to the left taken in the winter of 1865 by Brady. A nice moderately priced image of Lee...................................
SOLD




110405 - GENERAL A.P. HILL
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose in Confederate uniform. Card has excellent contrast, overall fine......................
SOLD



110411 - GENERAL JOHN C. BRECKENRIDGE
, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Jones of Richmond, VA. Bust pose in Confederate uniform. Really a nice from life card from a famous Confederate photographer. Scarce as such....................
SOLD



10702 - GENERAL FITZHUGH LEE
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. This photo of Lee was taken probably in late 1862 or early 1863. Son of Robert E. Lee's brother Captain Sidney Lee of the Confederate Navy. Nice crisp card with good contrast..............................
$250.00


10705 - GENERAL JOHN C. BRECKENRIDGE
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. View of Breckenridge in Confederate uniform. Crisp card, choice...........................
$245.00


10706 - GENERAL BENJAMIN CHEATHAM
, Carte de Viste, no imprint. A nice early war photo while Cheatham was commanding Tennessee State troops in July 1861. Very fine.......................................
$125.00



10708 - PRESIDENT JEFFERSON DAVIS
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose facing to the right. President of the Confederate States. Crisp card, good contrast......................
$225.00

10709 - GENERAL RICHARD EWELL, Carte de Viste by Anthony. A rare first generation photo of Ewell in uniform slightly facing to the right. Led the advance into Gettysburg. Replaced Jackson as Corps Commander, defended Richmond in the final days. An unusually nice image of Ewell. Choice card, near mint.......................$245.00

10711 - GENERAL RICHARD BROOKE GARNETT, Carte de Viste, no back mark. A version of the only known photo of Garnett known in uniform that being his Federal uniform as a Major, but the star has been removed from his collar by the photographer. Garnett was killed in action at Gettysburg. This bust pose is very sharp and unusually nice...........................................$495.00

10712 - GENERAL MARTIN GARY, Carte de Viste, no imprint. A from life view, the card has been tipped totally unaffecting the photograph. Escorted Davis and his party south after he cut his way out of Richmond as Lee moved west. Very scarce.........................................SOLD


10715 - GENERAL WADE HAMPTON
, Carte de Viste  by Anthony. Nice bust pose in uniform from life. South Carolina, commanded "Hampton's Legion". Very fine...................................................
$285.00

10718 - GENERAL JOHN HUNT MORGAN, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Jones, Richmond, VA. From life pose of Morgan in uniform considered Morgan's last photo taken before his death at Greenville, TN in 1864. Nice image, corners of card show a rifle tipping, otherwise a bright photo with firm card........................$495.00

10720 - MARCUS "BRICK" POMEROY, Carte de Viste by Tanner and Van Ness of Lynchburg, VA. Pomeroy was the "Copperhead" editor of the LaCrosse Democrat who after first supporting the War turned against the effort. Seeing all the bloodshed, he attributed to the emancipation of slaves effort. He used his editorials to condemn the War and called Lincoln the "widow maker" and was celebrated in the South as this Southern back mark card proclaims. Crisp card and rare - first example we have ever offered............................................SOLD

10721 - GENERAL JOHN PEGRAM, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Jones of Richmond, VA. A bust uniformed pose of Pegram from life. As usual, all photographs of Pegram show some slight touch up. Killed at Hatcher's Run in February 1865, three weeks after his marriage.......................................$295.00

10723 - GENERAL WILLIAM PRESTON, Carte de Viste by Anthony. A from life bust pose in uniform taken after 1862 facing slightly to the left. Fought at Chickamauga and constantly politically campaigned against Bragg who basically had him banished to the Trans-Mississippi. A nice example. Very fine....................$265.00


10724 - GENERAL STERLING PRICE
, Carte de Viste by Minnis of Richmond, VA. Price's best known pose as Major General. A bust pose from life which is very scarce as most other cards are copy photos of this pose. Missouri General................
$365.00

10725 - GENERAL ROBERT RODES, Carte de Viste, no back mark. Bust pose in uniform, severely wounded at Seven Pines. Led Jackson's flank movement at Chancellorsville. Fought at Gettysburg, the Wilderness, mortally wounded at Winchester, scarce..........................................SOLD

10728 - GENERAL JEB STUART, Carte de Viste, no imprint, but a fine 1st Generation photo probably by Anthony. The most wanted pose of Stuart seated with his hat and sword on his lap. A choice crisp card within a large oval, exceptional.........................................$795.00


10729 - ADMIRAL RAPHAEL SEMMES
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose of good quality slightly facing to the left. Commanded the Alabama which plundered shipping on the seas for several years. Very nice card..........................
$250.00



82202 - GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE
, Carte de Viste. Full standing pose in his dress uniform taken by Vannerson in 1864 in Richmond. A most desirable pose of Lee within an oval, light tone, untrimmed card..................................
$1,100.00


82208 - LT. E.S. HULL
, Carte de Viste. Oval from life pose in Confederate uniform of Lt. E.S. Hull later a Captain on CS General Staff. Yellow cardstock typical of the pastel color cardstock brought through the blockade and used by Charleston photographers. Came from Charleston album..............................................
$450.00

82209 - GENERAL FRANKLIN GARDNER, Carte de Viste in Confederate uniform. A scarce photograph showing Gardner with thinning hair taken after his release and exchange in August 1864 (surrendered at Port Hudson, LA). Card trimmed, a very scarce image of Gardner that is seldom seen.......................................$275.00



464A - GENERAL JAMES ARCHER
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Exceptional from life pose in Confederate uniform, wears Colonel's stars, but Brigadier General's buttons. Distinguished himself at Fredericksburg, captured at Gettysburg. Untrimmed card with nice contrast..............................................
SOLD

471 - GENERAL PIERRE G.T. BEAUREGARD, Carte de Viste by Anthony. One of the poses Beauregard took at Charleston in April - May, 1861 as a Major General. He stands leaning on a column. Nice photo, tips of card slightly rounded. Nice image overall............................$165.00

474 - GENERAL JOHN C. BRECKENRIDGE, Carte de Viste by Anthony. The early War pose of Breckenridge in a Federal uniform with no mustache. Uncommon and in very fine condition..................................................$125.00

476 - GENERAL JOHN C. BRECKENRIDGE, Carte de Viste by Anthony. A pirated copy from the Minnis & Cowell photo taken in 1864. Trifle light, but clear................................$150.00



479 - GENERAL BENJAMIN CHEATAM
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. A from life bust pose in Confederate uniform of Cheatham probably taken in Nashville, July 1861 - March 1862, as a Brigadier General, Tennessee Campaigns. Nice image.......................................
$255.00


480 - ALFRED HOLT COLQUITT
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Colquitt's finest wartime portrait taken by Cook of Richmond dating to late 1864-65. Light age tone, Antietam Campaign, Fredericksburg, Petersburg, from Georgia. Uncommon...................................
SOLD

481 - ALFRED HOLT COLQUITT, Carte de Viste no back mark. Colquitt's finest wartime portrait taken by Cook of Richmond dating to late 1864-65. Antietam Campaign, Fredericksburg, Petersburg from Georgia. Uncommon.....................................$250.00



484 - JEFFERSON DAVIS
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. The popular view of President Davis from the waist up. Excellent clarity and card condition........................................
$225.00


485 - GENERAL THOMAS F. DRAYTON
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. A from life pone of Drayton, waist up taken early in the War before he was transferred to the Trans-Mississippi. Revenue stamp on verso, uncommon.....................................
$350.00

487 - JUBAL A. EARLY, Carte de Viste by Bendamn of Baltimore. Pose of Early from life, was in every battle of the Army of Northern VA except when he was wounded. A rare back mark by this famous Baltimore photographer. Somewhat light. WAS......$895.00   NOW........$550.00



488 - JUBAL A. EARLY
, Carte de Viste by Monumental of Baltimore. A bust pose in Confederate uniform, served gallantly in the Army of Northern VA in every battle except when wounded. A decent image of this scarce commander...............
$295.00




490 - GENERAL ARNOLD ELZEY
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Elzey's first war photo showing Brigadier button arrangement with stars of a Colonel. Fought at 1st Manassas, Gaines Mill, Seven Days battle, defenses of Richmond. Trifle light, scarce..................................
SOLD


491 - GENERAL RICHARD EWELL
, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Jones of Richmond, VA. A rare first generation photo of Ewell in uniform slightly facing to the right. Led the advance into Gettysburg, replaced Jackson as Corps Commander, defended Richmond in the final days. An unusually nice image of Ewell, choice card............................................
$375.00


492 - GENERAL RICHARD EWELL
, Carte de Viste back mark of Walker (London). Ewell in uniform slightly facing to the right. Led the advance into Gettysburg, replaced Jackson as Corps Commander, defended Richmond in the final days. An unusually nice image of Ewell though a copy photo of above average quality.....................................
$150.00


493 - GENERAL RICHARD EWELL
, Carte de Viste (no back mark). Ewell in uniform slightly facing to the right. Led the advance into Gettysburg, replaced Jackson as Corps Commander, defended Richmond in the final days. One of the imported views that came through the blockade. Good quality image and scarce..................................
$250.00



498 - GENERAL THOMAS J. STONEWALL JACKSON
, Carte de Viste (no back mark). A variant of the famous last pose taken of him in 1863 before his death at Chancellorsville. Bust pose facing left, very sharp..........................................
$175.00



499 - GENERAL THOMAS J. STONEWALL JACKSON
, Carte de Viste (no back mark). A variant of the famous last pose taken of him in 1863 before his death at Chancellorsville. Bust pose facing left, very sharp, larger pose, old id says killed at "Wilderness"................................................
$195.00


501 - GENERAL WADE HAMPTON
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. From life in Confederate uniform, the most popular pose of Hampton. Early in the War in 1861 as a Colonel of Hampton's Legion. A nice, sharp photo.......................................
$265.00


504A - GENERAL A.P. HILL
, Carte de Viste. A superb from life view of Hill wearing three stars as a Colonel, but most certainly taken after his promotion to General. Killed at Petersburg late in the War. A most unusual card with the image being probably produced by Cook of Charleston. The card is of blockade runner style being an enamel finish card. Outstanding from life pose. This card came from an album of similar cards dated in Charleston in October 1862 (one card in group). Card has some trim to fit into the album. A very desirable CDV of Hill.......................
$695.00


507 - GENERAL ROBERT FREDERICK HOKE
, Carte de Viste with no back mark, but a quality image from a Vannerson album. Photo from life as Colonel of the 21st North Carolina in 1862. Only one other War time photo of Hoke is known. Wounded at Chancellorsville, then from Cold Harbor to Petersburg. A quality image..........................................
$395.00



508 - GENERAL ROBERT FREDERICK HOKE
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Hoke in uniform as Colonel of the 21st North Carolina in 1862, wounded at Chancellorsville. A nice sharp bust pose in Confederate uniform................
$265.00


513 - GENERAL JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON
, Carte de Viste by Lumpkin & Tomlinson of Richmond, VA. Very sharp from life pose of Johnston taken early in the War wearing a Colonel's collar with Brigadier buttons. A scarce Southern photographer, tips of card slightly rounded, but great quality image.........................................
$265.00

514 - GENERAL JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON,, Carte de Viste with no back mark. A large bust pose of Johnston with Colonel's stars, but Brigadier buttons. Overall fine................................$200.00



516 - GENERAL FITZHUGH LEE
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Nephew of Robert E. Lee, photo taken 1862-63. Nice contrast. Son of Robert Lee's brother, Captain Sidney Lee. Very fine...........................................
$245.00


518 - GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE
, Carte de Viste by Sarony, NY. A close up from life of Lee's best known bust portrait taken in 1863 by Julian Vannerson of Richmond, VA. Sarony produced this carte probably about 1870 from the war-time negative. Commander in Chief of the Confederate armies. This is a rare pose that is seldom seen so nice as the details are crisp and bold....................................
$495.00

526 - GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET, Carte de Viste with no back mark, but undoubtedly by Vannerson of Richmond due to the quality of the image and being in a near complete VAnnerson album. Photo from life of Longstreet's best known pose which dates from 1863 and shows the effects of the War on him. Lee's War horse, he was wounded at the Wilderness leaving his right arm useless. (He was fearless in that Battle leading routed troops to success). An excellent quality image of most definite Southern origin......................................$750.00

526A - GENERAL JAMES LONGSTREET, Carte de Viste. A wonderful from life view of Longstreet. This fine image was most probably produced by Cook of Charleston and was mounted on enamel stock typical of European cardstock imported through the blockade. The image has great clarity and contrast. Slight mount trim to enable the card to be inserted into an album. This card came from an album dated at Charleston in October 1863, that contained many officers and other generals..................................SOLD


530 - GENERAL BEN MCCULLOCH
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. A view of McCulloch with beard. Good quality..........................................
$200.00


70106 - COLONEL JOHN MOSBY
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. A view of Mosby as a Major from the chest up. Untrimmed and has good contrast for this view. Famous Cavalry Commander in Virginia. Very fine......................................
$400.00



532 - COLONEL JOHN MOSBY
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. An early War pose of Mosby as a Major in uniform. Card is in excellent condition with excellent clarity. One of the most popular Virginia military figures of the Civil War...............
SOLD



533 - GENERAL JOHN HUNT MORGAN
, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Jones, Richmond, VA. From life pose of Morgan in uniform considered Morgan's last photo taken before his death at Greenville, TN in 1864. Nice image, corners of card show a rifle tipping, otherwise a bright photo with firm card with revenue stamp affixed...................................
$550.00


534 - GENERAL JOHN HUNT MORGAN
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. A scarcer seated alone pose of Morgan as Colonel of the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry. He is seated with hat on a table and wearing high riding boots. A good copy photo by Anthony......................................
$215.00


535 - GENERAL JOHN PEGRAM
, Carte de Viste photograph by Vannerson & Jones of Richmond, VA. A bust uniformed pose of Pegram from life. As usual, all photographs of Peagram show some slight touch up. This image has lots of contrast and is unusually nice. Killed at Hatcher's Run in February 1865, three weeks after his marriage..................................
$425.00



541 - GENERAL GEORGE PICKETT
, Carte de Viste with no back mark. The flamboyant pose of Pickett, bust pose of rather nice quality with excellent clarity. Made famous for his charge at Gettysburg and along with Stuart. One of the Southern cavaliers of the War. Very fine.............................................................
$675.00


546 - GENERAL STERLING PRICE
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Price's best known pose as Major General. A bust pose from life which is very scarce as most other cards are copy photos of this pose. Commanded in Missouri, respected and called "Old Pap" by his troops. Very fine...............................................
$200.00


549 - GENERAL E. KIRBY SMITH
, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Jones. From life pose of Smith taken in 1861 showing Lt. Colonel's stars, but buttons of a Brigadier General. Commanded the Trans-Mississippi. A nice from life image.............
$295.00



550 - GENERAL E. KIRBY SMITH
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. A bust pose from life late in the War with Smith showing signs of fatigue and stress. His beard is longer and his eyes appear to sag. Nice details, commanded the Trans-Mississippi.....
$225.00



551 - GENERAL E. KIRBY SMITH
, Carte de Viste by Minnis of Richmond, VA. A bust pose taken probably in 1861. Trifle light, a rare photographer.......................
$275.00



553 - GENERAL JEB STUART
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. A from life pose of Stuart in his most popular pose. A variant of the full length view in full finery. Killed at Yellow Tavern in 1864. Old contemporary ID, nice and bold photo of good quality.....................................
SOLD



554 - GENERAL JEB STUART
, Carte de Viste with no back mark. A variant of the famous pose of Stuart seated with sword, but being a bust version of rather good quality. A very moderately priced Stuart........................................
$495.00



558 - GENERAL LLOYD TILGHMAN
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Full standing view of Colonel of the 3rd Kentucky, sword at his side. Killed by an artillery shell at Champion Hill in 1863. Uncommon and very nice.....................................
$395.00




563 - THE REBEL ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST
, Carte de Viste, no imprint, but done by Anthony. Price, Forrest, Bragg, Gardner, E.K. Smith, Johnston, and Hood in mini-CDV's. Nice quality card....................................................
$195.00


9292 - MAJOR HARRY GILMOR, CSA, Carte de Viste by Anthony. 3/4 standing pose in Confederate uniform, wears white gauntlets, sword at his side. During the Civil War, as a member of Captain Charles Ridgely's Baltimore County Horse Guards, Gilmor was arrested and imprisoned in Fort McHenry following the occupation of Baltimore by Federal troops. Upon his release, he traveled South and eventually rejoined the fighting serving, for a and spent five months in prison. During the Gettysburg Campaign, Major Gilmor was assigned command of the First Maryland Cavalry and Second Maryland Cavalry, supporting Brig. Gen. George Steuart's Infantry Brigade. Gilmor was the provost marshal of the town of Gettysburg while it was occupied by the Confederates July 1 - 4. After the Battle of Monocacy on July 9, 1864, Colonel Gilmor's command, along with Brig. Gen. Bradley T. Johnson's Infantry, made a series of raids around Baltimore going as far east as Magnolia Station in Hartford County, Maryland and Fork, Maryland. On July 10, 1864, Major Harry Gilmor of the 2nd Maryland Cavalry was given 135 men of the 1st and 2nd Maryland and directed to cross Baltimore County into Hartford County at Jerusalem Mill, and destroy the railroad bridge of the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad at Magnolia Stations, northeast of the city. Early on the morning of July 11, Gilmor's cavalrymen reached Magnolia Station, [Major Harry W. Gilmor] located just off present-day I-95 near Joppa. There they proceeded to wreck two trains, one northbound and one southbound. After first evacuating the passengers and looting the cars, the troopers set fire to one of the trains and backed it over the trestle, thus partially destroying the bridge. To further sweeten the pot, aboard the northbound train was an unexpected prize--convalescing Union Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin. This raid was always regarded as one of the most daring ever attempted by detached cavalry on either side during the war. Gilmor was eventually ordered to take his command to Hardy County, West Virginia, and attack the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. There, he was captured on February 4, 1865, and was held as a prisoner of war at Fort Warren in Boston Harbor until July 24, 1865. A beautiful near mint card with outstanding contrast...............................................SOLD

9293 - GENERAL STEPHEN D. LEE, Carte de Viste by Vannerson and Jones of Richmond. Bust pose in Confederate uniform. This is a very pose that Vannerson & Jones copied from a seated pose of Lee originally taken by Oppenheimer of Mobile [we recently sold that Oppenheimer pose and recognized the slope of his shoulders that is identical to the Oppenheimer pose.] The card is crisp and sharp, a tad light. Extremely rare. Lee fought in the Peninsular Campaign, Antietam, Vicksburg [captured], Atlanta, Franklin, and with Johnston in the Carolinas................................................................SOLD

9295 - GENERAL JOSEPH FINNEGAN, Carte de Viste by E & T Anthony. Waist up pose in Confederate uniform. In April 1862, Finegan assumed command of Middle and East Florida from Brigadier General P.G.T Beauregard began rushing reinforcements to Finegan. Some Finegan detractors believe he did little more to contribute to the Confederate victory at Olustee than to shuttle troops forward to General Alfred H. Colquitt of Georgia, whom they credit for thwarting the Federal advance. They point out that Finegan was quickly relieved of his command over the state troops, replaced by Major General James Patton Anderson. But this change in command was necessary as Finegan was ordered to lead the "Florida Brigade" in the Army of Northern Virginia. And, he performed with excellence in that capacity until near the end of the war. Confederate officials became aware of a build-up of Federal troops in the occupied city of Jacksonville. As Florida was a vital supply route and source of beef to the other southern states, they could not allow it to fall completely into Union hands. On February 20, 1864, Finegan stopped a Federal advance from Jacksonville under General Truman Seymour that was intent upon capturing the state capitol at Tallahassee. Their two armies clashed at the Battle of Olustee, where Finegan's men defeated the Union Army and forced them to flee back beyond the Saint John's River. Critics have faulted Finegan for failing to exploit his victory by pursuing his retreating enemy, contenting himself by salvaging their arms and ammunition from the battlefield. But, his victory was one rare bright spot in an otherwise gloomy year for the dying Confederacy. A rare FLORIDA General. This CDV sold in the late 1990's for $1650! Only the 3rd, we have ever handled...................................................SOLD

9296 - GENERAL LEONIDAS POLK, Carte de Viste by de Jongh, Vevey, [France]. An extremely rare view of Leonidas Polk with a full beard, arms folded from life. He also served as bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana and was for that reason known as The Fighting Bishop. Polk was one of the more controversial political generals of the war, elevated to a high military position with no prior combat experience because of his friendship with Confederate President Jefferson Davis. He fought as a corps commander in many of the major battles of the Western Theater, but is remembered more for his bitter disagreements with his immediate superior, Gen. Braxton Bragg of the Army of Tennessee, than for his success in combat. He was killed in action in 1864 during the Atlanta Campaign. An extremely rare pose in Confederate uniform. Ex Herb Peck Collection..............................................SOLD

9301 - GENERAL JAMES KEMPER, Carte de Viste no imprint. Bust pose in Confederate uniform. Although his has no imprint the photo is distinctive of Vannerson & Jones of Richmond. Great contrast, light damp stain below bust. James Lawson Kemper (June 11, 1823 - April 7, 1895) was a lawyer, a Confederate general in the American Civil War, and the 37th Governor of Virginia. He was the youngest of the brigade commanders, and the only non-professional military officer, in the division that led Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg, in which he was wounded and captured but rescued. Very scarce......................................SOLD

9302 - GENERAL FITZ HUGH LEE, Carte de Viste no imprint. A very unusual pose of Lee in Confederate uniform facing to the right. First of this view we have seen or offered. Fitzhugh Lee (November 19, 1835 - April 28, 1905), nephew of Robert E. Lee, was a Confederate cavalry general in the American Civil War, the 40th Governor of Virginia, diplomat, and United States Army general in the Spanish-American War. He served at Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Petersburg, and led the last attack at Farmville, VA. Photo very fine, old glue stains on verso of card................................................................SOLD

9303 - GENERAL MATTHEW RANSOM, Carte de Viste no imprint. Bust pose from life in Confederate uniform within an ornate gold frame. Ransom was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 1st North Carolina Infantry and later Colonel of the 35th North Carolina Infantry. This regiment was part of his brother Robert's brigade, which Matt later commanded. Ransom was promoted to Brigadier General June 13, 1863. Ransom saw action in the battles of Seven Pines, the Seven Days Battles, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Plymouth, Weldon, Suffolk and the Siege of Petersburg. He was wounded three times during the Civil War and finally surrendered at Appomattox. Ransom is extremely scarce and this is a choice image..........................SOLD

9305 - GENERAL ARNOLD ELZEY, Carte de Viste no imprint. Bust pose in Confederate uniform from life. In early April 1861, he resigned his commission in the US Army on 25 April 1861, and traveled to Richmond, Virginia, where he joined the Confederate Army with the initial rank of colonel of the newly formed 1st Maryland Infantry, CSA. He was assigned to the brigade of Brigadier General Edmund Kirby Smith and fought in the First Battle of Manassas. When Smith was wounded during the afternoon, Elzey, as the senior colonel, assumed command and led a successful charge, for which he received the thanks of commanding general P.G.T. Beauregard. He was promoted on the field to brigadier general by Jefferson Davis. The following year, Elzey commanded a brigade under Richard S. Ewell during Stonewall Jackson's Valley Campaign. He was wounded in the leg and had his horse shot under him at the Battle of Cross Keys. Elzey was shot through the head at the Battle of Gaines Mill, a serious wound that kept him from active field command for the rest of the war. After he had recovered sufficiently to perform administrative and desk duty, he was promoted to major general dating from December 4, 1862. He was assigned command of the Department of Richmond and charged with the defense of the Confederacy's capital city. He dealt with a raid by George Stoneman's Union cavalry during the Chancellorsville Campaign, as well as Union gunboats that summer that threatened Richmond from the James River. Later relieved of command, he raised the Local Defense Brigade, a militia group consisting primarily of government clerks. He also helped organize the Virginia state reserves. Elzey was assigned as the Chief of Artillery for the Army of Tennessee and traveled to Georgia to serve under John Bell Hood. However, he missed Hood's disastrous Franklin-Nashville Campaign. With Hood's army essentially wrecked, Elzey was relieved of duty on February 17, 1865, and then assumed command of militia at Augusta, Georgia. Following the collapse of the Confederacy, he was paroled in Washington, Georgia, in May 1865. Elzey's photo is quite sharp with good contrast. The image has some spotting. While not marked with a Richmond imprint, the quality of the image is consistent with a Vannerson & Jones image.............................................SOLD

81610 - GENERAL GEORGE PICKETT, Carte de Viste by Vannerson & Joness of Richmond, VA. Bust pose from life in Confederate uniform. George Edward Pickett (January 16, 25, or 28, 1825 - July 30, 1875) was a career United States Army officer who became a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He is best remembered for his participation in the futile and bloody assault at the Battle of Gettysburg that bears his name, Pickett's Charge. Very fine, scarce card......................................................................SOLD

42933 - GENERAL JOHN MAGRUDER, Carte de Viste no imprint, from life photograph. Magruder stands in his own adaptation of a uniform and is not ever seen photographed in a Confederate as "Price John". He was a U.S. Army officer in the Mexican-American War, a Confederate general during the American Civil War, and a post bellum general in the Imperial Mexican Army. Known as "Prince John" to his army friends. Magruder was most noted for his actions in delaying Federal troops during the 1862 Peninsula Campaign through elaborate ruses that gave Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan the impression that the Confederates had more forces than in actuality, and in successfully defending Galveston, Texas, against the Union Army and Navy early in 1863. Choice condition...............................................SOLD

32400 - ROBERT E. LEE, CUSTIS LEE, AND COLONEL WALTER TAYLOR, Robert E. Lee returned to the ruined city of Richmond, Virginia on April 15, 1865. When he reached his home on East Franklin Street, he only wanted to rest from the exhausting events of the previous few days. Mathew Brady, the photographer who was making a camera record of the war, hurried from Appomattox to Richmond and went to the Lee house with a request to photograph its famous occupant. At first turned away, Brady was allowed to photograph Lee on his back porch. Six negatives were made on April 17 - only eight days after Appomattox. The best of them are among the very finest of all Lee Portraits. They are the only ones which show the Confederate general in the uniform he wore when he met Grant. As General Lee wore his uniform for the last time, he posed with his oldest son Major General George Washington Custis Lee (left) and Colonel Walter Taylor (right). Brady recalled in 1891, "It was supposed that after his defeat it would be preposterous to ask him to sit, but I thought that to be the time for the historical picture. He allowed me to come to his house and photograph him on his back porch in several situations. Of course I had known him since the Mexican War when he was upon Gen. Scott's staff, and my request was not as from an intruder." Wet plate albumen on original cardstock, albumen itself, 9" X 11", handsomely presented in a vintage walnut frame measuring 16 3/4" X 18 3/4". Archival matting with UV glass. Photo has nice contrast and clarity, a very rare large presentation of this important photograph..........................................................SOLD

21300 - COLONEL FRANCIS BARTOW, Carte de Viste by Quimby & Co of Charleston, SC from life pose. Colonel Francis Stebbins Bartow (September 6, 1816 - July 21, 1861) was an attorney, Confederate States of America political leader, and military officer during the early months of the American Civil War. He was an inaugural representative ot the Confederate Provisional Congress, where he led efforts to prepare for the coming war. Bartow was killed at the First Battle of Manassas, becoming the first brigade commander in the Confederate States Army to die in combat. Bartow commanded the 7th & 8th Georgia Regiments -- the 9th Georgia Regiment, Pope's and Duncan's Kentucky Battalions Infantry remained at Piedmont Station and were no present on July 21, 1861. He addressed his troops, "...but remember, boys, that battle and fighting mean death, and probably before sunrise some of us will be dead." Early the next morning, Bartow had the 7th and 8th Georgia march to the left flank of the army. He was shot from his horse leading his troops at Manassas and killed. A rare photo with the scarce Quimby back mark. Very fine.............................................SOLD

1242 - GENERAL WADE HAMPTON, CSA, Carte de Viste, Salt print of General Wade Hampton in Confederate Uniform. In the Gettysburg Campaign, Hampton was slightly wounded in the Battle of Brandy Station, the war's largest cavalry battle. His brigade then participated in Stuart's wild adventure to the northeast, swinging around the Union army and losing contact with Lee. Stuart and Hampton reached the vicinity of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, late on July 2, 1863. On July 3, Hampton led the cavalry attack to the east of Gettysburg, attempting to disrupt the Union rear areas, but colliding with Union cavalry. He received two more saber cuts to the front of his head, but continued fighting until he was wounded again with a piece of shrapnel to the hip. He was carried back to Virginia in the same ambulance as General John Bell Hood. On August 3, 1863, Hampton was promoted to major general and received command of a cavalry division. His wounds from Gettysburg were slow in healing, so he did not actually return to duty until November. During the Overland Campaign of 1864, Stuart was killed at the Battle of Yellow Tavern and Hampton was given command of the Cavalry Corps on August 11, 1864. He distinguished himself in his new role at the bloody Battle of Trevilian Station, defeating Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan's Cavalry, and in fact, lost no cavalry battles for the remainder of the war. While Lee's Army was bottled up in the Siege of Petersburg, in January 1865, Hampton returned to South Carolina to recruit additional soldiers. He was promoted to lieutenant general on February 14, 1865, but eventually surrendered to the Union along with General Joseph E. Johnston's Army of Tennessee at Bennett Place in Durham, North Carolina. Exceptionally rare view, great contrast, corners of card trifle tipped............................SOLD


1150 - JEFFERSON DAVIS
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. 3/4 standing pose with hand on a book. President of the Confederate States. A nice, crisp card. Very fine..........................................................
SOLD

1151 - GENERAL THOMAS J. STONEWALL JACKSON, Carte de Viste by Tanner and Van Ness of Lynchburg, VA. Profile pose facing left. One of the best-known Confederate commanders after General Robert E. Lee. His military career includes the Valley Campaign of 1862 and his service as a corps commander in the Army of Northern Virginia under Robert E. Lee. Confederate pickets accidentally shot him at the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 2, 1863, which the general survived, albeit with the loss of an arm to amputation. However, he died of complications of pneumonia eight days later. His death was a severe setback for the Confederacy, affecting not only its military prospects, but also the morale of its army and of the general public. Jackson in death became an icon of Southern heroism and commitment, joining Lee in the pantheon of the "Lost Cause". Although a common pose, the back mark of Tanner and Van Ness of Lynchburg, VA makes this a most attractive card. Very fine, crisp card...........................................SOLD

1152 - GENERAL THOMAS J. STONEWALL JACKSON, Carte de Viste no imprint. Profile pose facing left. One of the best-known Confederate commanders after General Robert E. Lee. His military career includes the Valley Campaign of 1862 and his service as a corps commander in the Army of Northern Virginia under Robert E. Lee. Confederate pickets accidentally shot him at the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 2, 1863, which the general survived, albeit with the loss of an arm to amputation. However, he died of complications of pneumonia eight days later. His death was a severe setback for the Confederacy, affecting not only its military prospects, but also the morale of its army and of the general public. Jackson in death became an icon of Southern heroism and commitment, joining Lee in the pantheon of the "Lost Cause". An excellent example, sharp, great contrast, they don't get much better in quality for this pose, near mint...................................................SOLD

1153 - GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE, Carte de Viste by Minnis of Richmond, VA. Pose of Lee slightly facing to the camera in uniform. This photograph is attributed to have been originally taken by Minnis & Cowell in 1862 and is dubbed as being the only pose of Lee taken in the field. It later was wildly copied by other photographers. Very fine crisp card.......................................................SOLD


1154 - GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Nice bust pose in uniform, Commander in Chief of the Confederate Army. Crisp and near mint card. Excellent clarity and contrast, hard to find better.............................
SOLD

1155 - GENERAL JAMES SIMONS, SOUTH CAROLINA, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Pose in Militia Uniform. James Simons was South Carolina's Speaker of the House, a longtime politician who also held a Brigadier's commission in the state militia when war commenced. Simons commanded Morris Island during the bombardment on Ft. Sumter but soon fought with Governor Pickens over the prerogatives of rank--Simons disliked having to take orders from his arch-political rival--and resigned his commission on July 10, 1861 taking no real part in the war after that..................................................................................SOLD



1156 - GENERAL JEB E. STUART
, Carte de Viste, no imprint. Bust pose engraving of Stuart. Killed at Yellow Tavern in 1864, quite reasonable..............................
SOLD


1157 - GENERAL JOHN B. HOOD
, Carte de Viste, no imprint. A nice from life pose of Hood in Confederate uniform. Commanded the Army of the Tennessee. Arguably one of the best brigade and division commanders in the Confederate States Army. Hood became increasingly ineffective as he was promoted to lead larger, independent commands late in the war, and his career was marred by his decisive defeats leading an army in the Atlanta Campaign and the Franklin-Nashville Campaign. Very fine.................................................
SOLD

1159 - GENERAL WILLIAM ROONEY LEE, Carte de Viste, no imprint. Bust pose from life in Confederate uniform. Also known as Rooney Lee or W. H. F. Lee, was the second son of Robert E. Lee and Mary Anna Randolph Custis. He was a planter, a Confederate cavalry General in the American Civil War, and later a member of the U. S. Congress. Very fine, near mint, very nice example.........................................SOLD

1160 - GENERAL GEORGE T. ANDERSON, Carte de Viste, no imprint. Bust pose in uniform. He became colonel of the 11th George Infantry regiment but arrived too late to participate in the First Battle of Bull Run. He saw battle during the Peninsula Campaign at Yorktown and commanded a brigade during the Seven Days Battles, Second Bull Run, Turner's Gap, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. Anderson missed Chancellorsville being with the majority of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet's First Corps operating in southeastern Virginia. Longstreet's men rejoined the Army of Northern Virginia in time for the Gettysburg Campaign. Anderson fought around Devil's Den and the Wheatfield at Gettysburg, where he was wounded. He recuperated in the Charleston area while Longstreet's Corps went to Georgia. Anderson did not rejoin his men until the Siege of Knoxville. He saw heavy action in 1864 at the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, and the operations around Richmond and Petersburg. He surrendered with Lee at Appomattox Court House in April 1865. A near mint card. Great contrast.......................SOLD

1161 - WILLIAM QUANTRILL, CONFEDERATE GUERILLA, Carte de Viste, no imprint, bust pose. Confederate guerilla William C. Quantrill (July 31, 1837 - June 6, 1865) was a Confederate guerrilla leader during the American Civil War. After leading a Confederate bushwhacker unit along the Missouri-Kansas border in the early 1860s, which included the infamous raid and sacking of Lawrence, Kansas in 1863, Quantrill eventually ended up in Kentucky where he was mortally wounded in a Union ambush in May 1865, aged 27. The only published view of Quantrill is an engraving. This rendition was copied from that pose. The first example we have had in years. Fine, crisp card.............SOLD

1162 - GENERAL DABNEY MAURY, Carte de Viste, no imprint, nice bust from life. He entered the Confederate Army as a colonel, serving as an Adjutant General, and then was Chief of Staff under General Earl Van Dorn. Following the Battle of Pea Ridge, he was promoted to the rank of brigadier general and assigned to field command. Maury led a division at the Battle of Corinth, and was appointed major general in November 1862. He participated in army operations around Vicksburg, Mississippi, and in the defense of Mobile, Alabama. In the latter military campaign, Maury commanded the Department of the Gulf. Very fine crisp card.........................SOLD

8205 - GENERAL ROBERT E. LEE, Carte de Viste, no imprint. The famous seated pose taken by Brady just after the War [April 15th, 1865] in Richmond at his home on Franklin Street on the back porch. This is one of the six photos of Lee, Brady took that day of which only five survive today. A remarkable photograph showing the strain of the war and his thoughts of facing another ordeal after the surrender days before at Appomattox. A very clear and defined image with no imprint but of excellent quality.............................SOLD

4232 - GENERAL STERLING PRICE, PUBLISHED BY QUIMBY OF CHARLESTON, Carte de Viste of General Sterling Price in uniform published by Quimby of Charleston. Price was the 11th Governor of Missouri from 1853 to 1857. He also served as a United States Army brigadier general during the Mexican-American War, and a Confederate Army major general in the American Civil War. Price is best known for his victories in New Mexico and Chihuahua during the Mexican conflict, and for his losses at the Battles of Pea Ridge and Westport during the Civil War - the latter being the culmination of his ill-fated Missouri Campaign of 1864. Following the war, Price took his remaining troops to Mexico rather than surrender, unsuccessfully seeking service with Emperor Maximillian there. He ultimately returned to Missouri, where he died in poverty and was buried in St. Louis. A very desirable Charleston back mark. Card has some slight tip trim otherwise fine................................SOLD

2241 - GENERAL A. C. GODWIN, Cabinet albumen photo that had been applied to a thick scrapbook page, old contemporary ID at bottom [3.75" X 5.5"]. War period photos of Godwin are non-existent and this image was made taken from a composite of his only known pre-war image and a artist drawing of a CSA uniform. As assistant provost marshal in charge of Libby Prison. Jefferson Davis assigned Godwin the task of constructing the prison stockade in Salisbury, North Carolina. He was transferred to the front taking the colonelcy of the 57th North Carolina Infantry on July 17, 1862. Godwin's first action came at the Battle of Fredericksburg on December 13, 1862. He also served as a member of Robert F. Hoke's Brigade during the Fredericksburg phase of the Chancellorsville Campaign. Hoke had been wounded and was replaced by Colonel Isaac E. Avery. Godwin marched under the command of Avery to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania in the summer of 1863 participating in the attack on Cemetery Hill on July 2 at the Battle of Gettysburg. With the mortal wounding of Colonel Avery, Godwin temporarily assumed command of the brigade and led it back into Virginia and until November 7, 1863 when he was captured at Rappahannock Bridge. He was exchanged in 1864, and promoted to brigadier general commanding what had formerly been Hoke's Brigade on August 5. On September 19, he was killed at the Third Battle of Winchester. He had acquired a reputation for being quite cruel to Union captives. There had been some discussion after the war of trying Godwin for war crimes until it was discovered that he was already dead. This is the first image of Godwin we have ever offered in over 30 years.......................................SOLD

2122 - CASTLE THUNDER, RICHMOND, VA, Carte de Viste Castle Thunder, located in Richmond, Virginia, was a former tobacco warehouse located on Tobacco Row, converted into a prison used by the Confederacy to house civilian prisoners, including captured Union spies, political prisoners and those charged with treason during the American Civil War. A large number of its inmates were sentenced to death. Even thought he inmates were sometimes allowed boxes of medicine and other supplies, the prison guards had a reputation for brutality. The prison's most notorious commandant was Capt. George W. Alexander. As a Confederate soldier fighting in Maryland, Alexander was captured in 1861. While awaiting execution by the Union Army, he escaped and fled to Richmond. Once in Richmond, Alexander took command of the Castle Thunder Prison. Security at the prison was intense under Alexander. Prisoners are said to have complained of Alexander's brutality. Those held in the prison as spies, criminals, or charged with treason were said to have been treated with unnecessary brutality by the guards. The unsavory reputation of the prison obliged the Confederate House of Representatives in 1863 to order and investigation of the commandant, Capt. George W. Alexander, who had been accused of "harshness, inhumanity, tyranny, and dishonesty." Alexander was eventually cleared of the charges, partially by citing the hard-bitten character of the inmates as justification for his behavior. Very fine, trifle ink spot to far right corner..................................SOLD



9041 - GENERAL CUSTIS LEE
, Carte de Viste, son of Robert E. Lee. Bust pose in Confederate uniform. While this card has no backmark [has a revenue stamp]. It resembles nearly exactly the Vannerson pose of Custis Lee which we have handled many times before. Quite nice and half the price of a Vannerson card..........................................
SOLD


2262 - GENERAL DAVID RUMPH JONES
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose in Confederate uniform. Seven days, 2nd Manassas, South Mountain, died in 1863. Scarce...........................................
SOLD

2263 - GENERAL RICHARD TAYLOR, Carte de Viste. Bust pose in Confederate uniform, Red River Campaign in Louisiana, driving banks South. Excellent photo quality, possibly an old remount, difficult to obtain so nice as many of Taylor's photos seem to lack detail.................................................SOLD

2266 - GENERAL JOHN HUNT MORGAN AND HIS WIFE, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Seated pose of Morgan in uniform and his wife stands to his right. The famous "wedding pose" of Morgan and his wife. One of the nicest we've seen of this pose where many are lacking of important details. Very fine.............................SOLD


22615 - ADMIRAL RAPHAEL SEMMES
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose of Semmes facing to the right. Captain of the Confederate Raider "ALABAMA". Very fine..........................................
SOLD

22618 - GENERAL A.P. HILL, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose in Confederate uniform, wounded at Chancellorsville, reinforced Lee at Sharpsburg, directed the 3rd Corps at Gettysburg, killed near Petersburg. Crisp card, scarce and popular.........................SOLD

 

 
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