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The Civil War
 Union Autographs


100815 - ADMIRAL CHARLES STEEDMAN AND COMMANDER W. D. WHITING, 8" X 14" letter dated July 24th, 1871, ordering Engineer George Hunt to report for duty. Steedman and Whiting had extensive Civil War records. Steedman captured several ships including the Ticonderoga and Whiting was a Lt.  Commander and later a Commodore. Hunt had served with Farragut at Mobile Bay on the "Metacomet." Very fine......................................$60.00

100816 - ADMIRAL CHARLES H. BELL, Navy Dept. letterhead, August 18th, 1866, appointment of Engineer George P. Hunt as 1st Asst. Engineer in the US Navy after being appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Hunt was formerly on the "Metacomet" that served at Mobile Bay wit distinction. Bell signs as Rear Admiral............................................................$65.00

100817 - ADMIRAL DANIEL AMMEN, Commanded several navy ships during the War, the SENECA in the S. Atlantic blockading squadron, engagements against Fort McAllister, Port Royal, Fort Sumter, commanded the Monitor PATAPSCO later the MOHICAN at Fort Fisher. Autograph document July 12th, 1876 as Rear Admiral assigning George Hunt on the USS Wyandotte, also signed by Commander L. Blakley Creighton. Very fine............................$60.00

100826 - LOT OF CIVIL WAR PERIOD AUTOGRAPHS POLITICIANS AND FINANCIERS, RUSSELL SAGE, (4 August 1816 - 22 July 1906) was a financier, railroad executive and Whig politician from New York, United States. As a frequent partner of Jay Gould in various transactions, he amassed a fortune. Clipped signature, Oakes Ames, (January 10, 1804 - May 8, 1873) was an American manufacturer, capitalist, and member of the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts. As a congressman, he is credited by many historians as being the single most important influence in the building of the Union Pacific portion of the transcontinental railroad. He is also noted for the subsequent scandal that alleged the improper sale of stock of the railroad's construction company. Large signature, E. D. Morgan, Edwin Denison Morgan (February 8, 1811 - February 14, 1883) was the 21st Governor of New York from 1859 to 1862 and served in the United States Senate from 1863 to 1869. He was the first and longest-serving chairman of the Republican National Committee. He was also a Union Army general during the American Civil War. Large ink signature Thomas Hart Benton (March 14, 1782 - April 10, 1858), nicknamed "Old Bullion" was a U.S. Senator from Missouri and a staunch advocate of westward expansion of the United States. He served in the Senate from 1821 to 1851, becoming the first member of that body to serve five terms. Benton was an architect and champion of westward expansion by the United States, a cause that became known as Manifest Destiny. His autograph on a portion of a free frank envelope. Jacob Sechler Coxey, Sr. sometimes known as General Coxey (April 16, 1854 - May 18, 1951) of Massillon, Ohio was an American politician, who ran for elective office several times in Ohio. Twice, in 1894 and 1914, he led "Coxey's Army", a group of unemployed men who marched to Washington, D. C. to present a "Petition in Boots" demanding that the United States Congress allocate funds to create jobs for the unemployed. Although the marches failed, Coxey's Army was an early attempt to arouse political interest in an issue that grew in importance until the Social Security Act of 1935 encouraged the establishment of state unemployment insurance programs. The lot of 5 ink signatures....................................$100.00

100828 - GENERAL JAMES A. HALL, served with distinction at Gettysburg, ALS written at Savannah, GA, February 22nd, 1864 and signed by Hall, informing the addresses that he was now in Savannah, old mount remnants on verso [removable], fine otherwise....................$70.00


GENERAL DANIEL SICKLES

8241 - DANIEL EDGAR SICKLES, (October 20, 1819 - May 3, 1914) was a colorful and controversial American politician, Union general in the American Civil War, and diplomat. Harper's Weekly described him as "loved more sincerely, and hated more heartily, than any man of his day." As an antebellum New York politician, Sickles was involved in a number of public scandals, most notably the killing of his wife's lover, Philip Barton Key II, son of Francis Scott Key. He was acquitted with the first use of temporary insanity as a legal defense in U.S. History. He became one of the most prominent political generals of the Civil War. At the Battle of Gettysburg, he insubordinately moved his III Corps to a position in which it was virtually destroyed, an action that continues to generate controversy; despite this, he would eventually be awarded the Medal of Honor in 1897. His combat career ended at Gettysburg when his leg was struck by cannon fire. After the war, Sickles commanded military districts during Reconstruction, served as U.S. Minister to Spain, and eventually returned to the U.S. Congress, where he made important legislative contributions to the preservation of the Gettysburg Battlefield. [a] A check written entirely in his hand and signed by him....................................................$125.00  [b] His clipped signature in ink from a check, bold....................................................$85.00

8220 - U.S. GRANT AS PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, 14" X 18", pre-printed and filled in Presidential appointment dated January 26th, 1872 for George A. Barksdale to be the Vice Consul of the Argentine Republic at Richmond, VA., signed by Hamilton Fish as Secretary of State and U.S. Grant as President in lavender ink. Large paper seal with eagle with spread wings attached to the left. Good signatures, some paper restoration to the verso, light stain at left margin that could be framed out [edges cropped out in scan, document has wide margins]....................................................................SOLD

8133 - AUTOGRAPHED CHECK WRITTEN AND SIGNED FOR BY WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, a colorful check drawn on the Riggs Bank of Washington with an imprinted revenue stamp, 1882, bold manuscript and signature of Sherman famous for his "March through Georgia and the Carolina." Very fine............................................$450.00




7054 - GENERAL WILLIAM T. SHERMAN
, ALS by Sherman, March 21st, 1877 to the Secretary of the Navy R. W. Thompson on Headquarters Army of the United States stationary, 1 page, Sherman sends this letter of introduction for Commodore T. H. Stevens who he states he has been professionally and socially associated with over the past 30 years. Very fine......................................................................
SOLD

52812 - U.S. GRANT, Commander in Chief of the Union armies, 18th President of the United States, a large and bold signature on a white calling card in bold ink, card is choice with no mounting stains, getting quite scarce...........................................SOLD

12125 - GENERAL JOHN SCHOFIELD, USA, On April 17, 1863, he took command of the 3rd Division in the XIV Corps of the Army of the Cumberland. He returned to Missouri as commander of the Department of Missouri in 1863. His command in Missouri was marred by controversy, with pro-Union Missourians sending a delegation to Washington DC to plead with President Lincoln to dismiss Schofield--for sympathizing with pro-Confederate Bushwhacker para-military marauders who were attacking loyal Union citizens. In 1864, as commander of the Army of the Ohio, he took part in the Atlanta Campaign under Major General William T. Sherman. Sherman, after the fall of Atlanta, took the majority of his forces on a March to the Sea through Georgia. Schofield's Army of the Ohio was detached to join Major General George H. Thomas in Tennessee. Confederate General John Bell Hood invaded Tennessee, and on November 30, Hood managed to attack Schofield's Army of the Ohio in the Battle of Franklin. Schofield successfully fought off Hood and joined his forces with Thomas. On December 15, and December 16, Schofield took part in Thomas's crowning victory at the battle of Nashville. However, during the buildup towards the battle, Schofield intrigued against Thomas, feeding Grant false information, in order to try to succeed his senior in command. For his services at Franklin, he was awarded the rank of brigadier general in the regular army on November 30, 1864, and the brevet rank of major general on march 13, 1865. Ordered to operate with Sherman in North Carolina, Schofield moved his corps by rail and sea to Fort Fisher, North Carolina, in 17 days, occupied Wilmington on February 22, 1865, fought the action at Kinston on March 10, and on March 23, joined Sherman at Goldsboro. Headquarters First Military District, April 25th, 1863, State of Virginia, 8" X 10" partially printed appointment signed by Schofield for the commissioner of revenue. Very fine.........................................................................SOLD

12128 - GENERAL HENRY EUGENE DAVIES, USA, Henry Eugene Davies (July 2, 1836 - September 7, 1894) was an American soldier, writer, public official and lawyer. He served in the Union Army as a brigadier general of volunteers in cavalry service during the American Civil War ("Civil War") and was promoted to the grade of major general of volunteers at the end of the war. Davies was one of the few nonprofessional soldiers in the Union cavalry in the East to be promoted to the grade of general. He led his brigade in several major battles, especially during the Overland Campaign, the Battle of Trevilian Station, the Siege of Petersburg and the Appomattox Campaign at the end of the war. His signature in ink, uncommon...........................................................$49.00

121210 - GENERAL A. J. SMITH, USA, Andrew Jackson Smith (April 28, 1815 - January 30, 1897) was a United States Army general during the American Civil War, rising to the command of a corps. He was most noted for his victory over Confederate General Stephen D. Lee at the Battle of Tupelo, Mississippi, on July 14, 1864 in which General S. D. Lee was in command of the Confederate army. His ink signature as postmaster of St. Louis, quite bold.................................................................$49.00

121211 - GENERAL GEORGE GETTY, after subsequent engineering duty and command of a diversion to the South Anna River during the Gettysburg Campaign, Getty served as acting Inspector General of the Army of the Potomac in early 1864. He was assigned to command 2nd Division, VI Corps. He was wounded in the Battle of the Wilderness, but recovered to lead his troops during the lengthy Siege of Petersburg, and later in Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign. Getty became acting commander of VI Corps when Brig. Gen. James B. Ricketts was wounded leading the corps at the Battle of Cedar Creek. On December 12, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln nominated Getty for appointment to the brevet grade of Major General of volunteers, to rank from August 1, 1864, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on February 14, 1865. Getty's division, including the famed Vermont Brigade, made the initial breakthrough at Petersburg on April 2, 1865, and took part in the final campaign of the Army of the Potomac, which concluded in the surrender of Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House. His ink signature on a card, very fine.........................................$75.00

121213 - GENERAL ALFRED TERRY, USA, Terry served in several areas, the Siege of Charleston, New Market, Fort Fisher, Petersburg. Terry was the commander of the U.S. Army column marching westward into the Montana Territory during what is now popularly known as the Centennial Campaign in 1876-77. Two other columns marched toward the same objective area (George Crook's from the south and John Gibbon's from the west). A column of troops under his command arrived shortly after the Battle of Little Big Horn and discovered the bodies of Custer's men. In October 1877, he went to Canada to negotiate with Sitting Bull. He was still in command in Montana during the Nez Perce War and sent reinforcements to intercept Chief Joseph. His signature in ink as Bvt., Maj., General, scarce...............................................$85.00

121215 - GENERAL FRANK BLAIR, USA, In Missouri, Blair commanded a brigade consisting of the 13th Illinois Infantry, the 29th, 30th, 31st, and 32nd Missouri Infantry, the 58th Ohio Infantry, 4th Company, Ohio Light Artillery, and Company C, 10th Missouri Cavalry. Blair subsequently commanded a division in the Vicksburg campaign and in the fighting about Chattanooga, and was one of William T. Sherman's corps commanders in the final campaigns in Georgia and the Carolinas. His XVII Corps was engaged protecting the rear areas of Sherman's army until later in the Atlanta Campaign. Before it left on the March to the Sea, XVII Corps absorbed part of the detachment of XVI Corps that had served with Sherman. A large ink signature as Major General, very fine...................................................SOLD

121216 - GENERAL CHARLES GRIFFIN, USA, Assigned command of a division in the V Corps, he served at the Battle of Fredericksburg and during the Chancellorsville Campaign. Stricken with illness, he turned over command of the division to a subordinate and did not accompany it during the early part of the Gettysburg Campaign. Arriving as the Battle of Gettysburg was winding down, his return was widely celebrated by his men. The popular officer led the division throughout the year, including during the Mine Run Campaign. Griffin participated in most of the major battles of the Army of the Potomac in 1864, including the Overland Campaign and Siege of Petersburg. Griffin was promoted to brevet major general in the regular army on March 13, 1865 for his service at the Battle of Five Forks, and to major general of volunteers on April 2, 1865. He assumed command of V Corps during its final campaign and was present when Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House. His ink signature, very fine........................................................$55.00

121217 - GENERAL WILLIAM T. BARRY, as the Army of the Potomac and during the Peninsula Campaign, later took part in the battles of Yorktown, Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, White Oak Swamp, and Malvern Hill. After later supervising forts and ordnance surrounding Washington, DC. Barry became chief of artillery under Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, serving with him in Tennessee, the March to the Sea, and on January 23, 1865, President Lincoln nominated Barry for appointment to the brevet grade of major general of volunteers, to rank from September 1, 1864, for his service in the Atlanta Campaign, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on February 14, 1865. A large ink signature of Barry as Brig. General, Chief of Artillery, very nice.....................................................$60.00

121218 - GENERAL WILLIAM T. BARRY, Army of the Potomac and during the Peninsula Campaign, later took part in the battles of Yorktown, Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill, White Oak Swamp, and Malvern Hill. After later supervising forts and ordnance surrounding Washington, DC. Barry became chief of artillery under Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, serving with him in Tennessee, the March to the Sea, and the Carolinas, chief of artillery under Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan. Barry organized ordnance for the campaign. On January 23, 1865, President Lincoln nominated Barry for appointment to the brevet grade of major general of volunteers, to rank from September 1, 1864, for his service in the Atlanta Campaign, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the appointment on February 14, 1865. ALS, October 20th, 1871, stationary of Headquarters Artillery School, Fort Monroe, VA. 3 plus pages in ink signed by Barry General H. A. Abbot in regarding to meeting him in New York, very fine............................................$95.00

121220 - GENERAL E. O. ORD, USA, Edward Otho Cresap Ord (October 18, 1818 - July 22, 1883) was an American engineer and United States Army officer who saw action in the Seminole War, the Indian Wars, and the American Civil War. He commanded an army during the final days of the Civil War, and was instrumental in forcing the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. He also designed Fort Sam Houston. He died in Havana, Cuba of Yellow fever. Headquarters Department of California stationary, San Francisco, CA, August 29th, 1871, 3 page ALS by Ord regarding the serviceability of an officer that has syphilis. Very fine...................................................................$95.00


Civil War Federal

10110 - GENERAL WILLIAM B. HAZEN, Distinguished at Stones River, fought at Perryville, Chattanooga, Chickamauga, Atlanta Campaign, capture of Ft. McAllister, later Colonel of Buffalo Troops. Post war letter on Office of the Chief Signal Officer to an editor of a newspaper, ALS by Hazen to an editor of a newspaper. Fine..................................$95.00

10111 - GENERAL JOHN LOGAN, Known as Blackjack Logan, Battle of Belmont, Ft. Donelson, Corinth, Shiloh, Vicksburg, won Congressional Medal of Honor, Atlanta Campaign with Sherman, signature in ink........................................$65.00

101112 - GENERAL N. P. BANKS, Commanded the Department of the Gulf, Port Hudson Campaign, Red River Campaign in Louisiana, Governor of Massachusetts. Large signature in ink AS CM..................................................SOLD

101113 - GENERAL CHARLES JACKSON PAINE, Commanded the 2nd Louisiana Negro Regiment, Port Hudson, Drewry's Bluff, Fort Fisher. Large ink signature as CM..............$55.00

101116 - GENERAL NELSON MILES, large signature as Lt. General, Peninsular Campaign, wounded at Seven Pines, Antietam, wounded at Fredericksburg, again at Chancellorsville, Wilderness. Received Congressional Meal of Honor.....................................SOLD

101117 - GENERAL JOHN COLBURN, fought at Fair Oaks, Antietam, Fredericksburg. Recruited the 65th New York. Large signature as CM................................$49.00

101118 - GENERAL GEORGE W. MORGAN, twice wounded during the Mexican War, brevetted for bravery, commanded at Vicksburg, dissatisfied with the use of Negro troops and resigned. Large signature as CM......................................$45.00

101119 - GENERAL GREEN BERRY RAUM, Colonel of the 56th Illinois, Corinth, Vicksburg wounded at Chickamauga [Missionary Ridge], Atlanta Campaign. Large signature as CM.............................................$55.00

101120 - GENERAL RALPH P. BUCKLAND, Colonel of the 72nd Illinois, fought valiantly at Shiloh, Vicksburg Campaign later Congressman. Large signature as CM...................$49.00

101121 - GENERAL WILLIAM ANDERSON PILE, Chaplain of the 1st Missouri, Corinth, Colonel of the 33rd Missouri, Vicksburg commanded Negro regiments at Fort Blakely, Mobile Campaign. Large signature as CM...........................................$55.00

101122 - GENERAL JOHN HENRY KETCHAM, Colonel of the 150th NY, Gettysburg, Atlanta Campaign, Resaca, Battles around Atlanta, [wounded]. Wounded again at Savannah, large signature as CM, scarce.........................................$65.00

101123 - GENERAL JOHN BEATTY, Colonel of the 3rd Ohio, Perryville, Murfreesboro, [two horses killed from under him], Chickamauga, Knoxville. Large signature as CM, uncommon...........................................$65.00

101124 - GENERAL JOHN FRANKLIN FARNSWORTH, Colonel of the 8th Illinois Cavalry, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Peninsular Campaign. Large signatures as MC....................$49.00

101125 - GENERAL ABNER CLARK HARDING, Colonel of the 83rd Illinois, Fort Donelson. Saved Fort Donelson from an attack by Wheeler and Forrest. Large signature as MC, really scarce.........................................$59.00

101126 - GENERAL C. C. WASHBURN, Colonel of the 2nd Wisconsin Cavalry, Missouri and Vicksburg Campaigns. Commanded the 3rd Division of the XVI Corps. Large Signature as MC.....................................................$49.00

101127 - BVT. GENERAL CHARLES E. PHELPS, CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR, In 1861, he was commissioned a major of the Maryland Guar, and in 1862, he was raised to lieutenant colonel of the Seventh Maryland Volunteers, fighting for the Union. He became colonel in 1863. He was honorably discharged on account of wounds in 1864, and was shortly thereafter elected as congressman from the 3rd district of Maryland to the Thirty-Ninth Congress, and was reelected to the Fortieth Congress. He mustered into the Union Army on May 1, 1833 at Baltimore, Maryland. He was subsequently given commission as brevet Brigadier General, and received the Medal of Honor for valor at the Battle of Spotsylvania on May 8, 1864. While leading a charge on the "crater" at Spotsylvania, he was wounded and taken prisoner. However, he was later rescued by General Phillip Sheridan's Calvary. During the Battle of the Wilderness in 1864, his horse was killed from under him. His large signature as a CM....................................................$75.00

101128 - BVT. GENERAL W. B. STOKES, He entered the Union Army on May 15, 1862 as a major of the Tennessee Volunteers. He served as colonel of the 5th Tennessee Cavalry until he resigned on March 10, 1865. He briefly served in temporary brigade command in the Army of the Ohio between June 17, 1863 and August 6, 1863. On December 24, 1866, President Andrew Johnson nominated Stokes for the award of the honorary grade of brevet brigadier general to rank from March 13, 1865. His signature as a Tennessee Congressman in the 40th Congress, scarce............................................$40.00

101129 - BVT. GENERAL MORTON C. HUNTER, In the summer of 1862 in response to Lincoln's call for volunteers, he organized the 82nd Indiana Infantry. On August 27, 1862, he was commissioned a colonel by Governor Oliver Morton. At the battle of Chickamauga when Confederate Gen. Longstreet routed the right wing of the Army of the Cumberland, Hunter on his own initiative was the first officer to form a new position on Horseshoe Ridge that was to become the line that saved the army from destruction. His commanding officer John Connell wrote of Hunter's stubborn resistance on that ridge "which truly and most fortunately changed the fortunes of that disastrous day, and saved the army from worse than defeat." In the Battle of Missionary Ridge, Hunter's 82nd and the Ohio 99th were the first two regiments to attack Bragg's center with orders to halt after taking the Confederate line below Missionary Ridge. Not content to be subjected to murderous fire from the high ground, the attacking units charged the ridge, and Hunter's 82nd was the first of his division to gain the summit and occupy the confederate works. The initiative of his and Ohio units collapsing Bragg's center what the pivotal moment of the battle. For his gallantry that day, Hunter received the commendation of his commanders. He was later promoted to command his regiment's brigade (First Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps) under Gen. George Thomas and led his unit on Sherman's March to the Sea. At the end of the war, he received a brevet commission as a brigadier general of volunteers. His bold signature as a Congressman............................$45.00

101130 - BVT. GENERAL JAMES ROBINSON MCCORMICK, Militia General from Missouri, began war as a Surgeon in the 6th Missouri, later Brig. General of Militia. Bold signature as a Congressman in 1868..........................................$35.00

101131 - BVT. GENERAL H. D. WASHBURN, With the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted in the Union Army on August 16, 1861, serving as lieutenant colonel of the Eighteenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted to colonel of the regiment on July 15, 1862. Washburn was brevetted as a brigadier general of volunteers on December 15, 1864, and then as a major general on July 26, 1865. He mustered out August 26, 1865. Large signature as Congressman in 1868..................................................$30.00

101132 - BVT. GENERAL JOHN F. BENJAMIN, Missouri. He entered the Union Army as a private in 1861 and was subsequently promoted to the ranks of captain, major, lieutenant colonel, and brigadier general. Provost marshal of the Eighth District of Missouri in 1863 and 1864. He served as delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1864. Large signature as a Congressman in 1868............................................$25.00

101133 - BVT. GENERAL A. F. STEVENS, During the Civil War, he served two terms of duty, one with the 1st New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry, which he spent stationed at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, and another with the 13th New Hampshire Infantry and was wounded at both Drury Creek and Fort Harrison. With the 13th, he participated in the disastrous attack against Marye's Heights in the Battle of Fredericksburg. Brevetted Major General, large signature as a Congressman in 1868...........................................$35.00

101134 - BVT. GENERAL EPHRAIN K. ECKLEY, Ohio. During the Civil War, Eckley served in the Union Army as the colonel of the 26th Ohio Infantry, and later of the 18th Ohio Infantry. At the end of the war, he was brevetted as a brigadier general and mustered out of the army. Large ink signature as a Congressman in 1868...........................................$25.00

101135 - BVT. GENERAL AMASA COBB, WISCONSIN, At the outset of the Civil War in 1861, he joined the Union Army as Colonel of the 5th Wisconsin Infantry, serving in the Army of the Potomac in several campaigns and battles. Most notably, Cobb succeeded BG Winfield S. Hancock in command of a brigade in second division VI Corps at the Battle of Antietam, after Hancock was transferred to commend of first division II Corps. In the fall of 1862, he was elected to the 38th Congress from Wisconsin for a two-year term. His last action with 5th Wisconsin was the Battle of Fredericksburg. He resumed his military career on September 29, 1864, when he was named as Colonel of the newly raised 43rd Wisconsin Infantry. After arriving at Nashville, Tennessee in October, Cobb and his regiment guarded the important supply and railroad depot at Johnsonville in Benton County, Tennessee on the Tennessee River. On November 4, Cobb's men fought off an attack by John Bell Hood's Confederates led by MG Nathan Bedford Forrest in the Battle of Johnsonville. For the rest of the war, the regiment was positioned in various parts of Tennessee to guard railroads and supply routes, and Cobb briefly commanded a brigade under MG Robert H. Milroy. Cobb was brevetted as a brigadier general on March 13, 1865, shortly before the end of the war. Large signature as Congressman in 1868...............................................$35.00

101141 - THOMAS FERRY, PRESIDENT FOR A DAY, President on March 4, Congressman from Michigan. As the U. S. Constitution specifies that the President shall take the oath of office "before he enters on the execution of his office", Ferry always believed be had served for one day as President of the United States: March 4, 1877. As Ulysses Grant was no longer the President, and Hayes had not, at least in Ferry's view, assumed the office, he believed he was President. Ferry never knew, and neither did the public, that Hayes had taken the oath in a private ceremony held at the White House the day before, satisfying constitutional requirements and, for all legal purposes, becoming. Large signature as a congressman in 1868...............................................$45.00

101142 - VICE PRESIDENT SCHULYER COLFAX, Schuyler Colfax, Jr. March 23, 1823 - January 13, 1885) was a United States Representative from Indiana (1855 - 1869). Speaker of the House of Representatives (1863 - 1869), and the 17th Vice President of the United States (1869 - 1873). To date, he is one of only two Americans (John Nance Garner in the 20th Century being the other) to have served as both House speaker and vice president. President Ulysses S. Grant and Colfax, 46 and 45 respectively at the time of their inauguration, were the youngest Presidential team until the inauguration of Bill Clinton and Al Gore in 1993. Large signature as Speaker of the House......................................$45.00

101143 - FERNANDO WOOD, NEW YORK, CONFEDERATE SYMPATHIZER, A successful shipping merchant who became Grand Sachem of the political machine known as Tammany Hall, Wood first served in Congress in 1841. In 1854, he was elected Mayor of New York City. Reelected in 1860 after an electoral loss in 1857 by a narrow majority of 3,000 votes, Wood evinced support for the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War, suggesting the New York City Council that New York City secede from the Union and declare itself a free city in order to continue its profitable cotton trade with the Confederacy. Wood's Democratic machine was concerned to maintain the revenues (which depended on Southern cotton) that maintained the patronage. Large signature as Congressman in 1868............$35.00

101144 - OAKES AMES, Oakes Ames (January 10, 1804 - May 8, 1873) was an American manufacturer, capitalist, and member of the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts. As a congressman, he is credited by many historians as being the single most important influence in the building of the Union Pacific portion of the transcontinental railroad. He is also noted for the subsequent scandal that alleged the improper sale of stock of the railroad's construction company. Large signature as Congressman in 1868......................$25.00

101145 - INDIANA CIVIL WAR GOVERNOR OLIVER MORTON, Oliver Hazard Perry Throck Morton (August 4, 1823 - November 1, 1877), commonly known as Oliver P. Morton, was a U.S. Republican Party politician from Indiana. He served as the 14th Governor of Indiana during the American Civil War, and was a stalwart ally of President Abraham Lincoln. During the war, Morton suppressed the Democratic - controlled Indiana General Assembly. He exceeded his constitutional authority by calling out the militia without approval, and during the period of legislative suppression he privately financed the state government through unapproved federal and private loans. He was criticized for arresting and detaining political enemies and suspected southern sympathizers. His signature as US senator...................$35.00

101146 - J. S. COXEY, COXEY'S ARMY 1894, Born on April 16, 1854, Jacob S. Coxey - who would gain fame as the leader of "Coxey's Army," a group of unemployed men who in 1894 stage the first citizen's march on Washington - was born in Selinsgrove, PA. Coxey was a wealthy Ohio businessman and Populist Party member who grew concerned over the plight of the unemployed during a major depression that started with the Panic of 1893. Many families went hungry, and unemployed men roamed the country begging for jobs and food. Coxey advocated a national system of public roads to be financed by the federal government, arguing that the plan would reduce unemployment. When Congress refused to pass such a bill, Coxey said, "We will send a petition to Washington with boots on." In 1894, he led an "army" of 100 unemployed men, who left Massillon, Ohio, for Washington on Easter Sunday. They were met by cheering crowds in many cities along the way. By the time the marchers arrived in Washington on May 1, they numbered 500. When Coxey tried to speak at the U.S. Capitol, police arrested him for walking on the grass. His army of unemployed men dispersed. Coxey was elected mayor of Massillon in 1931 and was selected as the Farmer-Labor Party's presidential candidate the following year. He received 7,309 votes and was defeated by Franklin D. Roosevelt. He later claimed that Roosevelt's New Deal was based on his ideas of public works, proposed in the late 19th Century. Coxey died in 1951. Large signature..........................................................$20.00

101149 - ADMIRAL WINFIELD SCOTT SCHLEY, During the American Civil War was in progress. He was made master, and was assigned to the Potomac of the Western Gulf Squadron until 1862. He then served on the side-wheel gunboat Winona of that Squadron, and later on the sloops Monongahela and Richmond, and participated in all the engagements that led to the capture of Port Hudson, Louisiana, in 1863, having been promote to lieutenant on 16 July 1862. Spanish American War Admiral, large signature as Rear Admiral......................$40.00


9224 - THE OCCUPATION OF NEW ORLEANS, AUGUST 1862, Military Appointment under the authority of General George Shepley and signed by General Godfrey Weitzel as Asst. Commandant of New Orleans [also acting Mayor] for J. Elliot Smith a member of the 8th Vermont as Superintendent of the City Fire Alarm Telegraph System dated August 23rd, 1862. The New Orleans Fire Alarm Telegraph system was a telegraph system designed to pinpoint fires but with the Federal takeover of the City, the army used the existing system an expanded it to communicate military information throughout the area. Smith had been promoted to Lt. with the rank of Superintendent of Telegraph. Weitzel later commanded Union forces in the Lafourche Region and later commanded forces in Virginia and was the first commander into Richmond and made his headquarters in Jefferson Davis' home. Pre-printed on blue linen paper, very fine. An important New Orleans occupation document...............................$395.00

9227 - GENERAL GEORGE G. MEADE WAR-DATED LETTER SIGNED, 1 page octavo, Headquarters Army of the Potomac, January 9th, 1864, General Meade writes to the wife of General John C. Robinson in Washington. In part..."I take great pleasure in complying with the request contained in your letter of the 4th only today received. I trust that the enclosed letter from the PRESIDENT will assure your purposes. Very truly yours, Geor. G. Meade, Maj. Genl." Obviously Mrs. Robinson had asked Meade to ask President Lincoln for a favor and he obliged by letter. Very fine...........................................................SOLD

The following are signatures...

9230 - U.S. GRANT CABINET DURING HIS SECOND TERM, 7 MEMBERS OF HIS CABINET, Grant's two terms were riddled with 11 individual scandals which marred his Presidency with many members of his cabinet involved resulting in resignations, indictments, and one impeached by the House of Representatives. This grouping includes member of his cabinet in the 2nd term of his Presidency. All signatures are large and originated from an autograph book. They are as follows:  GENERAL AND SECRETARY OF WAR WILLIAM BELKNAP,  Union General and Secretary of War under Grant, William Worth Belknap (September 22, 1829 - October 13, 1890) was a United States Army general, government administrator, and United States Secretary of War. He was the only Cabinet secretary ever to have been impeached by the United States House of Representatives. He was impeached for his scandal involving the trading post incident at Fort Sill, signature as Secretary of War under Grant, POSTMASTER GENERAL MARSHALL JEWELL, Governor of Connecticut, he was first appointed by President Ulysses S. Grant as Minister to Russia from 1873 to 1874, but after only seven months in St. Petersburg, he left. Jewell then served as the Postmaster General between 1874 and 1876. He was also a presidential candidate at the 1876 Republican National Committee from 1880 until 1883, SECRETARY OF THE NAVY GEORGE ROBESON, US General during the Civil War, Robeson was appointed Secretary of Navy by President Ulysses S. Grant, replacing Adolph E. Borie who served only a few months. He held the position until the end of Grant's second term, serving from June 26, 1869 until March 4, 1877. Robeson, while Secretary of Navy, allegedly took $320,000 in bribes from a grain company to pay for a new vacation home. Robeson was also alleged by a House committee to have squandered $15,000,000 of missing Naval construction funds to purchase real estate in Washington D.C. Robeson was so adept at hiding his financial tracks that he was known as "the cuttle fish" of the Navy. SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR COLUMBUS DELANO, Delano resigned because of evidence that his son, John Delano, had been given partnerships in surveying contracts over which the Interior Department had control. In addition, Delano had taken bribes in order to secure fraudulent land grants. SECRETARY OF STATE HAMILTON FISH, Hamilton Fish (August 3, 1808 - September 7, 1893) was an American statesman who served as the 16th Governor of New York, United States Senator and United States Secretary of State. Fish has been considered one of the best Secretary of States in the United States history; known for his judiciousness and reform efforts during the Grant Administration. [1] Sec. Fish skillfully settled the controversial Alabama Claims with Great Britain through his development of the concept of international arbitration. [1] Sec. Fish kept the United States out of war with Spain over Cuban independence by coolly handling the volatile Virginius Incident. In 1875, Sec. Fish initiated the process for Hawaiian statehood, by having negotiated a reciprocal trade treaty for he island nation's abundant sugar supply. [1] President Grant stated that Hamilton Fish, above all, was the person whom he most trusted for political advice. ATTORNEY GENERAL EDWARDS PIERREPOINT, President Ulysses S. Grant appointe Pierrepoint Attorney General of the United States on April 26, 1875. He was an active member of the "Committee of Seventy." On May 22, 1876, he became Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States to Britain, serving until December 1, 1877. Pierrepoint died in New York City two days after his 75th birthday on March 6, 1892, where he had lived after his return from England, SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY BENJAMIN BRISTOW, Benjamin Helm Bristow (June 20, 1832 - June 22, 1896) was an American lawyer and Republican Party politician who served as the first Solicitor General of the United States and as a U.S. Treasury Secretary. Fighting for the Union, Bristow served in the army during the American Civil War and was promoted to Colonel. As America's first Solicitor General, appointed by President Ulysses S. Grant. Bristow forcefully prosecuted the Ku Klux Klan and enforced African American citizenship rights given after the Civil War. Upon his appointment as Secretary of Treasury by President Grant, Bristow prosecuted and shut down the Whiskey Ring; a bribery conspiracy by liquor distillers and government agents to defraud the Treasury millions of dollars each year. In 1876, Bristow ran for President, however, he was unsuccessful at gaining the Republican nomination that went to Rutherford B. Hayes. The collection of seven, all bold ink signatures in ink...................................................$275.00

9231 - JOHN SHERMAN, John Sherman, nicknamed "The Ohio Icicle" (May 10, 1823 - October 22, 1900), was a U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator from Ohio during the Civil War and into the late nineteenth century. He served as both Secretary of the Treasury and Secretary of State and was the principal author of the Sherman Antitrust Act. His older brothers were Charles Taylor Sherman, a federal judge in Ohio, and General William Tecumseh Sherman of Civil War fame. His younger brother was banker Hoyt Sherman. Clipped ink signature, John Sherman, Secretary.................................................$35.00

9232 - GENERAL SAMUEL CRAWFORD, Surgeon and Union General, forced to command artillery batteries at Fort Sumter, led a charge at Gettysburg, wounded at Weldon Railroad. War dated clipped ink signature with rank, some glue bleed but a very bold signature. Scarce.............................................................$100.00

9234 - GENERAL JOSEPH HOOKER, Commanding Army of the Potomac, suffered a disastrous defeat at Chancellorsville, nice ink clip as Major General. Choice condition and becoming scarce........................................SOLD

9236 - GENERAL WILLIAM ROSECRANS, William Starke Rosecrans (September 6, 1819 - March 11, 1898) was an inventor, coal-oil company executive, diplomat, politician, and United States Army officer. He gained fame for his role as a Union general during the American Civil War. He was the victor at prominent Western Theater battles, but his military career was effectively ended following his disastrous defeat at the Battle of Chickamauga in 1863. Large clipped signature as Major General......................$100.00

9239 - COMMANDER GEORGE MORRIS, Lieutenant Morris was assigned to USS Cumberland during 1861-62, and was her acting commanding officer when she was lost in a heroically-fought action with CSS Virginia on 8 March 1862. Promoted to Lieutenant Commander in July 1862, Morris was Commanding Officer of the gunboats Port Royal and Shawmut during the next three years. He was Executive Officer of USS Brooklyn in 1865-66 and achieved the rank of Commander in July of the latter year. Nice ink signature as Lt. Commander, USN. Scarce..................................................$125.00

9240 - REAR ADMIRAL JOHN L. WORDEN, Commanded the ironclad Monitor against the Virginia at Hampton Roads and was wounded, later commanded the Montauk and sunk the Confederate blockade runner Nashville. Large ink signature as Captain US Navy. A very desirable signature..........................................$150.00

9242 - ADMIRAL RICHMOND P. HOBSON, MEDAL OF HONOR WINNER, Richmond Pearson Hobson (August 17, 1870 - March 16, 1937) was a United States Navy Rear Admiral who served from 1907 - 1915 as a U.S. Representative from Alabama. A veteran of the Spanish -American War. He received the Medal of Honor years later for his part in that conflict. Large signature from an autograph book.................................................................$45.00


9243 - JOSEPH JEFFERSON, 19TH CENTURY ACTOR
, Joseph Jefferson, commonly known as Joe Jefferson (February 20, 1829 - April 23, 1905), was an American actor. He was the third actor of this name in a family of actors and managers, and one of the most famous of all American comedians. Large clipped signature from an autograph page........................................
$25.00


71145 - MAJOR GENERAL JOE HOOKER SIGNS HIS PAY VOUCHER TWICE THAT INCLUDED THREE BLACK SERVANTS LISTED BY NAME IN JANUARY 1864 RIGHT AFTER HIS HEROIC ACTIONS AT LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN, 11" X 16" pre-printed and filled in pay voucher signed twice by Hooker as Major General January 4th, 1864 for the sum for $450.70 detailing his pay for the month of December 1863 for him a four servants. Three are listed as black - Peter, William, and Kate [Kate being a mulatto]. Another servant is listed as "James" with a complexion notation of "blond" with sandy hair and light eyes - appears to be a white servant. Hooker at this time was in Chattanooga after his recent victory at that battle. [Lookout Mountain]. With the Union defeat at Chickamauga, he was given charge of the Army of the Potomac's 11th and 12th Corps and sent to the relief of the Army of the Cumberland at Chattanooga. In the battles around that place in November 1863 he did well in keeping open the supply lines and in the taking of Lookout Mountain. However, in Grant's report his actions were overshadowed by the less distinguished role of Sherman. The next spring the two corps was merged into the new 20th Corps with Hooker at their head. He fought through the Atlanta Campaign but when McPherson was killed before the city and Howard received command of the Army of the Tennessee, he asked to be relieved. This was granted and he finished the war in the quiet sector of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. Choice condition with two War dated signatures of Hooker.......................................SOLD


2203 - GENERAL WILLIAM HAYS
, Nice large clipped signature in ink as Brig. General Volunteers, fought at Antietam, Seven Pines, Fredericksburg, wounded and a POW Chancellorsville, Gettysburg......................................
$75.00




2204 - GENERAL ANDREW JACKSON LIGHTBURN
, Clipped signature in ink as Brig. General US Vols., fought at Vicksburg, Jackson, Missionary Ridge, Atlanta Campaign [wounded]......................................................
$65.00




2205 - GENERAL JULIUS STAHEL
, Large clip signature as Brig. General, 1st and 2nd Bulls Run, New Market, Piedmont, Medal of Honor winner, nice bold signature........................
$95.00


2207 - GENERAL MAX WEBER, Ink clipped signature as Brig. General. Raised a German Regiment [Turner Rifles 20th NY], Fort Hatteras, Peninsula Campaign, wounded at Antietam, Harpers Ferry. Very uncommon.........................................
$85.00


2208 - GENERAL WALTER WHITAKER
, Nice ink signature as Brig. General, commanded the 6th Kentucky, wounded at Stones River, wounded at Chickamauga, wounded at Resaca, GA, wounded at the 3rd Battle of Chattanooga. Also fought at Franklin and Nashville, scarce...................................................
$75.00


122138 - GENERAL JOSEPH R. HAWLEY, USA, ink signature on a card, 1.75" X 3", "Jos R. Hawley, Conn." Bold signature was the 42nd Governor of Connecticut, a U.S. politician in the Republican and Free Soil parties, a Civil War general, and a journalist and newspaper editor. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives and was a four-term U.S. Senator. He assisted Col. Alfred H. Terry in raising the 7th Connecticut Infantry, a three-year regiment, and was named as lieutenant colonel. He participated in the Port Royal Expedition in November, and commanded the forces assigned to garrison two captured forts. He was a part of the four-month siege that culminated in the capture of Fort Pulaski in April 1862. Again, he commanded the garrison force. With Colonel Terry's promotion to brigade command, Hawley succeeded him as commander of the 10th Connecticut, leading the regiment in the battles of James Island and Pocotaligo. He was in Brannan's expedition to Florida in January 1863, and commanded the post at Ferandina, near Jacksonville. In April, he participated in an unsuccessful expedition to capture Charleston, South Carolina. In the summer, he commanded a brigade on Morris Island during the siege of Charleston, and was involved in the attacks on Fort Wagner in September. During the autumn, he procured enough Spencer breech-loading rifles to outfit his regiment with the rapid-fire weapon. The following year, Hawley commanded a brigade under General Truman Seymour in the Battle of Olustee in Florida. He and his men were reassigned to the front lines in Virginia as a part of Terry's Division, X Corps, Army of the James. He was in the battles of Drewry's Bluff, Deep Run, Derbytown Road, and other actions near Bermuda Hundred and Deep Bottom. With openings created by Battlefield losses and reassignments, Hawley commanded a division during the Siege of Petersburg and was promoted in September 1864 to brigadier general of volunteers. In January 1865, Hawley succeeded his mentor Alfred Terry as divisional commander when Terry was sent to command troops in the attacks on Fort Fisher. Hawley later joined him in NOrth Carolina as Chief of Staff for the X Corps. After the capture of Wilmington, North Carolina, Hawley took over command of the forces in southeastern North Carolina. In June, following the surrender of the Confederate armies, Hawley rejoined Terry and served as Chief of Staff for the Department of Virginia, serving until October when he returned home to Connecticut.......................................$39.00

122139 - GENERAL ETHAN ALLEN HITCHCOCK, USA, ink signature on a card 1.75" X 3", signed as "Secretary of the Interior", dated April 1900. After the start of the Civil War, Hitchcock applied to return to the service, but was rejected. It was only after the intervention of his former general, Winfield Scott, that he was commissioned a major general in the U.S. Army and became special adviser to the Secretary of War from February 17, 1862. From March 17 to July 23, 1862, he served as the chairman of the War Board, the organization that assisted President Abraham Lincoln and Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton in the management of the War Department and the command of the Union armies during the period in which there was no general-in-chief. (Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan had been relieved of his responsibilities as general-in-chief and Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck had not yet replaced him.) He sat on the court-martial of Maj. Gen. Fitz John Porter which convicted the general of disobedience and cowardice..........................$29.00


662 - GENERAL WILLIAM WELLS, WINNER OF THE CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR, 1st Vermont Cavalry, as a Major at Gettysburg. He led a charge of the 1st Vermont Cavalry when General Farnsworth was killed at both Round Tops. As a Major of the 1st Vermont Cavalry, he won the Medal of Honor, later Brig. General. A nice check signed all in his hand, post-war. Very fine....................................................$100.00

664 - GENERAL LORENZO THOMAS, Brig. General. Organized many Colored Regiments in the Department of Mississippi and Dept. of the Gulf that were important to fortifying the white units in those districts. His signature on an 1851 printed general order as Asst. Adj. General of the United States.....................................$85.00

666 - GENERAL RICHARD OGLESBY, (1824-99). Union Major General - Illinois; Civil War Governor of Illinois (1864-69). Oglesby led the 8th Illinois Infantry at Forts Henry and Donelson. Was severely wounded at Corinth and commanded a division in the 16th Corps before resignation and a successful Illinois gubernatorial bid. Closing and signature, "Respectfully yours, R.J. Oglesby......................................$55.00

668 -  GENERAL ALEXANDER P. WEBB, Union Brigadier General. Won Medal of Honor at Gettysburg where he was severely wounded. Short note from him signed in 1866. Scarce, very fine......................................$175.00

670 - GENERAL WILLIAM ROSECRANS, Tennessee Campaigns and Corinth. Nice ink clip as Major General.......................................$100.00

671 - GENERAL JOHN GEARY, Wounded at Cedar Mountain, Gettysburg, and Chancellors Ville Campaign. Nice ink clip.....................................$95.00


12124 - GENERAL GEORGE W. CULLUM, USA, from April 1861, Cullum was a lieutenant colonel and aide-de-camp to General Winfield Scott, before becoming chief engineer of the Department of the Missouri in November 1861. He was appointed brigadier general of volunteers to rank from November 1, 1862 on November 10, 1862 but President Lincoln had to submit the nomination four times before the U.S. Senate finally confirmed it on March 11, 1863. He later superintended engineering works on the Western rivers and was chief engineer at the Siege of Corinth. He was superintendent of the military academy from 1864 to 1866. On March 8, 1866, President Andrew Johnson nominated Cullum to be appointed to the grade of brevet major general, USA, to rank from March 1866, and the U.S. Senate confirmed the award on May 4, 1866 and reconfirmed it July 14, 1866 after the dates of rank of staff officers were adjusted to follow those of field officers. He was mustered out of the volunteers on September 1, 1866. A short ALS dated July 27th, 1858 in regard to a dinner engagement on his embossed stationary, fine..............................................................SOLD

12127 - GENERAL WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, Sherman served under General Ulysses S. Grant in 1862 and 1863 during the campaigns that led to the fall of the Confederate stronghold of Vicksburg on the Mississippi River and culminated with the routing of the Confederate armies in the state of Tennessee. In 1864, Sherman succeeded Grant as the Union commander in the western theater of the war. He proceeded to lead his troops to the capture of the city of Atlanta, a military success that contributed to the re-election of President Abraham Lincoln. Sherman's subsequent march through Georgia and the Carolinas further undermined the Confederacy's ability to continue fighting. He accepted the surrender of all the Confederate armies in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida in April 1865. His bold ink signature dated 1889 on the verso of his printed calling card. Very fine......................................................SOLD

12129 - SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War under Lincoln. Cameron gave his support to Abraham Lincoln, and became his Secretary of War. He only served a year before resigning amidst corruption. Cameron became the minister to Russia during the Civil War, but was overseas for less than a year. He again served in the Senate, eventually being succeeded by his son, J. Donald Cameron, and only resigned from the Senate upon confirmation that his son would succeed him. His signature in lavender ink on his calling card, war period, scarce.........................................SOLD

101114 - GENERAL GRENVILLE DODGE, Iowa, Pea Ridge, wounded at Atlanta, fought guerillas and Indians in Kansas. Large ink signature as CM, scarce.................................SOLD

101115 - GENERAL O. O. HOWARD, large signature as Brig. General, 1st Manassas, lost an arm at Seven Pines, 2nd Manassas, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Atlanta Campaign, scarce...................................SOLD

101147 - SIX OF THE SEVEN MEMBERS OF THE IMPEACHMENT COMMITTEE THAT VOTED TO IMPEACH ANDREW JOHNSON, On February 24, 1868, three days after Johnson's dismissal of Stanton, the House of Representatives voted 126 to 47 in favor of a resolution to impeach the President of high crimes and misdemeanors. The two sponsors of the resolution, Thaddeus Stevens and John A. Bingham were immediately dispatched to inform the Senate that the House had officially voted for impeachment. Johnson Impeachment Committee from a photograph by Mathew Brady in the Signal Corps, War Department, Washington. Left to right, Seated: Benjamin F. Butler, Thaddeus Stevens, Thomas Williams, John A. Bingham. Standing:  James F. Wilson, George S. Boutwell and John A Logan. Large signatures of all the above but Bingham. These signatures originated from an autograph book signed during the impeachment year 1868.............................SOLD

101148 - ADMIRAL GEORGE DEWEY, George Dewey (December 26, 1837 - January 16, 1917) was an admiral of the United States Navy. He is best known for his victory at the Battle of Manila Bay during the Spanish-American War. He was also the only person in the history of the United States to have attained the rank of Admiral of the Navy, the most senior rank in the United States Navy. A nice ink signature on a card dated 1902. Very fine.......................SOLD

9225 - GENERAL GEORGE MCCLELLAN, ALS TO GENERAL JOHN ROBINSON, As Governor of New Jersey, dated at Trenton, NJ, August 9th, 1878. One page in ink, McClellan regrets that he will be unable to attend a GAR reunion and hopes that the reunion will be a success. Robinson is noted as Commander in Chief GAR. Written on executive stationary. Very fine...................................SOLD


9226 - BENJAMIN HARRISON
, Typed letter signed by Harrison, 8" X 10" dated July 7th, 1888 addressed to General John C. Robinson. He regrets that he will not be able to attend the Army of the Potomac Reunion at Gettysburg as he was pressed with duties and was just getting the chance to thank for the invitation. Harrison was involved in the early stages of the Campaign for President in 1888 in which he defeated Grover Cleveland. Thus this letter is written as candidate in mid 1888. Very fine......................................................
SOLD

9228 - GENERAL U.S. GRANT DESIRES GENERAL JOHN C. ROBINSON TO ACCOMPANY HIM TO FORTRESS MONROE BUT STATES THAT PERMISSION FROM GENERAL MEADE IS NECESSARY, 3.5" X 5.0". ANS by General Grant as Lt. General along with the telegram dated March 30th, 1864 on United States Military Telegraph form stating that General Meade has approved of General Robinson accompanying Grant to Fortress Monroe. 2 items with the telegram dating Grant's note to March 28 or 29th, 1864. Grant writes General Robinson, "I will be very glad of the company of General Robinson on the trip to Fortress Monroe. General Meade's authorization will be required however. An extra train leaves here at 8 AM tomorrow. U.S. Grant Lt. Gen." The telegram authorizing Robinson's permission to accompany Grant states "Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, March 30th, 1864 to General Jno. C. Robinson...the commanding Genl. has no objections to you accompanying Lt. General Grant to Fort Monroe. S. Williams AAG. Lincoln appointed Grant General-in-Chief of the Union Army in March 1864. Newly appointed Lt. General, this trip mentioned is Grant's first initial trip from Washington to Fort Monroe where the Army of the Potomac had been moved. There Grant met Butler for the first time and prepared his army for the move south where he would soon fight Lee at the Wilderness. 2 items, telegram and ANS by Grant soon after becoming Commander in Chief. Very fine....................................SOLD

9229 - GENERAL AND PRESIDENT U.S. GRANT, Lt. General US Army, Commander and Chief of the Federal Army, 18th President of the United States. A very large ink signature of Grant in dark black ink on a partial autograph page, signature is 3", exceptionally nice...........................SOLD

9235 - GEORGE H. THOMAS, His stout defense at the Battle of Chickamauga in 1863 saved the Union Army from being completely routed, earning him his most famous nickname, the "Rock of Chickamauga." He followed soon after with a dramatic breakthrough on Missionary Ridge in the Battle of Chattanooga. In the Franklin-Nashville Campaign of 1864, he achieved one of the most decisive victories of the war, destroying the army of Confederate General John Bell Hood, at the Battle of Nashville. Large ink signature as Major General USA, bold signature......................................................SOLD

9237 - GENERAL ROBERT ANDERSON, The hero of Fort Sumter in April 1861, later commanded in Kentucky, ink signature as Brig. General, USS. Scarce.....................................................................SOLD

9238 - GENERAL JUDSON KILPATRICK, was an officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War, achieving the rank of brevet major general. He was later the United States Minister to Chile, and a failed political candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives. Known as "Kilcavalry" (or "Kill-Cavalry") for using tactics in battle that were considered as a reckless disregard for lives of soldiers under his command, whose homes and towns he devastated, dark ink signature as Brig. General, some old glue bleed but strong signature........................................................................SOLD

9241 - GENERAL PHILIP KEARNEY, Philip Kearny, Jr. (June 2, 1815 - September 1, 1862) was a United States Army officer, notable or his leadership in the Mexican-American War and American Civil War. He was killed in action in the 1862 Battle of Chantilly. Clipped signature in ink, signed just Kearney. Very rare, lists for $250 in Sanders................................................................SOLD

71146 - GENERAL WILLIAM T. SHERMAN WRITES ON THE DEATH OF GENERAL JOHN A. LOGAN, 5th Avenue Hotel, NY, December 28th, 1886. A two page ALS in ink by William T. Sherman to a friend "Haren" on the death of General John A. Logan just two days prior. Sherman relates to his friend Haren, "Logan's death was very much more sudden than I apprehended. He used to be troubled with his throat with too much speaking in the open air. At first he was angry with me about putting Howard over him [O. O. Howard] but of late he toned down very much and was most friendly to me especially the last few years. I feel very deeply for the family bereaved, I know they enlisted strong hopes he would become President...W. T. Sherman. John Alexander Logan (February 9, 1826 - December 26, 1886) was an American soldier and political leader. He served in the Mexican-American War and was a General in the Union Army in the American Civil War. He served the state of Illinois as a State Senator, Congressman and Senator and was an unsuccessful candidate for Vice President of the United States with James G. Blaine in the election of 1884. He is regarded as the founder of Memorial Day. 

Sherman is commenting on his placing O. O. Howard ahead of Logan commanding the Army of the Tennessee upon McPherson's death at Atlanta in 1864. Logan has just ran as a Vice President candidate with James Blaine in 1884 and was defeated. Logan had just died unexpectedly on December 26th. Letter is accompanied by two engraving CDV's, one of Logan and one of Sherman. Three items, an excellent Sherman letter with excellent content, very fine...................................................................SOLD

122136 - GENERAL WINFIELD SCOTT HANCOCK, ALS by Hancock, one page in ink, Governor's Isle, NY, April 10th, 1865 thanking a Congressman for a copy of the Congressional Record that a speech given in Congress on "American Citizenship" was given. Hancock served with distinction in the Army for four decades, including service in the Mexican-American War and as a Union general in the American Civil War. Known to his Army colleagues as "Hancock the Superb", he was noted in particular for his personal leadership at the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. One military historian wrote, "No other Union general at Gettysburg dominated men by the sheer force of their presence more completely than Hancock." As another wrote, "...his tactical skill had won him the quick admiration of adversaries who had come to know him as the 'Thunderbolt of the Army of the Potomac'." His military service continued after the Civil War, as Hancock participated in the military Reconstruction of the South and the Army's presence at the Western frontier. Framed with a copy photograph of Hancock in uniform. Overall 14" X 16", very fine. Gettysburg Hero....................................................SOLD

122137 - GENERAL WINFIELD SCOTT HANCOCK, DS by Hancock from New York City, January 4th, 1869. One page in ink to Horatio King acknowledging receipt of the notice for a meeting to be held at Delmonico's in New York, framed with engraving of Hancock, overall 16" X 22", very fine. Hancock served with distinction in the Army for four decades, including service in the Mexican-American War and as a Union general in the American Civil War. Known to his Army colleagues as "Hancock the Superb", he was noted in particular for his personal leadership at the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. One military historian wrote, "No other Union general at Gettysburg dominated men by the sheer force of their presence more completely than Hancock." As another wrote, "...his tactical skill had won him the quick admiration of adversaries who had come to know him as the 'Thunderbolt of the Army of the Potomac'." His military service continued after the Civil War, as Hancock participated in the military Reconstruction of the South and the Army's presence at the Western frontier. Gettysburg Hero................................................SOLD

9233 - GENERAL HENRY HUNT, Chief of Artillery in the Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War. Considered by his contemporaries the greatest artillery tactician and strategist of the war, he was a master of the science of gunnery and rewrote the manual on the organization and use of artillery in early modern armies. His courage and tactics affected the outcome of some of the most significant battles in the war. His greatest achievement was his skill at Gettysburg. Large ink clip with rank, Commanding Artillery, Army of the Potomac. Scarce.............................SOLD


2206 - GENERAL ALFRED ELLET
, Nice ink signature as Brig. General commanding the M.M. Brigade [Mississippi Marine Brigade], fought at Pea Ridge, converted steamers to rams, Battle of Memphis, Vicksburg. A very scarce signature war date as Marine Commander.........................................................
SOLD



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