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The Civil War
 Union Cartes DeVisite


8146 - GENERAL ROBERT O. TYLER, ADVOCATE OF THE FREEDMEN, wet plate albumen carte de visite, Brady imprint, waist up pose in uniform profile to the left. From 1862 to December 1863, Foster commanded the Department of North Carolina. After the Emancipation Proclamation, he appointed Horace James, a Congregational minister, to help freedmen prepare for independent life, and directed a former contraband camp to be developed as the Freedman's Colony of Roanoke Island. By 1864, 2200 freedmen were settled on household plots. Many worked for pay for the Army, which held the forts. Under President Andrew Johnson, after the war, the Army abandoned the colony. Most of the freedmen chose to return to the mainland for work. In December 1863, Foster was sent to Tennessee to assume command of the Department of the Ohio and its corresponding Army of the Ohio. He was in command for only a short time before he was badly injured in a fall from his horse. Upon his recovery, he took command of the Department of the South and aided in forcing the surrender of Savannah, Georgia. He was making preparations for the surrender of Charleston, but his wounds forced him to relinquish command to Maj. Gen. Quincy A. Gilmore. Foster was assigned to command of the Department of Florida at the end of the war, receiving a promotion to the rank of major general in the volunteer service and brevet major general in the regular army. Very fine.....................................................$145.00

8147 - GENERAL ALEXANDER MCCOOK, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Campbell, Army Photographer, 20th Corps, Army of the Cumberland. Bust pose in uniform. The start of the Civil War, McCook was appointed colonel of the 1st Ohio Infantry in April 1861. He served in the Washington defenses and saw action at the First Battle of Bull Run. On September 3, 1861, he was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers and commanded a division in Tennessee. He earned the brevet of lieutenant colonel in the regular army for his part in the capture of Nashville, Tennessee. McCook then commanded the 2nd Division in the Army of the Ohio at the Battle of Shiloh on the second day of fighting, and then in the subsequent campaign against Corinth. He was promoted to major general of volunteers on July 17, 1862. McCook was given command of the I Corps in the Army of the Ohio. His corps suffered heavy causalities and driven back a mile at the Battle of Perryville in October 1862. Command of the Army of the Ohio was reorganized and his command designated the Right Wing of the XIV Corps in the new Army of the Cumberland. His command again suffered heavy losses at the Battle of Stones River. Once again the command structure was reorganized and his corps named the XX Corps. For the third and final time, at Chickamauga, McCook's troops suffered heavily and were driven from the field. He was court martialed and partially blamed for the Union disaster at Chickamauga. He was not convicted but relieved of duty in the Army of the Cumberland. He later received another command defending Washington. Scarce backmark, very fine..........................................$145.00


GETTYSBURG COMMANDERS

2088 - GENERAL WESLEY MERRITT, wet plate albumen, carte de visite by Anthony, 3/4 standing pose in uniform. In the Gettysburg Campaign, Merritt commanded the Reserve Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac. He was slightly wounded in the Battle of Brandy Station, soon after (June 29, 1863), he was appointed brigadier general of volunteers for his "gallant and meritorious service" at Brandy Station and Upperville. In the initial cavalry actions of the Battle of Gettysburg, Merritt saw no action, his reserve brigade guarded the lines of communications of the Army of the Potomac. On July 3, 1863, however, he participated in the assault ordered by division commander Brig. Gen. Judson Kilpatrick on the Confederate right flank, following Pickett's Charge. His fellow general, Elon J. Farnsworth, was killed during this futile assault against infantry troops. Merritt took over command of the 1st Division of the Cavalry Corps following the death by typhoid fever of its commander, John Buford, in December 1863. Later he received a brevet promotion to lieutenant colonel in the regular army for his actions at the Battle of Yellow Tavern, the engagement in which Confederate cavalry commander Maj. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart was killed. During Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan's Valley Campaigns of 1864, Merritt commanded the 1st Division, Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Shenandoah. Arriving at the opportune moment, his division routed the Confederate forces at the Third Battle of Winchester, a deed for which he received a brevet promotion to major general. He was brevetted major general in the regular army, in April 1865, for bravery at the Battle of Five Forks and the Appomattox Campaign. A very desirable Gettysburg cavalry General, scarce standing pose, choice condition.....................................................SOLD

2089 - GENERAL HENRY SLOCUM, Wet plate albumen carte de visite by Goldin of Washington. An excellent seated pose of Slocum, very uncommon. Slocum had mixed results at Gettysburg being criticized for arriving too slow on the battlefield, thus he received the nickname "Slow Come". As the ranking general on the field after Reynolds' death on July 1st, Slocum commanded the army for about six hours after the fighting that day, until Meade arrived after midnight. Meade planned an attack from the Power's Hill area into the Confederate left flank, to be led by Slocum the following day, utilizing the V Corps and the XII Corps as the army's "right wing". Slocum resisted the suggestion, claiming the terrain was too difficult for an assault, but he continued to fancy himself the right wing commander for the rest of the battle, leaving Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams temporarily in command of his XII Corps during this period. When Meade ordered Slocum to send the entire XII Corps to assist the defense against Lt. Gen. James Longstreet's assault on the Union left flank on July 2, Slocum wisely recommended holding one brigade back in its position on Culp's Hill. This brigade, under Brig. Gen. George S. Greene, was able to hold out against a massive Confederate assault and saved the critical hill for the Union. Slocum was transferred to the Tennessee Theater and later commanded the XX Corps under Sherman. A choice image as usually he is only seen in bust poses......................................................................$325.00


2090 - GENERAL DANIEL SICKLES
, wet plate albumen carte de visite, by Anthony, seated pose facing left with campaign hat. Upon the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861, Sickles became one of the war's most prominent political generals, recruiting the New York regiments that became known as the Excelsior Brigade in the Army of the Potomac. Despite his lack of military experience, he served competently as a brigade, division, and corps commander in some of the early Eastern campaigns. His military career ended at the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863, after he insubordinately moved his III Corps to a position where it was virtually destroyed. He left the battle with an amputated leg, struck by cannon fire, and was eventually awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions. Choice card, exceptional............................
SOLD

2091 - GENERAL DAVID MCMUTRIE GREGG, Wet plate albumen carte de visite by Anthony, waist up pose in uniform. Gregg was promoted to brigadier general just before the Battle of Fredericksburg. As at Antietam, the cavalry was underutilized and held in reserve. He commanded a brigade in the division of Alfred Pleasonton. Gregg was sent to assume command of another cavalry brigade when its commander, Brig. Gen. George Dashiell Bayard, was killed. After Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker assumed command of the demoralized Army of the Potomac, he shook up the cavalry organization, because the mounted arm had not been used effectively. He removed cavalry units from corps and divisions, and consolidated them as a separate Cavalry Corps. At the Battle of Chanellorsville, Stoneman's corps, including Gregg's division, was dispatched on a raid around Lee's left flank to destroy facilities in his rear. The raid lasted nine days and caused a lot of destruction in the rear of the Army of Northern Virginia, but it accomplished little strategically and Stoneman was widely criticized for lack of aggression and not being able to draw any Confederate forces away from the main battle. During the start of the Gettysburg Campaign, Lee's stealthy troop movements away from the Fredericksburg area caused Union consternation and Pleasonton was ordered to find out where they were going. Launching a surprise attack on Maj. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart at Brandy Station resulted in the largest predominantly cavalry engagement of the war. The initial assault crossed the Rappahannock River at Beverly Ford under command of Brig. Gen. John Buford. While Buford attacked, Gregg led the 2nd and 3rd Divisions across Kelly's Ford to attack the flank and rear of the Confederates on Fleetwood Hill, where Stuart's headquarters were located. The fighting was fierce, saber-wielding, and hand-to-hand. The Confederates managed to repulse Gregg. The battle overall was essentially a draw, although it surprised and humiliated Stuart, and orders left behind provided valuable intelligence about Lee's intentions to invade Maryland and Pennsylvania. In the middle of the Gettysburg Campaign, Pleasonton reorganized his corps and Gregg now commanded the 2nd Division. He led it in cavalry engagements at Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville. While his fellow, newly promoted division commander Brig. Gen. John Buford was initiating the Battle of Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, Gregg was still moving north. His division arrived mid-day on July 2 and took up positions to protect the right flank and rear of the Union Army. On July 3, Stuart started a large raid to flank the Union right and hit their trains and lines of communications, hoping to exploit the infantry assault on the Union center (Pickett's Charge), which had just started. Three miles east of Gettysburg, in what is now called "East Cavalry Field," Stuart's forces collided with Gregg's division and Brig. Gen. George A. Custer's brigade of the 3rd Division Gregg commanded the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac in early 1864 until the arrival of Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan, who commanded the cavalry of the forces of Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in the Overland Campaign. Other engagements he was in were: Battle of Yellow Tavern, Battle of Haw's Shop, Battle of Trevilian Station, Bermuda Hundred Battle of Saint Mary's Church, and the Siege of Petersburg. Gregg's division was particularly engaged at the Second Battle of Deep Bottom, the Second Battle of Ream's Stations, and the Battle of Peebles' Farm. Extremely scarce. Choice condition......................................................$495.00



2092 - GENERAL EDWARD W. HINKS, COMMANDER OF BLACK TROOPS AT PETERSBURG
, Wet plate albumen carte de visite by Anthony, waist up  pose of Hinks in uniform. Hinks saw service at Ball's Bluff, the Peninsula Campaign, and at Glendale, where he was wounded. He returned to his regiment for the Maryland Campaign, but was seriously wounded at Antietam on September 17, 1862. In March through May 1864, he commanded the prison camp at Camp Lookout, Maryland before being assigned to command the 3rd Division of the XVII Corps, composed entirely of United States Colored Troops, led by white officers. He was one of the leaders of the unsuccessful First Battle of Petersburg and served in the Siege of Petersburg. Scarce, choice condition..................................................
$225.00




2093 - GENERAL C. C. AUGUR, PORT HUDSON, LA
, Wet plate albumen carte de visite, waist up pose in uniform. Appointed brigadier general of volunteers in 1861, he commanded a brigade under Irvin McDowell during the early part of the war. He was severely wounded at Cedar Mountain in August 1862 while leading a division under Maj. Gen. Nathaniel Banks. He was appointed major general by President Abraham Lincoln on November 14, 1862, to rank from August 9, 1862. President Lincoln had to submit the nomination three times before the U.S. Senate finally confirmed the appointment on March 10, 1863. Subsequently Augur commanded a division in the Army of the Gulf during the siege of Port Hudson. He commanded the XXII Corps and the Department of Washington (1863 - 66), ending the war with an exemplary record. Choice condition...............
SOLD

2094 - GENERAL SAMUEL HEINTZELMAN, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Anthony. Waist up pose in uniform. Colonel of the 17th Pennsylvania Infantry, and was soon promoted to command of a division in the Army of Northeastern Virginia. He was wounded at the July 1861 battle of Bull Run. He commanded the III Corps of the Army of the Potomac in the Peninsula Campaign. His corps played a prominent role in the siege of Yorktown where Heintzelman and division commander Fitz John Porter were among the first to use the Union Army Balloon Corps. The corps bore the brunt of the fighting at Williamsburg and saw significant action at Fair Oaks and Oak Grove. His corps was temporarily attached to the Army of Virginia and took part in the Second Battle of Bull Run. He was commissioned as a brevet brigadier general in the regular army for the battle of Fair Oaks and a major general of volunteers for the battle of Williamsburg. His popularity and confidence in the army were eclipsed by the aggressive nature of his subordinate division commanders Joseph Hooker and Philip Kearny. Relieved of duty with the Army of the Potomac in late 1862, he was assigned to the defense of Washington, D.C. in command of the Department of Washington. Choice card..........................................................$135.00

2031 -  GENERAL JOHN F. HATRANFT, Carte de Visite by Lenzi of Norristown, PA. Bust pose from life in uniform. Hartranft raised a three-year regiment, the 51st Pennsylvania Infantry, and became its colonel. They first served on the North Carolina coast in the Burnside Expedition, Hartranft led them in battle at Roanoke Island and New Bern. In July 1862, Hartranft's men proceeded to Newport News, Virginia, to become part of Burnside's IX Corps, with whom they fought in the Second Battle of Bull Run and at South Mountain. They also fought at the Battle of Antietam, where Hartranft led its famous charge across Burnside's Bridge, suffering 120 casualties. They also participated in the Battle of Fredericksburg. The 51st Pennsylvania was transferred to the Western Theater, where Hartranft saw action at the battles of Vicksburg, Campbell's Station, and Knoxville; in the latter two actions, he served as commander of the 2nd Division of the IX Corps while still a colonel. He commanded the 1st Brigade, 3rd Division of the IX Corps in the 1864 Overland Campaign, participating in the fighting at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania before he was promoted to brigadier general, as of May 12, 1864. He continued in operations against Richmond and Petersburg. At the war's end, Hartranft commanded the Old Capitol Prison and was appointed a special provost marshal during the trial of those accused in the Lincoln assassination. He was noted for his kind treatment toward Mary Surratt, the first woman executed by the Federal government. On July 7, 1865, Hartranft led Mary Surratt, Lewis Paine, David Herold, and George Atzerodt to the gallows in what is now called Fort Lesley McNair. He read them their last rites, and they were hanged. Very scarce..............................................................$295.00



8015 - A RARE VIEW OF WILLIAM T. SHERMAN WITH A SIGNATURE AFFIXED TO THE CARTE DE VISITE
, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Fredericks of New York, Sherman poses 3/4 standing in uniform with his hat and military greatcoat draped over a chair. A signature in in signed as Lt. General being a nice clip affixed to the bottom of the card. Sherman was made Lt. General in 1866 and this photograph probably dates to that year noting the later Fredericks style backmark. A sharp photograph and one we have not offered before...............................................
SOLD

7031 - GENERAL DAVID BIRNEY, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Brady. Waist up pose in uniform facing slightly to the right. Birney fought at the Second Battle of Bull Run in support of Maj. Gen. John Pope's Army of Virginia, and at the Battle of Chantilly immediately following. When Kearny was killed in that battle, Birney took, over command of his division. Stationed in Washington, DC, he missed the Battle of Antietam, but his division returned to the Army of the Potomac to fight at Fredericksburg. He was complimented in III Corps commander Maj. Gen. George Stoneman's official report for "the handsome manner in which he handled his division." Birney led his division in heavy fighting at Chancellorsville, where they suffered more casualties (1,607) than any other division in the army. As a result of his distinguished service at Chancellorsville, he was promoted to major general on May 20, 1863. At the Battle of Gettysburg, the III Corps commander was the notorious Maj. Gen. Daniel Sickles. On July 2, 1863, Sickles insubordinately moved his corps from its assigned defensive position on Cemetery Ridge. Birney's new position was from the Devil's Den, to the Wheatfield, to the Peach Orchard, part of a salient directly in the path of the Confederate assault, and it was too long a front for a single division to defend. Assaulted by the divisions of Maj. Gen. John Bell Hood and Lafayette McLaws, Birney's division was demolished. Army commander Meade rushed in reinforcements, but the line could not hold. His division and the entire corps were finished as a fighting force. As Birney watched the few survivors of his division gather about him on Cemetery Ridge, he whispered to one of his officers, "I wish I were already dead." Sickles was grievously wounded by a cannonball and Birney assumed temporary command of the corps, despite having received two minor wounds himself. He retained command until February 1864. A near MINT card............................SOLD

7032 - GENERAL PHILIP ST. GEORGE COOKE, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Whitehurst but carded by Anthony. A rare full standing pose with high riding boots. Philip St. George Cooke (June 13, 1809 - March 20, 1895) was a career United States Army cavalry officer who served as a Union General in the American Civil War. He is noted for his authorship of an Army cavalry manual, and is sometimes called the "Father of the U.S. Cavalry." His service in the Civil War was significant, but was eclipsed in prominence by the contributions made by his famous son in law, J. E. B. Stuart, to the Confederate States Army. Cooke was appointed brigadier general, U.S. Army, on November 21, 1861, to rank from November 12, 1861. President Abraham Lincoln nominated Cooke for the appointment on December 21, 1861 and the U.S. Senate confirmed it on March 7, 1862. He initially commanded a brigade of regular army cavalry within the defenses of Washington, DC. For the Peninsula Campaign, he was selected by McClellan to command the Cavalry Reserve, a division-sized force, of the Army of the Potomac. When Confederate forces evacuated the city of Yorktown, Cooke was sent along with Major General George Stoneman in pursuit and his cavalry was roughed up in an assault ordered by Stoneman against Fort Magruder. He saw subsequent action at the battles of Williamsburg, Gaines' Mill, and White Oak Swamp. Cooke ordered on ill-fated charge of the 5th U.S. Cavalry at Gaines' Mill during the Seven Days Battles, sacrificing nearly an entire regiment of regulars. Very fine, a rare pose............................$250.00



7033 - GENERAL ALBERT PLEASANTON
, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Anthony. 3/4 standing pose of Pleasanton in uniform. Alfred Pleasonton (July 7, 1824 - February 17, 1897) was a United States Army officer and major general of volunteers in the Union cavalry during the Civil War. He commanded the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac during the Gettysburg Campaign, including the largest predominantly cavalry battle of the war, Brandy Station. In 1864, he was transferred to the Trans-Mississippi Theater, where he defeated Confederate General Sterling Price in two key battles, effectively ending the war in Missouri. Card dated 1862 by Anthony. Very fine................................................
SOLD



7034 - GENERAL ALBERT PLEASANTON
, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Morse, Army of the Cumberland, Nashville. Waist up pose of Pleasanton in uniform. Alfred Pleasonton (July 7, 1824 - February 17, 1897) was a United States Army officer and major general of volunteers in the Union cavalry during the Civil War. He commanded the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac during the Gettysburg Campaign, including the largest predominantly cavalry battle of the war, Brandy Station. In 1864, he was transferred to the Trans-Mississippi Theater, where he defeated Confederate General Sterling Price in two key battles, effectively ending the war in Missouri. Scarce backmark, choice condition.....................................................
SOLD



AN EXCEEDINGLY RARE SIGNED CARTE DE VISITE OF ROBERT TODD LINCOLN TAKEN DURING THE CIVIL WAR

6009 - ROBERT TODD LINCOLN, wet plate albumen carte de visite taken by Goldin & Co with their imprint in Washington, DC. Robert Todd Lincoln poses facing left with his arm on a chair with a dapper moustache. Lincoln signs it boldly on the verso, "Yours truly Robert T. Lincoln." Ostendorf identified the CDV as being taken in 1865. See Ostendorf page 303. Exceedingly rare as most images of Robert T. Lincoln signed are much post war. This example is a war period example signed on the verso boldly. He was the first son of Abraham Lincoln. Active in Republican politics, and a tangible symbol of his father's legacy, Robert Lincoln was often spoken of as a possible candidate for office, including the presidency, but never took steps to mount a campaign. The one office to which he was elected was Town Supervisor of South Chicago, which he held from 1876 to 1877. (The town later became part of the city of Chicago.) He did accept appointments as Secretary of War in the administrations of James A. Garfield and Chester A. Arthur, and Minister to England in the Benjamin Harrison administration. Near mint condition.................................................$3,400.00

A SUPERB SIGNED CARTE DE VISITE OF ANDREW JOHNSON AS PRESIDENT

6010 - PRESIDENT ANDREW JOHNSON, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Alexander Gardner, Washington, DC. A seated pose of Johnson in an ornate chair, dated 1866. Signed boldly on the verso in dark black ink. Andrew Johnson (December 29, 1808 - July 31, 1875) was the 17th President of the United States, serving from 1865 to 1869. Johnson became president as he was vice president at the time of President Abraham Lincoln's assassination. A Democrat who ran with Lincoln on the National Union ticket, Johnson came to office as the Civil War concluded. The new president favored quick restoration of the seceded states to the Union. His plans did not give protection to the former slaves, and he came into conflict with the Republican-dominated Congress, culminating in his impeachment by the House of Representatives. The first American president to be impeached, he was acquitted in the Senate by one vote. Choice condition......................................$2,995.00

DEFENDED MARY SURRATT


6600 - REVERDY JOHNSON SIGNED CARTE DE VISITE
, 2.4" X 4". A profile portrait of Johnson signed on the mount, "Reverdy Johnson". Very clean and untrimmed; with the gentlest of toning. The original owner has written in period ink on the verso, "Will Hon Senator Johnston please write his name on his picture so it will show in an Album." Back stamp reads, "Alexander Gardner Photographer to the Army of the Potomac...Published by Philip & Solomons." Johnson was a statesman and jurist from Maryland; most notable for defending Lincoln conspirator Mary Surratt. Very choice conditioin. RARE SIGNED.............................................................$395.00


6014 - GENERAL GEORGE A. CUSTER, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Brady of New York. Bust pose of Custer as Major General facing to the left. Katz #20, taken October 8th, 1863. George Armstrong Custer (December 5, 1839 - June 25, 1876) was a United States Army officer and cavalry commander in the Civil War and the American Indian Wars. Raised in Michigan and Ohio, Custer was admitted to West Point in 1858, where he graduated last in his class. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Custer was called to serve with the Union Army. Custer developed a strong reputation during the Civil War. He fought in the first major engagement, the First Battle of Bull Run. His association with several important officers helped his career, as did his success as a highly effective cavalry commander. Custer was eventually promoted to the temporary rank (brevet) of major general and promoted major general of Volunteers. (At war's end, he reverted to his permanent rank of captain.) At the conclusion of the Appomattox Campaign, in which he and his troops played a decisive role, Custer was present at General Robert E. Lee's surrender. After the Civil War, Custer was dispatched to the west to fight in the American Indian Wars and appointed lieutenant colonel of the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment where he and all his men were killed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876 fighting against a coalition of Native American tribes. The battle is popularly known in American history as "Custer's Last Stand." Custer and his men were defeated so decisively in this battle that the Battle of the Little Bighorn has overshadowed all his prior achievements. A very desirable wartime image of Custer...............................................$1,250.00

6015 - LT. COLONEL GEORGE A. CUSTER, wet plate albumen carte de visite, no imprint but taken by Jose Mora in March 1876, Katz #120. Photo as Lt. Colonel 7th US Cavalry. George Armstrong Custer (December 5, 1839 - June 25, 1876) was a United States Army officer and cavalry commander in the Civil War and the American Indian Wars. Raised in Michigan and Ohio, Custer was admitted to West Point in 1858, where he graduated last in his class. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Custer was called to serve with the Union Army. Custer developed a strong reputation during the Civil War. He fought in the first major engagement, the First Battle of Bull Run. His association with several important officers helped his career, as did his success as a highly effective cavalry commander. Custer was eventually promoted to the temporary rank (brevet) of major general and promoted major general of Volunteers. (At war's end, he reverted to his permanent rank of captain.) At the conclusion of the Appomattox Campaign, in which he and his troops played a decisive role, Custer was present at General Robert E. Lee's surrender. After the Civil War, Custer was dispatched to the west to fight in the American Indian Wars and appointed lieutenant colonel of the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment where he and all his men were killed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876 fighting against a coalition of Native American tribes. The battle is popularly known in American history as "Custer's Last Stand." Custer and his men were defeated so decisively in this battle that the Battle of the Little Bighorn has overshadowed all his prior achievements. Excellent quality image, tips of card slightly rounded. A very desirable late image of Custer just before his death..............................................SOLD


5152 - DR. MARY WALKER, US SURGEON, MEDAL OF HONOR WINNER, wet plate albumen, carte de visite, imprint of Elliott & Fry. An excellent pose of Dr. Walker wearing brogan shoes, and men's trousers under her long skirt. She wears her Congressional Medal of Honor proudly. Mary Edwards Walker (November 26, 1832 - February 21, 1919) was an American feminist, abolitionist, prohibitionist, alleged spy, prisoner of war and surgeon. As of 2015, she is the only woman ever to receive the Medal of Honor. Prior to the American Civil War, she earned her medical degree, married and started a medical practice. The practice didn't do well and she volunteered with the Union Army at the outbreak of the American Civil War and served as a surgeon. Women and sectarian physicians were not even considered for the Union Army Examining Board because they were unfit, let alone someone who met both of those qualifications. She was captured by Confederate forces after crossing enemy lines to treat wounded civilians and arrested as a spy. She was sent as a prisoner of war to Richmond, Virginia until released in a prisoner exchange. After the war, she was approved for the highest United States Armed Forces decoration for bravery, the Medal of Honor, for her efforts during the Civil War. She is the only woman to receive the medal and one of only eight civilians to receive it. Her name was deleted from the Army Medal of Honor Roll in 1917 and restored in 1977. After the war, she was a writer and lecturer supporting the women's suffrage movement until her death in 1919. Choice condition.................................................SOLD






5153 - GENERAL US GRANT
, wet plate albumen carte de visite by Anthony. A very nice from life seated pose of Grant as Lt. General Commander of the US forces in the east after leaving the western theater. He received Lee's surrender at Appomattox. Sharp photo, tips of card a trifle rounded to enter an album page. One of the better poses of Grant. Fine................................
SOLD



5154 - LT. JOSEPH WILLIS, 8TH NEW HAMPSHIRE, CO. F, KILLED AT PORT HUDSON, Wet plate albumen carte de visite, by Wilder, Laconia, NH. A bust pose as 1st Sergeant. Killed June 14th, 1863 at Port Hudson, LA. June 14th - The hard charging infantrymen began to climb the parapet. Many were shot down and fell back into the ditch below, but some managed to enter the Rebel works through a gap in the defenses. "They all fought gallantly" wrote one Confederate witness "but the main body in the rear evidently could not be induced to come up to their support." The supporting Union regiments had stopped and hit the ground due to the heavy fire and pulled back rather than press the attack. The defenders closed the gap and killed or captured the Federals that had made it inside the works. Those outside were forced to take cover where they could in ditches and ravines, with many having to stay there under the broiling sun until nightfall. All attacks against other points in the Hudson by storm was another disastrous failure. The Eighth New Hampshire had gone into action with 217 officers and men and lost 29 killed and 93 wounded, or 56 per cent casualties Total Federal casualties were approximately 1800 killed, wounded, and missing while the Confederates lost only 22 killed and 25 wounded. This was the Union's most lopsided defeat of the war when casualties are compared. A printed notation on the verso of the CDV states "Lt. Wallis, Co. F, was killed in the ditch and buried there, the Rebels throwing dirt over the parapet within their reach." Very fine, a scarce unit, great ID..............................................$225.00


4202 - GENERAL EDWARD FERRERO, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of brigadier general, holding slouch hat. Backmark: E. & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Light age toning. Sharp image. Uncommon. On October 14, 1861 he mustered into service as colonel of the 51st New York Infantry, a regiment which he commanded in Burnside's North Carolina expedition. At Second Bull Run, Antietam and Fredericksburg, he was in charge of a brigade of the 9th Corps. He served in the Vicksburg and Knoxville campaigns and returned east to command the newly organized colored division of the 9th Corps. At the celebrated battle of the Crater on July 30, 1864, Ferrero's men were supposed to follow Ledlie's forces in the assault on the Rebel lines after the explosion, but they were caught in the huge excavation and the whole affair became a dismal failure with 3,800 men becoming casualties..................$165.00

4203 - GENERAL WILLIAM F. SMITH, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Seated view in uniform with rank of major general, and wearing a badge. Backmark: Bogardus Photographer, 363 Broadway, New York. Light age toning and wear. In July 1861, he was appointed colonel of the 3rd Vermont Infantry and saw action at the 1st Battle of Bull Run. On August 13th of that year he was promoted to brigadier general. He commanded a division of the 6th Corps in the Peninsular and Antietam campaigns, and commanded the corps in the battle of Fredericksburg. Sent to the western theatre, he was chief engineer of the Department of the Cumberland and later held the same position in the Military Division of the Mississippi. Praised by Grant, Sherman and Thomas, he made a valuable contribution to the assault on Missionary Ridge. Grant brought him east in 1864  and gave him command of the 18th Corps of Butler's Army of the James. His corps was later attached to the Army of the Potomac in time to take part in the bloody battle at Cold Harbor, and in the Petersburg campaign.............................................$145.00

4205 - GENERAL JAMES S. NEGLEY, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Standing view in uniform with epaulettes, single star on each side of the collar, piping across his chest, sash, gauntlets and sword attached to his belt. His hat is just visible on the table at his side, and he is holding what appears to be a small telescope. The table covering is a flag with stars visible. Backmark: E. & H. T. Anthony, New York. Light age toning and wear. Scarce. He rose to brigadier general of the 18th division and in 1861 was put in charge of organizing and equipping volunteers in the Pittsburgh area. That summer he served under General Robert Patterson and on February 6, 1862, was appointed a brigadier general of U.S. Volunteers. Meanwhile he was sent to Kentucky and served with General Don Carolos Buell's army until the fall of 1862, when General Braxton Bragg's army invaded Kentucky. Buell marched northward leaving Negley to defend Nashville. At the battle of Stone's River, Negley commanded a division under General George H. Thomas and was promoted to major general for his services. His capabilities were again ably demonstrated when Bragg was driven out of Tennessee.......................................................$175.00

4206 - GENERAL CHARLES D. JAMERSON, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: Whitehurst Gallery, Washington, DC. Light age toning and wear. Very fine. Scarce. Colonel of the 2nd Maine Infantry and led his regiment at 1st Bull Run and was commissioned brigadier general to rank from Sept. 3, 1861. During the Peninsular campaign he commanded a brigade in the 3rd Corps. As "General of the Trenches" on May 4, 1862, he was the first to discover the Confederate evacuation of Yorktown, VA. During the battle of Seven Pines, Jameson's command got closer to Richmond than any portion of McClellan's army, and he was praised for bravery by his corps commander General Samuel P. Heintzelman. Soon after he contracted "camp fever" which forced him to take a leave of absence and return to Maine. He died on a steamboat between Boston and Bangor, Maine...............................................$175.00

4207 - GENERAL GEORGE L. HARTSTUFF, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: E. & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Sharp image. Very fine. Scarce. In 1861, he went with the expedition which secretly reinforced Fort Pickens, Florida. During the fall and winter of 1861-62, he was chief of staff to General William S. Rosecrans in West Virginia, and on April 15, 1862, was appointed brigadier general. He fought gallantly at 2nd Bull Run, and was severely wounded at the battle of Antietam. He was promoted to rank of major general to rank from November 19, 1862, and then commanded the 23rd Corps until being incapacitated again by his wounds. In March 1865, he took command of the Bermuda Hundred front for the siege of Petersburg, between the James and Appomattox Rivers.............................................................$165.00

4204 - GENERAL DAVID HUNTER, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Full standing view wearing double breasted frock coat with epaulettes, Hardee hat with plume and 1st cavalry hat wreath insignia, and holding his sword. Backmark: E. Anthony, NY, with photographic sticker on the reverse of agent McAllister & Brother, 728 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Excellent. Desirable pose. Hunter was invited by President Elect Abraham Lincoln to travel with him on the inaugural train to Washington in Feb. 1861. Selected for high command by Lincoln himself, Hunter became the 4th highest ranking officer in the volunteer army. His field service included the 1st battle of Bull Run where he was wounded, the battle of Secessionville, SC, and the battle of Piedmont. He was also known for his 1862 order to abolish slavery in the Department of the South, an order that was instantly repudiated by Lincoln, he presided at the court martial of General Fitz John Porter, he ordered the burning of the buildings of the Virginia Military Institute in 1864, and he presided at the trial of the Lincoln conspirators. He also was chosen to accompany the body of Abraham Lincoln to Springfield, Illinois for burial in 1865..................................................$195.00

4208 - GENERAL SAMUEL P. CARTER, wet plate albumen, carte de visite by Fredericks, NY. 3/4 standing pose with arms folded. US Naval officer as well as a Brig. General. Saw Mexican War service. Carter was appointed a brigadier general of volunteers without resigning from the Navy. He led an infantry brigade at the Battle of Mill Springs on January 19, 1862, and participated in operations under Brigadier General George W. Morgan that resulted in th occupation of Cumberland Gap on June 17, 1862. Carter's hope that Morgan would then invade and occupy East Tennessee was dashed when Morgan was forced to retreat in the face of a Confederate move into Kentucky - Braxton Bragg's Perryville Campaign. Folowing Bragg's defeat and retreat to Middle Tennessee, Carter successfully lobbied his superiors for permission to conduct a raid into East Tennessee. Carter's plan was to cripple the vital East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. This would support the operations of Major General William S. Rosecrans in Middle Tennessee, and test the route through the mountains as a potential path of invasion. The result was the first long-range, large-scale Federal cavalry raid of the war. With a force of just under 1,000 men Carter moved through the rugged mountains of eastern Kentucky and Tennessee during the last week of 1862. On December 30, he destroyed railroad and wagon bridges at Union and Carter's Depot, Tennessee. He repeatedly defeated the Confederate forces in his path, captured a moving train, destroyed tens of thousands of dollars of military stores, and returned safely to Kentucky on January 2, 1863. Plans to follow the raid with an invasion and occupation of East Tennessee, a move urged by Lincoln, were canceled when Carter reported the route impracticable for a large force. In July 1863, Carter was placed in command of the XXIII Corps cavalry division and continued campaigning across Tennessee throughout the year, engaging Confederate forces during the Battle of Blue Springs of the Knoxville Campaign. By 1865, Carter was in North Carolina and commanding the left wing of the Union forces at the Battle of Wyse Fork. He was promoted to brevet major general of volunteers on March 13, 1856, briefly commanding the XXIII Corps before being mustered out of volunteer service in January 1866. While Carter was serving in the Union Army, the U.S. Navy promoted him to lieutenant commander in 1863, then to commander in 1865. A mint card and very scarce.............................................$295.00

4209 - GENERAL JOHN C. FREMONT, wet plate albumen, carte de visite by Fredericks of NY, waist up pose of Fremont- probably his best Civil War pose. John Charles Frémont or Fremont (January 21, 1813 - July 13, 1890) was an American military officer, explorer, and politician who became the first candidate of the anti-slavery Republican Party for the office of President of the United States. During the 1840's, when he led four expeditions into the American West, that era's penny press and admiring historians accorded Frémont the sobriquet The Pathfinder. During the Civil War, he was given command of Department of the West by President Abraham Lincoln for insubordination. In 1861, Frémont was the first commanding Union general who recognized an "iron will" to fight in Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant. Although Frémont had successes during his brief tenure as Commander of the Western Armies, he ran his department autocratically, and made hasty decisions without consulting Washington, DC or President Lincoln. After Frémont's emancipation edict that freed slaves in his district he was relieved of his command by and promoted him commander at the strategic base near Cairo, Illinois. Very fine, an excellent card........................................................$175.00

4210 - GENERAL PETER OSTERHAUS, wet plate albumen, carte de visite of Anthony, waist up pose in uniform from life. At the outbreak of the Civil War Osterhaus was appointed a major of the 2nd Missouri Volunteers and during the first year of the war was employed in Missouri and Arkansas, where he took a conspicuous part in the battles of Wilson's Creek (August 10, 1861) and Pea Ridge (March 7 - 8, 1862). At Pea Ridge, he commanded the troops that first made contact with Confederate forces advancing on the Union left. He was promoted to brigadier general on June 9, 1862. In 1863, he commanded a division in the Battle of Port Gibson, where he displayed tactical ability in prying Confederate defenders out of a favorable position. Osterhaus continued in division command during the Vicksburg Campaign, fighting in the Battle of Champion Hill and at the Battle of Big Black River Bridge, where he was slightly wounded. Osterhaus's division made an unsuccessful first attack on the defenses of Vicksburg, the first act of the Siege of Vicksburg. His division helped cover the siege against intervention by the Confederate forces of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, and he took part in Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman's advance on Jackson, Mississippi, that was designed to protect the rear of the Army of the Tennessee in its siege operations. After the fall of Vicksburg, Osterhaus's division was transferred to Tennessee. In the Chattanooga Campaign (November 23 to November 25) he aided Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker in the capture of Lookout Mountain. Osterhaus then participated in the Atlanta Campaign but a month-long sick leave caused him to miss the crucial battle of Atlanta. However, he returned to command and played a significant role in the battle of Jonesboro. After the capture of Atlanta, he received command of the XV Corps, one of the four corps into which the army was consolidated, in the March to the Sea. In March, 1865 Osterhaus was appointed chief of staff in the Military Division of West Mississippi under the command of Edward Canby, a commander with little combat experience in high command. Osterhaus served Canby through the battles of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely. When Edmund Kirby Smith surrendered the Confederate forces in the Trans-Mississippi Theater, Osterhaus was sent as Canby's representative and therefore personally signed the documents on behalf of the Union army, very scarce.....................................................$195.00

4211 - GENERAL PHILIP SHERIDAN, wet plate albumen, carte de visite by Brady, a fine seated pose of Sheridan facing to the right. His career was noted for his rapid rise to major general and his close association with General-in-chief Ulysses S. Grant, who transferred Sheridan from command of an infantry division in the Western Theater to lead the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac in the East. In 1864, he defeated Confederate forces in the Shenandoah Valley and his destruction of the economic infrastructure of the Valley, called "The Burning" by residents, was one of the first uses of scorched earth tactics in the war. In 1865, his cavalry pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee and was instrumental in forcing his surrender at Appomattox. Sheridan fought in later years in the Indian Wars of the Great Plains. Both as a soldier and private citizen, he was instrumental in the development and protection of Yellowstone National Park. In 1883, Sheridan was appointed general-in-chief of the U.S. Army, and in 1888 he was promoted to the rank of General of the Army during the term of President Grover Cleveland. A very desirable pose..................................................SOLD

4212 - GENERAL JAMES MCPHERSON, wet plate albumen, carte de visite, no imprint. From life pose in uniform from the waist up in uniform. On July 17, Confederate President Jefferson Davis became frustrated with Johnston's strategy of maneuver and retreat, and replaced him with Lt. Gen. John Bell Hood. With the Union armies closing in on Atlanta, Hood first attacked George Henry Thomas's Army of the Cumberland north of the city on July 20, at Peachtree Creek, hoping to drive Thomas back before other forces could come to his aid. The attack failed. Then Hood's cavalry reported that the left flank of McPherson's Army of the Tennessee, east of Atlanta, was unprotected. Hood visualized a glorious replay of Jackson's famous flank attack at Chancellorsville and ordered a new attack. McPherson had advanced his troops into Decatur, Georgia, and from there, they moved onto high ground on Bald Hill overlooking Atlanta. Sherman believed that the Confederates had been defeated and were evacuating; however, McPherson rightly believed that they were moving to attack the Union left and rear. On July 22, while they were discussing this new development, however, four Confederate divisions under Lt. Gen. William J. Hardee flanked Union Maj. Gen. Grenville Dodge's XVI Corps. While McPherson was riding his horse toward his old XVII Corps, a line of Confederate skirmishers appeared, yelling "Halt!". McPherson raised his hand to his head as if to remove his hat, but suddenly wheeled his horse, attempting to escape. The Confederates opened fire and mortally wounded McPherson. This was early in the one-day Battle of Atlanta, part of the Atlanta Campaign that led to the surrender of Atlanta a month later........................................................$195.00

4213 - GENERAL W. T. SHERMAN, wet plate albumen, carte de visite by Anthony seated pose of Sherman facing to the left. Sherman served under General Ulysses S. Grant in 1862 and 1863 during the campaigns that ld to the fall of the Confederate stronghold of Vicksburg on the Mississippi River and culminated with the routing of the Confederate armies in the state of Tennessee. In 1864, Sherman succeeded Grant as the Union commander in the western theater of the war. He proceeded to lead his troops to the capture of the city of Atlanta, a military success that contributed to the re-election of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln. Sherman's subsequent march through Georgia and the Carolinas further undermined the Confederacy's ability to continue fighting. He accepted the surrender of all the Confederate armies in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida in April 1865. When Grant assumed the U.S. presidency in 1869, Sherman succeeded him as Commanding General of the Army (1869-83). As such, he was responsible for the U.S. Army's engagement in the Indian Wars over the next 15 years, in the western United States. He steadfastly refused to be drawn into politics and in 1875 published his Memoirs, one of the best-known first-hand accounts of the Civil War. British military historian B. H. Liddell Hart famously declared that Sherman was "the first modern general." An excellent pose...............................................SOLD


4214 - SHERMAN AND HIS GENERALS
, wet plate albumen, carte de visite from life no imprint. Sherman is seated surrounded by six of his generals. John Logan, Slocum, O. O. Howard, Jefferson C. Davis, Mower, and Hazen. This wonderful from life photo is attributed to Mathew Brady. A superb photo high in detail...........................................
$595.00


4215 - GENERAL GUSTAVAS DE RUSSY
, wet plate albumen, carte de visite by Anthony. Superb bust pose from waist up. Mexican War service and he remained in the army following the war, and served as quartermaster at Fort Monroe from 1848 until 1857, when he was promoted to captain. By the start of the Civil War, he was serving in the 4th US Artillery. He commanded the artillery reserve of III Corps in the Peninsula Campaign and the Seven Days Battles, receiving promotions to major and lieutenant colonel. He was promoted to colonel in March 1863 and again to brigadier general of volunteers in May of the same year, and commanded the southern defenses of Washington, D. C. until the end of the war. Choice condition.............................................
$165.00

4216 - GENERAL JAMES MULLIGAN, wet plate albumen, carte de visite by Anthony. 3/4 standing pose in uniform as Colonel of the 23rd Illinois. At the onset of the Civil War, Mulligan raised the 23rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment in 1861, which was locally known as the "Irish Brigade" (not to be confused with a New York unit by the same name.) This unit included the "Chicago Shield Guards." In September 1861, he led his troops toward Lexington, Missouri, as word had been received that this vital river town would be attacked by the pro-Confederate Missouri State Guard under Major General Sterling Price. Commanded Camp Douglas, fought at the Battle of Leetown. On July 24, 1864, Mulligan led his troops into the Second Battle of Kernstown, near Winchester, Virginia. Late in the afternoon, Major General John B. Gordon's Confederate force attacked Mulligan's 1,800 soldiers from ground beyond Opequon Church. Mulligan briefly held off Gordon's units, but Confederate Major General John C. Breckinridge, a former U.S. Vice President, led a devastating flank attack against the Irishman from the east side of the Valley Pike. Sharpshooters under Confederate Major General Stephen D. Ramseur then attacked Mulligan's right flank from the west. Now encompassed on three sides, the Union battle line fell apart. Mulligan was shot by a sharpshooter and died two days later. Choice condition and rare so nice...........................................$325.00

4217 - GENERAL LEW WALLACE, wet plate albumen, carte de visite, not imprint but a superb from life standing pose which is rare in itself. Wallace's military career included service in the Mexican-American War and the American Civil War. He was appointed Indiana's adjutant general and commanded the 11th Indiana Infantry Regiment. Wallace, who attained the rank of major general, participated in the battle of Fort Donelson, the battle of Shiloh, and the battle of Monocacy. He also served on the military commission for the trials of the Lincoln assassination conspirators, and presided over the military investigation of Henry Wirz, a Confederate commandant of the Andersonville prison camp. Authored BEN HUR in 1880 and later Governor of the New Mexico Territory. An unusually nice image of Wallace as most seen are bust poses. Choice...............................................$395.00





4218 - GENERAL FREDERICK WINTHROP
, wet plate albumen, carte de visite by Brady. An outstanding 3/4 standing pose. With his regiment joining the Army of the Potomac in early 1862, Winthrop served with that army in every major engagement until he was killed at the Battle of Five Forks on April 1st, 1865. An outstanding image in condition and very scarce it itself................................................
$275.00


4219 - GENERAL JASPER A. MALTBY, wet plate albumen, carte de visite by the Washington Gallery, Vicksburg, MS. Bust pose in uniform facing right Mexican War veteran. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Maltby enlisted as a private in the 45th Illinois Infantry (known as the "Lead Mine Regiment") on December 26, 1861. He was elected as the regiment's lieutenant colonel that same day. He participated in the 1862 attack on Fort Donelson in Tennessee, and was wounded in the elbow and both thights. He was eventually shipped home to Galena. to recuperate. After his recovery, he was promoted to colonel. The following year he commanded his Illinois troops in Ulysses S. Grant's operations against the Confederate defenses of Vicksburg, Mississippi. Maltby was again wounded during an attack on Fort Hill on June 25. Union troops had tunneled under the 3rd Louisiana Redan and packed the mine with 2,200 pounds of gunpowder. The resulting explosion blew apart the Confederate lines, while troops from John A. Logan's division of the XVII Corps followed the blast with an infantry assault. Maltby's 45th Illinois charged into the 40-foot (12m) diameter, 12-foot (3.7m) deep crater with ease, but were stopped by recovering Confederate infantry. The Union soldiers became pinned down while the defenders rolled artillery shells with short fuses into the pit with deadly results. Maltby suffered severe injuries to his head and right side and never fully recovered, but was able to continue in the army. He was promoted to brigadier general on August 4, 1863. On September 8, he took command of the 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, of the XVII Corps in the Army of the Tennessee. For much of 1864, his brigade was in the 1st Division of the Department of Vicksburg, but for part of summer was temporarily commanded by Colonel John H. Howe while Maltby recovered from complications from his Vicksburg wounds. Maltby's Brigade remained in Vicksburg throughout the year while much of the army fought in northern Georgia and later in Tennessee. Very scarce. Excellent condition.......................................................SOLD

4220 - GENERAL RUFUS SAXTON, wet plate albumen, carte de visite by Anthony. 3/4 standing pose in uniform holding his hat. As the Civil War broke out, Saxton served as a quartermaster and ultimately a brigadier general for the Union forces. During the war, he commanded the Union defenses at Harpers Ferry and he was awarded the Medal of Honor for his "gallant service" there in May and June 1862. According to a New York Times article of April 22, 1893, about Saxton's award, "So far to only two other general officers have been awarded the medals, Gens. Schofield and Miles." Saxton was later appointed military governor of the Department of the South. As such, he directed the recruitment of the first regiments of black soldiers who fought in the Union Army as directing the organization of black contrabands in South Carolina early in the war. Choice........................................$195.00

4221 - DR. MARY WALKER, US SURGEON, MEDAL OF HONOR WINNER, wet plate albumen, carte de visite, no imprint. An excellent pose of Dr. Walker wearing brogan shoes, and men's trousers under her long skirt. She wears her Congressional Medal of Honor proudly. Attractive calligraphy identification at bottom of card. Mary Edwards Walker (November 26, 1832 - February 21, 1919) was an American feminist, abolitionist, prohibitionist, alleged spy, prisoner of war and surgeon. As of 2015, she is the only woman ever to receive the Medal of Honor. Prior to the American Civil War she earned her medical degree, married and started a medical practice. The practice didn't do well and she volunteered with the Union Army at the outbreak of the American Civil War and served as a surgeon. Women and sectarian physicians were not even considered for the Union Army Examining Board because they were unfit, let alone someone who met both of those qualifications. She was captured by Confederate forces after crossing enemy lines to treat wounded civilians and arrested as a spy. She was sent as a prisoner of war to Richmond, Virginia until released in a prisoner exchange. After the war, she was approved for the highest United States Armed Forces decoration for bravery, the Medal of Honor, for her efforts during the Civil War. She is the only woman to receive the medal and one of only eight civilians to receive it. Her name was deleted from the Army Medal of Honor Roll in 1917 and restored in 1977. After the war, she was a writer and lecturer supporting the women's suffrage movement until her death in 1919. Comes with a biography [pamphlet] of her life. Fine, some emulsion blems completely away from image, very scarce and desirable....................................SOLD


33100 - GENERAL JACOB AMMEN, Carte de Visite by J. P. Ball of Cincinnati, Ohio, the black abolitionist photographer. Bust pose in uniform facing slightly left. Within a week after the Confederate bombardment of Fort Sumter in April 1861, Ammen rejoined the Federal army, serving as a captain in the newly raised 12th Ohio Infantry. He was soon commissioned as colonel of the 24th Ohio Infantry. After training at Camp Chase, Ammen's regiment was sent in late July to serve in western Virginia, seeing their first combat at the Battle of Cheat Mountain. Shipped to the Western Theater, Ammen led a brigade in the Army of the Ohio at the Battle of Shiloh and the Siege of Corinth. Ammen was promoted to brigadier general on July 16, 1862. In August, Ammen assumed the division command vacated by William "Bull" Nelson, who had been given a new command and sent to defend Richmond, Kentucky. When his health deteriorated, Ammen then performed administrative duty for nearly a year, commanding Camp Douglas in Illinois in early 1863, as well as other Federal garrisons. In late 1863, he returned to the field and commanded the Fourth Division of the XXIII Corps. In September 1864, his 800-man force blocked the vital Virginia and Tennessee Railroad at Bull's Gap, Tennessee, during Stephen G. Burbridge's Saltville raid. Very fine, slight tone, a very desirable BALL imprint on the verso...................................$200.00




33001 - GENERAL JOHN DIX WITH AUTOGRAPH SIGNED ON A SEPARATE CARD
, Carte de Visite by Bogardus of New York. An unusually nice pose of Dix facing to the right in uniform from life. The best pose we have ever seen of Dix. John Adams Dix (July 24, 1798 - April 21, 1879) was Secretary of the Treasury under Buchanan, Governor of New York and Union major general during the Civil War. He was notable for arresting the pro-Southern Maryland legislature, preventing that divided border state from seceding, and for arranging a system for prisoner exchange via the Dix-Hill cartel, concluded in partnership with Confederate Maj. Gen. D. H. Hill. Also included is his autograph on a card dated March 6th, 1874. Two Items......................
$165.00

33002 - GENERAL JOHN FREMONT, Carte de Visite by Anthony from life pose full standing holding his sword in front of him, his hat rests on an adjacent column. John Charles Frémont or Fremont (January 21, 1813 - July 13, 1890) was an American military officer, explorer, and politician who became the first candidate of the anti-slavery Republican Party for the office of President of the United States. During the 1840's, when he led four expeditions into the American West, that era's penny press and admiring historians accorded Frémont the sobriquet The Pathfinder. During the Civil War, he was given command of Department of the West by President Abraham Lincoln for insubordination. In 1861, Frémont was the first commanding Union general who recognized an "iron will" to fight in Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant. Although Frémont had successes during his brief tenure as Commander of the Western Armies, he ran his department autocratically, and made hasty decisions without consulting Washington D.C. or President Lincoln. After Frémont's emancipation edict that freed slaves in his district he was relieved of his command by and promoted him commander at the strategic base near Cairo, Illinois. Very fine, an excellent card..................................................$165.00


MORE UNION COMMANDERS

31424 - GENERAL JOSEPH A. MOWER, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view in uniform. Back mark: E. & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very fine. Scarce. (1827 - 70) Born in Woodstock, Vermont, he was educated at Norwich Academy, and fought in the Mexican War. He compiled a superb fighting record during the Civil War serving as a regimental, brigade, division, and corps commander. He was commissioned colonel of the 11th Missouri Infantry in May 1862, and promoted to brigadier general, on March 16, 1863, and major general, on Aug. 12, 1864. He saw action in the battles of Iuka and Corinth, where he was wounded, captured, escaped, and recaptured. He commanded a brigade in the Vicksburg campaign, accompanied General N. P. Banks in the Red River campaign, led the attacking column on Fort De Russy and commanded the rear guard at Yellow Bayou. After fighting against General Sterling Price during his invasion of Missouri in early 1864, he served in the Georgia and Carolina's campaigns under General William T. Sherman, first as a division commander, and then leading the 20th corps with much distinction. General Sherman was quoted to have said that Mower was "the boldest young soldier we have." He remained in the U.S. Army after the war, and commanded the 39th and 25th U.S. Colored Troops respectively. He died of pneumonia in New Orleans, on January 6, 1870, while in command of the Department of Louisiana, and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.............................................................$225.00

31425 - GENERAL SAMUEL D. STURGIS, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view in uniform. Back mark: R. W. Addis Photographer, McClees Gallery, 308 Penna Avenue, Washington, DC. Scarce. (1822 - 89) graduated in the celebrated West Point class of 1846. During the Mexican War, he served as a lieutenant of dragoons and was captured and held prisoner for eight days while making a reconnaissance near Buena Vista. After the Mexican War, he took part in a number of Indian campaigns out west. At the start of the Civil War, he was in command at Fort Smith, Arkansas. Many of his officers defected to the Confederacy; however Sturgis refused to surrender and managed to march his troops with much of the government property to Fort Leavenworth. Taking part in the battle of Wilson's Creek, MO, in August 1861; he succeeded to command of the Union forces after the death of General Nathaniel Lyon. Sturgis was promoted to brigadier general to rank from Aug. 10, 1861. Sent east, he was ordered to support General John Pope's Army of Virginia at the 2nd Battle of Bull Run, and during the campaign he made the now famous quote, "I don't care for John Pope one pinch of owl dung!" He fought in the Antietam campaign where one of the brigades in his division carried Burnside's Bridge. During the battle of Fredericksburg, he commanded a division of the 9th Corps. In 1863, he went west with the 9th corps serving in Tennessee and Mississippi, and then served as chief of cavalry of the Department of the Ohio. In June 1864, he was routed by General Nathan Bedford Forrest at the battle of Brice's Cross Roads, MS. He remained in the army after the Civil War, and on May 6, 1869, he became colonel of the celebrated 7th Cavalry, whose lieutenant colonel was George A. Custer.......................................................SOLD

31426 - GENERAL JOHN MCARTHUR, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of brigadier general and wearing a hat with insignia. Back mark: Morse's Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, TN. Very sharp image. Light age toning. Rare. (1826 - 1906) Born in Scotland, he was captain of a militia company called the "Chicago Highland Guards" before the Civil War. On May 3, 1861, he was appointed colonel of the 12th Illinois Infantry. From the capture of Forts Henry and Donelson in February 1862, until the end of the war, the tall, brawny Scotsman, compiled a combat record second to none. Promoted to brigadier general in March 1862, he saw action at Shiloh, Iuka, Corinth, and the Vicksburg campaign, and was commander of the city itself until August 1864. At that time he was ordered to join Sherman before Atlanta. In November 1864, he went to Nashville, and the following month, his 4,000 men rolled up John Bell Hood's left on the first day of battle. Thereafter he served under E. R. S. Canby in the campaign which concluded the war...............................................$295.00

31427 - GENERAL JOHN W. GEARY, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Seated view in uniform with rank of major general. Back mark" Henszey & Co., Philadelphia. Very sharp image. Excellent view. (1819 - 1873) from the age of 16 he had been a militia lieutenant and with the outbreak of war with Mexico, he was elected Lieutenant Colonel of the 2nd Pennsylvania Infantry, and took part in General Winfield Scott's advance from Vera Cruz to Mexico City. In the interval between the close of the Mexican War and start of the Civil War, Geary organized the post office system in California, served as the 1st mayor of San Francisco, and for several months was the territorial Governor of Kansas. On June 28, 1861, he was appointed Colonel of the 28th Pennsylvania Infantry and joined the command of General N. P. Banks at Harper's Ferry. He distinguished himself in several engagements and was wounded at Bolivar Heights, captured Leesburg in March 1862, was twice wounded at Cedar Mountain, and returned to action in time to command a division of the 12th Corps at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. Later transferred to the western army, he fought at Chattanooga, the Atlanta campaign and took part in General Sherman's celebrated March to the Sea. After the capture of Savannah, GA, Geary was appointed it's military governor. His post war career saw him elected Governor of Pennsylvania in 1866, serving two terms..............................................................$169.00

31428 - GENERAL PHILIP KEARNY, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Black & Case, Boston imprint on the front mount. Back mark: Black & Case Photographic Artist, 163 & 173 Washington St., Boston. Light age toning and wear. (1815 - 62) during the Mexican War, in 1846, his company served as escort for commanding General Winfield Scott during the advance on Mexico City, and at Churubusco his left arm was shattered necessitating amputation. For his gallant conduct here he was brevetted major. In 1859 Kearny went abroad and served in Napoleon III's Imperial Guard during the Italian War. He took part in every cavalry charge at Magenta and Solferino with the reins of his horse clenched in his teeth. When the Civil War broke out he hurried home and was one of the first brigadier generals of volunteers appointed. He was assigned to command the "New Jersey Brigade," part of Gen. W. B. Franklin's division. He fought in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, rising to division command. At the close of the 2nd Bull Run campaign, on Sept. 1, 1862, at Chantilly, VA, he was killed. Respected by officers of both the North & the South, his body was sent through the lines under a flag of truce by Gen. Robert E. Lee. The originator of the "Kearny Patch," the forerunner of the corps badge, he was termed by Gen. Scott as "the bravest man I ever knew, and a perfect soldier." High praise indeed! He also earned the sobriquet, "Kearny The Magnificent." Kearny's own motto was, "It is sweet and fitting to die for one's country"................................................$165.00

31429 - GENERAL WILLIAM H. FRENCH, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of major general. Back mark: E. & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very sharp view. (1815 - 81) graduated in the West Point class of 1837. French fought in the Florida Wars and the Mexican War. He earned the brevets of captain and major for gallantry in Mexico. Appointed brigadier general of volunteers to rank September 28, 1861. He commanded a brigade of the 2nd Corps during the peninsular campaign, and a division of the corps at Antietam. He also fought in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville and commanded the District of Harper's Ferry during the Gettysburg campaign. French commanded the 3rd Corps during the Mine Run campaign.....................................$165.00

31431 - GENERAL FRANCIS P. BLAIR, JR, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Seated view in uniform with rank of major general. Imprint on the front mount, C. D. Fredericks & Co., N.Y. Back mark: C. D. Fredericks & Co., New York, Habana and Paris. Very sharp image. Excellent. (1821 - 75) the son of an advisor to presidents and the brother of Montgomery Blair, Abraham Lincoln's first postmaster general. From secession to reconstruction, Francis P. Blair, Jr. made a series of major contributions to the Union cause. No man did more to block Missouri's joining the Confederacy in 1861; as a U.S. Congressman he battled for Lincoln's early war programs; he was a distinguished divisional and corps commander in the Vicksburg and Atlanta campaigns; and as a post war senator battled the Radical Republicans in an attempt to bring reconstruction to a shattered nation. Blair also saw service during the Civil War in the Yazoo expedition, at Chattanooga, Sherman's March to the Sea and the Carolina's campaign. Both Grant and Sherman who were highly critical of most "political generals" rated Blair as one of the most competent military leaders of the war............................................................SOLD

31432 - GENERAL HENRY E. DAVIES, JR, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Excellent quality full standing view in uniform with rank of brigadier general, and holding his slouch hat. Back mark: E. & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative from Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very sharp image. (1836 - 94) he was educated at Harvard, Williams and Columbia colleges, graduating in 1857 from the latter. He then studied law and was admitted to the state bar and began practice. At the outbreak of the Civil War he became captain in the 5th N.Y. Infantry and fought at the battle of Big Bethel, on June 10, 1861. In August he was appointed major of the 2nd N.Y. Cavalry. The regiment was attached to McDowell's corps on the Rappahannock during the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign and he saw hard service during the 2nd Bull Run campaign. Davies was promoted to lieutenant colonel in December 1862, to colonel in June, 1863, to brigadier general in September 1863, and to major general by the end of the war. In June 1863 his regiment suffered very heavy casualties at Beverly Ford and Aldie while the army was enroute to Pennsylvania. From then until the close of the war Davies was in brigade and divisional command in the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac; he played a gallant role in the raids on Richmond and in all the actions in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864 and rendered outstanding service in the cavalry operations which culminated in the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox. He was wounded on February 6, 1865, at Hatcher's Run, VA........................................................$175.00

31433 - GENERAL O. O. HOWARD, carte de visite by Brady, Washington studio, wet plate albumen, large waist up pose facing to the left of Howard in uniform. As a brigade commander in the Army of the Potomac, Howard lost his right arm while leading his men against Confederate forces at Fair Oaks in June 1862, an action which later earned him the Medal of Honor. As a corps commander, he suffered two humiliating defeats at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg in may and July 1863, but recovered from the setbacks as a successful corps and later army commander in the Western Theater. Known as the "Christian general" because he tried to base his policy decisions on his deep religious piety, he was given charge of the Freedmen's Bureau in mid-1865, with the mission of integrating the freed slaves into Southern society and politics during the second phase of the Reconstruction Era. Howard took charge of labor policy, setting up a system that required free slaves to work on former plantation land under pay scales fixed by the Bureau, on terms negotiated by the Bureau with white land owners. Howard's Bureau was primarily responsible for the legal affairs of the freedmen. He attempted to protect freed blacks from hostile conditions, but lacked  adequate power, and was repeatedly frustrated by President Andrew Johnson. Howard's allies, the Radical Republicans, won control of Congress in the 1866 elections and imposed Radical Reconstruction, with the result that freedmen were given the vote. With the help and advice of the Bureau, they joined Republican coalitions along with "carpetbaggers" and "scalawags" to take political control of most of the southern states. Howard was also a leader in promoting higher education for freedmen, most notably in founding of Howard University in Washington and serving as its president 1867 - 73. After 1874, Howard commanded troops in the West, conducting a famous campaign against the Nez Perce tribe. Led campaigns against the Apaches in 1872, and against the Sheepeaters in 1879 all add up to a lengthy record, although he did no fight as much as George Custer and Nelson Miles. Excellent quality Brady photograph with just the slightest trim at the bottom of the card. Scarce on a Brady card..............................................$295.00


7114 - GENERAL DAVID HUNTER, CDV by Addis of Washington. BOLDLY SIGNED ON THE FRONT OF THE CARD BY HUNTER AS MAJOR GENERAL. Bust pose in uniform. David Hunter (July 21, 1802 - February 2, 1886) was a Union general in the American Civil War. He achieved fame by his unauthorized 1862 order (immediately rescinded) emancipating slaves in three Southern states and as the president of the military commission trying the conspirators involved with the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Hunter was a strong advocate of arming blacks as soldiers for the Union cause. After the Battle of Fort Pulaski, he began enlisting black soldiers from the occupied districts of South Carolina and formed the first such Union Army regiment, the 1st South Carolina (African Descent), which he was initially ordered to disband, but eventually got approval from Congress for his action. Very fine..........................................................SOLD

3200 - LIEUTENANT FRANCIS H. LACEY, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view, in uniform, with shoulder straps. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker Photographers, 407 Main Street, Louisville, KY. Very fine. Francis H. Lacey, was a 30 year old resident of La Porte City, Iowa, when he enlisted as 3rd Corporal, on August 15, 1862, and was mustered into Co. D, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to 4th sergeant, February 1, 1863; 2nd lieutenant, February 19, 1863; 1st lieutenant, September 21, 1864; and was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, KY, on June 27, 1865. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, and Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old pencil ID............................................................$115.00

3201 - CAPTAIN ADAM GEBERT, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view, in uniform, with shoulder straps. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker Photographers, 407 Main Street, Louisville, KY. Very fine. Adam Gebert, was a 39 year old resident of Maquoketa, Iowa, when he enlisted as a 2nd lieutenant, on August 13, 1862, and was mustered into Co. F, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to captain, March 31, 1863, and was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, KY, on June 27, 1865. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old pencil ID.................................................$115.00

3202 - LIEUTENANT SIMON N. LANDON, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view, in uniform, with shoulder straps. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker Photographers, 407 Main Street, Louisville, KY. Very fine. Simon N. Landon, was a 39 year old resident of Wyoming, Iowa, when he enlisted as a 2nd sergeant, on August 8, 1862, and was mustered into Co. G, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to 2nd lieutenant, March 31, 1863; and was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, KY, on June 27, 1865. the 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old pencil ID.............................................................$115.00

3203 - LIEUTENANT CORYDON SMITH, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view, in uniform, with shoulder straps. Back mark: Albert S. Cooper's Photographic & Fine Art Gallery, No. 231 Main Street, 3 doors above 3d, Louisville, KY. Wm. Dorr has been written in ink above Albert S. Cooper's. Very fine. Corydon Smith, was a 25 year old resident of Cedar Falls, Iowa, when he enlisted as a private, on October 12, 1862, and was mustered into Co. B, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to 2nd lieutenant, August 29, 1863; and was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, KY, on June 27, 1865. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old Pencil ID.................................................$115.00

3204 - LIEUTENANT THOMAS C. BIRD, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view, oval format, in uniform, with shoulder straps. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker, Photographers 407 Main Street, between 4th & 5th, Louisville, KY, with 2 cents blue George Washington U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp. Excellent CDV. Thomas C. Bird, was a 37 year old resident of Waterloo, Iowa, when he enlisted as 1st sergeant, on August 2, 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to 2nd lieutenant, March 31, 1863; and 1st lieutenant, July 16, 1863. He was wounded on November 25, 1863, at Missionary Ridge, TN, and was wounded a second time on August 14, 1864, at Atlanta, GA. He was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, KY on June 27, 1865. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among it's battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta. Old Pencil ID...................................................$185.00

3205 - CAPTAIN JOSEPH H. EVANS, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Standing view in uniform with captain's shoulder straps, and sporting a goatee beard. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker Photographers, 407 Main Street, Louisville, KY, with 2 cents blue George Washington, U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp. Very fine. Joseph H. Evans, was a 40 year old resident of Clarence, Iowa, when he enlisted as a private, on August 15, 1862, and was mustered into Co. G, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to captain, March 31, 1863; and was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, KY on June 27, 1865. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, and Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old pencil ID................................................................$135.00

3206 - LIEUTENANT JOHN W. GILMAN, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view, in uniform, with shoulder straps. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker Photographers, 407 Main Street, Louisville, KY, with 2 cents blue George Washington, U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp. Very fine. John W. Gilman, was a 25 year old resident of Cedar Falls, Iowa, when he enlisted as a private, on August 6, 1862, and was mustered into Co. B, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to commissary sergeant, January 9, 1863; 2nd lieutenant, March 31, 1863; 1st lieutenant, June 9, 1863; quartermaster, July 11, 1863; and was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, KY, on June 27, 1865. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old Pencil ID..................................................$120.00

3207 - LIEUTENANT ANDREW J. MCPEAK, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view, in uniform, with shoulder straps. Back mark: Albert S. Cooper's Photographic & Fine Art Gallery, No. 231 Main Street, 3 doors above 3d, Louisville, KY. Very fine. Andrew J. McPeak was a 23 year old resident of Maquoketa, Iowa, when he enlisted as a 4th corporal, on August 13, 1862, and was mustered into Co. F, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to 1st sergeant, May 1, 1863; 2nd lieutenant, July 16, 1863; 1st lieutenant, September 23, 1864; and was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, KY, on June 27, 1865. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old Pencil ID.......................................$120.00

3208 - LIEUTENANT MICHAEL MALONEY, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view, oval format, in uniform, with shoulder straps. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker, Photographers, 407 Main Street, between 4th & 5th, Louisville, KY, with 2 cents blue George Washington U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp. Very fine. Michael Maloney, was a 21 year old resident of Bellvue, Iowa, when he enlisted as a 2nd sergeant, on August 5, 1862, and was mustered into Co. K, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to sergeant major, July 18, 1863; 1st lieutenant, May 15, 1864; and was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, KY, on June 27, 1865. In the report of Colonel William Smyth, 31st Iowa Infantry, dated June 6, 1864, during the Atlanta campaign, he mentions Michael Maloney by name. "Just before dark, on the evening of 31st of May, the enemy succeeded in bringing a piece or two of artillery into the edge of the woods in front of the Ninth and Twenty-fifth Iowa, and commenced throwing shot and shell into the pits we had just abandoned and those which we then occupied, as well as the woods occupied by our skirmishers. The traverses in our works covered us so effectually that not a man was injured, although the enemy had fair range of us. One shell fell in our works, but did not explode. Sergeant Major Maloney, now acting as lieutenant of Company K, pending his recommendation for promotion to lieutenant of that company, picked it up and threw it over the breastworks." The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, and Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign...................................................$185.00

3209 - LIEUTENANT HENRY E. WILLIAMS, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view, oval format, in uniform, with shoulder straps and wearing a cockade pinned to his coat. This is possibly a mourning badge. The 31st Iowa Infantry did participate in the Grand Review in Washington, D.C. with General Sherman's Army, prior to being shipped to Louisville, so maybe this badge is being worn in memory of President Lincoln? Back mark: Campbell & Ecker, Photographers, 407 Main Street, between 4th & 5th, Louisville, KY with 2 cents orange George Washington U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp. Excellent CDV of a Union officer wearing badge. Henry E. Williams, was a 36 year old resident of Cedar Falls, Iowa, when he enlisted as a private, on October 12, 1862, and was mustered into Co. B, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to sergeant major, February 16, 1863; 2nd lieutenant, June 9, 1863; 1st lieutenant, July 11, 1863; and captain, September 18, 1864. He was severely wounded on August 31, 1864, at Jonesboro, GA. Mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, KY on June 27, 1865. In the report of Colonel William Smyth, 31st Iowa Infantry, dated June 6, 1864, at Acworth, GA, describing the actions of the 31st Iowa Infantry from May 23rd to June 6, 1864, during the Atlanta campaign, he notes that Lieutenant Williams commanded the division sharpshooters. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign...................................$165.00

3210 - CAPTAIN GEORGE D. HILTON, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Standing view wearing single breasted frock coat with shoulder straps. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker, Photographers, 407 Main Street, between 4th & 5th, Louisville, KY, with 2 cents orange George Washington U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp. Very fine. George D. Hilton, was a 25 year old resident of Anamosa, Iowa, when he enlisted as a 2nd lieutenant, on August 9, 1862, and was mustered into Co. E, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to captain, March 17, 1863. He was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry,  at Louisville, KY, on June 27, 1865. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, and Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina campaign................................................$150.00

3211 - LIEUTENANT JOHN S. DUNHAM, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view, oval format, in uniform, with shoulder straps and wearing a 15th Corps badge pinned to his coat. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker, Photographers, 407 Main Street, between 4th & 5th, Louisville, KY, with 2 cents orange George Washington U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp. Excellent CDV of a Union officer wearing his corps badge. John S. Dunham, was a 26 year old resident of Spragueville, Iowa, when he enlisted as a 1st sergeant, on July 26, 1862, and was mustered into Co. 1, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to 2nd lieutenant, May 24, 1863. He was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, KY, on June 27, 1865. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old Pencil ID.....................................$115.00

3212 - SERGEANT EDMUND B. WYLIE, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view, oval format, in uniform, wearing a 15th Corps badge pinned to his coat at lower right. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker, Photographs, 407 Main Street, between 4th & 5th, Louisville, KY, with 2 cents orange George Washington U.S. Inter Rev. tax stamp. Excellent CDV of a Union soldier wearing his corps badge. Edmund B. Wylie, was a 23 years old resident of Andrew, Iowa, when he enlisted as a private, on August 13, 1862, and was mustered into Co. K, 31st Iowa Infantry. He was promoted to 2nd sergeant, the exact date unknown. He was mustered out of the service with the 31st Iowa Infantry, at Louisville, KY, on June 27, 1865. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old Pencil ID................................................$115.00

3213 - ADJT. JOSEPH ROSENBAUM, 31ST IOWA INF, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view, oval format, in uniform. He had previously been quartermaster sergeant of the regiment before being promoted to adjutant. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker, Louisville, KY w/2 cents blue G. Washington revenue stamp. Residence Cedar Falls, IA; 24 years old. Enlisted on 8/6/1862 as a 5th Sergt. On 10/12/1862, he mustered into "B" Co. IA 31st Infantry. He was mustered out on 6/27/1865 at Louisville, KY...Promotions: Qtr. Master Serg. 4/1/1863. Adjutant 6/17/1865 (not mustered). The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old pencil ID....................................................SOLD

3214 - LIEUT. DAVID RORICK, 31ST IOWA INF, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Seated pose in uniform. Note the mourning ribbon he is wearing no doubt for Lincoln's assassination. The regiment was with Sherman's Army at Washington, D.C. for the Grand Review prior to them being sent to Louisville, KY. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker, Louisville, KY. with 2 cents orange G. Washington tax stamp. On 10/13/1862, he was commissioned into "H" Co. IA 31st Infantry. He was mustered out on 6/27/1865 at Louisville, KY. He was listed as: Wounded 9/1/1864 Jonesboro, GA (wounded severely Promotions: 1st Sergt., 1/20/1863, 1st Lieut. 9/1/1863). The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old pencil ID..........................$185.00

3215 - CAPT. JEREMIAH S. ALEXANDER, 31ST IOWA INF, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. The original imprint on the reverse is Albert S. Cooper's Photographic & Fine Art Gallery, Louisville, KY. Apparently a new owner took over and crossed out Cooper's name and wrote their own name in ink above it. 2nd Lieut. 2/16/1863, Sergt. Major 11/23/1863, Capt. 6/14/1864. Born in Iowa, mustered out at Louisville, KY. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old pencil ID.........................................................$115.00

3216 - CAPTAIN SEWELL S. FARWELL, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X card. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker Photographers, 407 Main Street, Louisville, KY with 2 cents blue G. Washington U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp, bust pose in uniform. On 10/13/1862, he was commissioned into "H" Co. IA 31st Infantry. He was Mustered out on 6/27/1865 at Louisville, KY. Major May 27th, 1865, the 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and the 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old Pencil ID........................................$115.00

3217 - CAPTAIN LEVI HERRING, COMPANY C, 31ST IOWA INFANTRY, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Back mark: Campbell & Ecker, Photographers, 407 Main Street, Louisville, KY with 2 cents blue G. Washington U.S. Inter. Rev. tax stamp, bust pose in uniform. Residence Black Hawk County, IA; 28 years old. Enlisted on 8/9/1862 as a 6th Corpl. On 9/24/1862 he mustered into "C" Co. IA 31st Infantry. He was mustered out on 6/17/1865 at Louisville, KY. Promotions: 4th Corpl. 3/28/186* 5th Sergt. 9/1/1863; 4th Sergt. 1/20/1864; 1st Sergt 8/7/1864; Capt. 12/30/1864. The 31st Iowa Infantry Regiment received much praise for its noteworthy conduct seeing much action during the Civil War. Among its battle honors were Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain, Roswell, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Savannah and 1865 Carolina's campaign. Old Pencil ID...............................................$115.00

3219 - GENERAL MANNING F. FORCE, MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENT, Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Bust view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Period ink ID on the front mount with name, rank and 2nd Brig., 3rd Div, 17 A. C. No imprint. Light age toning and wear. Rare. (1824 - 99) Graduated from Harvard Law School in 1848. He mustered into the U.S. service in 1861 as major of the 20th Ohio Infantry. He was promoted successively to lieutenant colonel, colonel and brigadier general and established a stellar military record in the process. He took part in the capture of Fort Donelson, the battle of Shiloh, and the 1862-63 campaigns in Tennessee and Mississippi including Vicksburg. At the battle of Atlanta, he earned the Medal of Honor and suffered a facial wound, first thought fatal, which disfigured him for life. He charged upon the enemy's works on July 22, 1864, and after their capture defended his position against assaults of the enemy until he was severely wounded. Returning to duty in October 1864, he joined General William T. Sherman's Army on its "March to the Sea," and for the 1865 Carolina's campaign. During his post war career, he served as a judge of the superior court, and from 1887 until his death, he was the commandant of the Ohio Soldier's and Sailor's Home. Extremely rare!.......................................................$295.00

3223 - GENERAL ROBERT S. GRANGER, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Seated view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Back mark: E. & H. T. Anthony, New York, with 2 cents revenue tax stamp on the reverse. Light age toning and a tiny cut in upper left edge of the photographic print. Scarce. 1816 - 94. Graduated in the West Point class of 1838. Almost 50% of this class attained the rank of full general on either side, Union or Confederate, during the Civil War. He served in the Florida Seminole War, in the Mexican War, and was an instructor at West Point. At the outbreak of the War Between the States, while a Major in the 5th U.S. Infantry, he was captured on duty in Texas and not paroled until August 1862. He was appointed Brig. Gen. U.S. Vols. in Oct. 1862, and served in Kentucky, Tennessee, and North Alabama, where he resisted the invasions of John Bell Hood, Joseph Wheeler, Nathan Bedford Forrest and Philip D. Roddey. Granger later was in command at Huntsville, Decatur and Stevenson, Alabama..............................................$175.00

3224 - GENERAL JOHN G. PARKE, Wet plage, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of major general. His kepi is visible at lower left corner. Back mark: E. & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very sharp view. Excellent. Scarce. 1827 - 1900. Graduated #2 in the West Point class of 1849. He was appointed brigadier general on Nov. 23, 1861, and commanded a brigade in Burnside's North Carolina expedition. He was promoted to major general on Aug. 20, 1862, and served as Burnside's chief of staff in the battles of Antietam and Fredericksburg. In 1863, he commanded the 9th Corps and directed his men skillfully at Vicksburg and the capture of Jackson, MS. He then took part in the Knoxville campaign against Gen. James Longstreet. Returning east in 1864, he did yeoman's work during Grant's Overland campaign. He later served in the Petersburg campaign, and after the debacle at the Crater, he succeeded Burnside in command of the 9th Corps. During the attack on Fort Stedman. Mar. 25, 1865, Parke commanded the army in the temporary absence of Gen. George G. Meade and moved quickly and capably to repel the last tactical assault by Gen. R. E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. For this service, he was brevetted major general in the Regular Army........................................................$185.00


2070 - THE UNION GUNBOAT USS TYLER, MISSISSIPPI RIVER BROWN WATER FLEET, Carte de Visite, no imprint of the Tyler at dock seemingly undergoing repairs as the planking has been removed from her port paddle box, twin stacks, canvas shades on deck, docked on the Mississippi River c. 1864. On 19 April 1862, Tyler moved farther south where she captured the Confederate transport Albert Robb and burned another Southern ship, Dunbar. After Shiloh and the capture of Island No. 10 on the Mississippi, the North shifted the emphasis of its war in the west to conquering that mighty river in an effort to divide the Confederacy in two. Fort Pillow fell on 4 June and Memphis, Tennessee fell on 6 June. Vicksburg, Mississippi was the next obstacle, and it took more than a year to remove it. Those efforts occupied Tyler intermittently for the ensuing 13 months. Her first action of the Vicksburg Campaign came in mid-July when she joined the ironclad USS Carondelet and the USS Queen of the West in probing the Yazoo River above Vicksburg in search of the incomplete Confederate ironclad ram CSS Arkansas which had eluded capture at Memphis and sought refuge far up the Yazoo. The falling waters of the Yazoo forced Arkansas downriver; but, by then, she was virtually complete and ready for battle. On 15 July, the Union probe and the falling river brought Tyler and her colleagues into a collision with Arkansas. After a brisk exchange of cannonades, Carondelet was disabled. Only Tyler, abandoned by Queen of the West, remained to suffer the full onslaught of the powerful Southern warship. Recognizing the futility in attacking her adversary unsupported, Tyler reluctantly retreated with Arkansas in pursuit. After a running fight all the way down the Yazoo, the two warships reached the Unioin fleet lying near the confluence of the two rivers. Tyler sought refuge among the fleet while Arkansas ran through it, delivering salvo after salvo into the aggregate of ships, and moored safely under the protection of the Vicksburg shore batteries. During the first phase of the siege of Vicksburg, Tyler participated in the joint Army - Navy expedition up the Yazoo River to establish a landward advance on the Confederate stronghold. That expedition showed no immediate fruits, the land campaign, in conjunction with the waterborne attacks, eventually brought Vicksburg to her knees. In the meantime, Tyler saw action in two other operations. The first was to open Arkansas to invasion and the second was in support of the slow strangulation of Vicksburg. In mid-January, she joined other units of the squadron in escorting Army transports to Fort Hindman which guarded Arkansas Post on the invasion route to Little Rock. Federal forces carried that fort finally on 9 January 1863 after a combined sea and land campaign. Following that expedition, the gunboat resumed a patrol routine on the Mississippi until late April. In 1865 the Tyler was pressed into service rescuing survivors from the Sultana disaster. On the 29th, she joined another expedition up the Yazoo, and it resulted in the fall of the important fortifications on Haynes Bluffs on 1 May. That operation was the gunboat's last major role in the reduction of Vicksburg which surrendered to Union forces on 4 July 1863. Tyler resumed her support for Army troops upriver invading Arkansas. On the day that Vicksburg surrendered, the gunboat brought her guns to bear on an attacking Confederate force near Helena, Arkansas. Some age tone. A very scarce photo..................................SOLD

2074 - ADMIRAL LOUIS GOLDSBOROUGH, Carte de Visite by Kinder of Newport, RI. A very scarce pose of Goldsborough with his arms folded. Goldsborough was given command of the Atlantic Blockading Squadron in September 1861, relieving Flag Officer Silas Horton Stringham. In October of that year the Atlantic squadron was split into the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron and South Atlantic Blockading Squadron; Goldsborough took command of the North Squadron, and Flag Officer Samuel Francis DuPont assumed command of the South squadron. During his command of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, which he commanded from its inception to September 1862. he led his fleet off North Carolina, where in cooperation with troops under General Ambrose Burnside, he captured Roanoke Island and destroyed a small Confederate fleet. After aiding the capture of Roanoke Island, Goldsborough and his command were sent to Hampton Roads at the request of Major General George B. McClellan to help protect Union forces landing on the Virginia Peninsula at the start of the Peninsula Campaign. Goldsborough refused to be placed under McClellan's direct command, telling Assistant Secretary of the Navy Gustavus Vasa Fox that he would instead cooperate with McClellan. After sending six of his vessels to attack the Gloucester Point batteries, Goldsborough withdrew them, saying the area was too dangerous for his ships -- even though none of them sustained any damage -- and fearful of a return appearance by CSS Virginia, which had laid waste to a Union naval force in Hampton Roads while Goldsborough was at Roanoke Island. At the start of the Seven Days Battles, Goldsborough was asked again, this time by President Abraham Lincoln, to come to McClellan's aid. Goldsborough continued to hold back his fleet, forcing Lincoln to accept a recommendation by Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles to detach ships under Goldsborough's command and place them under Commodore Charles Wilkes, who as a lieutenant had relieved Goldsborough at the Depot of Charts and Instruments (see above), and who would report directly to Welles. This move, coupled with newspaper accounts critical of the Navy, so seriously hurt Goldsborough that he requested that he be relieved. He was promoted to Rear Admiral in August 1862. Very fine....................................................$185.00

2075 - GENERAL RALPH P. BUCKLAND, Carte de Visite by Barr & Young, Army Photographers, Vicksburg, MS, and a bust pose from life. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Buckland entered the Union Army as the colonel of the 72nd Ohio Infantry on January 10, 1862. Buckland commanded the Fourth Brigade of the First Division of the Tennessee Army under William T. Sherman in th 5th Division of the Army of the Tennessee at the Battle of Shiloh in April. He was commissioned as a brigadier general of volunteers on November 29, 1862. During the Siege of Vicksburg in the spring and early summer of 1863, Buckland commanded a brigade in Sherman's XV Corps. During Forrest's Raid on Memphis, Union forces had taken Memphis and were occupying the city. General Forrest was being pursued by troops under the command of General A. J. Smith. Forrest managed to escape his pursuers and circled back for a quick night raid on the city of Memphis. Forrest's goal was to swoop in and kidnap the three Union Generals known to be in the city; General Washburn, General Hurlbut, and General Buckland. Forrest and his men captured the troops on patrol outside the city and began their nighttime assault on the city. General Washburn was routed out of bed and managed to escape capture wearing only a pair of pants. Buckland's sentry abruptly awakened him as he pounded on the door while firing at the approaching enemy. Buckland immediately realized the dire circumstances, but he was not going to be captured without a fight. Buckland quickly ordered rapid firing on an alarm gun to wake up his troops and cause his enemy concern. Buckland rallied some men and quickly attacked the Confederate forces, which had congregated around Washburn's headquarters. Buckland took the lead in the charge and was soon met with reinforcements. Buckland's counter attack was so swift and sure that within an hour the Confederates were all chased out of Memphis. A little later that morning, a fierce battle took place between Buckland and the Union forces under his command and the Confederates under Forrest. Forrest's forces were soundly defeated and soon were in full retreat. Some age tone on verso, scarce Vicksburg imprint..........................................$195.00

2076 - GENERAL MORTIMER LEGGETT, Carte de Visite from life in uniform, no imprint but from an album of Vicksburg generals taken by Barr & Young of Vicksburg. At the beginning of the Civil War, Leggett served as a volunteer on the staff of his friend, Major General George B. McClellan in Western Virginia. He helped raise the 78th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and was commissioned as its colonel in January 1862. He commanded his regiment at the battles of Fort Donelson, Shiloh, and Corinth. In November 1862, he was appointed brigadier general of volunteers and participated in the Vicksburg Campaign, suffering a painful wound. After he recovered, Leggett commanded the 3rd Division of the VII Corps during the Atlanta Campaign and Sherman's March to the Sea. He was brevetted major general of volunteers in July 1864, and was commissioned as a major general a year later. His last action was in the Carolinas Campaign during the spring of 1865. Some age tone but a really sharp photograph, uncommon............................................................$165.00






2079 - MRS. JULIA GRANT
, Carte de Visite, no imprint, Julia Grant seated from life facing left. The wife of General and President U.S. Grant. A nice image of Julia as First Lady in the White House 1869 - 77, image taken early in his first term. Fine....................................
$85.00




5075 - GENERAL ALFRED TERRY, Carte de Visite by Anthony. Bust pose in uniform, Terry's greatest achievement of the war came when he was placed in command of the Fort Fisher Expeditionary Corps. Benjamin Butler had previously failed in an expedition against Fort Fisher at the end of 1864. Terry had gained the confidence of General Ulysses S. Grant and was now  in command of the ground forces in a second expedition against the fort. Unlike Butler, Terry worked well with the Navy under the command of David D. Porter. On January 13, 1865, Terry sent a division of United States Colored Troops to hold off Confederate forces under Braxton Bragg to the north of Fort Fisher. He sent his other division under Adelbert Ames against the northern part of the fort. After hand-to-hand fighting, the Union troops took control of the fort. For his part in the Battle of Fort Fisher, Terry was promoted to major general of volunteers and brigadier general in the regular army. Post war Terry was the commander of the U.S. Army column marching westward into the Montana Territory during what is now popularly known as the Centennial Campaign in 1876-77. Two other columns marched toward the same objective area (George Crook's from the south and John Gibbon's from the west). A column of troops under his command arrived shortly after the Battle of Little Big Horn and discovered the bodies of Custer's men. In October 1877,. he went to Canada to negotiate with Sitting Bull. He was still in command in Montana during the Nez Perce War and sent reinforcements to intercept Chief Joseph. Fine..................................$125.00



5078 - LT. COLONEL JAMES BENEDICT, RHODE ISLAND
, Carte de Visite. Imprint obscured on verso but signature on verso was done at Washington, DC, 3/4 standing pose in uniform, old ID on front and signature on verso partially obscured. While identified to Rhode Island, there is no record of a Colonel Benedict serving in a RI unit. However there is a Lt. Colonel James Benedict who was a military agent in Washington 1863 - 66 for Rhode Island. Benedict may have been on Governor's Sprague's Staff. Other than some verso blemishes, photo is fine...........................................................
$89.00


THE SHADOW OF ANDERSONVILLE

When Sherman's Union army took Atlanta on September 2, 1864, Confederate prison authorities knew that Andersonville would be a prime target of any Union thrust into the heartland of Georgia, and they began moving Union prisoners of war to more secure locations. At Camp Davidson, constructed in July 1864 on the grounds of what had been the U.S. Marine Hospital in Savannah, prisoners were confined within a stockade that enclosed part of an orchard. The ample rations were a welcome respite from the horrors of Macon and Andersonville. The camp guards, the First Georgia Volunteers, had once been prisoners of war themselves. Because of overcrowding caused by the influx of Andersonville prisoners in September, a second Savannah prison, for officers, was set up on land adjacent to the city jail. Another stockade was hastily constructed for enlisted men, but both had to be abandoned after only a month and a half of use. The most substantial prison holding former Andersonville captives was Camp Lawton in Millen, located in Jenkins County between Augusta and Savannah. Camp Lawton was a stockade structure enclosing forty-two acres, making it the largest Civil War prison in terms of area. Set only a mile off the Augusta Railroad, the pen was designed to hold up to 40,000 prisoners, although the population never grew to much beyond 10,000. By all accounts the prison at Millen was infinitely better than Andersonville.  A generous spring ran north to south through the site, providing a fresh supply of drinking water. Rations were also more plentiful, since the countryside had yet to be scavenged of its food resources. Yet disease and death were not unknown because many of the prisoners were terribly debilitated from their incarceration at Andersonville. During the short time the prison was open, from late September to early November 1864, nearly 500 prisoners succumbed to disease..........................................$475.00

12133 - GENERAL CASSIUS CLAY, Carte de Visite by Appleton, NY. Bust pose in small oval gold bordered in uniform. Clay served in the Mexican-American War as a Captain with the 1st Kentucky Cavalry form 1846 to 1847. He opposed the annexation of Texas and expansion of slavery into the Southwest. While making a speech for abolition in 1849, Clay was attacked by the six Turner brothers, who beat, stabbed and tried to shoot him. In the ensuing fight, Clay fought off all six and, using his Bowie knife, killed Cyrus Turner. Clay's connections to the northern antislavery movement remained strong. He was a founder of the Republican party in Kentucky and became a friend of Abraham Lincoln, supporting him for the presidency in 1860. Clay was briefly a candidate for the vice presidency at the 1860 Republican National Convention, but lost the nomination to Hannibal Hamlin. Clay organized a group of 300 volunteers to protect the White House and US Naval Yard from a possible Confederate attack. These men became known as Cassius M. Clay's Washington Guards. President Lincoln gave Clay a presentation Colt revolver in recognition. Recalled to the United States as ambassador to Russia in 1862 to accept a commission from Lincoln as a major general with the Union Army, Clay publicly refused to accept it unless Lincoln would agree to emancipate slaves under Confederate control. Lincoln sent Clay to Kentucky to assess the mood for emancipation there and in the other border states. Following Clay's return to Washington, DC, Lincoln issued the proclamation in late 1862, to take effect in January 1863. Usually just seen in civilian attire. Very uncommon...........................................................$200.00

12134 - PRIVATE ROWLAND WARD, 4TH NY HEAVY ARTILLERY - HIS 'PLASTIC, OPERATION', Carte de Visite no back mark. Five views of the progression of the surgeries in his face. Assigned to Fort Ethan Allen, Ward helped man the heavy guns which protected Washington, DC. Grant reassigned many of these units to combat duty in the Spring of 1864. He was at the Battle of the Wilderness. After his massive injury at Reams Station due to a shell wound to the jaw, the Confederates initially captured him but gave him back to the Union medical corps. He spent a year at Lincoln General Hospital before returning home. Remarkably, he lived until 1898 in Hunts Hollow, NY. Noted on the verso of the CDV in bold pencil with a short description of his "plastic operation" stating that the operation was performed in a Washington Hospital in October 1865. This is a very rare medical CDV. Views of Ward are also seen in the "Photographic Atlas of Civil War Injuries" page 150. Fine...................................$695.00






12135 - GENERAL GEORGE MEADE
, Carte de Visite by A.M. Bailey, 3/4 standing view of Meade in uniform with one arm behind him, the other holding his kepi. The victor at Gettysburg over Lee's army but failed to pursue and destroy the retreating army after Gettysburg. Nice card, very fine..............................................
SOLD

 

12139 - GENERAL JOHN C. FREMONT, Carte de Visite by Anthony. Seated pose of Fremont at a desk. John Charles Frémont or Fremont (January 21, 1813 - July 13, 1890) was an American military officer, explorer, and politician who became the first candidate of the anti-slavery Republican Party for the office of President of the United States. During the 1840s, when he led four expeditions into the American West, that era's penny press and admiring historians accorded Fremont the sobriquet The Pathfinder. During the Mexican American War, Fremont, a major in the U.S. Army, took control of California from the Bear Flag Republic in 1846. Fremont then served as military of Governor of California. During the American Civil War, he was given command of Department of the West by President Abraham Lincoln. Although Fremont had successes during his brief tenure as Commander of the Western Armies, he ran his department autocratically, and made hasty decisions without consulting Washington, DC or President Lincoln. After Fremont's emancipation edict that freed slaves in his district, he was relieved of his command by President Lincoln for insubordination. In 1861, Fremont was the first commanding Union general who recognized an "iron will" to fight in Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant and promoted him commander at the strategic base near Cairo, Illinois. Very fine................................................................$100.00




121340 - GENERAL/GOVERNOR E. D. MORGAN
, Carte de Visite by J. O. Kane of New York, large waist up pose. He was Governor of New York from 1859 through 1862, elected in 1858 and 1860. He was appointed major general of volunteers in September 1861 and commanded the Department of New York until he resigned on January 3, 1863, serving simultaneously as governor and head of the military department. In February 1863, he was elected to the U.S. Senate, and served one term until 1869. Very fine............................................
$85.00

121341 - GENERAL U.S. GRANT, Carte de Visite by Anthony. Seated pose of Grant from life in uniform slightly facing left. 18th President of the US. Grant graduated in 1843 from the United States Military Academy at West Point and served in the Mexican-American War. When the Civil War began in 1861, he rejoined the U.S. Army. In 1862, Grant took control of Kentucky and most of Tennessee, and led Union forces to victory in the Battle of Shiloh, earning a reputation as an aggressive commander. He incorporated displaced African American slaves into the Union war effort. In July 1863, after a series of coordinated battles, Grant defeated Confederate armies and seized Vicksburg, giving the Union control of the Mississippi River and dividing the Confederacy in two. After his victory in the Chattanooga Campaign, President Abraham Lincoln promoted him to lieutenant general and commander of all the Union Armies. Grant confronted Robert E. Lee in a series of bloody battles in 1864, trapping Lee's army at Petersburg, Virginia. During the siege, Grant coordinated a series of devastating campaigns in other theaters. The war ended shortly after Lee's surrender at Appomattox. Very fine....................................$185.00


121342 - GENERAL AMBROSE BURNSIDE
, Carte de Visite no imprint. A nice from life pose chest up facing to the left. Ambrose Everett Burnside (May 23, 1824 - September 13, 1881) was an American soldier, railroad executive, inventor, industrialist, and politician from Rhode Island, serving as governor and a U.S. Senator. As a Union Army general in the American Civil War, he conducted successful campaigns in North Carolina and East Tennessee, as well as countering the raids of Confederate General John Hunt Morgan, but suffered disastrous defeats at the terrible Battle of Fredericksburg and Battle of the Crater. His distinctive style of facial hair became known as sideburns, derived from his last name. He was also the first president of the National Rifle Association. Fresh card, very fine..................
$100.00

121344 - GENERAL ALFRED ELLET, Carte de Visite no imprint, from life photograph of Ellet seated in uniform facing to the right. In August 1861, Ellet was commissioned a captain in the 9th Missouri Volunteer Infantry Regiment, which later became the 59th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment. In March 1862, he fought in the Battle of Pea Ridge. When his elder brother, Col. Charles Ellet, Jr., undertook the conversion of several river steamers to rams in the spring of 1862, Alfred Ellet became lieutenant colonel of Charles Ellet's U.S. Ram Fleet. Following Charles Ellet's death in June 1862, Alfred took over the unit and was appointed brigadier general of the newly formed Mississippi Marine Brigade the following November. He commanded the Mississippi Marine Brigade during operations on the Western Rivers until 1864, when the unit was disestablished. A rare image seldom seen................................$495.00

121347 - GENERAL GERSHOM MOTT, Carte de Visite by Brady. Seated pose in uniform. Colonel of the 5th New Jersey Infantry. His regiment fought in the Peninsula Campaign and shortly after the Battle of Williamsburg he was promoted to colonel and command of the 6th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry. He was commended for bravery in the Battle of Seven Pines, but he and his regiment saw little action in the Seven Days Battles. During the Second Battle of Bull Run, Mott was severely wounded in the arm and for his bravery was promoted to brigadier general on September 7, 1862. He was forced to recuperate during the Battle of Antietam and returned to the Army just after the Battle of Fredericksburg. Mott led a brigade in the III Corps at the Battle of Chancellorsville, but was again seriously wounded and missed the subsequent Gettysburg Campaign. His brigade was commanded by Colonel George C. Burling during that engagement. Mott returned to duty in the fall of 1863 and led his brigade in the Bristoe and Mine Run campaigns. He commanded the 4th Division of the II Corps during the 1864 Overland Campaign. At the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House his division suffered such heavy losses during an assault on the Mule Shoe that they were dispersed and the division discontinued despite Mott's protests. In addition, Mott and his division, once the proud command of Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker, were thought unreliable by Winfield S. Hancock and Francis C. Barlow. Mott continued as a brigade commander under Maj. Gen. David B. Birney and was restored to division command (3rd Division, II Corps) in July, performing well during the Siege of Petersburg and the Appomattox Campaign. He was one of the few Union officers to be commanded for his actions in the disastrous Battle of the Crater, for which he was given a brevet promotion to major general. Three days before the Confederate surrender at Appomattox, Mott was wounded in the leg at the Battle of Amelia Springs. Very fine....................................................................$200.00

121350 - GENERAL EDWARD CANBY, carte de visite by Lilienthal of New Orleans, dated September 15th, 1863. Waist up pose in uniform. In May 1864, Canby wasa promoted to major general and relieved Nathaniel P. Banks of his command at Simmesport, Louisiana. He next was assigned to the Midwest, where he commanded the Military Division of Western Mississippi. He was wounded in the upper thigh by a guerrilla while aboard the gunboat USS Cricket on the White River in Arkansas near Little Island on November 6, 1864. Canby commanded the Union forces assigned to conduct the campaign against Mobile, Alabama in the spring of 1865. This culminated in the Battle of Fort Blakely, which led to the fall of Mobile on April 12, 1865. Canby accepted the surrender of the Confederate forces under General Richard Taylor in Citronelle, on May 4, 1865, and those under General Edmund Kirby Smith west of the Mississippi River on May 26, 1865. He later was in the Indian Wars and was killed by the Modoc Indians in 1873 in Northern California. A scarce imprint taken in New Orleans in 1863. A rare photo taken in New Orleans after Canby had accepted the surrender of the Trans-Mississippi army by General Buckner on May 26th, 1865 in behalf of General E. K. Smith who had gone to Mexico. Very fine....................................................................$295.00

121352 - GENERAL CUVIER GROVER, Carte de Visite by Anthony. Three quarter standing pose facing left in uniform. Grover was stationed in the western frontier before being transferred to help in defense preparations of Washington, DC, at the outbreak of the Civil War. He was appointed brigadier general of volunteers in April 1862, but with a date of rank of April 14, 1861, the day after the evacuation of Fort Sumter, making him one of the more senior generals in the Army. He served as a brigade commander in the III Corps of the Army of the Potomac, in which role he won distinction at the Battle of Williamsburg and was brevetted lieutenant colonel in the regular army, and winning promotion to full colonel for gallantry at the Battle of Seven Pines. His brigade was later transferred to the command of Maj. Gen. John Pope and cited for bravery in leading a bayonet charge against Confederate forces of Stonewall Jackson at the Second Battle of Bull Run. Grover was transferred to the Department of the Gulf in December 1862 and commanded a division in the XIX Corps during the capture of Baton Rouge and the Siege of Port Hudson. Returning to the East in August 1864, he participated in the Third Battle of Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek, where he was wounded and brevetted to the rank of major general of volunteers. Before the war's end, Grover was brevetted to major general in the regular army on March 13, 1865, before returning to frontier and garrison duty with the U.S. Cavalry. Choice card, uncommon.........................................................$175.00

121353 - COMMANDER WILLIAM "DIRTY BILLY" PORTER, Carte de Visite by J. O. Kane of NY. Full standing pose in uniform. William David Porter (10 March 1808 - 1 May 1864) was a flag officer of the United States Navy. He was the son of Commodore David Porter (1780 - 1843) and brother of Admiral David Dixon Porter (1813 - 1891) as well as foster brother of Admiral David Farragut (1801 - 1870). Between January and August 1862, Porter served gallantly up and down the Mississippi River. On 10 January, Essex and St. Louis engaged three Confederate gunboats and forced them to retreat to the protection of Southern shore batteries. The two Union gunboats repeated the feat three days later and succeeded in damaging their opponents. Only Confederate shore batteries prevented the capture of the three steamers. On 6 February, Essex joined the rest of Foote's gunboat squadron in the attack on Fort Henry. Porter's ship, second in line, sustained heavy fire from shore batteries and received at least 15 direct hits. About half an hour into the fray, Essex took a 32-pound shot through her bow shield. It pierced her boilers, releasing steam which severely scalded 28 men. Commander Porter - himself blinded and scalded - continued to man his ship until she was clear of the action. He served at the bombardment of Vicksburg and later dueled the shore batteries at Port Hudson. He later destroyed the Confederate Ram Arkansas near Vicksburg. Very fine................................................$175.00

THE FOLLOWING VIEWS OF ADMIRAL DAVID FARRAGUT ARE FROM THE COLLECTION OF PAUL DEHAAN WHO HAS COLLECTED FARRAGUT ITEMS AND EXHIBITED THEM FOR YEARS

12150 - ADMIRAL DAVID FARRAGUT, Carte de Visite by Fredericks. Large waist up pose in uniform facing slightly left. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and admiral in the United States Navy. He is remembered for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay. (In which he was victorious), usually paraphrased as "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" in U.S. Navy tradition. Farragut was appointed under secret instructions on February 3, 1862, to command the Gulf Blockading Squadron, sailing from Hampton Roads in the screw steamer USS Hartford, bearing 25 guns, which he made his flagship, accompanied by a fleet of 17 ships. He reached the mouth of the Mississippi River, near Confederate forts St. Philip and Jackson, situated opposite one another along the bands of the river, with a combined armament of more than 100 heavy guns and a complement of 700 men. Now aware of Farragut's approach, the Confederates had amassed a fleet of 16 gunboats just outside New Orleans. On April 18, Farragut ordered the mortar boats, under the command of Porter, to commence bombardment on the two forts, inflicting considerable damage, but not enough to compel the Confederates into surrender. After two days of heavy bombardment, Farragut ran past forts Jackson and St. Philip and the Chalmette batteries to take the city and port of New Orleans on April 29, a decisive event in the war. Later that year, Farragut passed the batteries defending Vicksburg, Mississippi, but had no success there. A makeshift Confederate ironclad forced his flotilla of 38 ships to withdraw in July 1862. In August 1864, he won a great battle at Mobile Bay. Fresh card, sharp, ex-Paul DeHaan Collection. Very fine..........................................$165.00

12151 - ADMIRAL DAVID FARRAGUT, Carte de Visite by Fredericks. Large waist up pose in uniform facing to the right, one hand in his coat another on the handle of his sword. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and admiral in the United States Navy. He is remembered for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay. (In which he was victorious), usually paraphrased as "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" in U.S. Navy tradition. Farragut was appointed under secret instructions on February 3, 1862, to command the Gulf Blockading Squadron, sailing from Hampton Roads in the screw steamer USS Hartford, bearing 25 guns, which he made his flagship, accompanied by a  fleet of 17 ships. He reached the mouth of the Mississippi River, near Confederate forts St. Philip and Jackson, situated opposite one another along the banks of the river, with a combined armament of more than 100 heavy guns and a complement of 700 men. Now aware of Farragut's approach, the Confederates had amassed a fleet of 16 gunboats just outside New Orleans. On April 18, Farragut ordered the mortar boats, under the command of Porter, to commence bombardment on the two forts, inflicting considerable damage, but not enough to compel the Confederates into surrender. After two days of heavy bombardment, Farragut ran past forts Jackson and St. Philip and the Chalmette batteries to take the city and port of New Orleans on April 29, a decisive event in the war. Later that year, Farragut passed the batteries defending Vicksburg, Mississippi, but had no success there. A makeshift Confederate ironclad forced his flotilla of 38 ships to withdraw in July 1862. In August 1846, he won a great battle at Mobile Bay. Fresh card, sharp, ex-Paul DeHaan Collection. Very fine.......................................................$175.00

12152 - ADMIRAL DAVID FARRAGUT, Carte de Visite by Fredericks. Large seated pose in uniform facing to the right, one hand in his coat another on the handle of his sword. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and admiral in the United States Navy. He is remembered for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay. (In which he was victorious), usually paraphrased as "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" in U.S. Navy tradition. Farragut was appointed under secret instructions on February 3, 1862, to command the Gulf Blockading Squadron, sailing from Hampton Roads in the screw steamer USS Hartford, bearing 25 guns, which he made his flagship, accompanied by a fleet of 17 ships. He reached the mouth of the Mississippi River, near Confederate forts St. Philip and Jackson, situated opposite one another along the banks of the river, with a combined armament of more than 100 heavy guns and a complement of 700 men. Now aware of Farragut's approach, the Confederates had amassed a fleet of 16 gunboats just outside New Orleans. On April 18, Farragut ordered the mortar boats, under the command of Porter, to commence bombardment on the two forts, inflicting considerable damage, but not enough to compel the Confederates into surrender. After two days of heavy bombardment, Farragut ran past forts Jackson and St. Philip and the Chalmette batteries to take the city and port of New Orleans on April 29, a decisive event in the war. Later that year, Farragut passed the batteries defending Vicksburg, Mississippi, but had no success there. A makeshift Confederate ironclad forced his flotilla of 38 ships to withdraw in July 1862. In August 1864, he won a great battle at Mobile Bay. Fresh card, sharp, ex-Paul DeHaan Collection, very fine...............................................................$175.00

12153 - ADMIRAL DAVID FARRAGUT, Carte de Visite by Fredericks. 3/4 standing in uniform facing to the right, one hand in his coat. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and admiral in the United States Navy. He is remembered for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay. (In which he was victorious), usually paraphrased as "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" in U.S. Navy tradition. Farragut was appointed under secret instructions on February 3, 1862, to command the Gulf Blockading Squadron, sailing from Hampton Roads in the screw steamer USS Hartford, bearing 25 guns, which he made his flagship, accompanied by a fleet of 17 ships. He reached the mouth of the Mississippi River, near Confederate forts St. Philip and Jackson, situated opposite one another along the banks of the river, with a combined armament of more than 100 heavy guns and a complement of 700 men. Now aware of Farragut's approach, the Confederates had amassed a fleet of 16 gunboats just outside New Orleans. On April 18, Farragut ordered the mortar boats, under the command of Porter, to commence bombardment on the two forts, inflicting considerable damage, but not enough to compel the Confederates into surrender. After two days of heavy bombardment, Farragut ran past forts Jackson and St. Philip and the Chalmette batteries to take the city and port of New Orleans on April 29, a decisive event in the war. Later that year, Farragut passed the batteries defending Vicksburg, Mississippi, but had no success there. A makeshift Confederate ironclad forced his flotilla of 38 ships to withdraw in July 1862. In August 1864 he won a great battle at Mobile Bay. Rare pose, ex-Paul DeHaan Collection. Very fine...........................................$175.00

12154 - ADMIRAL DAVID FARRAGUT, Carte de Visite by Fredericks. Large pose 3/4 standing in uniform facing slightly to the right, one hand in his coat, the other at his side on his sword handle. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and admiral in the United States Navy. He is remembered for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay. (In which he was victorious), usually paraphrased as "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" in U.S. Navy tradition. Farragut was appointed under secret instructions on February 3, 1862, to command the Gulf Blockading Squadron, sailing from Hampton Roads in the screw steamer USS Hartford bearing 25 guns, which he made his flagship, accompanied by a fleet of 17 ships. He reached the mouth of the Mississippi River, near Confederate forts St. Philip and Jackson, situated opposite one another along the banks of the river, with a combined armament of more than 100 heavy guns and a complement of 700 men. Now aware of Farragut's approach, the Confederates had amassed a fleet of 16 gunboats just outside New Orleans. On April 18, Farragut ordered the mortar boats, under the command of Porter, to commence bombardment on the two forts, inflicting considerable damage, but not enough to compel the Confederates into surrender. After two days of heavy bombardment, Farragut ran past forts Jackson and St. Philip and the Chalmette batteries to take the city and port of New Orleans on April 29, a decisive event in the war. Later that year, Farragut passed the batteries defending Vicksburg, Mississippi, but had no success there. A makeshift Confederate ironclad forced his flotilla of 38 ships to withdraw in July 1862. In August 1864, he won a great battle at Mobile Bay. Rare pose, ex-Paul DeHaan Collection. Very fine.....................................................$175.00

12155 - ADMIRAL DAVID FARRAGUT, Carte de Visite by Fredericks. Large pose 3/4 standing in uniform facing slightly to the right, one hand in his coat, the other at his side. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and admiral in the United States Navy. He is remembered for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay. (In which he was victorious), usually paraphrased as "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" in U.S. Navy tradition. Farragut was appointed under secret instructions on February 3, 1862, to command the Gulf Blockading Squadron, sailing from Hampton Roads in the screw steamer USS Hartford, bearing 25 guns, which he made his flagship, accompanied by a fleet of 17 ships. He reached the mouth of the Mississippi River, near Confederate forts St. Philip and Jackson, situated opposite one another along the banks of the river, with a combined armament of more than 100 heavy guns and a complement of 700 men. Now aware of Farragut's approach, the Confederates had amassed a fleet of 16 gunboats just outside New Orleans. On April 18, Farragut ordered the mortar boats, under the command of Porter, to commence bombardment on the two forts, inflicting considerable damage, but not enough to compel the Confederates into surrender. After two days of heavy bombardment, Farragut ran past forts Jackson and St. Philip and the Chalmette batteries to take the city and port of New Orleans on April 29, a decisive event in the war. Later that year, Farragut passed the batteries defending Vicksburg, Mississippi, but had no success there. A makeshift Confederate ironclad forced his flotilla of 38 ships to withdraw in July 1862. In August 1864, he won a great battle at Mobile Bay. Rare pose, ex-Paul DeHaan Collection. Very fine.....................................................$195.00

12156 - ADMIRAL DAVID FARRAGUT, Carte de Visite by Fredericks. Large pose 3/4 standing in uniform facing slightly to the camera, wears hat, one hand on sword another at his side. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and admiral in the United States Navy. He is remembered for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay. (In which he was victorious), usually paraphrased as "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" in U.S Navy tradition. Farragut was appointed under secret instructions on February 3, 1862, to command the Gulf Blockading Squadron, sailing from Hampton Roads in the screw steamer USS Hartford, bearing 25 guns, which he made his flagship, accompanied by a fleet of 17 ships. He reached the mouth of the Mississippi River, near Confederate forts St. Philip and Jackson, situated opposite one another along the banks of the river, with a combined armament of more than 100 heavy guns and a complement of 700 men. Now aware of Farragut's approach, the Confederates had amassed a fleet of 16 gunboats just outside New Orleans. On April 18, Farragut ordered the mortar boats, under the command of Porter, to commence bombardment on the two forts, inflicting considerable damage, but not enough to compel the Confederates into surrender. After two days of heavy bombardment, Farragut ran past forts Jackson and St. Philip and the Chalmette batteries to take the city and port of New Orleans on April 29, a decisive event in the war. Later that year, Farragut passed the batteries defending Vicksburg, Mississippi, but had no success there. A makeshift Confederate ironclad forced his flotilla of 38 ships to withdraw in July 1862. In August 1864, he won a great battle at Mobile Bay. Rare pose, fresh card, very fine, ex-Paul DeHaan Collection.......................................................$195.00

THE FOLLOWING NOT FROM THE DEHAAN COLLECTION

12157 - ADMIRAL DAVID FARRAGUT, Carte de Visite by Gurney of NY. Seated pose with arm on table. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and admiral in the United States Navy. He is remembered for his order at the Battle of Mobile Bay. (In which he was victorious), usually paraphrased as "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead" in U.S. Navy tradition. Farragut was appointed under secret instructions on February 3, 1862, to command the Gulf Blockading Squadron, sailing from Hampton Roads in the screw steamer USS Hartford, bearing 25 guns, which he made his flagship, accompanied by a fleet of 17 ships. He reached the mouth of the Mississippi River, near Confederate forts St. Philip and Jackson, situated opposite one another along the banks of the river, with a combined armament of more than 100 heavy guns and a complement of 700 men. Now aware of Farragut's approach, the Confederates had amassed a fleet of 16 gunboats just outside New Orleans. On April 28, Farragut ordered the mortar boats, under the command of Porter, to commence bombardment on the two forts, inflicting considerable damage, but not enough to compel the Confederates into surrender. After two days of heavy bombardment, Farragut ran past forts Jackson and St. Philip and the Chalmette batteries to take the city and port of New Orleans on April 29, a decisive event in the war. Later that year, Farragut passed the batteries defending Vicksburg, Mississippi, but had no success there. A makeshift Confederate ironclad forced his flotilla of 38 ships to withdraw in July 1862. In August 1864, he won a great battle at Mobile Bay. Rare pose, fresh card, very fine..................................................$160.00


1175 - GENERAL GEORGE CUSTER, Carte de Visite Linomark, Pokepsie, NY, #29, George Armstrong Custer (December 5, 1839 - June 25, 1876) was a United States Army officer and cavalry commander in the American Civil War and the Indian Wars. Raised in Michigan and Ohio, Custer was admitted to West Point in 1858, where he graduated last in his class. However, with the outbreak of the Civil War, all potential officers were needed, and Custer was called to serve with the Union Army. Custer developed a strong reputation during the Civil War. He fought in the first major engagement, the First Battle of Bull Run. His association with several important officers helped his career, as did his success as a highly effective cavalry commander. Custer was eventually promoted to the temporary rank (brevet) of major general and promoted major general of Volunteers. (At war's end, he reverted to his permanent rank of captain). At the conclusion of the Appomattox Campaign, in which he and his troops played a decisive role, Custer was on hand at General Robert E Lee's surrender. After the Civil War, Custer was dispatched to the west to fight in the Indian Wars. His disastrous final battle overshadowed his prior achievements. Custer and all the men with him were killed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876, fighting against a coalition of Native American tribes in a battle that has come to be popularly known in American history as "Custer's Last Stand." Image taken originally by Brady when Custer brought captured flags to the War Dept. In Washington and had trimmed his hair. Very good contrast.................................................................$1,095.00





9285 - MARYLAND IMPRINTED YANK SOLDIER
, Carte de Visite by Dr. Ewing & Co, Cumberland, Maryland. Bust pose of a unidentified Union officer. Very fine...................................................
$39.00



9286 - GENERAL JOHN F. REYNOLDS
, Carte de Visite no imprint, bust pose in uniform. John Fulton Reynolds (September 20, 1820 - July 1, 1863) was a career United States Army officer and a general in the American Civil War. One of the Union Army's most respected senior commanders; he played a key role in committing the Army of the Potomac to the Battle of Gettysburg and was killed at the start of the battle. Good contrast, crisp and fresh card, very nice....................................................
$395.00




9010 - A WOUNDED YANK LEANS ON HIS CRUTCH
, tintype in a Carte de Visite card. A wounded Union soldier wearing a fatigue style coat and hat leaning on a wooden crutch for support. He stands in front of a photographer's prop. Excellent condition. A tintype and not a paper albumen image.................................................
$250.00

7507 - GENERAL JOHN SEDGWICK, Carte de Visite by Brady/New York. A rare pose of Sedgwick facing left from life in uniform. Sedgwick fell at the beginning of the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, on May 9, 1864. His corps was probing skirmish lines ahead of the left flank of Confederate defenses and he was directing artillery placements. Confederate sharpshooters were about 1,000 yards (900 m) away and their shots caused members of his staff and artillerymen to duck for cover. Sedgwick strode around in the open and was quoted as saying, "What? Men dodging this way for single bullets? What will you do when they open fire along the whole line?" Although ashamed, his men continued to flinch and he said, "Why are you dodging like this? They couldn't hit an elephant at this distance." Reports that he never finished the sentence are apocryphal, although the line was among his last words. He was shot moments later under the left ey and fell down dead. Sedgwick was the highest ranking Union casualty in the Civil War. On the verso of the card is a period obituary from a newspaper covering the back imprint but the Brady imprint is on the front of the card.....................................................$250.00

7121 - FORT LAFAYETTE, NY 1862, Carte de Visite, no imprint but full photographic. A distant view of the fort in New York Harbor that was used to house prisoners during the Civil War. Before 1861, the fort's 72 heavy cannon commanded the primary approaches to the harbor, but during the Civil War, the casemates were used to house Cofederate prisoners of war and politicians opposed to the administration's policies, detained under Abraham Lincoln's selective suspension of the writ of habeas corpus. Fort Lafayette came to be known as the "American Bastille War." In fact the printed info on the bottom of the card states "La Bastille des Etas Unis 1862, Fort Lafayette, NY", old mount traits on verso, card is however fresh and bright...........................................................................$225.00

6131 - GENERAL GEORGE A. CUSTER, Carte de visite by Matthew Brady. Full standing pose by Brady in New York, image taken by Matthew Brady, February 15th, 1864. Katz #31. Raised in Michigan and Ohio, Custer was admitted to West Point in 1858, where he graduated last in his class. However, with the outbreak of the Civil War, all potential officers were needed, and Custer was called to serve with the Union Army. Custer developed a strong reputation during the Civil War. He fought in the first major engagement, the First Battle of Bull Run. His association with several important officers helped his career, as did his success as a highly effective cavalry commander. Custer was eventually promoted to the temporary rank (brevet) of major general and promoted major general of Volunteers. (At war's end, he reverted to his permanent rank of captain). At the conclusion of the Appomattox Campaign, in which he and his troops played a decisive role, Custer was dispatched to the west to fight in the Indian Wars. His disastrous final battle overshadowed his prior achievements. Custer and all the men with him were killed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, in 1876, fighting against a coalition of Native American tribes in a battle that has come to be popularly known in American history as "Custer's Last Stand." Choice, a beautiful card, trifle age spot, a very rare pose..............................................................$2,200.00


6000 - GENERAL GEORGE MEADE
, wet plate albumen Carte de Visite by McClees of Philadelphia, PA. Unusual bust pose facing to the left. (December 31, 1815 - November 6, 1872) was a career United States Army officer and civil engineer involved in coastal construction, including several lighthouses. He fought with distinction in the Second Seminole War and the Mexican-American War. During the American Civil War, he served as a Union general, rising from command of a brigade to the Army of the Potomac. He is best known for defeating Confederate General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. Very fine..........................................................................
SOLD

6002 - GENERAL JAMES WADSWORTH, wet plate albumen no imprint but from life standing outdoors with saber at side. On August 9, Wadsworth was commissioned a brigadier general; on October 3, he received command of the 2nd Brigade in McDowell's Division of the Army of the Potomac. He then led the 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, of the I Corps of the army until March 17. After McClellan left the Army of the Potomac, and after the serious Union defeat at the Battle of Fredericksburg, Wadsworth was appointed commander of the 1st Division, I Corps on December 27, 1862, replacing Brig. Gen. John Gibbon, who had been promoted to command of the 2nd Division in the II Corps. He led this division until June 15, 1863, with two brief stints commanding the I Corps in January and March for about ten days combined. Wadsworth and his division's first test in combat was at the Battle of Chancellorsville in May 1863. He made a faltering start in maneuvering his men across the Rappahannock River below Fredericksburg and they ended up being only lightly engaged during the battle. His performance at the Battle of Gettysburg was much more substantial. Arriving in the vanguard of Maj. Gen. John F. Reynolds's I Corps on July 1, 1863, Wadsworth's division bore much of the brunt of the overwhelming Confederate attack that morning and afternoon. They were able to hold out against attacks from both the west and north, providing the time to bring up sufficient forces to hold the high ground south of town and eventually win the battle. But by the time the division retreated back through town to Cemetery Hill that evening, it had suffered over 50% casualties. Despite these losses, on the second day of battle, Wadsworth's division was assigned to the defense of part of Culp's Hill. When most of XII Corps was ordered to the left flank of the army, Wadsworth sent three regiments to reinforce the brigade of Brig. Gen. George S. Greene, which was holding the summit of the hill. Wadsworth was named commander of the 4th Division, V Corps, composed of troops from his old division and that formerly led by Maj. Gen. Abner Doubleday. This speaks well for his performance at Gettysburg, because a number of his contemporaries were left without assignments when the army reorganized or were sent to minor assignment elsewhere. He was killed at the Wilderness in 1864..................................................$135.00

6008 - GENERAL ALFRED PLEASANTON, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Superb quality half view in uniform with rank of major general. Maj. Gen. A. Pleasanton is written in period ink on the front mount. Backmark: E & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. June 22, 1863 is written in period ink on the reverse. Very sharp image. Excellent. (1824 - 1897) graduated in the West Point class of 1844. In 1846, he was awarded the brevet of first lieutenant for gallantry in the Mexican War. He later served on the Indian frontier and in Florida against the Seminoles as an officer of dragoons. Distinguished service in the 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign gained him promotion to brigadier general. He commanded a division of the Cavalry Corps in the Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville campaigns. Promoted to major general in June 1863, he took over command of the Cavalry Corps and directed 10,000 Federal horsemen in the battle of Brandy Station, VA, the biggest cavalry fight of the Civil War. The battle was said to have made the Union Cavalry. He also served in the Gettysburg campaign, and also led the cavalry corps at Beverly Ford, Aldie, Middleburg, Upperville, Culpepper Court House and in 1864 served in the Department of Missouri......................................$225.00

6009 - GENERAL WILLIAM ROSECRANS, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card, half view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: Schwing & Rudd, Photographers, Army of the Cumberland. Light age toning and wear. Desirable card with the Army of the Cumberland backmark. (1819 - 98) graduated #5 in the West Point class of 1842. Known as "Old Rosy," he was promoted to rank of brigadier general in 1861. He commanded a brigade under McClellan in the western Virginia campaign at the battle of Rich Mountain. In May 1862, he directed the left wing of General Pope's Army of the Mississippi in the advance on Corinth. When Pope was ordered east, Rosecrans took over command of the army and fought at Corinth and Iuka. He later commanded the Army of the Cumberland at Murfreesboro, Chattanooga and Chickamauga. He was promoted to major general to rank from Mar. 21, 1862...............................................................................$175.00

6011 - GENERAL JAMES MCPHERSON, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of major general. No imprint. Light age toning and wear. Sharp image. Very desirable pose (1828 - 64). Graduated #1 in the West Point class of 1853, a class which included Philip H. Sheridan and John Bell Hood. Eleven years after their graduation, now Confederate general Hood opposed McPherson before Atlanta, and Hood's battle order would result in the death of his old classmate. By the fall of 1862, McPherson had risen to rank of major general. He saw service at Forts Henry and Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth and Vicksburg. On March 26, 1864, he was given command of the Army of the Tennessee which he led in the subsequent campaign in northern Georgia. McPherson was killed before Atlanta on July 22, 1864. General William T. Sherman's tears rolled through his beard and down on the floor when he viewed the dead body of his friend laid upon door torn from its hinges and improvised as a bier......................................................$175.00

6014 - GENERAL G. K. WARREN, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of major general. Backmark: E & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Light age toning. Very fine. Very desirable. (1830 - 1882) Gouvenor K. Warren graduated in the West Point class of 1850 ranking #2. His Civil War career started as Lieutenant Colonel, 5th New York Infantry, seeing action at the first land battle of the war, Big Bethel, VA, June 10, 1861. Promoted to brigade command, he was wounded at Gaines Mills during the 1862 Peninsular campaign and later saw action with his brigade at 2nd Bull Run and Antietam. Appointed Chief Engineer of the Army of the Potomac in 1863, Warren's good eye and speedy action helped to save the vital position of Little Round Top at Gettysburg during the fighting on July 2, 1863. After the wounding of General Winfield S. Hancock at Gettysburg, Warren took over command of the 2nd Corps until Hancock's return in March 1864, Warren then taking over command of the 5th Corps.....................................$265.00

6015 - GENERAL ROBERT O. TYLER, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: E & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Light age toning. Very fine. (1831 - 74) a nephew of Union General Daniel Tyler, he graduated from West Point in 1853, and joined the artillery branch of the service. In 1861, he was a spectator at the bombardment of Fort Sumter being a member of the expedition that was sent to relieve the fort. He later saw yeoman service in McClellan's 1862 Virginia Peninsular campaign, in the battle of Fredericksburg he commanded the artillery of Hooker's "Center Grand Division," and he was in charge of the Artillery Reserve at Chancellorsville. At Gettysburg, his 130 guns pounded George E. Pickett's advancing Confederate columns as they attempted to storm Cemetery Ridge on July 3, 1863. Tyler commanded a brigade of Gibbon's division, 2nd corps at Spotsylvania, and at Cold Harbor he was cited for great gallantry and was struck in the ankle by a ball which not only lamed him permanently but brought about his death a decade later. By the end of the war, Tyler was breveted major general in the Regular Army.....................................................$145.00

6016 - GENERAL JOSEPH HOOKER, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of major general. He is holding his sword which is visible in the lower left portion of the view. 1862 M. B. Brady imprint on the front mount. Backmark: E & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Light age toning and wear. Sharp image. Very fine. (1814 - 1879) graduated in the West Point class of 1837. He displayed a gallant record in the Mexican War. A solid combat officer, Hooker fought in the Peninsular campaign, the Seven Days battles, 2nd Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, where he commanded the Army of the Potomac, and the Atlanta campaign. His sobriquet was, "Fighting Joe" Hooker.........................................................$145.00





6018B - GENERAL WILLIAM WOODS AVERILL
, carte de visite by Anthony, bust pose in uniform, cavalry commander who achieved mixed success during the War. Fought at 1st Bulls Run, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Fishers Hill, Kelly's Ford, pressed Stuart's Cavalry. Near mint card.........................................................
$110.00


6019 - A RARE CARTE DE VISITE OF SOLDIERS FIRING FROM BEHIND A BARRICADE, THREE APPARENT AMPUTEES IN THE MIDDLE AND A SKETCH ARTIST CROUCHING BEHIND THE BARRICADE, carte de visite by John Goldin & Co. Washington, DC. A rare view of Union soldiers firing muskets from behind a barricade, three appear to be amputees to the center, and a sketch artist crouches down to the left of the photo. This photo is so described in the Library of Congress Collection with no additional details. In mint condition, extremely rare content.................................................................$750.00


4007 - GENERAL GEORGE A. CUSTER, Carte de Visite, no imprint, waist up pose of Custer taken originally by Brady, February 15th, 1864. Katz #29, George Armstrong Custer (December 5, 1839 - June 25, 1876) was a United States Army officer and cavalry commander in the American Civil War and the Indian Wars. Raised in Michigan and Ohio, Custer was admitted to West Point in 1858, where he graduated last in his class. However, with the outbreak of the Civil War, all potential officers were needed, and Custer was called to serve with the Union Army. Custer developed a strong reputation during the Civil War. He fought in the first major engagement, the First Battle of Bull Run. His association with several important officers helped his career, as did his success as a highly effective cavalry commander. Custer was eventually promoted to the temporary rank (brevet) of major general and promoted major general of Volunteers. (At war's end, he reverted to his permanent rank of captain.) At the conclusion of the Appomattox Campaign, in which he and his troops played a decisive role, Custer was on hand at General Robert E. Lee's surrender. After the Civil War, Custer was dispatched to the west to fight in the Indian Wars. His disastrous final battle overshadowed his prior achievements. Custer and all the men with him were killed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876, fighting against a coalition of Native American tribes in a battle that has come to be popularly known in American history as "Custer's Last Stand." Image taken originally by Brady when Custer brought captured flags to the War Dept. In Washington and had trimmed his hair. Although it has no backmark, this is a very nice image with good contrast and hundreds of dollars less than one with an Anthony or Brady backmark............................................................$995.00

4009 - PARSON BROWNLOW, TENNESSEE GOVERNOR, FIERCE UNION LOYALIST, Carte de Visite by Anthony, Brownlow seated from life pose. William Gannaway "Parson" Brownlow (August 29, 1805 - April 29, 1877) was an American newspaper editor, minister, and politician. He served as Governor of Tennessee from 1865 to 1869 and as a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1869 to 1875. He rose to prominence in the 1840s as editor of the Whig, a polemical newspaper that promoted Whig Party ideals and opposed secession in the years leading up to the Civil War. Brownlow's uncompromising and radical viewpoints made him one of the most divisive figures in Tennessee political history and one of the most controversial politicians of the Reconstruction-era south. As a result of his persistent opposition to secession after the outbreak of the Civil War, he was jailed in December 1861, and was subsequently forced into exile in the North. As governor, he adopted the stance of the Radical Republicans and spent much of his term opposing the policies of his longtime political foe Andrew Johnson. His gubernatorial policies, which have been described as both autocratic and progressive, helped Tennessee become the first former Confederate state to be readmitted to the Union after the war. Brownlow's policy of disenfranchising ex-Confederates and enfranchising former slaves fueled the rise of the Ku Klux Klan in the late 1860's. Choice..................................................................$135.00


3216 - GENERAL JEFFERSON C. DAVIS, Carte de Visite, by Moore & Pleasee, Gallery of the Cumberland, Nashville, TN. Bust pose in uniform. He commanded the 4th Division, Army of the Mississippi, at Corinth. He went on sick leave, but left his hospital bed to serve in the defenses of Cincinnati, Ohio. During this time of convalescence, on September 29, 1862, Davis got into an argument with his superior officer, Maj. Gen. William "Bull" Nelson, in the Galt House in Louisville, Kentucky. Davis had been offended by insults on prior occasions and when his face was slapped by Nelson, Davis shot and killed him. He was arrested and imprisoned, but Maj. Gen. Horatio G. Wright came to his aid and was able to get him released from prison. He avoided conviction for the murder because there was a need for experienced field commanders in the Union Army Davis was a capable commander, but because of the murder of General Nelson, he never received a full promotion higher than brigadier general of volunteers. He did however receive a brevet promotion to major general of volunteers on August 8, 1864 (for his service at the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain), and was appointed commanding officer of the XIV Corps during the Atlanta Campaign, a post he retained until the end of the war. He received a brevet promotion to brigadier general in the regular army on March 20, 1865. However, it was his actions during the Ebenezer Creek passing and his ruthlessness toward the freed slaves, that causes his legacy to be clouded in continued controversy. As Sherman's army proceeded on the March to the Sea toward Savannah, Georgia, on December 9, 1864, Davis ordered a pontoon bridge removed before the African-American refugees following his corps could cross the creek. Several hundred were captured by the Confederate cavalry or drowned in the creek, attempting to escape. Scarce backmark, taken in Nashville. Photo included his biography "Jefferson Davis in Blue" published at $50.00. The pair CDV and biography..................$275.00

3217 - LARGE 100# PARROT GUN ON THE DECK OF A CIVIL WAR GUNBOAT, Carte de Visite, no imprint but from life pose of the deck of a US Navy gunboat during the Civil War. The officers and crew stand posing aside a large pivot 100# parrot gun. Defensive protection can be seen along the rails. The gun is in the bow section of the ship. Extremely clear. Some additional research will undoubtedly identify the vessel. Very fine.................$425.00


21301 - GENERAL ADELBERT AMES, (1835 - 1933). He graduated #5 in the West Point class of May 6, 1861, and went almost immediately to the front as a lieutenant of artillery where he was badly wounded at 1st Bull Run. His gallantry here earned him the rank of brevet major in the Regular Army and the Medal of Honor. He fought in the peninsular campaign, and was brevetted lieutenant colonel for Malvern Hill. Appointed colonel of the 20th Maine Infantry, he led his troops in the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. On May 20, 1863, he was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers and later led a brigade in General O.O. Howard's 11th Corps at Gettysburg. During the Petersburg campaign, Ames was in divisional command. He also participated in the capture of Fort Fisher, N.C., and for his gallantry here, and throughout the Civil War, he was brevetted major general of volunteers, and brigadier and major general, U.S. Army. His contributions to the Union war effort were second to none of his age and experience! Ames was the last survivor of the full rank generals on either side in the Civil War! Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: E. & H. T. Anthony, New York, from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Bottom of mount is stained. Very sharp image. Rare...............................................................$395.00

21304 - GENERAL ALVAN C. GILLEM, (1830 - 75). He graduated in the West Point class of 1851 and served against the Florida Seminoles and on the frontier of Texas. During the Civil War, he served at the battles of Mill Springs, KY, and Shiloh, TN. In May 1862, he became colonel of the 10th Tennessee Union Infantry and at the insistence of Andrew Johnson, Gillem was appointed brigadier general of volunteers to rank from Aug. 17, 1863. In 1864, it was his troops that killed the celebrated Confederate guerrilla, General John Hunt Morgan. He later served under Gen. George Stoneman in Western North Carolina, commanding a cavalry division. In January 1865, he was vice president of the Tennessee convention and in April became a member of the state legislature. Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. No backmark. Excellent condition. Scarce..........................................................$195.00

21306 - GENERAL HIRAM G. BERRY, (1824 - 63). A former member of the Maine state legislature and mayor of Rockland, ME. Berry was appointed Colonel of the 4th Maine Infantry, June 15, 1861. He saw action at 1st Bull Run, and was later in brigade command during the Peninsular campaign, receiving high praise from his superiors. He commanded a brigade of the 3rd Corps in the battle of Fredericksburg, and led General Hooker's old division into the battle of Chancellorsville. In the confused fighting which occurred in the early morning hours of May 3, 1863, while the Federals attempted to regroup after Stonewall Jackson's celebrated flank attack of the previous day, Berry was killed at the head of his command. Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Standing view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: E & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Very sharp image. Excellent condition. Scarce.................................................................$250.00

21307 - GENERAL JOHN M. BRANNAN, (1819 - 92). A graduate of the West Point class of 1841, he served with the 1st U.S. Artillery in the Mexican War, and was brevetted captain for gallantry at Contreras and Churubusco. In 1861, he was appointed brigadier general and served creditably on the South Atlantic coast. He later commanded an infantry division under General William S. Rosecrans in the Tullahoma campaign, and under General George H. Thomas at Chickamauga. He lost 38% of his command at Chickamauga in a gallant effort to hold Horseshoe Ridge, the last Union position on that bloody field. Afterwards appointed chief of artillery of the Army of the Cumberland, he supervised the defenses of Chattanooga and took part in the Atlanta campaign. Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 4 card. Half view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: E & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Sharp image. Very fine............................................................$195.00

21308 - GENERAL EDWARD D. TOWNSEND, (1817 - 93). Graduated #16 in the West Point class of 1837. He served in the Florida War and in the Adjutant General's Office, when on Mar. 7, 1861, he was named General Winfield Scott's chief of staff. He later served most of the Civil War as Assistant Adjutant General of the U.S. Army. Townsend was one of a select few who were chosen to accompany the body of the slain President Abraham Lincoln back to Springfield, Illinois for burial. It was General Townsend, and Admiral Charles H. Davis, who were photographed with the open coffin of Lincoln, the only known photo of Lincoln in death. Wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 3/8 X 3 7/8 card. Half view in uniform with rank of brigadier general. Backmark: E & H. T. Anthony, New York, made from a photographic negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery. Bottom of the mount is slightly trimmed. Sharp image. Scarce pose....................................$175.00

21311 - GENERAL ORLANDO WILLCOX - SIGNED CDV, Wilcox was appointed colonel of the 1st Michigan Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded and captured in the First Battle of Bull Run (First Manassas) while in command of a brigade in Maj. Gen. Samuel P. Heintzelman's division. He later received the Medal of Honor in 1895 for "most distinguished gallantry" during the battle. After his release and exchange more than a year later, on August 19, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln appointed Willcox a brigadier general of volunteers, to rank from July 1, 1861. The President had to submit the nomination three times, the last on March 7, 1863, before the U.S. Senate finally confirmed the appointment on March 11, 1863. Willcox commanded the 1st Division of Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside's IX Corps in 1862. He led the division at the Battle of Antietam and the corps at the Battle of Fredericksburg. During the 1863 draft riots, Willcox commanded the District of Indiana and Michigan. He again led a division at Knoxville and during Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's Overland Campaign. On December 12, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln nominated Willcox for appointment to the brevet grade of Major general of volunteers to rank from August 1, 1864, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on April 14, 1865. Following the Siege of Petersburg, he led the first troops to enter Petersburg, Virginia, before ending the war serving in North Carolina...........................................................................SOLD

21312 - COMMANDER CHARLES WILKES, During the blockade he visited the British colony of Bermuda. Acting on orders, Wilkes remained in port for nearly a week aboard his flagship the Wachusett, violating the British rule that allowed American naval vessels (of either side) to remain in port for only a single day. While Wilkes remained in port, his gunboats Tioga and Sonoma blockaded Saint George's harbor, a key Confederate blockade runner base. The gunboats opened fire at a Royal Mail Steamer, the Merlin. When Wilkes learned that James Murray Mason and John Slidell, two Confederate commissioners to England, were bound for England on the British mail packet Trent, he ordered the steam frigate San Jacinto to stop them. On November 8, 1861, the San Jacinto met the Trent and fired two shots across its bow, forcing the ship to stop. A boarding party from the San Jacinto led by its captain then boarded the Trent and arrested Mason and Slidell. The diplomats were taken to Fort Warren in Boston Harbor. The actions of "The Notorious Wilkes" -- as Bermuda media branded him -- convinced many that full-scale war between the United States and the United Kingdom was inevitable. He was officially thanked by Congress "for his brave, adroit and patriotic conduct." However, his action was later disavowed by President Lincoln due to diplomatic pressure by the British Government. (Mason and Slidell were released.) His next service was in the James River flotilla. Subsequently, after reaching the rank of commodore on July 16, 1862, he was assigned to duty against blockade runners in the West Indies..................................................................$185.00

21315 - GENERAL US GRANT, Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant; April 27, 1822 - July 23, 1885) was the 18th president of the United States (1869 - 1877) following his success as military commander in the American Civil War. Under Grant, the Union Army defeated the Confederate military; the war, and secession, ended with the surrender of Robert E. Lee's army at Appomattox Court House. As president, Grant led the Radical Republicans in their effort to eliminate vestiges of Confederate nationalism and slavery, protect African American citizenship, and defeat the Ku Klux Klan. In foreign policy, Grant sought to increase American trade and influence, while remaining at peace with the world. Although his Republican Party split in 1872 as reformers denounced him, Grant was easily reelected. During his second term the country's economy was devastated by the Panic of 1873, while investigations exposed corruption scandals in the administration. The conservative white Southerners regained control of Southern state governments and Democrats took control of the federal House of Representatives. By the time Grant left the White House in 1877, his Reconstruction policies were being undone, nice image some wear at tips...................................................$125.00


A RARE TRIO OF RARE POW PHOTOGRAPHS - ALL SHOW THE PRIVATIONS OF A PRISONER OF WAR CAMP

1292 - POW IN A HOSPITAL SCENE, wet plate, albumen carte de visite photograph, mounted to 2 1/2 X 4 card. Excellent full seated view of soldier wearing hospital garb and sitting on a bed with a pillow propped up behind him. No imprint. This very possibly is a captured and wounded Confederate soldier. It's very comparable to a few Confederate hospital images. I've seen like this several years ago. Very rare and desirable! Ex Turner Collection.................................................................$895.00

1334 - GENERAL WINFIELD SCOTT HANCOCK, Carte de Visite by E & T Anthony, seated pose facing to the left. Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 - February 9, 1886) was a career U.S. Army officer and the Democratic nominee for President of the United States in 1880. He served with distinction in the Army for four decades, including service in the Mexican-American War and as a Union general in the American Civil War. Known to his Army colleagues as "Hancock the Superb," he was noted in particular for his personal leadership at the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. One military historian wrote, "No other Union general at Gettysburg dominated men by the sheer force of their presence more completely than Hancock." As another wrote, "...his tactical skill had won him the quick admiration of adversaries who had come to know him as the "Thunderbolt of the Army of the Potomac." His military service continued after the Civil War, as Hancock participated in the military Reconstruction of the South and the Army's presence at the Western frontier. Trifle tone but still. Very fine........................................SOLD




1335 - A VERY TALL YANK OFFICER TAKEN IN NEW ORLEANS
, Carte de Visite by Washburn of New Orleans. An unusually tall Union officer standing next to a studio podium. By comparing him with other soldiers taken by that photographer he appears to be at least 6'5". Photo is creased and priced accordingly....................................................
$49.00




6163 - GENERAL NATHANIAL BANKS
, Carte de Viste by Anthony, waist up pose by Case & Getchell of Boston, scarce backmark, commanded at New Orleans after Butler sent north, Port Hudson Campaign, ill fated Red River Campaign in 1864, later Governor of Massachusetts, nice clean card........................................................
$125.00



6164 - GENERAL ROBERT ANDERSON
, Carte de Viste by Fredericks of NY, 3/4 standing pose, surrendered Ft. Sumter in April 1861, card is lightly tinted with buttons gold, red to tablecloth, really attractively done, card trimmed at bottom slightly............................................
$95.00


6165 - COLONEL ELMER ELLSWORTH
, Carte de Viste, no imprint, full standing pose with cape and sword. On May 24, 1861 (the day after Virginia's secession was ratified by referendum), President Lincoln looked out from the White House across the Potomac River, and saw a large Confederate flag prominently displayed over the town of Alexandria, Virginia. Ellsworth immediately offered to retrieve the flag for Lincoln. He led the 11th New York across the Potomac and into the streets of Alexandria uncontested. He detached some men to take the railroad station, while he led others to secure the telegraph office and get that Confederate flag, which was flying above the Marshall House Inn. Ellsworth and four men went upstairs and cut down the flag. As Ellsworth came downstairs with the flag, the owner, James W. Jackson, killed him with a shotgun blast to the chest. Corporal Francis E. Brownell, of Troy, New York, immediately killed Jackson. Brownell was later awarded a Medal of Honor for his actions. Quite a nice from life image.................................................................
$185.00

6166 - GENERAL JOSEPH KNIPE, Carte de Viste taken by Morse of Nashville, a rare full standing view taken while in the Western theater. In the spring of 1862, Knipe fought in the Valley Campaign against Stonewall Jackson's forces. He was wounded at the First Battle of Winchester. He was again wounded at the Battle of Cedar Mountain. Due to the chain of command changes necessitated during the Battle of Antietam by the death of XII Corps commander Joseph K. Mansfield, Knipe took command of the brigade of Samuel W. Crawford in the first division. Crawford had taken command of the division when Alpheus Williams became acting corps commander. On April 15, 1863, Knipe was promoted to brigadier general, backdated to November 1862. He led first brigade first division XII Corps under Alpheus Williams which saw action at the Battle of Chancellorsvlle. Suffering from lingering effects from his wounds and a bout with malaria, he temporarily left the Army of the Potomac and returned to Harrisburg. He took command of a brigade of inexperienced New York militia and led it in pursuit of the retreating Army of Northern Virginia following the Battle of Gettysburg. Returning to his XII Corps brigade, Knipe went to the Western Theater and served in the Atlanta Campaign. He took command of a division of Union cavalry during John Bell Hood's incursion into Tennessee, and captured 6,000 Confederates and eight battle flags in a decisive victory over the retreating Army of Tennessee following the Battle of Nashville. Choice image, light stain on verso.................................................$395.00

6167 - GENERAL GEORGE STONEMAN, Carte de Viste by Anthony. During the entire battle at Chancellorsville, Stoneman accomplished little and Hooker considered him one of the principal reasons for the Union defeat at Chancellorsville. Hooker needed to deflect criticism from himself and relieved Stoneman from his cavalry command, sending him back to Washington, D. C. Later, as the army fought in the Atlanta Campaign under Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, Stoneman and his aide, Myles Keogh, were captured by Confederate soldiers outside Macon, Georgia, becoming the highest ranking Union prisoner of war. He was a prisoner for three months. Stoneman was exchanged relatively quickly based on the personal request of Sherman to the Confederates and he returned to duty. In December 1864, he led a raid from East Tennessee into southwestern Virginia. He led raids into Virginia and North Carolina in 1865, took Salem and other towns, destroyed Moratock Iron Furnace (a Confederate foundry) and at Salisbury attempted to free about 1,400 prisoners, but the prisoners had been dispersed by the time he arrived in Salisbury. In recognition of his service, he was brevetted major general in the regular army. His command nearly captured Confederate president Jefferson Davis during his flight from Richmond, Virginia. Later the 15th Governor of California, 3/4 standing view, nice image bottom of card slightly rimmed......................................$125.00


51113 - GENERAL SOLOMON MEREDITH, Carte de Viste by Brady, 3/4 standing pose in uniform. Commanded the IRON BRIGADE. In the spring of 1863, Meredith's brigade participated in the Chancellorsville Campaign, but saw relatively little combat. That would change in July, when the Iron Brigade suffered significant casualties during the first day's fighting at Gettysburg in Herbst's Woods and on Seminary Ridge. They were one of the first infantry brigades to reach the field and in the morning they routed the shocked brigade of Brig. Gen. James J. Archer and captured Archer. However, in the afternoon the brigade was ravaged by a flanking maneuver by the 11th North Carolina and a frontal assault by the 26th North Carolina, of Confederate Brig. Gen. J. Johnston Pettigrew's brigade. [10] Meredith was wounded when he was struck in the head by shrapnel, fracturing his skull and giving him a severe concussion. The blow killed his horse, which then fell on him, breaking his ribs and injuring his right leg. He was disabled and unfit for any further field command. One of the most sought after Gettysburg Generals; extremely rare..............................................$650.00

51114 - GENERAL WILLIAM BARRY, Carte de Viste by Fredericks, 3/4 standing pose in uniform. As chief of artillery under Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan, Barry organized ordnance for the Army of the Potomac and, during the Peninsula Campaign, later took part in the battles of Yorktown, Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, White Oak Swamp, and Malvern Hill. After later supervising forts and ordnance surrounding Washington, D.C., Barry became chief of artillery under Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, serving with him Tennessee, the March to the Sea, and the Carolinas Campaign. On January 23, 1865, President Lincoln nominated Barry for appointment to the brevet grade of major general of volunteers, to rank from September 1, 1864, for his service in the Atlanta Campaign, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on February 14, 1865. Barry was mustered out of the volunteer force on January 15, 1866. Very fine..................................$165.00

51119 - COLONEL HIRAM BERDAN, Carte de Viste by Brady, near full standing pose in uniform. Hiram Berdan (September 6, 1824 - March 31, 1893) was an American engineer, inventor and military officer, world-renowned marksman, and guiding force behind and commanding colonel of the famed United States Volunteer Sharpshooter Regiments during the American Civil War. He was the inventor of the Berdan rifle, the Berdan center fire primer and numerous other weapons and accessories. A SCARCE IMAGE...........SOLD

51120 - GENERAL JAMES WADSWORTH, Carte de Viste by Anthony, seated pose in uniform with sword in lap, Wadsworth and his division's first test in combat was at the Battle of Chancellorsville in May 1863. He made a faltering start in maneuvering his men across the Rappahannock River below Fredericksburg and they ended up being only lightly engaged during the battle. His performance at the Battle of Gettysburg was much more substantial. Arriving in the vanguard of Maj. Gen. John F. Reynolds's I Corps on July 1, 1863, Wadsworth's division bore much of the brunt of the overwhelming Confederate attack that morning and afternoon. They were able to hold out against attacks from both the west and north, providing the time to bring up sufficient forces to hold the high ground south of town and eventually win the battle. But by the time the division retreated back through town to Cemetery Hill that evening, it had suffered over 50% casualties. Despite these losses, on the second day of battle, Wadsworth's division was assigned to the defense of part of Culp's Hill. When most of XII Corps was ordered to the left flank of the army, Wadsworth sent three regiments to reinforce the brigade of Brig. Gen. George S. Greene, which was holding the summit of the hill. Killed at the Battle of the Wilderness...................................$175.00

51122 - GENERAL JOSEPH MANSFIELD, Carte de Viste by Anthony/Brady, full standing pose in uniform hold sword. At Antietam, Mansfield personally led troops on his left flank, from the brigade of Brig. Gen. Samuel W. Crawford, in the East Woods. He returned ot the rear to bring up more troops, and when he reached the line again he saw soldiers from the 10th Maine Infantry regiment firing into the woods. Mansfield, assuming that men from Hooker's corps were in the woods, rode down the regimental line crying out, "You are firing on our own men!" The soldiers convinced Mansfield that in fact they were not and were receiving heavy fire from the woods. Mansfield replied, "Yes, yes, you are right," and just then his horse was hit and a bullet caught him squarely in the right chest. Writes Dr. Patrick Henry Flood, Surgeon, 107th NY Regiment, in a letter to his widow, "I found the clothing around his chest saturated  with blood, and upon opening them, found he was wounded in the right breast, the ball penetrating about two inches from the nipple, and passing out the back, near the edge of the shoulder blade. After being brought to a field hospital he died the next morning. Very fine........................................................$250.00




51123 - GENERAL BENJAMIN BUTLER
, Carte de Viste by Anthony, partial standing pose in uniform, commanded New Orleans in 1862, later moved to Virginia in the Army of the James, fine.............................................
$125.00


ORDER #28 IN NEW ORLEANS 1862


9282 - EDWARD BATES, ATTORNEY GENERAL UNDER LINCOLN 1861-64
, Carte de Viste by Earles' Philadelphia. From life head and shoulders look. Originally a Senator from Missouri, very fine, crisp card..............................................
$185.00


9283 - JOHN BROWN
, Carte de Viste, no imprint, led the uprising at Harper's Ferry in 1859. Captured and executed by federal authorities. Rabid Abolitionist. The usual artist's depiction of Brown but a very sharp example. Fine..................................
$85.00

9287 - PRESIDENT GARFIELD AND HIS WIFE, Carte de Viste, busts of President James Garfield and his wife Lucretia. Garfield's presidency lasted just 200 days -- from March 4, 1881, until his death on September 19, 1881, as a result of being shot by assassin Charles J. Guiteau on July 2, 1881. Only William Henry Harrison's presidency, of 32 days, was shorter. Garfield was the second of four United States Presidents who were assassinated. President Garfield advocated a bi-metal monetary system, agricultural technology, an educated electorate, and civil rights for African-Americans. No imprint, very fine and scarce in a CDV form as most seen are cabinet photographs..................................................$135.00


7111 - GENERAL JOHN FOSTER, CDV by Brady, ¾ standing pose in uniform, May 27, 1823 - September 2, 1874) was a career military officer in the United States Army and a Union general during the American Civil War whose most distinguished services were in North and South Carolina. A post bellum expert in underwater demolition. He wrote the definitive treatise on the subject in 1869. He continued with the Army after the war, using his expertise as assistant to the Chief Engineer in Washington, DC and at a post on Lake Erie. From 1862 to December 1863, Foster commanded the Department of North Carolina. After the Emancipation Proclamation, he appointed Horace James, a Congregational minister, to help freedmen prepare for independent life, and directed a former contraband camp to be developed as the Freedmen's Colony of Roanoke Island. By 1864, 2200 freedmen were settled on household plots. Many worked for pay for the Army, which held the forts. Under President Andrew Johnson, after the war, the Army abandoned the colony. Most of the freedmen chose to return to the mainland for work. Near Mint card.................................$135.00

7112 - GENERAL JAMES RICKETTS, SIGNED CDV BY ALEXANDER GARDNER. A very rare view of Ricketts with his arm in a sling seated in uniform after being wounded. H was shot four times and captured at the First Battle of Bull Run on July 21, when his battery was overrun by Confederate infantry. For his personal bravery in the face of overwhelming odds, on that same day Ricketts was brevetted as a lieutenant colonel in the Regular Army. He was confined as a prisoner of war in Richmond, although his wife Fannie was allowed to travel to Richmond and stay with him as his nurse. On December 18, 1861, he was exchanged for Confederate Colonel Julius A. De Lagnel. Ricketts was not paroled until January 1862, when he was placed on medical leave to recuperate. On April 30, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln appointed Ricketts a brigadier general of volunteers to rank from July 21, 1861. The President had nominated Ricketts for the promotion on March 27, 1862, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on April 28, 1862. At the subsequent Battle of Antietam, he had two horses killed under him and he was badly injured when the second one fell on him. In July 1864, Ricketts and his command, numbering only 3,350 men, were hurried north to oppose Jubal Early's attack on Washington, D.C. Ricketts fought at the Battle of Monocracy under Major General Lew Wallace, suffering the heaviest losses while holding the Union left flank. For his service there, on December 12, 1864, President Lincoln nominated Ricketts for appointment to the brevet grade of major general of volunteers, to rank from August 1, 1864, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on February 14, 1865. Ricketts was engaged in Philip Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign. At the Battle of Cedar Creek, he commanded the VI Corps in the initial hours of the fighting but was wounded by a Minié ball through his chest that disabled him for life. Despite his poor health, he returned to command of his division two days before Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865. SIGNED BOLDLY ON THE FRONT OF THE CARD "JAMES RICKETTS BVT. MAJ. GENL".............................................SOLD

7117 - GENERAL HORATIO WRIGHT
, Carte de Viste by Goldin of Washington, DC. Seated pose in his uniform wearing a corps badge. In May 1863, Wright was given command of the 1st Division in the VI Corps of the Army of the Potomac under Maj. Gen. John Sedgwick. His first battle in division command was Gettysburg in July 1863, where his corps was held in reserve. The corps saw action at Mine Run in November 1863, and the Battle of the Wilderness on May 5 to May 6, 1864. After General Sedgwick's death at Spotsylvania Court House on May 9, Wright assumed command of the VI Corps, receiving promotion as major general of volunteers (confirmed by the Senate this time) and brevet colonel in the regular army on May 12, 1864. Wright's corps fought at Cold Harbor from June 3 to June 12, 1864. In the Valley Campaigns of 1864, he was dispatched to Washington, DC, to defend against Confederate Lt. Gen. Jubal Early's raid on July 11 and July 12, 1864, commanding the Washington Emergency Defense Force, consisting of the VI, VIII, and XIX Corps. Wright commanded the VI Corps again during Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley campaign from August 6 to October 16, 1864. Wright directed fighting at Cedar Creek on October 19 before General Sheridan's arrival. In the Siege of Petersburg, the VI Corps was the first unit to break through the Confederate defenses, on April 2, 1865. Subsequently, operating under the command of Sheridan, it defeated Confederate forces at Sayler's Creek on April 6, 1865, resulting in the capture of a large number of Confederate soldiers, including Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell. For Wright's actions at Petersburg he was promoted to a brevet major general in the regular army. Excellent photo, card slightly trimmed at bottom, scarce...............................................
$120.00

7119 - GENERAL NATHANIAL LYON, Carte de Viste by Appleton of NY. A full standing pose in uniform with his sword at side. August 10, 1861 was the first Union general to be killed in the American Civil War and is noted for his actions in the state of Missouri at the beginning of the conflict. Lyon is a controversial figure in American history. Some credit his quick action and hard line Unionism for stopping the Missouri secession movement. Others question his influence peddling and his role in events such as the Camp Jackson Affair, which inflamed many Missourians on the secession issue. Trifle bottom trim, otherwise crisp and fresh.......................................................$95.00

7120 - GENERAL JOHN LOGAN, Carte de Viste by Webster & Bros, Louisville, KY. Blind imprint on front of card, large bust pose in uniform. Logan fought at Bull Run as an unattached volunteer to a Michigan regiment, and then returned to Washington, resigned his congressional seat, and entered the Union Army as Colonel of the 31st Illinois Volunteers, which he organized. He was known by his soldiers with the nickname "Black Jack" because of his black eyes and hair and swarthy complexion, and was regarded as one of the most able officers to enter the army from civilian life. He served in the army of Ulysses S. Grant in the Western Theater and was present at the Battle of Belmont, where his horse was killed, and at Fort Donelson, where he was wounded. Soon after the victory at Donelson, he was promoted to brigadier general, as of March 21, 1862. Major John Hotaling served as his chief of staff. During the Siege of Corinth, Logan commanded first a brigade and then the 1st Division of the Army of the Tennessee. In the spring of 1863, he was promoted to major general to rank from November 29, 1862. In Grant's Vicksburg Campaign, Logan commanded the 3rd Division of James B. McPherson's XVII Corps, which was the first to enter the city of Vicksburg in 1863, and after its capture, Logan served as its military governor. In November, 1863, he succeeded William Tecumseh Sherman in command of the XV Corps; and after the death of McPherson he commanded the Army of the Tennessee at the Battle of Atlanta (July 22, 1864) until relieved by Oliver O. Howard. He returned to Illinois for the 1864 elections but rejoined the army afterward and commanded his XV Corps in the Carolinas Campaign. Very fine........................................................$155.00

7121 - GENERAL JOHN LOGAN, Carte de Viste. From life seated pose, near mint card. Logan fought at Bull run as an unattached volunteer to a Michigan regiment, and then returned to Washington, resigned his congressional seat, and entered the Union army as Colonel of the 31st Illinois Volunteers, which he organized. He was known by his soldiers with the nickname "Black Jack" because his black eyes and hair and swarthy complexion, and was regarded as one of the most able officers to enter the army from civilian life. He served in the army of Ulysses S. Grant in the Western Theater and was present at the Battle  of Belmont, where his horse was killed, and at Fort Donelson, where he was wounded. Soon after the victory at Donelson, he was promoted to brigadier general, as of March 21, 1862. Major JOhn Hotaling served as his chief of staff. During the Siege of Corinth, Logan commanded first a brigade and then the 1st Division of the Army of the Tennessee. In the spring of 1863, he was promoted to major general to rank from November 29, 1862. In Grant's Vicksburg Campaign, Logan commanded the 3rd Division of James B. McPherson's XVII Corps, which was the first to enter the city of Vicksburg in 1863, and after its capture, Logan served as its military governor. In November 1863, he succeeded William Tecumseh Sherman in command of the XV Corps; and after the death of McPherson he commanded the Army of the Tennessee at the Battle of Atlanta (July 22, 1864) until relieved by Oliver O. Howard. He returned to Illinois for the 1864 elections but rejoined the army afterward and commanded his XV Corps in the Carolina Campaign. Very fine..........................................................$145.00

7123 - GENERAL JOSEPH HOOKER, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Waist up pose in uniform. He distinguished himself as an aggressive combat commander leading a division in the Battle of Williamsburg, May 5, 1862, resulting in his promotion to major general. As a corps commander, he led the initial Union attacks at the Battle of Antietam, in which he was wounded. At the Battle of Fredericksburg, he commanded a "Grand Division" of two corps, and was ordered to conduct numerous futile frontal assaults that caused his men to suffer serious losses. Throughout this period, he conspired against and openly criticized his army commanders. Following the defeat at Fredericksburg, he was given command of the Army of the Potomac. Hooker planned an audacious campaign against Robert E. Lee, but he was defeated by the Confederate Army at the Battle of Chancellorsville. Hooker suddenly lacked the nerve to marshal the strength of his larger army against Lee, who boldly divided his army and routed a Union corps with a flank attack by Stonewall Jackson. Hooker began to pursue Lee at the start of the Gettysburg Campaign, but his poor performance at Chancellorsville prompted Abraham Lincoln to relieve him from command just prior to the Battle of Gettysburg. He returned to combat in November, leading two corps from the Army of the Potomac to help relieve the besieged Union Army at Chattanooga, Tennessee, and achieving an important victory at the Battle of Lookout Mountain during the Chattanooga Campaign. He continued in the Western Theater under Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, but left before the end of the Atlanta Campaign when he was bypassed for a promotion to command the Army of the Tennessee. A nice bold card with a minute card trim difficult to notice.......................................................$125.00

7124 - GENERAL U.S. GRANT
, Carte de Viste. ¾ standing pose in uniform, hand in pocket. Vicksburg Campaign, later Commander in Chief of the Union Army. Accepted Lee's surrender at Appomattox in April 1865, later 18th President of the US. A nice from life pose of Grant, card has trifle top corner trim but an outstanding photograph..................................
SOLD

7128 - GENERAL AMBROSE BURNSIDE, Carte de Viste by Fredericks. Waist up pose in uniform. Ambrose Everett Burnside (May 23, 1824 -- September 13, 1881) was an American soldier, railroad executive, inventor, industrialist, and politician from Rhode Island, serving as governor and a U.S. Senator. As a Union Army general in the American Civil War, he conducted successful campaigns in North Carolina and East Tennessee but was defeated in the disastrous Battle of Fredericksburg and Battle of the Crater, earning his reputation as one of the most incompetent generals of the war. His distinctive style of facial hair is now known as sideburns, derived from his last name. A choice and near mint card...............................................$125.00

7130 - GENERAL SAMUEL CURTIS, Carte de Viste by Anthony. ¾ standing pose in uniform. When war broke out, he raised the 2nd Iowa Infantry and was assigned to organizing the chaotic affairs in Saint Louis. General Halleck gave Curtis command of the Army of the Southwest on Christmas Day, 1861. After Pea Ridge, Curtis continued the campaign, eventually capturing Helena, Arkansas on July 12th, 1862. He was promoted to Major General for his successes at Pea Ridge. In September, 1862, Curtis was given command of the Department of Missouri, although President Lincoln was soon forced to reassign him because of a bitter dispute between Curtis and Missouri's governor over Curtis' abolitionist views. He took to the field once again in 1864 against Sterling Price's invasion of Missouri. He ended Price's plans at the Battle of Westport (near present day Kansas City, Missouri). Curtis ended the war as commander of the Department of the Northwest, dealing with issues on the frontier. Fresh card, quite nice....................................................SOLD

7132 - GENERAL FRANZ SIGEL, Carte de Viste from life pose ¾ standing view. Sigel was promoted to major general on March 21, 1862. He served as a division commander in the Shenandoah Valley and fought unsuccessfully against Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, who managed to outwit and defeat the larger Union force in a number of small engagements. He commanded the I Corps in Maj. Gen. John Pope's Army of Virginia at the Second Battle of Bull Run, another Union defeat, where he was wounded in the hand. Over the winter of 1862-63, Sigel commanded the XI Corps, consisting primarily of German immigrant soldiers, in the Army of the Potomac. During this period, the corps saw no action; it stayed in reserve during the Battle of Fredericksburg. Sigel had developed a reputation as an inept general, but his ability to recruit and motivate German immigrants kept him alive in a politically sensitive position. Many of these soldiers could speak little English beyond "I'm going to fight mit Sigel," which was their proud slogan and which became one of the favorite songs of the war. They were quite disgruntled when Sigel left the corps in February 1863, and was replaced by Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, who had no immigrant affinities. Fortunately for Sigel, the two black marks in the XI Corps' reputation--Chancellorsville and Gettysburg--would occur after her was relieved. Very fine..............................................$135.00

7133 - GENERAL ROSECRANS, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Seated pose of Rosecrans with map in lap. Given command of the Army of the Cumberland, he fought against Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg at Stones River, and later outmaneuvered him in the brilliant Tullahoma Campaign, driving the Confederates from Middle Tennessee. His strategic movements then caused Bragg to abandon the critical city of Chattanooga, but Rosecrans' pursuit of Bragg ended during the bloody Battle of Chickamauga, where his unfortunately worded order mistakenly opened a gap in the Union line and Rosecrans and a third of his army were swept from the field. Besieged in Chattanooga, Rosecrans was relieved of command by Grant. A fresh and attractive card....................................................$120.00

7134 - GENERAL PHILIP SHERIDAN, Carte de Viste by Anson of NY. From life pose slightly facing right. Sheridan was a career United States Army officer and a Union general in the American Civil War. His career was noted for his rapid rise to major general and his close association with Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, who transferred Sheridan from command of an infantry division in the Western Theater to lead the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac in the East. In 1864, he defeated Confederate forces in the Shenandoah Valley and his destruction of the economic infrastructure of the valley, called "The Burning" by residents, was one of the first uses of scorched earth tactics in the war. In 1865, his cavalry pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee and was instrumental in forcing his surrender at Appomattox. Sheridan prosecuted the later years of the Indian Wars of the Great Plains. Both as a soldier and private citizen, he was instrumental in the development and protection of Yellowstone National Park. In 1883 Sheridan was appointed general-in-chief of the U.S. Army, and in 1888 he was promoted to the rank of General of the Army during the term of President Grover Cleveland. Choice card............................................$180.00

7137 - GENERAL FITZ JOHN PORTER, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Standing outdoor by a huge US flag in uniform. Fitz John Porter (August 31, 1822 - May 21, 1901) (sometimes written FitzJohn Porter or Fitz-John Porter) was a career United States Army officer and a Union General during the American Civil War. He is most known for his performance at the Second Battle of Bull Run and his subsequent court martial. Although Porter served well in the early battles of the Civil War, his military career was ruined by the controversial trial, which was called by his political rivals. After the war, he worked for almost 25 years to restore his tarnished reputation and was finally restored to the army's roll. Attractive card, one corner slightly tipped..................................................$110.00

7138 - GENERAL JOHN POPE, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Waist up pose of Pope in uniform. Pope was a career United States Army officer and Union general in the American Civil War. He had a brief but successful career in the Western Theater, but he is best known for his defeat at the Second Battle of Bull Run (Second Manassas) in the East. Pope was a graduate of the United States Military Academy in 1842. He served in the Mexican-American War and had numerous assignments as a topographical engineer and surveyor in Florida, New Mexico, and Minnesota. He spent much of the last decade before the Civil War surveying possible southern routes for the proposed First Transcontinental Railroad. He was an early appointee as a Union brigadier general of volunteers and served initially under Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont, with whom he had a stormy relationship. He achieved initial success against Brig. Gen. Sterling Price in Missouri and then led a successful campaign that captured Island No. 10 on the Mississippi River. Pope's success in the West inspired the Lincoln administration to bring him to the troubled Eastern Theater to lead the newly formed Army of Virginia. He initially alienated many of his officers and men by publicly denigrating their record in comparison to his Western command. He launched an offensive against the Confederate army of General Robert E. Lee, in which he feel prey to a strategic turning movement into his rear areas by Maj. Gen. Stonewall Jackson. At Second Bull Run, he concentrated his attention on attacking Jackson while the other Confederate corps, under Maj. Gen. James Longstreet, executed a devastating assault into his flank, routing his army. He deflected some of the blame for the defeat by wrongfully accusing Brig. Gen. Fitz John Porter of disobeying his orders. Choice card........................................SOLD

7139 - GENERAL GEORGE MEADE, Carte de Viste by Henszey & Co. of Philadelphia. Bust pose from life facing left. Meade was a career United States Army officer and civil engineer involved in coastal construction, including several lighthouses. He fought with distinction in the Second Seminole War and Mexican-American War. During the American Civil War, he served as a Union general, rising from command of a brigade to the Army of the Potomac. He is best known for defeating Confederate General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. Slight trim to tips, otherwise fine.................................$125.00



7146 - SOLDIER POSING WITH A FRENCH VINCENNES RIFLE
, Carte de Viste of a Union soldier posing with a Model 1859 Vincennes rifle. This contemporary CDV was taken from a case image but has excellent detail. A scarce rifle. Fine..............................
$110.00


5137 - GENERAL ABNER DOUBLEDAY, Carte de Viste by Fredericks of NY. Profile pose in uniform facing left. He fired the first shot in defense of Fort Sumter, the opening battle of the war, and had a pivotal role in the early fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg. Gettysburg was his finest hour, but his relief by Maj. Gen. George G. Meade caused lasting enmity between the two men. At the start of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1, 1863, Doubleday's division was the second infantry division on the field to reinforce the cavalry division of Brig. Gen. John Buford. When his corps commander, Maj. Gen. John F. Reynolds, was killed very early in the fighting, Doubleday found himself in command of the corps. His men fought well in the morning, putting up a stout resistance, but as overwhelming Confederate forces massed against them, their line eventually broke and they retreated back through the town of Gettysburg to the relative safety of Cemetery Hill south of town. It was Doubleday's finest performance during the war, five hours leading 9,500 men against ten Confederate brigades that numbered more than 16,000. Seven of those brigades incurred casualties that ranged from 35 to 50 percent, indicating the ferocity of the Union defense. But on Cemetery Hill, the I Corps, could muster only a third of its men as effective for duty and the corps was essentially destroyed as a combat force for the rest of the battle; it would be decommissioned in March 1864, its surviving units combined into other corps. On July 2, 1863, Army of the Potomac commander Maj. Gen. George G. Meade replaced Doubleday with Maj. Gen. John Newton, a more junior officer from another corps. The ostensible reason was a report by XI Corps commander Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard that Doubleday's corps broke first, causing the entire Union line to collapse, but Meade also had a long history of disdain for Doubleday's combat effectiveness, dating back to South Mountain. Doubleday was humiliated by this snub and held a lasting grudge against Meade, but he returned to division command and fought well for the remainder of the battle. He was wounded in the neck on the second day of Gettysburg and received a brevet promotion to Colonel in the regular army for his service. He formally requested reinstatement as I Corps commander, but Meade refused, and Doubleday left Gettysburg on July 7 for Washington. Card is in superb condition.................................$495.00

5139 - GENERAL DANIEL SICKLES, Carte de Viste, no imprint but from life. Bust view facing to the left. Corps Commander at Gettysburg. During the height of the Confederate attack, Sickles fell victim to a cannonball that mangled his right leg. He was carried by a detail of soldiers to the shade of the Trostle farmhouse, where a saddle strap was applied as a tourniquet. He ordered his aide, Major Harry Tremain, "Tell General Birney he must take command." As he was carried by stretcher to the III Corps hospital on the Taneytown Road, he bravely attempted to raise his soldiers' spirits by grinning and puffing on a cigar along the way. His leg was amputated that afternoon. He insisted on being transported back to Washington, D.C., which he reached on July 4, 1863, bringing some of the first news of the great Union victory, and starting a public relations campaign to ensure his version of the battle prevailed. On the afternoon of July 5, President Lincoln and his son, Tad, visited General Sickles, as he was recovering in Washington. Very fine..............................................$250.00


42928 - DANIEL WEBSTER, Carte de Viste by Anthony. From life photograph facing right. Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 - October 24, 1852) was a leading American statesman and senator from Massachusetts during the period leading up to the Civil War. He was one of the nation's most prominent conservatives, leading opposition to Democrat Andrew Jackson and the Democratic Party. He was a spokesman for modernization, banking and industry, but not for the common people who composed the base of his enemies in Jacksonian Democracy. During his 40 years in national politics, Webster served in the House of Representatives for 10 years (representing New Hampshire), in the Senate for 19 years (representing Massachusetts), and was appointed the Secretary of State under three presidents. Webster took part in several key U.S. Supreme Court cases which established important constitutional precedents that bolstered the authority of the federal government. As Secretary of State, he negotiated the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, which established the definitive eastern border between the United States and Canada. Chiefly recognized for his Senate tenure, Webster was a key figure in the institution's "Golden days." Webster was considered the Northern member of a trio known as the "Great Triumvirate," with his colleagues Henry Clay from the West (Kentucky) and John C. Calhoun from the South (South Carolina). As with his fellow Whig Henry Clay, Webster wanted to see the Union preserved and civil war averted. They both worked for compromises to stave off the sectionalism that threatened war between the North and the South. Webster tried and failed three times to become President of the United States. Very fine.........................................$95.00

42931 - CHAPLAIN OF THE 22ND MASS REV. JOHN PIERPOINT, FAMOUS POET, Carte de Viste by Anthony, Chaplain Pierpoint seated in his Chaplain's uniform holding a kepi with the emblem of the 22nd Mass. Mint condition. John Pierpoint (April 6, 1785 - August 27, 1866) was an American poet, who was also successively a teacher, lawyer, merchant, and Unitarian minister. His most famous poem is The Airs of Palestine.........................................$200.00

42932 - SURGEON WILLIAM HAYES, Carte de Viste by Wenderoth & Taylor of Philadelphia. Bust pose in uniform, noted on verso "Medical Director, 1st Division, Army of West Virginia, August 1863." Along with the CDV of Hayes are identified photos of his wife and two daughters. 4 CDV's [other 3 CDV's various backmarks] in all identified in period ink and dated, condition in near mint for the group................................................$225.00


34001 - FAIRFAX COURTHOUSE, VIRGINIA, JUNE 1863, Wet plate albumen photograph, 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card. Negative by O'Sullivan positive by Alexander Gardner, no imprint. The village of Fairfax Courthouse, Virginia, eighteen miles from Washington, was previous to the rebellion, one of the loveliest of the State. Numbering about three thousand inhabitants, with three large hotels, two fine churches, and a flourishing female institute, the place had become of considerable importance at the time of secession, from which it was the first to suffer. Each of the many commands which occupied the town during the war added to the work of devastation commenced in 1861, and long before peace was announced its comeliness had departed. Its best houses were burned, the churches were converted into hospitals, and then into stables, while the venerable courthouse was stripped of its wood-work, leaving only the naked walls and roof. In 1864, loop-holes were cut through the sides of the building for riflemen and troops stationed in it to repel any attack that might be made by guerillas that constantly hovered in the vicinity. The records kept here were of great historical interest, dating from the early settlement of Virginia, and including many documents in the writing of General Washington. A great number of these were carried off by curiosity hunters in the sacking which took place in September, 1862, and a still greater number were ruthlessly destroyed by the soldiery. Generals McClellan and Hooker each temporarily had their headquarters here when in command of the Army of the Potomac as did also the lamented Sumner, and other officers of equal rank. The battle-field of Bull Run is ten miles distant, and Chantilly, where the gallant Kearney and Stephens fell, but five miles away. Sharp print, very light tone to mount on verso...................................................$150.00

34002 - BATTERY #1 BEFORE YORKTOWN, VA, MAY 1862, Wet plate albumen photograph, 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card. Negative by Wood & Gibson positive by Alexander Gardner, no imprint. When Gen. McClellan undertook to capture the Confederate Army on the Peninsula by siege. He commenced to construct a line of works from the York to the James River, across the narrow neck of the Peninsula, in front of Yorktown. The first battery was located on the York River, about a mile and three-quarters from Confederate's wharves and their main works in front of Yorktown. It was built by the First Connecticut artillery, Col. Tyler, and had six of the heaviest rifled guns ever mounted in a land battery, namely, one 200-pound Parrott and five 100-pounders. The guns were mounted on heavy wrought-iron carriages, and could only be fired once in fifteen minutes. The muzzles of the guns were about five feet from the ground, and the bottom of the carriages about ten feet below the surface. The dirt thrown out of the excavation was banked up in front of the guns, and kept from falling in by wicker baskets, constructed by the Engineer Corps, and filled with earth. On the top of these were piled bags of sand, and the whole sodded, making an embankment of thirty feet thick in front of the guns. The enemy fired a number of solid shot and shell into this bank from an English sixty-four rifled gun, but none of them did any damage, or entered over ten feet into the earth. Very fine...............................................$150.00

34003 - BATTERY #1 NEAR YORKTOWN, VA, MAY 1862, Wet plate albumen photograph, 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card. Negative by Wood & Gibson positive by Alexander Gardner, no imprint. This, the best constructed of all the works thrown up for the bombardment of the rebel lines, was built in the orchard of the Farinholt House, near Yorktown, and was so completely concealed behind the little crest rising from the shore of the York River, as to be quite undistinguishable from the enemy's lines, except when the smoke of the guns revealed its existence. The ordnance consisted of five 100-pounders, and one of 200, all Parrot guns. The rebels, in trying to return the deadly fire of this artillery, burst one of their largest rifle guns, with fatal effect upon the cannonries. That the fire of battery "Number One" contributed largely to the reasons for evacuating the stronghold, there can be no doubt, the rebels wisely reasoning that if one battery could accomplish so much, what might not be the result if all opened. This earthwork was occupied by the Zouaves, Fifth Regiment New York Volunteers, commanded by Colonel, afterwards General G. K. Warren. Very fine...............................................................$150.00

34004  - BATTERY #4, NEAR YORKTOWN, VA, MAY 1862, Wet plate albumen photograph, 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card. Negative by Wood & Gibson positive by Alexander Gardner, no imprint. This represents one of the batteries planted for the bombardment of Yorktown. In places subjected to mortar fire, the men construct bomb proofs, and place a sentinel on the watch, to give warning of the approach of a shell, and enable every man to seek shelter till the explosion of the missile. If the bombardment is continuous, the troops remain under cover, unless absolutely required to man the works. The mortars of Battery No. 4 were of thirteen inch caliber, and required great labor to place them in position. As the fire of mortar is entirely a work of calculation, it is not necessary for the gunners to see the object against which the shells are directed, and accounts for the position of this Battery under the high bank. Sharp photo, slight blemish really unaffecting quality of the image.......................$110.00

34005 - PONTOON BRIDGE ACROSS THE POTOMAC AT BERLIN, MD, Wet plate albumen photograph, 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card by Alexander Gardner, no imprint. Berlin is a quiet little village on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, twelve miles from Point of Rocks. A fine bridge connected it with the Virginia shore until June, 1861, when the Confederates sacrificed it to the spirit of destruction that ruined Harper's Ferry and laid waste the pleasant places of the border. Its inhabitants, numbering about five hundred, are dependent principally for support upon the business of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, which passes the place, and during the war, from the interruption of navigation necessarily suffered much hardship. The bivouac of the Army of the Potomac in its vicinity in 1862 first introduced its name to the country, and it has fallen again into the partial oblivion that has hidden much more pretentious villages. Here McClellan had his headquarters after the battle of Antietam, and the troops crossed into Virginia, marching down through London to Rectortown and Warrenton, and thence to Fredericksburg. The Photograph only shows the village and a small portion of the Maryland shore, from which no adequate impression can be formed of the beauty of the surrounding scenery. The river at this point is obstructed by scattered rocks, and with the wooded hills that slope precipitously to the water's edge, forms one of the most charming pictures of the Potomac. Very fine...................................................$150.00


1291 - ARMY OF THE POTOMAC SECRET SERVICE, Wet plate albumen photograph by A. Gardner, no imprint. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.74" X 3.75" card. Taken by Alexander Gardner. Scouts of an army undergo more hardship and brave greater peril than any other class. Secrecy being their only safety, their heroic deeds pass unrecorded, and when the altogether forgotten. Volumes might be written of their heroic deeds, and the historian of the rebellion will have failed in his duty if he neglects to chronicle the instances of their exploits. Every army had its scouts, but none proved more efficient than those of the Army of the Potomac. The individuals in this group were attached to the Secret Service Department of the Army of the Potomac when conducted by Major Allen Pinkerton. Their faces are indexes of the character required for such hazardous work. Men of iron nerve and indomitable perseverance, they braved the halter with perfect consciousness of their peril, and seldom failed in an undertaking. Gardner took this photo at Berlin, MD, October 1862. Excellent contrast, a very scarce image............................................................................$550.00

1292 - A SHARPSHOOTER'S LAST SLEEP, GETTYSBURG, JULY 1863, Wet plate albumen photograph. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" x 3.75" card. Taken by Alexander Gardner, no imprint. A burial party, searching for dead on the borders of the Gettysburg battlefield, found, in a secluded spot, a sharpshooter lying as he fell when struck by the bullet. His cap and gun were evidently thrown behind him by the violence of the shock, and the blanket, partly shown, indicates that he had selected this as a permanent position from which to annoy the enemy. How many skeletons of such men are bleaching today in out of the way places no one can tell. Now and then the visitor to a battlefield finds the bones of some man shot as this one was, but there are hundreds that will never be known of, and will moulder into nothingness among the rocks. There were several regiments of Sharpshooters employed on both sides during the war, and many distinguished officers lost their lives at the hands of the riflemen. The first regiment was composed of men selected from each of the Loyal States, who brought their own rifles, and could snuff a candle at a hundred yards. Some of the regiments tried almost every variety of arms, but generally found the Western rifle most effective. The men were seldom used in line, but were taken to the front and allowed to choose their own positions. Some climbed into bushy trees, and lashed themselves to the branches to avoid falling if wounded. Others secreted themselves behind logs and rocks, and not a few dug little pits, into which they crept, lying close to the ground and rendering it almost impossible for an enemy to hit them. Occasionally a Federal and Confederate Sharpshooter would be brought face to face, when each would resort to every artifice to kill the other. Hats would be elevated upon sticks, and powder flashed on a piece of paper, to draw the opponent's fire, not always with success, however, and sometimes many hours would elapse before either party could get a favorable shot. When the armies were entrenched, as at Vicksburg and Richmond, the sharpshooters frequently secreted themselves so as to defy discovery, and picked off officers without the Confederate riflemen being able to return the fire. Great contrast, a most desirable view........................................................................$495.00

1293 - ANTIETAM BRIDGE, MARYLAND, Wet plate albumen photograph. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card. Taken by Alexander Gardner. No imprint. The bridge described by Garner as being the structure on the turnpike leading from Boonsboro to Sharpsburg. Traces of the recent engagement are evident in the overturned stone wall, the shattered fences. The cavalry of the Army of the Potomac had captured this bridge after a sharp fight. One of the most memorable of the Gardner views.........................................................$350.00

1296 - WHAT DO I WANT, JOHN HENRY, Wet plate albumen photograph. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card. By Alexander Gardner, no imprint, Warrenton, VA, November 1862. White soldier sitting facing young black servant, who is holding bottle and cake with two other soldiers sitting and one standing in front of two tents. One of the soldiers is Brevet Major J. R. Coxe, who was in charge of the camp commissary. Scarce view of a Negro contraband in a partial uniform. Sharp image, very desirable................................$295.00

1297 - THE SLAVES PEN AT ALEXANDRIA, Wet plate albumen photograph. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card. Negative by Pywell, Positive by A. Gardner, no imprint. Taken August 1863, the building used by Price, Birch & Company for the sale of slaves was located at 283 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA. It was later used as a military prison by the Federals. A scarce view published by Gardner. Very fine..............................................$295.00

1298 - CONFEDERATE PRISONERS AT FAIRFAX COURTHOUSE, JUNE 1863, Wet plate albumen photograph. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card. Negative by O'Sullivan Positive by A. Gardner, no imprint. A group of Confederate cavalrymen captured by Pleasanton at the Battle of Aldie that took place at the foot of the Bull Run range of hills in Loudoun County. Pleasanton attacked and drove them five miles across the country with Generals Buford and Gregg leading their divisions in the fight. A very desirable Gardner photograph. Very fine.........................................................$495.00

31101 - INTERIOR OF THE BREASTWORKS AT ROUND TOP, GETTYSBURG, Wet plate albumen photograph. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card, no imprint. Negative by O'Sullivan Positive by Gardner. Union defensive position at Little Round Top on the battlefield at Gettysburg in Pennsylvania, USA, Little Round Top Hill saw some of the fiercest fighting of the Battle of Gettysburg, the decisive engagement of the war. On 2 July the Confederate 15th Alabama Regiment were repulsed by the Union 20th Maine Infantry, defending the hill. Defeat at Gettysburg marked the end of General Robert E. Lee's planned invasion of the north..........................................................$425.00

31102 - THE SLAUGHTER PEN, BATTLEFIELD AT GETTYSBURG, Wet plate albumen photograph. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card, no imprint. Negative by O'Sullivan Positive by Alexander Gardner. Little Round Top Hill saw some of the fiercest fighting of the Battle of Gettysburg, the decisive engagement of the war. On 2nd July, the Confederate 15th Alabama Regiment were repulsed by the Union 20th Maine Infantry, defending the hill. Defeat at Gettysburg marked the end of General Robert E. Lee's planned invasion of the north. This was taken by Gardner on July 6th, 1863. Excellent clarity, very fine..................................$450.00 

31103 - TROSSEL HOUSE BATTLEFIELD AT GETTYSBURG, Wet plate albumen photograph. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card, no imprint. Negative by O'Sullivan, Positive by Alexander Gardner. View of the Trossel House on the Gettysburg battlefield showing the dead horses of the 9th Massachusetts Battery. General Sickles had his command near here and lost his leg due to a wound received near this house. Thousands of dead and wounded were strewn over the fields adjacent to this House, and graves of Confederates can be found in every direction. The trees are scarred by bullets, marks of cannon-shot and shell disfigure the buildings, and the remains of the hastily constructed breastworks, with moldering fragments of accoutrements, still show where the lines of battle were engaged. Very fine...................................................................$450.00

31104 - HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC AT GETTYSBURG, MEADE'S HEADQUARTERS, Wet plate albumen photograph. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card. By Alexander Gardner, negative by O'Sullivan, no imprint. On the first of July, Reynolds, with the First Corps, engaged the Confederates at Gettysburg, and after a gallant struggle, in which that officer was killed, the Corps, reinforced by the Eleventh, retired to the strong position on Cemetery Ridge. General Meade first heard of the engagement and its result at Taneytown, ten miles away, about sundown. Orders were at once dispatched for the other Corps to march for the Westminster, and shortly after midnight the General and staff pushed on to Gettysburg, establishing headquarters at this house. The second of July was one of the loveliest days of the season, and with the exception of occasional shots between the advanced picket lines, remained perfectly quiet until three o'clock. The headquarter, however, throughout the day presented a most animated appearance. Commanding officers and couriers were constantly arriving and departing, while the staff officers and escort lounged in the shade about the house, or slept on the green turf, gathering strength for the conflict momentarily expected to commence. In the afternoon, Sickles, with the Third Corps, was attacked by the enemy, and the battle finally became general, the First, Fifth, Sixth and Eleventh participating, with the Second and Twelfth in reserve in the rear of the right wing. The headquarters, from its exposed position, at once became the center of a terrible artillery fire. Shot and shell plunged through the building in quick succession, and made sad havoc with the group about it. In a few minutes, a number were killed, and the General was soon compelled to withdraw, leaving dead and struggling horses on every side. On the third day, the house was exposed to even a more severe fir, which threatened to utterly annihilate it...................................$350.00

31109 - RUINS AT MANASSAS JUNCTION, MARCH 1862, Wet plate albumen photograph. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card. Negative by Barnard & Gibson, Positive by Alexander Gardner, no imprint. Early in March, 1862, the rebel army, under Gen. Johnson, evacuated Centreville and Manassas, (their Northern line), and commenced a retreat towards Richmond. It was orderly and well conducted fro several days, but as the last trains were leaving, some of the soldiers fired a bridge south of the junction, supposing that all the trains had gone. Two, however, had not left, and these were at once fired, together with the surrounding buildings, used by the Railroad Company for depot, machine and repair shops, & etc. Everything was destroyed, except half a dozen cars, which contained flour and some camp equipage of a South Carolina Brigade, and which for some reason escaped the conflagration. The only wooden turn-table was uninjured, and is a fair sample of the old fashioned equipage of the Orange and Alexandria Road, at that period. A few mud huts, and about fifty broken down wagons, and the usual debris of a winter's camp, were the sole remnants of the rebel army, which, like the Arabs, had folded its tents, and silently stolen away. Manassas Junction was but a level plain, as seen by the photograph, and with neither natural or artificial works of any strength, the fortifications at that time consisting only of rude mud banks..................................................................$150.00

31111 - FORTIFICATIONS AT MANASSAS, Wet plate albumen photograph. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card. Negative by Barnard & Gibson, Positive by Alexander Gardner, no imprint. This sketch represents a portion of the Confederate fortifications at Manassas after their occupation by the Federal Army. The works were laid out by General Beauregard, well known as an engineer of great ability; but their construction illustrates the inexperience in military matters of the men who rallied at this spot to resist the authority of the Government. The casks were filled with earth, and were intended to supply the lack of more suitable gabions, but would have offered very little resistance to artillery. The flooring was laid for the use of the guns, the four short posts marking the embrasure. The interior of the works was badly drained, and the trenches were almost constantly filled with stagnant water. The fortifications formed a semi-circle about four miles in length, but contiguous to this position were the ridges and earthworks of Centreville, extending the line to nearly fifteen miles. The armament consisted principally of six and twelve-pounder field batteries, with a few old fashioned thirty-twos, brought from the Norfolk Navy Yard. Located, however, upon high table-land, bounded by ravines and the almost impenetrable thickets bordering Bull Run, the works did not require, very heavy ordnance. Had they been assaulted, the musket and bayonet would have proved far more serviceable in repelling the attack than artillery, although there is no doubt that the small number of heavy cannon was attributable to their scarcity in the South rather than to confidence in the natural strength of the position. The fortifications are now rapidly being leveled, and in a few years will have entirely disappeared. The soil composing them is of a light character, and washes away in every rain, filling up the ditches and reducing the sharply defined works to sloping mounds, over which the farmer's plow is already turning the furrow. Light tone to card, photo excellent.................................................$150.00

31113 - RUINS OF THE STONE BRIDGE, BULL RUN, VA. MARCH 1862, Wet plate albumen photograph. 2.5" X 3.0", overall size 2.75" X 3.75" card. Negative by Barnard & Gibson, Positive by Alexander Gardner, no imprint. This sketch represents a portion of the fied of the battle of Bull Run, fought on the 21st of July, 1861, by the forces under Gen. McDowell said: "The enemy has planted a battery on the Warrenton turnpike to defend the passage of Bull Run; has seized the stone bridge, and made a heavy abates on the right bank, to oppose our advance in that direction. The ford above the bridge is also guarded, whether with artillery or not, is not positively known, but every indication favors the belief that he proposes to defend the passage of the stream. It is intended to turn the position, force the enemy from the road, that it may be re-opened, and if possible, destroy the railroad leading from Manassas to the Valley of Virginia, where the enemy has a large force." General  McDowell commenced operations with the divisions of Tyler, Hunter, Heintzelman, and Miles--33,000 men; 18,000 of whom were engaged. The strength of the enemy was about the same, and was all engaged. The plan of the attack was for Tyler's division to threaten the passage of the bridge, Miles to make a demonstration at Blackburn's Ford, two miles below, and the divisions of Hunter and Heintzleman to move up the stream ten miles, and by a flank movement surprise and overwhelm the enemy while occupied with the two other divisions. The country at that time was densely wooded, and the entire portion shown in the sketch occupied by the Confederates. It was expected that Hunter and Heintzelman would strike the left of the enemy at daylight on the 21st, but owing to unforeseen obstacles, failed to reach the designated point until after ten o'clock. This delay revealed the movement to Beauregard, who immediately disposed his forces to meet it by extending them obliquely across the turnpike, facing the bridge, at a distance of about two miles. Hunter, Heintzelman, and Tyler, who had crossed the bridge, attacked the enemy, and the engagement became general; our forces, after a severe struggle, driving him in great confusion from the field, and occupying the turnpike. The fighting had nearly ceased, and Gen. McDowell was expressing his thanks to some of his officers for their services, when Johnston's reinforcements from Winchester suddenly appeared in rear of our right, and threw our lines into utter confusion. A feeble attempt was made to repulse the attack, but the regiments rapidly broke to pieces, and forming a mass of terror-stricken fugitives, rushed from the field down across the bridge, which soon became obstructed by wagons, and to prevent pursuit by the enemy was destroyed. A portion of this ground was fought over in the battles of Gen. Pope in 1862, and hundreds of acres still bear evidences of those fearful scenes. Light age tone to card.........................................................................$150.00


12073B - GENERAL JOHN MARTINDALE, Carte de Viste, 3/4 standing pose from life, no bm, but superb condition. In August 1861, Martindale was commissioned as brigadier general of volunteers in the Union Army, and participated in all the battles of the Peninsula Campaign in V Corps. After the retreat from Malvern Hill, he was brevetted a major general of volunteers, and appointed Military Governor of Washington, D. C., a post he held from November 1862 to May 1864. Afterward, he returned to field service, fighting with the XVIII Corps in the Bermuda Hundred Campaign, the Battle of Cold Harbor and the Siege of Petersburg, commanding the corps briefly in mid-July 1864. In September 1864, he resigned his commission because of bad health.................$115.00

1108 - BATON ROUGE, LA. THE CAMP OF THE 1ST WISCONSIN BATTERY NEXT TO THE PENITENTIARY
, Carte de Viste, no imprint but attributed to Lyle [see Baton Rouge, A Civil War Album", pg. 77]. Noted in pencil as being a photo of the arsenal at Baton Rouge by Chaplain J. F. Moors, 32nd Mass. [owner of the album]. Very fine...................................................
$275.00

1114 - GENERAL ALEXANDER MCCOOK, Carte de Viste by Anthony and sold by Pittock of Pittsburgh. Nice seated pose facing left. One of the "Fighting McCook's." McCook then commanded the 2nd Division in the Army of the Ohio at the Battle of Shiloh on the second day of fighting, and then in the subsequent campaign against Corinth. He was promoted to major general of volunteers on July 17, 1862. McCook was given command of the I Corps in the Army of the Ohio. His corps suffered heavy casualties and driven back a mile at the Battle of Perryville in October 1862. Command of the Army of the Ohio was reorganized and his command designated the Right Wing of the XIV Corps in the new Army of the Cumberland. His command again suffered heavy losses at the Battle of Stones River. Once again the command structure was reorganized and his corps named the XX Corps. For the third and final time, at Chickamauga, McCook's troops suffered heavily and were driven from the field. He was court martialed and partially blamed for the Union disaster at Chickamauga. He was not convicted but relieved of duty in the Army of the Cumberland. A very nice card..........................................................$195.00

1117 - GENERAL JOHN F. REYNOLDS, Carte de Viste by McClees of Philadelphia. Bust pose from life slightly facing right. On the morning of July 1, 1863, Reynolds was commanding the "left wing" of the Army of the Potomac, with operational control over the I, III, and XI Corps, and Brig. Gen. John Buford's cavalry division. Buford occupied the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and set up light defensive lines north and west of the town. He resisted the approach of two Confederate infantry brigades on the Chambersburg Pike until the nearest Union infantry, Reynolds' I Corps, began to arrive. Reynolds rode out ahead of the 1st Division, met with Buford, and then accompanied some of his soldiers, probably from Brig. Gen. Lysander Cutler's brigade, into the fighting at Herbst's Woods. Troops began arriving from Brig. Gen. Solomon Meredith's Iron Brigade, and as Reynolds was supervising the placement of the 2nd Wisconsin, he fell from his horse with a wound in the back of the neck and died almost instantly. Command passed to his senior division commander, Maj. Gen. Abner Doubleday. Near mint card.....................$495.00

1120 - GENERAL GEORGE SYKES, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust view facing left. At the Battle of Gettysburg, Sykes' corps fought in support of the beleaguered III Corps on the Union left flank. In his 1st Division (Brig. Gen. James Barnes), the fabled defense of Little Round Top was led by brigade commander Col. Strong Vincent and the 20th Maine Infantry under Col. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. His 3rd Division, the Pennsylvania Reserves, led by Brig. Gen. Samuel W. Crawford, attacked from the Little Round Top, drove the Confederates across the "Valley of Death" and ended the deadly fighting in the Wheatfield. Very fine, crisp card.................................$395.00

1121 - GENERAL HIRAM BERRY, Carte de Viste by Anthony. 3/4 standing view. He participated in the First Battle of Manassas under the command of O. O. Howard. For his gallant service at Bull Run he was promoted to brigadier general in March 1862. Berry was reassigned to the command of the 3rd Brigade of Hamilton's Division (later Kearny's), 3rd Corps. The 3rd Brigade consisted of four regiments: the 2nd Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment and the 37th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Berry's decisive action at the Battle of Williamsburg benefited General Hooker. His brigade fought in the Battle of Seven Pines. Berry was then promoted to Major-General on November 29, 1862. Berry was placed in command of the 2nd Division of the III Corps, succeeding Major General Daniel Sickles, who had ascended to corps command. Berry was killed by a sharpshooter's round at 7:26 AM on May 3, 1863 at the Battle of Chancellorsville. Very fine, scarce............................$250.00

1122 - GENERAL CHARLES G. HARKER, Carte de Viste by Morse, Dept. of the Cumberland. Harker and the 65th OVI participated in the April 1862 Battle of Shiloh, as well as the subsequent Siege of Corinth, Mississippi. In late June, he took over command of the 20th Brigade, 6th Division, Army of the Ohio, replacing James A. Garfield. [2] Later that year, he was involved in the Battle of Perryville in Kentucky. Harker received praise for his significant contributions during the Battle of Stones River at the end of the year while leading the 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, Left Wing of XIV Corps of the Army of the Cumberland. In 1863, he was in command of the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, IV Corps, Army of the Cumberland, Military Division of the Mississippi. He again drew the attention of his senior commanders with a determined stand against Confederate attackers during the Battle of Chickamauga in northern Georgia. In recognition of his performance and service, he was promoted to fill an opening as a brigadier general, dating from September 20, 1863. After participating in the fighting around Chattanooga and the assault on Missionary Ridge, he and his men helped relieve Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside during the Siege of Knoxville. In mid-1864, as the Atlanta Campaign began, Harker commanded a brigade under Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard. On May 7, he successfully held the peak of Rocky Face Ridge despite determined Confederate efforts to dislodge his men. In June, William T. Sherman's Union army attempted to displace Confederate troops from their fortifications on Kennesaw Mountain. Harker was shot from his horse an mortally wounded during a failed attack on June 27, 1864. Very fine. Rare and with a great back mark......................................................$395.00

1123 - GENERAL JOHN BRANNAN, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose facing right. In 1863, he led an infantry division under Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans in the Tullahoma Campaign where he fought at Hoover's Gap. Brannan then fought under Maj. Gen. George Henry Thomas during the Chickamauga Campaign in XIV Corps. At Chickamauga, Brannon lost 38 per cent of his command. Nevertheless, Brannan was awarded a brevet appointment to colonel for meritorious service. When Rosecrans was relieved by Ulysses S. Grant, Brannan was reassigned from infantry back to artillery. He was promoted to the rank of major in the regular army in August 1863. From October 1863 until June 1865, Brannan was chief of artillery of the Department of the Cumberland, where he oversaw the defenses at Chattanooga. He was in the Battle of Missionary Ridge and in the Atlanta Campaign where he participated in the Battle of Resaca, Battle of Dallas, and the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain. He was also at the siege and surrender of Atlanta. A crisp and fresh card.......................................................................$225.00 

1124 - GENERAL IRVIN MCDOWELL, Carte de Viste by Earle's of Philadelphia. Seated pose outdoors in a tent. The three independent commands of Generals McDowell, John C. Fremont, and Nathaniel P. Banks were combined into Maj. Gen. John Pope's Army of Virginia and McDowell led the III Corps of that army. Because of his actions at Cedar Mountain, McDowell was eventually brevetted major general in the regular army; however, he was blamed for the subsequent disaster at Second Bull Run. He escaped culpability by testifying against Maj. Gen. Fitz John Porter, whom Pope court-martialed for alleged insubordination in that battle. Very fine..................................$185.00

1126 - GENERAL DAVID ALLEN RUSSELL, Carte de Viste by Anthony. 3/4 standing pose. In 1862, Russell was promoted to major in the regular army and assigned to the U.S. 8th Infantry Regiment. Still in command of the 7th Massachusetts, he fought in the Battle of Antietam. Later in 1862, Russell was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers and commanded a brigade during the Rappahannock campaign. He later fought at the Battle of Fredericksburg. Russell was primarily in reserve during the Battle of Gettysburg, but was brevetted colonel in the regular army shortly afterward. In 1864, Russell fought in the Overland Campaign. He was mortally wounded later that year in the Shenandoah Valley during the Battle of Opequon, otherwise known as the Third Battle of Winchester, when he was struck by a shell fragment. Very fine, very rare....................................................................$395.00

1128 - GENERAL GEORGE STONEMAN, Carte de Viste by Brady. Bust view slightly facing left. Stoneman was an infantry commander, commanding a division in the II Corps and the III Corps. At the Battle of Fredericksburg, Stoneman commanded the III Corps. He was promoted to major general of volunteers on November 29, 1862. However, following Fredericksburg, a new commanding general took over the Army of the Potomac: Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker. Hooker had a better understanding of the strategic value of a centralized Cavalry Corps and he named Stoneman to lead it. The centralized corps could undertake long raids into enemy territory, destroying supplies, and gathering intelligence about the enemy forces. They were not subject to the commanders of small infantry units. The plan for the Battle of Chancellorsville was strategically daring. Hooker assigned Stoneman a key role in which his Cavalry Corps would raid deeply into Robert E. Lee's rear areas and destroy vital railroad lines and supplies, distracting Lee from Hooker's main assaults. However, Stoneman was a disappointment in this strategic role. The Cavalry Corps got off to a good start in May 1863, but quickly bogged down after crossing the Rapidan River. During the entire battle, Stoneman accomplished little and Hooker considered him one of the principal reasons for the Union defeat at Chancellorsville. Hooker needed to deflect criticism from himself and relieved Stoneman from his cavalry command, sending him back to Washington, D.C., for medical treatment (chronic hemorrhoids, exacerbated by cavalry service), where in July he became a Chief of the U.S. Cavalry Bureau, a desk job. Crisp card, trifle tone.............................................................$145.00

1130 - GENERAL NATHANIAL BANKS, Carte de Viste, no imprint, from life pose facing right. Replaced Butler as Commander of the Dept. of the Gulf in New Orleans in 1862, Port Hudson Campaign, Red River Campaign, the Teche Campaign. Later Governor of Massachusetts. Very fine, unusual pose.......................................$115.00

1131 - GENERAL EDWIN SUMNER, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose facing right. (January 30, 1797 - March 21, 1863) was a career United States Army officer who became a Union Army general and the oldest field commander of any Army Corps on either side during the American Civil War. [1] His nicknames "Bull" or "Bull Head" came both from his great booming voice and a legend that a musket ball once bounced off his head. Sumner fought in the Black Hawk War, with distinction in the Mexican-American War, on the Western frontier, and in the Eastern Theater for the first half of the Civil War.  He led the II Corps of the Army of the Potomac through the Peninsula Campaign, the Seven Days Battles, the Maryland Campaign, and the Battle of Fredericksburg. Very fine......................................................$85.00

1132  - GENERAL ROBERT ANDERSON, Carte de Viste by Gurney of New York. Full standing pose. Robert Anderson (June 14, 1805 - October 26, 1871) was an American military leader. He served as a Union Army officer in the American Civil War, known for his command of Fort Sumter at the start of the war. He is often referred to as Major Robert Anderson, referring to his rank at Fort Sumter. Very fine.............................................................$175.00

1134 - THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. 7 Union Commanders of the Army of the Potomac. Grant, Meade, Parke, Warren, Humphreys, Hancock, and Wright. Fine, crisp card..........................................
$125.00

1135 - ADMIRAL DAVID PORTER, Carte de Viste by Gurney of NY. Bust pose facing left. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he was part of a plan to hold Fort Pickens, near Pensacola, FL, for the Union; its execution disrupted the effort to relieve the garrison at Fort Sumter, leading to its fall. Porter commanded an independent flotilla of mortar boats at the capture of New Orleans. Later, he was advanced to the rank of (acting) rear admiral in command of the Mississippi River Squadron, which cooperated with the army under Major General Ulysses S. Grant in the Vicksburg Campaign. After the fall of Vicksburg, he led the naval forces in the difficult Red River Campaign in Louisiana. Late in 1864, Porter was transferred from the interior to the Atlantic coast, where he led the Navy in the joint assaults on Fort Fisher, the final significant naval action of the war. Very fine............................................$175.00

1137 - GROUP OF THREE UNION COMMANDERS OF THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, CDV'S OF GRANT, MEADE, MCCLELLAN, All are engraving CDV's, the Grant card has some slight trimming, others untrimmed, the trio for...................................................$49.00


9220 - FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE, Carte de Viste, full standing pose from life. Florence Nightingale, (12 May 1820 - 13 August 1910) was a celebrated English nurse, writer and statistician. An Anglican, Nightingale believe that God had called her to be a nurse. She came to prominence for her pioneering work in nursing during the Crimean War, where she tended to wounded soldiers. She was dubbed "The Lady with the Lamp" after her habit of making rounds at night. Nightingale laid the foundation of professional nursing with the establishment, in 1860, of her nursing school at St. Thomas' Hospital in London. The Nightingale Pledge taken by new nurses was named in her honor, an the annual International Nurses Day is celebrated around the world on her birthday. Nightingale's work served as an inspiration for nurses in the American Civil War. The Union government approached her for advice in organizing field medicine. Although her ideas met official resistance, they inspired the volunteer body of the United States Sanitary Commission. A rare and desirable medical related photo..........................................$395.00

8203 - BVT GENERAL [COLONEL] THOMAS CHICKERING, 41ST MASS VOL., AND 3RD MASS CAVALRY
, Carte de Viste, seated pose as Colonel of the 3rd Mass. Cavalry from life pose seated in uniform. On September 15, 1862, Chickering was placed in command of the 41st Massachusetts Infantry. The regiment was deployed to New Orleans in November 1862 as part of Major General Nathaniel Bank's Louisiana expedition. During the winter of 1862 - 1863, the 41st Massachusetts garrisoned Baton Rouge, Louisiana without any significant incident. During April and May 1863, the 41st Massachusetts was part of an expedition to Opelousas, Louisiana to forage for supplies and gather freed slaves by the thousands for recruitment into the Union Army. Chickering was appointed military governor of Opelousas and commanded the Union troops (consisting of seven regiments of infantry) that were part of the expedition. In June 1863, as Chickering and the 41st Massachusetts prepared to join other troops of the Department of the Gulf in the Siege of Port Hudson, the regiment was consolidated with three companies of Massachusetts cavalry and became a mounted unit. The regiment was re-named the 3rd Massachusetts Cavalry. The unit saw action in the Siege of Port Hudson and the Red River Campaign. Chickering commanded this unit until September 1, 1864 when he resigned from the army. For his service during the war, Chickering was awarded the honorary grade of brevet brigadier general, nominated February 21, 1866, confirmed April 10, 1866, to rank from March 13, 1865. Very fine......................................................
$250.00


8204 - GENERAL PHILIP SHERIDAN
, Carte de Viste  by Hoag and Quick of Cincinnati. A beautiful from life pose of Sheridan in uniform. A famous cavalry commander during the War and Indian Fighter in postwar years. Near mint condition...................................
$135.00


71123 - BLACK UNION SOLDIER, wet plate albumen photograph in an oval 5" X 7" on the original 8" X 10" card within a gold border. A young black soldier seated from the knees up wearing a jacket with buttons and piping evident. Under his jacket he wears a vest with military buttons. The mid-war style coat with distinct (non-regulation) fold-over collar seems to have been more common among eastern regiments based on identified photographs. The image is well defined but has some fading of tone mainly at the bottom. The military buttons are quite obvious. Would display nicely in a period frame..................................................................SOLD

5070 - 3RD RHODE ISLAND HEAVY ARTILLERY, CAPTAIN GEORGE L. SMITH, Carte de Viste by Manchester Brothers, Providence, RI. Standing pose with sword, kepi and greatcoat on adjacent chair. Wounded on the gunboat "George Washington" by a gun explosion, later commanding the steamer "George Washington", later duty in South Carolina and Georgia. Sharp photo, bottom corners of card slightly tipped, otherwise fine................................$200.00


3490 - RODMAN SMOOTH BORE SIEGE CANNON YORKTOWN, VA, Carte de Viste, close up view of one of the huge Rodman bore siege guns in a Confederate battery taken at Yorktown, VA, in June 1862 with a soldier standing on it to give size perspective. Photo taken by Barnard no BM, very fine............................................$250.00

3493 - PONTOON BRIDGE AT DECATUR, AL, Carte de Viste, an excellent view of the Union pontoon bridge built at Decatur, Alabama along side of the destroyed railroad bridge over the Tennessee River. The bridge was the railroad bridge of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. Union forces burned the bridge and most of the town after the Battle of Decatur. The Battle of Decatur was a demonstration conducted from October 26 to October 29, 1864, as part of the Franklin-Nashville Campaign of the Civil War. Union forces of 3-5,000 men under Brig. Gen. Robert S. Granger prevented the 39,000 men of the Confederate Army of Tennessee under Lt. Gen. John B. Hood from crossing the Tennessee River at Decatur, Alabama. Very fine.......................................................$200.00


2120 - PORT HUDSON, LA - VIEW OF THE CITADEL ON THE BLUFFS, The Citadel was a powerfully fortified Confederate position near the southwestern corner of their defensive line on the bluffs near the river. This photo taken by McPherson & Oliver of Baton Rouge shows the effects of Federal shelling on that position with a Confederate gun on its side. Small holes in the entrenchments were for men to hide in during the bombardment and were nicknamed "ratholes". McPherson & Oliver imprint, Baton Rouge, LA. Very fine................................................$395.00

2121 - PORT HUDSON, LA - VIEW OF THE RATHOLES IN THE CITADEL, Another interior view of "The Citadel". Visible are the holes dug into the sides of the dirt walls of their fortifications by the Confederate soldiers to escape the Union artillery bombardments. These holes were call "ratholes". Taken by McPherson & Oliver of Baton Rouge, LA without their imprint. A scarce pose. Very fine.................$395.00


2209 - GENERAL DANIEL BUTTERFIELD
, Carte de Viste, from life pose from the waist up in uniform, wounded at Gaines' Mill, fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, severely wounded at Gettysburg, composed "Taps" in 1862, quite desirable and a very nice photograph...................................................
$225.00


2210 - GENERAL HENRY W. SLOCUM
, Carte de Viste, seated pose in uniform to the right, served during the Peninsular Campaign, 2nd Manassas, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Atlanta Campaign, sharp image, trifle blems.................................
$150.00


2212 - A SUPERB SIEGE OF VICKSBURG MAP OWNED BY A MEMBER OF SHERMAN'S STAFF AT VICKSBURG TOGETHER WITH HIS SIGNED CARTE DE VISTE
, 2 items, [a] Carte de Viste of Lt. Colonel J. H. Hammond, AAG to General William Sherman, 15th Army Corps. Hammond was AAG to Sherman at Shiloh as a Major and served continually on Sherman's Staff through the Vicksburg Campaign and later. He is pictured in the famous photo of Sherman and his staff. This CDV was signed in May 1863 by Hammond as AAG, 15th Army Corps, by Gurney of New York. It is signed on the front and back by Hammond. Hammond is mentioned in many documents as AAG during the siege of Vicksburg while serving Sherman on his Staff. [b] A beautiful manuscript map in black and red pen 6.5" X 7" that was drawn during the late siege period of May-June 1863. There are notations for cleared lands, the famous "Grant canal", notations for breastworks, railroads, and terrain symbols. The map includes the area from Haines Bluff in the north south to Warrenton, with Vicksburg and the adjacent fortifications in the center. The map accompanied the Hammond CDV and while there is no indication that Hammond drew the map, it certainly belonged to him through his retained papers. The map is in exceptional condition with details sharp and colors bright. It had been drawn on a linen map paper which remains remarkably undamaged by staining as many maps seem to have. A great pair of Vicksburg related items, CDV and manuscript map, 2 items included.......................
$995.00


2127 - PROFESSOR LOWE'S CONSERVATION BALLOON AT FAIR OAKS, Original Brady view #548 on original cardstock. Thaddeus S.C. Lowe was made Chief of Army Aeronautics in August 1861 by President Lincoln. This view is Scene at Balloon Camp, Gaines Mill with the subheading "Telegraphing, Reporting, and Sketching during the Battle of Fair Oaks June 1st, 1862." The view shows members of the Balloon Corps, some telegraphing and the balloon ready to ascend. This is a view of his balloon "Intrepid" which had stars painted on the basket. Often seen in stereo form, this is a rare war period version 4.5" X 6". In choice condition and very desirable...............................................................$695.00

1247 - BEAUTIFUL FORT SUMTER DISPLAY FRAMED, 8" X 16", double framed display with the following, Carte de Viste of General P.G.T. Beauregard standing by Fredericks of NY showing Beauregard taken in Charleston in 1861, another carte de viste of Major Robert Anderson by Anthony of New York, an albumen photograph of Sullivan's Island showing the northeast angle of Fort Marshall, and an albumen photograph showing Fort Sumter after the effects of shelling. As Southern states began to secede, Major Anderson, a pro-slavery, former slave-owner from Kentucky, remained loyal to the Union. He was the commanding officer of Fort Sumter at Charleston Harbor in Charleston, South Carolina, when at the time it was bombarded by forces of the Confederate States of America. The artillery attack was commanded by Brig. Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard, who had been Anderson's student at West Point. The attack began April 12, 1861 and continued until Anderson, badly outnumbered and outgunned, surrendered the fort on April 14. The battle began the American Civil War. NO one was killed in the battle on either side, but one Union soldier, Daniel Hough, was killed during a 100-gun salute. Anderson's actions at Fort Sumter made him an immediate national hero. He was promoted to Brigadier General, effective May 15. Anderson took the fort's 33-star flag with him to New York City, where he participated in a Union Square patriotic rally that is thought to have been the largest public gathering in North America up to that time. Anderson then went on a highly-successful recruiting tour of the North. His next assignment placed him in another sensitive political position, commander of the Department of Kentucky (subsequently renamed the Department of the Cumberland), in a border state that had officially declared neutrality between the warring parties. An excellent Fort Sumter presentation tastefully framed with the back of the photographs showing through the reverse glass....................................$495.00

1231 - THE BEACON HOUSE, albumen by Haas & Peale on original mount 5" X 7", [overall 6" X 8"], official US Army Photographers, Charleston Campaign of 1863. A view of the former mansion on Morris Island after the struggle for Fort Wagner nearby on July 18th, 1863. It had been used a headquarters for General W.H. Davis of the 104th PA, and a signal station for General Quincy Gillmore. Photo #19 by Haas & Peale. Nice contrast, trifle mount foxing................................................$395.00

1233 - HEADQUARTERS LT. COLONEL JAMES T. HALL, 1ST NY ENGINEERS ON FOLLY ISLAND, albumen by Haas & Peale on original mount 5" X 7", [overall 6" X 8"], official US Army Photographers, Charleston Campaign of 1863. Colonel Hall's headquarters tent on Folly Island summer of 1863, palmetto palms around the tent. While serving in the X Corps, the regiment was involved in capturing several key forts in Charleston Harbor. After the failed infantry assault on Fort Wagner which included the famous charge by the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, retold in the climax of the feature film Glory, the 1st New York established watchtowers and built batteries to pummel the fort into capitulation. But in spite of a near constant bombardment, as well as an attempted amphibious assault, Union forces were unable to occupy the fort until its abandonment by Confederate forces on February 17, 1865. They also built the battery that the famous "Swamp Angel" was fired into Charleston. Fine, trifle mount tone.............................................................$295.00

1234 - RUINS OF THE CHARLESTON LIGHTHOUSE, MORRIS ISLAND, CHARLESTON HARBOR, albumen by Haas & Peale on original mount 5" X 7", [overall 6" X 8"], official US Army Photographers, Charleston Campaign of 1863. Taken after the attacks on Fort Wagner and Fort Gregg, numerous soldiers, some by pitched tents at the base of the lighthouse on Morris Island. The lighthouse being damaged by shelling as it was near Fort Wagner. Excellent contrast, trifle mount tone.................................................................$395.00

1235 - TELEGRAPH OPERATOR'S BOMBPROOF, MORRIS ISLAND 1863, albumen by Haas & Peale on original mount 5" X 7", [overall 6" X 8"], official US Army Photographers, Charleston Campaign of 1863. A great close-up of the bombproof for the Union telegraph operators on Morris Island serving as protection for them during Gillmore's bombardment of the Confederate forts on that Island and the return fire. Photo #9 by Haas & Peale. Excellent contrast, very light age tone to mount................................................................$395.00

1238 - SPLINTERPROOF, MORRIS ISLAND, SC, SUMMER OF 1863, albumen by Haas & Peale on original mount 5" X 7", [overall 6" X 8"], official US Army Photographers, Charleston Campaign of 1863. The classic "splinter proof" bomb shelter on Morris used during the attack on Fort Wagner in the summer of 1863. Barrels are used to support the roof which was planked with an earth covering. Image #32 in the Haas & Peale series. Light tone, but descent contrast. Very good.........................$275.00


12092 - MEADE'S HEADQUARTERS AT GETTYSBURG, 2 7/8" X 3.5", albumen on original mount showing Meade's Gettysburg Headquarters with dead horses in the foreground. Old ink on verso states, "On the 3rd day 16 horses belonging to General Meade's Aides were killed while hitched to trees and fences at Headquarters prior to Pickett's Charge - see dead horses in the field"...........................................................$250.00

12094 - GETTYSBURG, CONFEDERATE DEAD ON THE SOUTHWESTERN EDGE OF THE ROSE WOODS, VIEW LOOKING NORTHWESTWARD, 3" X 3.5", albumen on original mount, taken July 5-6th, 1863 by O'Sullivan. Some have their legs tied to counter the effects of rigor mortis before burial. [F-113] An extremely rare view...............................................$375.00

9262 - LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN FROM THE OUTSKIRTS OF CHATTANOOGA, Carte de Viste by Morse, photographer to the Army of the Cumberland, Nashville. A panoramic of the famous Lookout Mountain from the outskirts of Chattanooga. Very fine................................$350.00

9263 - CHATTANOOGA AS SEEN FROM THE NORTH WITH LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN IN THE DISTANCE, Carte de Viste. A far distant Lookout Mountain looms in the distance with numerous buildings in the foreground. No imprint, but most probably taken by Morse or Butler who took numerous views of Chattanooga in 1863 - 64. Very fine...........................................$350.00

9264 - CHATTANOOGA, CAMERON HILL, Carte de Viste by Butler & Bonsall & Co., photographer to General Rousseau's Division. Several buildings to the rear of the train tracks, contemporary id to the site near Chattanooga. Very fine....................................................$350.00

9266 - LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN FROM THE CAMP OF THE 51ST OVI, Carte de Viste. Numerous log cabins and other structures identified in verso as the camp of the 51st OVI looking towards Lookout Mountain. The 51st Ohio participated in most of the Tennessee Campaigns including Chickamauga and the Siege of Chattanooga and then in the Atlanta Campaign. Very fine........................................$395.00


6004 - THE JUANITA, Ossippee Class screw steam sloop, commissioned 1862, searched for the CSS Tallahassee, attacked Fort Fisher twice, captured several Confederate blockade runners (5). A 3" X 4" photo taken of the "Juanita" after the war as so noted......................................................$295.00


4213 - GENERAL GEORGE MCCLELLAN AND STAFF
, Carte de Viste by Brady of Washington, DC. A 1861 view of McClellan standing second from the left. From left to right, Henry Clarke, McClellan, Van Vliet, and William Barry. Very fine............
$250.00



4214 - SURGEON JOHN N. FREEMAN
, Carte de Viste by Lewis of NY. Waist up pose in uniform. 106th NYV, also saw service in the 5th NY and the 8th NY Heavy Artillery. Notation shows he was in Hospital #8 when this photo was taken, superb..............................................
$195.00

2234 - COLONEL URIC DAHLGREN
, Carte de Viste by Wnderoth & Taylor of Philadelphia. Bust pose in uniform facing left. Chief of Artillery at 2nd Bull Run, served at Chancellorsville & Gettysburg. Severely wounded on the retreat from Gettysburg, co-commander of the Kilpatrick- Dahlgren Raid in January 1864. Quite scarce....................................
$250.00

2235 - GENERAL CARL SCHURZ, Carte de Viste. no imprint, but from life. A rare pose in uniform of Schurz who served as ambassador to Spain. Major General of Volunteers at 2nd Bulls Run, Chancerllorsville, Gettysburg, and in the Western theater under Sherman. Very fine...............................................SOLD



121106 - LT. COLONEL JOHN A. SAWYERS
, Carte de Viste by Nolien & Van Grieken of Keokuk, Iowa. Full standing view in uniform signed on the front. Commander in the NORTHERN BORDER BRIGADE in Iowa 1963-65, defending the northern border against Indian attacks by the Sioux. Slightly tipped top corners, otherwise a crisp and sharp card. A rare Iowa image.......................................
$350.00


568 - GENERAL HENRY WARNER SLOCUM
, Carte de Viste. Waist-up pose from life in uniform. Colonel of the 27th NY, Sharpsburg, Chancellorsville. Slocum was the Senior Major General on the field at Gettysburg, later served with distinction in the Western theater. Excellent photographic image.....................................
$195.00

569 - GENERAL HENRY WARNER SLOCUM, Carte de Viste. 3/4 standing pose of Slocum in uniform, hand in his coat. Very fine and fresh card................................$200.00

570 - GENERAL JOHN NEWTON, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose in uniform facing. Fought in  Maryland Campaign and Fredericksburg. Directed the I Corps at Gettysburg after the death of Reynolds. Served with Sherman in the Atlanta Campaign of 1864. Very fine and a rare card...................................................$350.00

571 - GENERAL ROBERT ANDERSON, Carte de Viste by Appleton of New York. Waist up pose in uniform dated 1861. Blind stamped sold by Lawrence Hoseyworth - San Francisco, the hero of Fort Sumter..................................$195.00

573 - GENERAL GEORGE STONEMAN, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose facing left, 3rd Corps at Fredericksburg, Atlanta Campaign. A MINT card................................$225.00

574 - GENERAL GEORGE MEADE, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust pose in uniform, corners slightly rounded, otherwise a fresh card. Commanded the Federal forces at Gettysburg................................................$125.00

575 - GENERAL GEORGE MEADE, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Larger waist up pose in uniform, corners slightly rounded, bold large pose...............................SOLD     another, same pose, untrimmed card. His name in ink at bottom of card...................................$165.00

577 - GENERAL O.O. HOWARD, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Bust shot of Howard in uniform. A bold and sharp image of Howard. Very fine........................................$250.00

580 - GENERAL WILLIAM BUEL FRANKLIN
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Waist up pose in uniform facing to the right. Peninsular Campaign, Sharpsburg, Red River Campaign and Texas Campaign. Sharp photo.......................................
$145.00

581 - GENERAL AMBROSE BURNSIDE, Carte de Viste by Tilton of Boston. Waist up pose facing in uniform. Army of the Potomac Commander. Very fine.....................................$125.00


582 - GENERAL WILLIAM S. ROSECRANS
, Carte de Viste by Anthony. 3/4 standing pose facing to the left in uniform, wearing a top cape. Commander in KY and Tennessee. Bottom two corners rounded, image fine.......................................
$95.00

586 - GENERAL HENRY HALLECK, Carte de Viste by Anthony. 3/4 standing pose holding his hat in his hand in uniform. Served in the Mexican War, prominent in designing the California Constitution. Corinth, replaced by a subordinate US Grant. Corners very slightly trimmed..................................................$85.00

592 - GENERAL JOSEPH HOOKER, Carte de Viste. Bust left, from life in uniform, untrimmed. Becoming scarce..................................$185.00

593 - GENERAL JOSEPH HOOKER, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Photo taken by Brady and dated 1862. Seated pose from the waist up facing right...................................$185.00

598 - GENERAL GEORGE MCCALL, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Interesting pose facing the left seated. Served in Mexican War, Chickahominy, POW at the Battle of Glendale, sent to Libby Prison where he was exchanged for Confederate General S.B. Buckner. Bottom two corners slightly tipped, otherwise very fine......................................$125.00

599 - GENERAL S.P. HEINTZLEMAN, Carte de Viste by Kane of New York. Oval pose with arms crossed. A copy photo in uniform, corners rounded slightly................................$55.00

602 - GENERAL NATHANIAL BANKS, Carte de Viste by Anthony. Excellent seated pose holding sword. Choice card...................................$125.00

604 - GENERAL WILLIAM F. SMITH
, Carte de Viste by Addis of Washington, D.C. Nice bust pose facing to the left. Missionary Ridge, Fredericksburg, Cold Harbor. Nice card................
$125.00



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