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The Civil War
 Union Documents and Letters


THE NEW ORLEANS, OPELOUSAS, AND GREAT WESTERN RAILROAD CAPTURED BY FEDERAL AUTHORITIES

6050 - PRINTED HANDBILL ORDERING RAILROAD WORKERS TO NOT INTERFERE WITH THE UNION TROOPS GUARDING THE RAILROAD AND TO GIVE RESPECT TO THE SOLDIERS, 5" X 7" printed handbill, small vignette of an antique train, dated at New Orleans, December 22nd, 1862, printed signature of Lt. Colonel L. [Ledyard] Colburn [military superintendent of the Railroad] Railroad workers are ordered not to interfere with the duties of the guards [Union troops] protecting the railroad as well as giving the respect due soldiers. Colburn was Lt. Colonel of the 12th Connecticut and assigned to supervising the railroad by General Weitzel. The road was chartered in 1851 and construction began the next year. Construction was halted in 1857 when the rails reached Brashear. Before the war, the road did a lively business carrying passengers from Texas to New Orleans, meeting scheduled streamers twice weekly at Brashear. In 1860, 29,000 passengers used the road. With the blockade's declaration, the road's desire to connect to a Texas road at Orange, Texas took on greater urgency. Both the Louisiana and Confederate governments attempted to assist in getting the road extended. By May 1862, 45 miles had been completed, except for laying the track, from Brashear to New Iberia. If the New Orleans & Texas RR had been constructed, it would probably connected to this road at Vermillionville, 15 miles further along the un-built NO, O & G W. In early May 1862, Union troops captured the entire length of the road and put it back into operation. Confederate troops recaptured the western portion in late May and both armies operated portions of the road until Union troops recaptured the entire road in November 1862. The road was completed to Brashear City in August 1863 except for a Confederate raid in 1863, the Union retained the road for the rest of the war. Confederate sympathizers worked on the road and were obviously hindering construction and harassing the guards. A unique piece of Louisiana railroad history in relation to the Union takeover of this railroad line to the west from New Orleans. Fine, trifle old tape repairs not impairing the appearance of the item. RARE..............SOLD

DESTROYED BY CONFEDERATE CAVALRY IN LOUISIANA

6051 - THE CLAIM FOR THE LOSS OF THE UNION STEAMER L.A. SYKES APPROVED BY GENERAL BANKS, July 28th, 1863, New Orleans, LA. Large 8" X 13" manuscript in ink detailing the claim against the US Government totaling over $26,000 for the loss of the steamer L.A. Sykes under lease by the US Government as a transport that was destroyed by Confederate fire at Plaquemine, LA during the Port Hudson Campaign. The New Orleans ERA reported the following: Four Steamers Burnt by Rebel Cavalry at Plaquemine "We learn that there is a rebel force of two regiments of cavalry and one of infantry, with a battery of six brass field pieces, under command of Col. J. P. MAJOR, at Indian Village, about nine miles in the rear of Plaquemine. On Thursday, 18th inst., at 6 o'clock in the morning, about 300 cavalry belonging to this force, under command of Col. PHILLIPS, dashed into Plaquemine, which was not guarded by a military force, seized and burned the steamers Anglo-American, Southern Merchant. L.A. Sykes and Segur; also, 75 bales of cotton, which they found on the levee, and a barge, called the Belfast which was about two miles down the bayou. There were about thirty convalescent soldiers belonging to the Twenty-eighth Marne at Plaquemine, who were made prisoners, together with some four or five civilians. All the prisoners were taken to Indian Village, into the presence of Col. MAJOR, and paroled. They were courteously treated by the rebel commander, and the sick soldiers were furnished with ambulances." Lt. Colonel J. P. Chandler approves the claim and notates the approval of General N. P. Banks. Very fine...........................................................$125.00

6054 - BUTLER ARRIVES IN NEW ORLEANS, HIS QUARTERMASTER ORDERS TROOPS DISPERSED AROUND THE CITY AND ACROSS THE RIVER, New Orleans, LA. May 30th, 1862, 2 page letter from Butler's Chief Quartermaster Colonel J. M. Shaffer. He writes to Captain Edey...he relates in part...The BURTON will be got ready immediately to take artillery company with horses and carriages and men, the MISSISSIPPI will take the 21st Indiana and 30th Mass. Regiments, the McCELLAN and BEE will be ready to leave for Carrollton to take the 9th Connecticut. The DIANA will be started in her usual trade; she had better be got off soon in order to take the troops off that sail ship that is aground. You will see that ferry boats are ready to being the 21st Indiana over to Algiers and take the 8th Vermont over to Algiers. Please see that everything is on time...you will arrange with captain artillery camp as to loading him...J. W. Shaffer Qtr. Master. Small corner restoration unaffecting text.........................$150.00

6055 - A NAVAL OFFICER APPLIED FOR PRIZE MONEY FROM A CAPTURED SHIP, June 2nd, 1864, manuscript letter on Treasury Sept. Stationary, 8" X 10" addressed to 1st Asst. Engineer Emory Brooks stationed on the USS Richmond in New Orleans responding for his claim for prize money being part of a US naval ship that captured a prize ship. The writer informs Brooks that the name of the capturing ship must be provided in order for consideration for prize money. It is quite likely that Brooks was on the Richmond when the prize ship was captured as that ship which saw extensive action in the Gulf was on blockade duty as well as participating in numerous conflicts namely the attack on New Orleans, Port Hudson, and Mobile. Very fine, well written.................................................$59.00

6057 - CARROLLTON AND NEW ORLEANS RAILROAD, NEW ORLEANS, LA, 1862, 8" X 10" pre-printed and filled in manifest "Carrollton and New Orleans Railroad" stationary detailing the shipment of cypress lumber for the United States from Jefferson Lake, LA dated October 9th, 1862 and verified by J. B. T. Tupper Conductor of the Government train. This railroad had been taken over by Federal authorities and was serving as a means of transpirations for the Union Army. Prior to the Civil War, hundreds of people took the train to Carrollton to tour the famed Carrollton Gardens or to dine at the Carrollton House or another of the village's restaurants. Among the antebellum officials was the line's secretary, Albert Blanchard, who would became a Confederate brigadier general in the Civil War. During the war, the line continued period operation, despite the Federal army occupying the city. Ridership and revenues were drastically reduced, and the railroad suffered financially. Following the Civil War, the line was leased to former Confederate general P. G. T. Beauregard, who with two financial backers, assumed control of the NO & CRR in April 1866. However, his partners proved untrustworthy, and Beauregard was publicly embarrassed when the line failed to pay its debts within a few years. However, the railroad survived. The line evolved into an urban tram line as the land along the route was developed and incorporated into the city of New Orleans. It is now the St. Charles Avenue Streetcar Line. Very fine................................................................SOLD

6058 - JUST BEFORE THE RED RIVER CAMPAIGN, 26TH MASS. VOLUNTEERS, Headquarters 19th Army Corps, Franklin [LA], February 7th, 1864, 8" X 10" manuscript order giving Lt. J. C. Cooke permission to travel to New Orleans for 7 days. On the verso are numerous endorsements allowing steamboat travel to Brashear City. Signed by Colonel Richard Irwin who later wrote books on the History of the 19th Corps as well as Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Irwin was on Bank's staff in Louisiana. Very fine, Cooke was later wounded at Winchester, VA............................................................$49.00


9018 - THE 165TH NYV HAVING DEPLETED RANKS SENDS AN OFFICER TO NEW YORK TO RECRUIT MORE VOLUNTEERS TO FILL ITS BATTLE WEARY RANKS, New Orleans, LA. November 21st, 1863, 8" X 10" manuscript General Order by command of General Banks ordering Major Felix Agnus and a Sergeant to return to NY to meet with the Governor to consult with him on recruiting for the regiment to bring it up to strength of 10 companies. Agnus signs at the bottom as receiving a "true copy of the order." The battalion left the state Dec. 2, 1862, sailing for New Orleans and on its arrival was assigned to the 3rd brigade, 2nd (Sherman's) division, 19th corps, Department of the Gulf. It participated in skirmishes in March, 1863 at North pass, Ponchatoula and Berwick Bay, sustaining a few casualties, and was actively engaged throughout the long siege of Port Hudson, losing heavily in the assault of May 27. Its losses during the siege amounted to 106 killed, wounded and missing, among the mortally wounded being the gallant Lieut-Col. Abel, who fell in the assault of May 27. It accompanied Franklin's expedition to Sabine Pass, TX, in Sept. 1863, and was later twice engaged at Vermilion Bayou. Agnus had been wounded at Gaines Mill in 1862, later Lt. Colonel and then Brevetted as Brig. General.............................................$69.00

9019 - COTTON AND OTHER PRODUCE SEIZED BY UNION TROOPS IN LOUISIANA IN 1863, 52ND MASS., 8" X 10" manuscript on imprinted Quartermaster General's Office in Washington, DC., January 13th, 1864. Addressed to Colonel George A. Piece in New Orleans making him aware of the receipt in Washington of the notice of cotton and other produce seized by the late Captain of the 52nd Mass, A. B. Long at New Iberia, LA in April and May 1863. On March 27, 1863, the 52nd Mass. was transferred to Donaldsonville, LA, and on the 31st started with Grover's Division up Bayou Lafourche, proceeding to Thibodaux, which place was reached April 2. Two days later it entrained at Terre Bonne for Bayou Boeuf whence, on April 9, it marched to Brashear City. Here, two days later, it took steamer for Indian Bend on the westerly shore of Grand Lake in an effort to cut off a Confederate force at Fort Bisland. After the battle at Indian Ridge, in which the 52nd did not participate, and the escape of the enemy northward, the 52nd joined in the pursuit to New Iberia. Four companies were left here to do guard duty, while the remainder proceeded on past Opelousas to Barre's Landing on Bayou Courtableau. Here they remained until the 21st of May, collecting and guarding supplies and loading and unloading boats at the landing. On the 19th the companies left at New Iberia arrived, and on the 21st the regiment commenced its return march via St. Martinsville to Brashear City, reaching its destination May 26.......................................................$49.00

9020 - 38TH MASSACHUSETTS AT BATON ROUGE AFTER PORT HUDSON, PLACED CANNONS IN THE STREETS, 2 page letter in ink on red/blue patriotic stationary showing Union Infantry during a charge by Private Edwin Ripley, Co. C, 38th Mass. Vol., written September 30th, 1863 to his friend Cushman, Camp William Rodman, Baton Rouge, LA. He relates in part...He expresses his physical condition as being well, he has written his friend weeks ago but has received no reply, he expects to stay here for the winter, all troops have left the area and gone to Texas except our brigade, he expects they may also stop in Texas this winter. They get little news of the war, had quite a time the other evening as they expected the Rebels to make a dash on this place but they would have had a warm welcome as they had cannon planted on every street, needs some writing paper if he could spare any, apples are 10 cents each there! Edwin Ripley, Co. C, 38th Regt. Mass. Vol. Baton Rouge, LA. Early in March, 1863, the regiment proceeded to Baton Rouge, LA, and later in the month cooperated with the Navy in the passage of the batteries at Port Hudson. About April 1, the regiment was transported down the Mississippi River to Algiers opposite New Orleans where it joined the Teche Expedition, taking train for Brashear City, April 9. At Fort Bisland, April 12, the regiment had its first combat experience, losing 6 killed and 29 wounded. It then pushed on to Opelousas and thence proceeded by a forced march of four days to Alexandria on the Red River, which place was reached May 8. Here the fleet was found in possession of the town. After a week's rest Alexandria on the 38th, with the rest of Emory's Division, returned by the same road as far as Chaneyville where it diverged to the eastward to Simmsport on the Atchafalaya River, reaching there May 18. On the following day the troops started for the Mississippi, reaching that river near Morganza Bend on 22nd. From here transports bore them to Bayou Sara some miles above Port Hudson. On May 25 the regiment was engaged at Sandy Creek with light loss. In the first assault on Port Hudson, May 27, the regiment lost Lieut. Col. William L. Rodman and two enlisted men killed and 14 wounded. In the second assault, June 14, it lost 7 killed and 84 wounded, 15 of these fatally. After the surrender of Port Hudson, July 9, the regiment accompanied an expedition to Donaldsonville, returning to Baton Rouge, Aug. 1. Here the regiment remained in camp through the fall and ensuing winter doing little active duty.........................................$145.00

9021 - 1ST NEW ORLEANS VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, December 4th, 1865, 8" X 10" manuscript order by Lt. Colonel Tisdale ordering officers to a court martial including the signer of the order Lt. P. Daley, Adj. of Tisdale commanding the 1st New Orleans Infantry. This unit was on duty in New Orleans and south of the city in 1864 - 65. Very fine...........................$35.00


LETTERS OF THE 176 NYV FIGHTING GUERILLAS IN LOUISIANA

The 176th NYV regiment was organized under the direction of the Young Men's Christian Association of New York City. It left the state under command of Col. Nott on Jan. 11, 1863, and embarked on transports for New Orleans. On its arrival it was stationed in the defenses of New Orleans for several weeks and was attached to Augur's division of the 19th Corps, when that corps was organized. It formed part of the garrison of New Orleans during the siege of Port Hudson, and took an active part in repelling the advance of the enemy under Gen. Taylor. During June, 1863, detachments of the regiment participated in the skirmishes at Pattersonville, La Fourche crossing, Thibodeaux, Fort Buchanan, Bayou Boeuff and Brashier City. In the action at La Fourche crossing, the regiment was commanded by Maj. Morgan and behaved most gallantly; in the actions at Fort Buchanan, on the Atchafalaya, and at Brashear City, the regiment met with serious disaster, over 400 men being captured. This disaster was not due to lack of bravery on the part of the men. There was no one in command, but the men fought with all the bravery that could be expected. The loss of the regiment in the above actions amounted to 464 killed, wounded and captured or missing. Union forces defeated the Confederates at Bisland, Grand Lake and Fort Burton in the spring of 1863, giving them control of the Atchafalaya waterways wherever they could operate gunboats. The Confederates could not match the firepower of these vessels. Even with this advantage, though, Confederate guerrilla forces, as well as jayhawkers and smugglers, constantly harassed the federals, especially in the summer of 1864. Jayhawkers were bands of deserters, draft dodgers and criminals who infested much of Louisiana during the last three years of the war. Confederate irregular forces used the familiar terrain of the basin to their advantage, cotton and firearms from basin residents.

7003 - CAMP CHALMETTE NEAR NEW ORLEANS, LA, LEAVING FOR PENSACOLA, Two page letter in ink by James M. Coombs, 28th Maine Infantry, to his father Ivory Coombs. His actual name is James N. Coombs but records are in error as his middle initial is listed as M and not N. Camp Chalmette, February 13th, 1863, 8 1/2 o'clock. He relates in part to his father...we are on the eve of departure [to Pensacola] although we have many sick in the regiment, we have our knapsack packed and are ready to leave by steamer for Pensacola...the drum is beating for roll call, the "Stillwater boys" are still in good spirits. Lt. Kelley sends his regards I am 175 lbs without my overcoat on but we have little need for an overcoat here today as it has been one of intense heat. I wear no "drawers" one shirt without any vest so judge for yourself if it is warm or not...James M. Coombs to his Father Ivory Coombs. On Nov. 26, 28th Maine was ordered to East New York, and on Jan. 17, 1863, embarked for Fortress Monroe and New Orleans, arriving at the latter place on the 29th. It encamped at Chalmette, 7 miles below the city, until Feb. 15, when it was ordered to Pensacola, FL. On March 29, it returned to New Orleans, and was at once ordered to Donaldsonville and Plaquemine. On May 27, six companies under Col. Woodman were ordered to Port Hudson, and assigned to Gen. Nickerson's brigade of Dwight's Division. They shared in the advance of June 14, and on June 22 assaulted a bastion of the Confederate works, losing 3 killed and 9 wounded. Meanwhile, the portion of the regiment which had remained at Donaldsonville to garrison Fort Butler, was attacked by a vastly superior force of the enemy, but repulsed them with heavy loss in one of the most gallant engagements of the war. The little garrison killed, captured and wounded more than three times its number, and was mentioned for gallantry in general orders read to the troops before Port Hudson.............................................$75.00

7004 - WEAPONS LEFT ON THE FIELD AT LOVEJOY, GA, September 8th, 1864 Camp of the 84th Indiana, near Atlanta, GA, 1st Sergeant Orlando Swain Co. D of the 84th Indiana Infantry near Atlanta. He writes a manuscript report in letter form listing the equipment and arms left on the field due to the loss of an officer. One large page in manuscript report in letter form listing the equipment and arms left on the field due to the loss of an officer. One large page in manuscript written by Swain...The Regiment to which my company belongs was directed to advance under the fire of the enemy to take a certain position. In doing so one non-commissioned officer were left in the field as we were repulsed and they could not be recovered. The following are the store items abandoned: 1-58 Cal. Enfield rifle, 1-cartridge box and plate, 1 cartridge box belt and plate, 1-waist belt and plate, 1-Cap box, 1-gun sling, 1-bayonets scabbard. The name of the officer was Lt. William McClellan, Co. D, 84th Indiana. The letter is then endorsed as being correct by another officer. Swain enlisted in August 1862. Swain saw action repulsing Van Dorn's attack on Franklin, Forrest's attack on Triune, Tullahoma Campaign, the Atlanta Campaign, Franklin, and Nashville. Very fine..................................................$120.00

7005 - 1ST WISCONSIN CAVALRY, FIGHTING IN MISSOURI, 4 large pages in pencil with a stamped envelope, Barnsville, Missouri, December 30th, 1862, Sergt. Perry C. Goodrich. He writes to his wife in part...It is now the Holiday season I will give you some idea how I spent it by the way not all destitute of pleasure...11 of us were on picket at our late camp near Lesterville. We were on the roads leaving to camp about a mile out. Three men were to be on guard at a time, two mounted and one stationed out about 30 rods from the post and one at the post, these were relieved every two hours, at night we were to have no fires. No sleep, and bout for the sergeants little rest. Four of us Oakland boys, Bill Bower, Alex Mc, Eli Horton and me managed to get on the same post. We went out prepared to have something extra for Christmas dinner. Alex and Horton bought two cans of oysters, we got some potatoes [a rarity] took out some flour and got a woman to bake us some biscuits so notwithstanding we were soldiers in the enemy's country outdoors on picket and we had almost a glorious Christmas. Yesterday a train of 10 wagons and a small escort were captured near Van Buren some 20 miles from here. It is said that two companies from our regiment had a fight with the same Secesh yesterday but they found then too strong and our men retreated. Although we have many troops near Van Buren swarms of guerillas are in the neighborhood. A soldier was accidentally shot through the head by another soldier cleaning his revolver...much more on the camp, "Dutchmen of the 4th Missouri passed our camp"...Perry C. Goodrich. Well written in bold pencil......................................$165.00

7006 - 1ST WISCONSIN CAVALRY, OCCUPIED NASHVILLE, THE FAMOUS ZOLLICOFFER HOUSE USED AS HOSPITAL AND BARRACKS, 6 STORIES HIGH IN THE CENTER OF NASHVILLE, OUR SUPPLY LINE 400 MILES LONG, THE REBELS MAKE ATTEMPTS TO BREAK THIS LINE, IF SO OUR GREAT ARMY IS DESTROYED, October 28th, 1863, long four page letter in ink with stamped cover to his wife...Zollicoffer House, Nashville, TN by Sergeant Perry C. Goodrich, 1st Wisconsin Cavalry. He relates in part...This camp is an immense building six stories high in the center of this city and was built for a hotel but was never completed not being finished off inside. It is now being used as barracks in which are kept convalescents from the hospitals, deserters, paroled prisoners and stragglers. 170 of our regiment were sent up to get horses for our division which is at Decherd. We arrived here yesterday and they shut us up in this prison and treat us as do the prisoners with the exception we can have passes to get out around the city...between two and three thousands are now in the building and it is not one quarter filled. The arrangement for feeding is very bad; all eat in one room, about 200 able to stand around the tables at a time. They are always feeding all the time and generally 300 or 400 are crowded around the dining room all eager to get in as if they expected something good. Two days ago one poor fellow was crushed to death in the rush to get something to eat. I believe the great crisis is rapidly approaching and something very decisive is about to take place. I tremble for the result. We have an immense army in the heart of our enemy's country but with just a single line of 300 to 400 miles in length in which to transport supplies. The railroad has to be crowded to its utmost and our army at the front is still short in rations. The Rebels will make as they have been desperate attempts to break this line of communication with it seems to me some possibility of success. Once the line is broken and our great army is destroyed, he described passing through the statehouse, much more on Nashville...Perry C. Goodrich. The Zollicoffer House was also known as the Maxwell House originally used by the Federals as a prison later used as barracks as well as a prison. Well written and very detailed letter.......................................$165.00

7008 - ANDERSON'S ZOUAVES, LETTER AND A PATRIOTIC MANUSCRIPT MARCHING SONG, 62ND NEW YORK INFANTRY, BY ALFRED COVELL WOODS LATER KILLED AT THE WILDERNESS, October 27th, 1862 near Clear Springs, Maryland, 4 pages in ink to his aunt. He relates in part, Pvt. Alfred Covell Woods, 62nd NYV...I think our nation has waited too long for the Rebels to starve. They must be sought and whipped. In the west it seems they have taken every opportunity for striking blows at the Rebels. The brilliant success of the Union troops having nearly annihilated at several places armies confidently relied on by the conspirators at Richmond to hold their ground. We are in hope of some day of getting a sight of the famous STUART CAVALRY OF STONEWALL JACKSON'S DIVISION. IT WOULD BE WORTH A WEEK'S HARD TACK TO SCATTER THESE TERRIFIC SLAVE DRIVERS. I presume when I write again we will have seen some action for the Rebels have already made some attempts for a second raid into Pennsylvania. The letter comes with a manuscript "Marching song" by Dr. Simpson dated July 31st, 1862 and reads in part...COME ANDERSON ZOUAVES WITH OUR VOICES LET US SING/WITH CHEERS FOR THE UNION WE'LL MAKE THE WELKING RING/THREE CHEERS FOR LITTLE MAC AND THREE FOR GALLANT KEYES/AND THREE MORE FOR OUR STARS AND STRIPES NOW FLOATING IN THE BREEZE..." Two items, letter and marching song sheet. Woods was killed on May 5th, 1864 at the Battle of the Wilderness. Lt. George Simpson became Surgeon of the 62nd NYV his photo shown with sword. A wonderful combination.........................................$250.00

7009 - A MARYLAND RECRUIT OOZES WITH SENTIMENTALITY AT THE BEGINNING OF THE WAR, dated August 6th, 1861 John F. Troxell, Co. G., 3rd Potomac Home Brigade. He writes a long poem to a sweetheart Miss Emily Fletcher entitled "Old Home", three pages in manuscript on patriotic red/blue edged paper, a sentimental poem on remembering life in the "Old Home." Troxell enlisted in the 3rd Potomac Home Brigade, Co. G on March 24th, 1862. He was captured with his unit at Harper's Ferry September 13th, 1862 and sent to Bell Island, VA. He was paroled to Annapolis Parole Camp and exchanged in June 1863. He saw action at Harper's Ferry, Monocracy, Snickers Gap, and Bolivar Heights. A scarce Maryland unit..............................................$100.00
 

7010 - BELLE ISLE CONFEDERATE PRISON
, A hand colored Magnus song sheet featuring a view of the prison along with the song TRAMP, TRAMP, TRAMP, THE PRISONER'S HOPE. The song bemoans imprisonment at Belle Isle and looks forward to an eventual return home. During the war, Belle Isle was used as a Confederate Prison and afforded little protection from the elements for near 10,000 Union prisoners there during the war. Exposure played a large part in the prison's large death toll. Tents were the only shelter the prisoners had to protect themselves from the harsh elements of winter. 5" X 7", fine with good color...............
$95.00

7011 - SOLDIER SENDS A FRIEND MONEY AND NEVER HEARS FROM HIM, 1 page letter in bold pencil by Charles E. Fowler, 1st Ohio Light Artillery, Columbia, TN, June 7th [1864] to Friend Mose...I should like to know the reason you do not write, I sent your folks $15 and have received nothing whether you have received it or not! Direct [your letter] to Captain W. E. Standart, 2nd Ohio Battery, Negley's Brigade, Columbia, TN, Chas., E. Fowler. Obviously aggravated he has heard nothing about the money but also that he received no letters from a friend he obviously tried to aid financially. Fine.........................................$75.00


21500 - AN EXTRAORDINARY MISSOURI LETTER - GUERRILLAS IN MISSOURI LURKING IN THE WOODS AND BUSHES, UNIONISTS HUNG AND MURDERED, A WISCONSIN SOLDIER DETAILS THE DIRE CONDITIONS IN MISSOURI FOR UNIONISTS, Bloomfield, MO., June 4th, 1862, 4 large 8" X 13" pages in manuscript by Pvt. Perry C. Goodrich, Company I, 1st Wisconsin Cavalry. He relates in part to his wife...Your letter finally found me. We left Hornersville Sunday June 1st at daylight and marched her and arrived here Monday at 3 o'clock the distance about 70 miles. We returned by a different route further to the east. For 50 miles the land which the road passes through is perfectly level, the soil somewhat sandy with many good farms and farmhouses the best I have seen in Missouri. Much of the land they call prairies but in Wisconsin we would call openings. The timber being much the same, full and heavy as seen in Oakland. This prairie I am told is a narrow strip swamp and timber on either side. When we were coming up we met two detachments of one regiment going down. I think they were going to the very place we left. Why we are charged about I do not know unless it is to awe the Secesh into submission. I do not think there is one enemy force in this part of the state yet separate characters are lurking in the swamps and bushes playing the part of cowardly ruffians, murderers, and way layers shooting at our men and Union Missourians whenever they think they will not be caught. Last Friday evening Dr. Gregory was shot at and mortally wounded by some of the desperadoes. The circumstances were as follows: Major LaGrange and about 120 men stopped for the night on this side of the Chalk River at the ferry. Our chaplain Rev. Dr. Dunmore was with them and had the curiosity to visit the battlefield about two miles across the river in Arkansas where the skirmish of the 15th took place. According to the Major the chaplain and the doctor crossed over on horseback and rode up there. They returned and crossed at dusk. As they were leaving their boats and Dr. Gregory was watering his horse seven shots were fired from the other side by unseen persons. One ball struck his left arm above the elbow shattering the bone, then entered his side and came out through his back passing through the back portion of his left side and came out through his back passing through the back portion of his left lung. It then entered his horse. His horse a splendid black one died the next day. I suppose his arm was amputated and he is very dangerous condition. It has been ascertained that these men followed them from the battle ground.

About two weeks ago when we Company I were at Chalk Bluff our Captain was informed that a house about two miles away held a musket. We always take possession of arms and ammunition we can find. The Captain sent a Corporal named Farnsworth to get the gun. The Corporal begged the Captain to let him go alone accompanied only part of the way by a citizen to show him the way. He searched the house and found the gun. As he was coming back through the woods and bushes someone called 'halt lay down your arms.' Farnsworth saw three men about 16 yards away with guns aimed at him. Of course the Corporal was not one to surrender even when the odds were 3/1. He proceeded to draw his revolver when they fired at him and fled. He sent the contents of his revolver after them without effect. Their shots took effect - in the belly of his horse and passed through his overcoat which was strapped to his saddle making seven holes in it. The horse was able to carry him back to camp but soon died. Two of the murders were taken a few days afterward but after taking the oath of allegiance were release by the Colonel. Most of our company was very indignant about this. These fiends cared nothing about the oath and kept at their old tricks. They have been taken a second time and sent to St. Louis. The Unionists here say we are too tender on our enemies. They are savages and have butchered and hung many in cold blood many loyal citizens. There is tremendous hatred that exists between former neighbors and not infrequently relatives. Almost every day I hear men telling of having friends murdered and searing the direst vengeance. It has been worse in the vicinity of Bloomfield than further south.

This is pretty town that is nearly deserted. Stores and dwelling places are used as quarters for our men. There is a tree I can see where last fall three men were hug because they were loyal to the government. I was shown where their bodies were half buried and the marks on the branches from the ropes. Last Sunday Major Pomeroy the commander here said he was determined to make an example of the worst murderers among the Secesh prisoners at this place. They were brought out to the very tree the Unionists had been hung and placed on their coffins, caps placed over their heads and men ready to draw ropes when suddenly the Major said they were reprieved. Two of the condemned who were bitter talking fell on their knees and blessed the Major but the other showed the least sign of felling when the reprieve came with not a feature moved and not a muscle stirring. All the soldiers had been called out to witness the execution. It is not like me to delight in such matters. What I have witnessed is enough to take the life of a human being. Enough of our men have enough vengeance - some have and tear like a tiger when they do not have a chance to kill the men who after taking the oath are set free again. One boy in our company when he saw the grave of Colonel Lewis [Confederate officer] who was killed at the taking of the steamboat at Hornersville jumped upon his grave and danced, sung, and shouted with all his might and seemed frantic with delight. It made me shudder to see it for I cannot not look on the grave of an enemy that I have warred with the handful of earth before me. But when I fight the enemy I shall not flinch or falter but will take good aim, strike hard, and do my best but I will do from a sense of duty and not from a feeling of vengeance. You along know my nature and know I am telling the truth....P. Goodrich. Four large pages in ink in excellent manuscript describing the Guerilla action near Bloomfield, capturing Guerillas, attacks by the Guerrillas. A great narrative on life in southeast Missouri in 1862 written by a compassionate Wisconsin cavalry soldier. The finest Missouri letter we have ever offered. Very fine..................................................$750.00


2039 - A MEMBER OF BUTLER'S STAFF APPOINTED THE HARBORMASTER OF NEW ORLEANS AFTER BUTLER TAKES CONTROL OF THE CITY, ALS by Colonel John Wilson Shaffer, Chief Quartermaster of the Dept. of the Gulf, later Brevet General for his actions in the Richmond Campaign of 1864. Dated at New Orleans, May 29th, 1862. 8" X 10" manuscript letter appointing Captain P. F. Edey as Harbor Master and Captain of the Port of New Orleans who will relieve Captain Snow on May 30th, 1862. Bold ink, very fine...............................................$79.00

1854 - TWO WAR DATED LETTERS FROM A 26TH MASSACHUSETTS SOLDIER DATELINED NEW ORLEANS IN 1862, Two separate letters one dated September 25th, 1862 and another dated December 6th, 1862 to his Father and brother Luke by a soldier signing only as "Daniel." Both letters are two pages in bold pencil. He relates in part...he has been gaining in health after being ill all summer with the bilious fever, he has lost near fifty pounds since leaving Ship Island, but the weather is cooler yet it is so warm he wipes the sweat off his face while writing this letter under a tree, he is sending letters and a diary to mother as he sent a packet by Mr. Woodward of Pepperell, Mass. who left here on the steamer Creole, wants to know how much money with interest he has at the savings bank...to his brother Luke he encourages him to attend school, important to have an education...he lives to get back to Massachusetts again...he is glad Lewis did not enlist as a soldier's life is hard and lesser life...Daniel. The Mr. Woodward from Pepperell is Alonzo Woodward of the 26th Massachusetts who was discharged at New Orleans on September 17th, 1862. Thus this "Daniel" is probably in the 26th Mass. but with several Daniels in that regiment his absolute identity is unknown. Both letters well written...........................................$95.00/the pair

1855 - AN INDIANA SOLDIER IS BEING DISCHARGED AND WILL BE APPOINTED A SUTLER OF THE 8TH INDIANA REGIMENT, New Orleans, April 2nd, 1864, 1 page in ink with a stamped cover postmarked NEW ORLEANS April 5th, [1864] to his friend Kate from David S. Scott of the 8th Indiana...He has come there about two weeks ago and will be on the way home as the regiment will be paid in a few days and hopes to see her on the Jersey Shore by June 1st...he has been appointed the Sutler of the 8th Indiana. The 8th Indiana served in the Vicksburg and Red River Campaigns. It took part in the capture of the fort on Mustang Island, TX., then moved to Indianola, where 417 out of 515 reenlisted as veterans, and were furloughed home in April, 1864. Obviously Scott was furloughed and received his sutler appointment. An unusual appointment for a soldier in the ranks to obtain the position of regimental sutler, 2 items................................................$69.00

1856 - HUGE IMPRINTED DOCUMENT ENVELOPE, DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, NEW ORLEANS, LA, 4.5" X 10", addressed to Lt. Colonel Don A. Pardee in Baton Rouge, LA imprinted Headquarters Provost Marshal General Dept. of the Gulf, 28 Carondelet St., New Orleans, LA. choice, Pardee was on the field and staff of the 42nd Ohio, later Bvt. General.....................................$45.00

1857 - 12 CIVIL WAR ERA STAMPED POSTAL COVERS WITH CANCELLATIONS, 11 different postal covers with stamps [11/12], FOUR postmarked from New Orleans, LA [one from a Chaplain of the 28th ?Connecticut, others with different cancellations, several military bulls eye cancellations, one written off the coast of Texas in 1864 probably a naval letter being routed through New Orleans, noted is "off Texas," very good or better, just one missing the stamp, the lot of 12...........................................$49.00

1858 - AN ATTRACTIVE CIVIL WAR LETTER WRITTEN ON A VIEW OF NEW ORLEANS STATIONARY, "A View of City Hall - Gallier Hall, New Orleans, LA." 8" X 10" lettersheet with a short unsigned note in pencil dated July 6th [1863 - 64], "most sundown, a number of transports in sight, Lt. Parker says we are ordered to Camp Parapet...home it is true as I am anxious to get home...if we don't start I will try and write...I am on the east bank of the Mississippi River within four rods of the water...please take this picture and frame. The picture he mentions is a fine lettersheet by Louis Schwartz of New Orleans entitled, "City Hall - New Orleans showing "Gallier Hall" between two contemporary buildings as it stands today in front of Lafayette Park on St. Charles Ave. Trifle stains, 5" X 7" engraved portion, the pencil notes are on the verso at the very bottom. The building was originally designed to be the city hall of New Orleans by the noted architect, James Gallier, Sr., Construction began in 1845, and the building was dedicated on 10 May 1853. Gallier Hall is a three-story marble structure fronted by two rows of fluted ionic columns in the neoclassical style. It is one of the most important structures built during the antebellum period of the city. After its dedication in 1853, Gallier Hall remained the city hall for just over a century. Many important events during the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the era of Louisiana governor Huey Long took place at Gallier Hall. Light stains, overall fine......................................$145.00


8020 - THE REPORTS OF THE NAVAL ENGAGEMENTS ON THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER, THE CAPTURE OF FORTS JACKSON AND ST. PHILIP AND THE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS AND THE DESTRUCTION OF THE REBEL NAVAL FLOTILLA, Washington, 1862, hardbound, 105 pages, blue cloth covers. Includes two lithographed engravings of the Confederate Rams Manassas and Louisiana, one colored, three fold out maps detailing the activities of the Federal flotilla on the Mississippi, all correspondence from every Federal naval Captain detailing his ships actions during attack on the forts and the ensuing Rebel Ram attack. Numerous official reports on causalities by boat and the destruction of the Confederate fleet. Signed on the inside in ink by T. H. Fortune USN, USS Varuna. Fortune was the Acting Gunner on the Varuna which was one of the two Federal ships lost during the engagements. The two lithographic prints are tipped in as well as the three foldout maps. There is light foxing, the three maps are intact but have some fissures that can easily be restored without loss of any details. A very scarce boo published within months of the action below New Orleans. Overall very good, seldom seen on the market.......................................$325.00

7030 - FEDERAL AUTHORITIES CONFISCATE PROPERTY OF A REBEL OFFICER IN NEW ORLEANS, September 1st, 1863, 1 page 8" X 13" manuscript outlining the property seized the Federal government owned by Captain H. F. Wade of the Louisiana Battery, Rebel Army. Two houses were seized by Captain McClure in the uptown area of the city that were both occupied by tenants [named], both houses were valued at $13,000. The document was signed by Benjamin Flanders of the Treasury department. On July 13, 1863, Flanders was made the Captain of Company C, 5th Regiment Louisiana Volunteers, a Union Army unit. He was honorably discharged in August, 1863, when he was appointed a Special Agent of the United States Treasury Department of the Southern Region by Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase. He held this position until 1866. While in office he made commissions while selling confiscated cotton. In 1867, General Philip Sheridan, Commander of the 5th Military District, which included Louisiana and Texas, removed elected Governor James Madison Wells for not responding to the riots appropriately and for not advancing the rights of freed slaves. Sheridan appointed Flanders as Governor of Louisiana. About six months later, on January 1, 1868, Major General Winfield Scott Hancock, as the new military commander of Louisiana removed all radicals from state offices and Governor Flanders resigned on January 8 and was replaced by Joshua Baker who was appointed by General Hancock. Very fine..................................................$125.00


32910 - AFTER WINCHESTER STONEWALL IN THE VALLEY, 4 page letter in ink from an unnamed Ohio soldier, New Market, VA, May 11th, 1862 to his sister back home in Tyrone, Ohio. He relates in part, "I received your last letter on who were brought to Tyrone [Ohio], I do not know any that died in our company that were killed in that Winchester battle. We are still camped at New Market but we will leave in the morning for a long march and will draw 10 days rations. I suppose we are going to Richmond...the next day after I wrote you we were given orders to march further and march another 10 miles and stayed a few days, Jackson and his army made an appearance and we retreated back a few miles and selected our ground to fight on - we had our cannons [facing] clear across the valley and we would have given them a warm reception if they had come. We had an inspection on the 7th and those who could not carry their knapsack were discharged. They took our tents away so we would not have so much to carry trough enemy territory." He continues on about affairs at home. Letter ends...well sister. Thus the letter while not signed has concluded all its pertinent information. Having advanced to within two miles of Franklin and finding Schenck in a very strong position which could only be reached by a combat at a disadvantage in a gap of the mountain, and ascertaining that Fremont was near at hand with large reinforcements, and being very desirous of getting back to the Valley to look after Banks' army and that he might also be at hand to respond to a call from General Lee, Jackson, after resting his army, fell back toward the Valley on Monday, May 12th, leaving a company of cavalry to look after Fremont's army from 15,000 to 20,000 men enveloped in the smoke of the burning forests, which had now become Jackson's ally instead of his foe.................................................$95.00

THE PAPERS AND THE LETTERS RELATING TO THE DEATH OF CAPTAIN JOHN CARTRIGHT 27TH OHIO COLORED INFANTRY AT THE BATTLE OF THE CRATER

32915 - MAJOR JOHN CARTRIGHT - A REQUEST TO ORDER HIS UNIFORM, August 18th, 1863, 1 page letter by Captain George Gibbs, 18th Battalion OVM to Cartright, Salem [Ohio] to John Cartright informing him that he is ordering uniforms for officers in the battalion and just has ordered one for the Colonel. He wants Cartright to give him the chance to order his and if so he will come and measure him. He is going to Pittsburgh to look at trimmings for the uniforms. Gibbs later became Captain in Company D in the 143rd Ohio. Very fine....................................................$65.00

32916 - JOHN CARTRIGHT, ADJ. GENERAL'S OFFICE, WASHINGTON, NOTICE OF HIS PAST SERVICE IN THE 5TH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY, DISCHARGED IN NEW MEXICO IN 1862, 8" X 10" pre-printed form, March 25th, 1863, Cartright had enlisted in 1857 and this documents affirms his discharged December 1862 at Albuquerque, NM due to expiration of service. He then was commissioned Captain in the 27th Ohio Colored Infantry. Very fine.........................................................$45.00


A SELECTION OF EXCELLENT NAVAL LETTERS

2018 -  THE USS HARTFORD IS ABOVE PORT HUDSON, DESCRIBES BEING SHOT AT BY REBEL BATTERIES AT GRAND GULF, DESTROYED STORES AT BAYOU SARA, FIRED ON BY THE PORT HUDSON BATTERIES, USS Hartford, above Port Hudson, April 22nd, 1863, 4 large pages in ink with stamped cover, by E. B. Latch, 2nd Engineer. He relates to his Mother, "we had two engagements with the rebels and  our vessel was struck a number of times but there was no particular damage to us...approached the dismantled steamer Vicksburg which had broken away from her moorings by the high wind we boarded her and found some loaded muskets...On the morning of the 31st we were in the company of the RAM and the PUP [Switzerland and the Albatross and started down the river and had a brush as we passed Grand Gulf during which we lost one man. Then we  came at anchor at Red River for the purpose of cutting off supplies to Port Hudson. We stayed there a few days and then went down river stopping at Bayou Sara and destroyed some army stores. Leaving Bayou Sara we run down the river and got  within sight of the batteries at Port Hudson and came to anchor out of range of their guns. In the evening, we fired some guns and sent up some rockets to signalize the lower fleet. Returning to our anchorage off the Red River capturing a little steam tender the J. D. Clarke with three prisoners, one of whom was a Major. It has been six weeks since we last left New Orleans and during that time we have considerable excitement." USS Hartford was launched 22 November 1858 at the Boston Navy Yard and commissioned 27 May 1859, Captain Charles Lowndes in command. Hartford served in several prominent campaigns in the American Civil War as the flagship of David G. Farragut, most notably the Battle of Mobile Bay in 186 as well as the capture of New Orleans and the attack on Port Hudson. A well written letter on large pages..............................$295.00

2019 - THE ITASCA CHASES A BLOCKADE RUNNER OFF THE MOUTH OFF THE TEXAS COAST, FIRES SHOTS AT HER, MUCH MORE NEWS ON BLOCKADE RUNNERS OFF THE TEXAS COAST, 10 large pages in ink by Assistant Surgeon Herber Smith, written on board the USS Itasca, June 14th, 1863, written to his Father, Mother, and sister. He relates in part..."He mentions a French schooner loaded with a cotton press for the Rebels, Butler has cleared vessels to trade at Rebel ports actually blockaded by our cruisers at Sabine Bay and Sabine Pass, Banks did not clear this schooner from New Orleans but he is responsible for it. Banks and Farragut have destroyed the communication between Texas and the Confederacy, the contraband trade is now dead between here and Matamoras...a schooner is now sighted coming down the Texas coast and we will chase it as we are between her and her destination and we will probably cut her off. It is a prize beyond doubt. She has made us out to be an American man of war and has changed her course and is heading for a little pass called Brazos de Santiago 10 miles above the Rio Grande which leads into a lagoon in the rear of Isle del Madre. The schooner has a little start and seems determined to go in...oh for sound machinery for a few moments and she would be ours but there barks our little rifled parrots at him and I must go on deck to see the shots, if the Reb is plunky enough to stand fire for a few moments he will go in. The chase is up for the present he will go through. We were a little late not withstanding our ten shots. The schooner rubbed through with only a rifled shot through her man sail but she is penned up within a circle of eight miles and I am in hopes the captain will send in boats to cut her out tonight. June 16th, I had the pleasure of seeing the party returning with the Schooner that was bound for the Rio Grande loaded with 170 bales of cotton. The prize is towing at our stern...chasing another schooner, she ran aground and her crew escaped across the sand banks, had  cotton aboard, removed some, the Captain has determined to burn her...looking for anchorage now to repair machinery, chasing another schooner but our machinery failed again...much more..." Assigned to the Gulf Blockading Squadron, Itasca promptly began to establish a distinguished record. She captured schooner Lizzie Weston loaded with cotton bound for Jamaica 19 January 1862. A month later she assisted Brooklyn in capturing Confederate steamer Magnolia loaded with cotton and carrying several secret letters containing valuable intelligence concerning Confederate plans to import arms and to assist side-wheel, blockade runner CSS Tennessee to escape through the blockade. When the Gulf Blockading Squadron was split 20 January 1862, Itasca was assigned to the Western Squadron under Flag Officer David Farragut, who stationed her briefly at Mobile, Alabama, and then called her to the mouth of the Mississippi River 4 March 1862 for service in the impending operations against New Orleans, Louisiana, and the Mississippi River Valley. This formed one prong of the gigantic pincer movement that was destined to cut the Confederacy in two, assuring its defeat. Itasca joined the fleet below Forts St. Philip and Jackson 19 April and promptly added her guns to the bombardment. The next day, accompanied by Kineo and Pinola, she boldly steamed up close to the forts to break the boom which prevented Farragut's ships from sailing up the river to attack New Orleans. Four days later the Union Squadron dashed through the passage to take the South's largest and most highly industrialized city. Itasca, in the dangerous rear of the movement, was caught in "a storm of iron hail...over and around us from both forts" and disabled by a 42-pound shot which made a large hole in her boiler. Before she could drift down the river out of range, the gallant gunboat received fourteen hits. After the fall of New Orleans, Itasca served in the Mississippi River for the remainder of the year successfully fulfilling a wide variety of duties. On one occasion she saved Admiral Farragut from grave danger when Hartford ran hard aground below Vicksburg, Mississippi, 14 May 1862. Itasca, deep in hostile territory, worked hastily, refloating her 3 days later. Early in 1863, Itasca was ordered to blockade duty off Galveston, Texas, where she arrived 31 January. While in Texas waters, Itasca took two prizes: Miriam, loaded with cotton, 17 June; and Sea Drift, containing a cargo of material and drugs, 22 June. On 30 June urgent need for repairs caused her to be dispatched to New Orleans, and she sailed from the port for the North 15 August, arriving Philadelphia for overhaul 26 August. An extraordinary long and detailed letter describing blockade duty off the Texas coast in mid 1863. Very fine....................................................$295.00

2025 - OFF MOBILE BAY ABOARD THE USS LACKAWANNA, FARRAGUT WANTS TO SEE IF THE MOBILE FORTS ARE OCCUPIED OR EVACUATED, June 3rd, 1863, 3 page letter in ink by Engineer Orleans Longacre to his Father James B. Longacre who was the chief engraver at the Philadelphia mint, includes the stamped postal cover addressed to Longacre in Philadelphia. He relates in part...I mentioned in my last letter that the steamer "Bermuda" was supposed to be lost but imagine our surprise when we saw her steaming up towards the flag ship yesterday. She experienced very heavy weather coming in from Key West having been caught in a "Cycloon". Although it lengthened her trip it did not damage her. I hasten to write you to assure you of the safe arrival of the letters by the "Bermuda"...I have not received your letters directed to the Brooklyn Naval Yard but we expect the "Circassia" from there within a week. The best way to send letters is to address to "New Orleans" or "elsewhere". He relates his excitement with the letters from home and a copy of the Philadelphia Inquirer. I expect something will be done here soon as the "Ossipee" comes here to relieve the "Colorado" [flag ship]. Admiral Farragut says we [the fleet] have been doing nothing long enough and we must now see if Forts Gaines and Morgan are occupied by Rebels or whether they evacuated. One of the small boats belonging to the "R.R. Chuyler" ran in one evening while on picket duty and destroyed a schooner so close to shore as to be fastened with a harvser and no attempt  was made to capture her [the small boat] by the Rebels; he says [Farragut] perhaps the majority of the garrison has evacuated. We will see what effect a few 11" shells will have on their nerves and whether they will come out of their hiding places...your affectionate son Orleans." The Battle of Mobile Bay of August 5, 1864, was an engagement of the American Civil War in which a Federal fleet commanded by Rear Admiral David G. Farragut, assisted by a contingent of soldiers, attacked a smaller Confederate fleet led by Admiral Franklin Buchanan and three forts that guarded the entrance to Mobile Bay. The battle was marked by Farragut's seemingly rash but successful run through a minefield that had just claimed one of his ironclad monitors, enabling his fleet to get beyond the range of the shore-based guns. This was followed by a reduction of the Confederate fleet to a single vessel, ironclad CSS Tennessee. Tennessee did not then retire, but engaged the entire Northern fleet. Tennessee's armor enabled her to inflict more injury than she received, but she could not overcome the imbalance in numbers. She was eventually reduced to a motionless hulk and surrendered, ending the battle. With no Navy to support them, the three forts within days also surrendered. Complete control of lower Mobile Bay thus passed to the Union forces. James B. Longacre as the chief engraver of the Philadelphia mint and designed numerous Civil War era coins including the flying eagle cent, Indian cent, 3 cent piece and shield nickel. He died suddenly in 1869. Orleans Longacre served in Engineer capacity on several ships from 1861 through 1865. Cover has a New Orleans CDS, military grid cancellation on a 3 cent ink Washington stamp, two items, very fine, letters come with a wealth of background info on the Lachawanna...................................................$245.00

2027 - WE WENT IN WITH SMALL BOATS TO CATCH A SMALL BLOCKADE RUNNER NEAR PENSACOLA, CAPTURED IT BUT OUR CAPTAIN LET THEM HAVE A PASS TO NEW ORLEANS, USS Morning Light, Pensacola Harbor, May 22th, 1862, four large pages in ink by Acting Master Henry W. Washburn, to his Father. He relates in part, "mentions an officer who supposedly chased a Rebel Schooner with our cutter with 10 armed men and made a half hearted chase of her as to get to our ship after dark. I obtained permission from our Lt. Commander to take a fishing smack to go around the island to cut her off with eight men, I drove the chase into a creek which I could not follow due to the draft of the smack and I missed alongshore within a rifle's shot at night, but succeeded in driving three small draft vessels into the bayou where I could not go...before daylight I saw a large lugger coming down before the wind and then I managed to get inshore of him when I pretended to be a fishing vessel and had dressed the crew in all sorts of disguise I found on board the smack and had the arms handy. My Yankee trick seemed to work and they came towards me but then smelled a mouse and hauled for the beach. I fired several shots across their bow did not good but a shot from a Sharps through the hat of the helmsman with a volley from our muskets which struck all around her stern and then came down her sale and up went a white flag...he came along thinking it best seeing 8 or 9 muskets pointed at him, On board was an old sesch, the owner of the Brig R. Bingham, took all four prisoners and took the lugger to the ship. It was loaded with livestock, pigs and chickens with a $900 - $1000 prize.  If I had a small boat I could have taken three more boats. Our commander gave the lugger and prisoners a pass to New Orleans...much more, is dissatisfaction with the leadership on his ship, longs for a position on a man of war." USS Morning Light (1853) was a sailing ship acquired by the Union Navy during the American Civil War. She was used by the Navy to patrol navigable waterways of the Confederacy to prevent the South from trading with other countries. Morning Light, an 8 gun ship, was built in 1853 by William Cramp and Sons at Kensington, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; launched 15 August 1853; purchased by the Navy 2 September 1861 at New York City; and commissioned 21 November 1861 at New York Navy Yard, Acting Volunteer Lt. Henry T. Moore in command. After fitting out for combat, Morning Light sailed from New York to cruise the lower U.S. East Coast in search of Confederate privateers and blockade runners. Morning Light returned to New York, arriving 28 February 1862. Assigned to Flag Officer David G. Farragut's West Gulf Blockading Squadron, Morning Light departed New York in March with provisions for ships in the Mississippi Sound area. On 15 April Farragut ordered her to remain with bark USS J. C. Kuhn off Ship Island, Mississippi, as protection for the Army command of Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler which provided occupation troops for New Orleans, Louisiana, after Farragut's fleet captured the city 25 April. By 27 May Morning Light was off Pensacola, Florida, performing blockade duties with sloop USS Vincennes. On 19 June sloop USS Florida, temporary tender for Morning Light, intercepted sloop Ventura, loaded with foodstuff for New Orleans, off Grant's Pass, Mobile Bay, Alabama. On 18 January 1863, Morning Light, Acting Master John Dillingham now in command, was ordered to blockade off Sabine Pass. Three days later two Confederate "cotton clad" steamers, Uncle Ben and Bell, with artillery and Texas infantry, attacked Morning Light and Schooner USS Velocity in a successful effort to destroy the blockade at Galveston, Texas. Due to the calm weather, neither Union sailing ship could evade the Confederate fire, and both were forced to strike their colors. Morning Light, left a riddled wreck, was taken by the Confederates 21 January and burned 2 days late. Very fine......................................................................$225.00

2029 -  THE LT COMMANDER TAKES $6000 IN GRAFT MONEY TO LET A SHIP OFF FOR SEA, WASHBURN REFUSES TO TAKE A PORTION OF THE GRAFT MONEY, A COURT MARTIAL WILL TAKE PLACE, USS Morning Star, July 27th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink with a postal cover stamped DUE 3, by Acting Master Henry W. Washburn to his wife. He relates in part...Lt. Moore has resigned and gone home...before he left he made an agreement with an owner of a ship to "get the ship off and ready for sea" [releasing a ship from being grounded with naval equipment]...he was to receive $6000 for it which was to be divided up among the crew [as prize money was]. We thought it was all right until he divided up the money. I finding it wrong with two more officers wrote the senior officer stating the case as it was. I wanted an investigation into the affair. It was wrong and against the law and I want money as bad as anyone but I will not take money earned illegally. I expect a court martial to be held for the officers who received money for the ship and if Mr. Spear does not look out he will be started out of the Navy. [Spear took over the ship after Moore left]. He expresses his contempt for Spear. He describes the departed Commander as a "Sesch" and Spear always agreed with him. More about his family matters back home, USS Morning Light (1853) was a sailing ship acquired by the Union Navy during the American Civil War. She was used by the Navy to patrol navigable waterways of the Confederacy to prevent the South from trading with other countries. Morning Light, an 8 gun ship, was built in 1853 by William Cramp and Sons at Kensington, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; launched 15 August 1853; purchased by the navy 2 September 1861 at New York City; and commissioned 21 November 1861 at New York Navy Yard, Acting Volunteer Lt. Henry T. Moore in command After fitting out for combat, Morning Light sailed from New York to cruise the lower U.S. East Coast in search of Confederate privateers and blockade runners. Morning Light returned to New York, arriving 28 February 1862. Assigned to Flag Officer David G. Farragut's West Gulf Blockading Squadron, Morning Light departed New York in March with provisions for ships in the Mississippi Sound area. On 15 April Farragut ordered her to remain with bark USS J. C. Kuhn off Ship Island, Mississippi, as protection for the Army command of Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler which provided occupation troops for New Orleans, Louisiana, after Farragut's fleet captured the city 25 April. By 27 May Morning Light was off Pensacola, Florida, performing blockade duties with sloop USS Vincennes. On 19 June sloop USS Florida, temporary tender for Morning Light, intercepted sloop Ventura, loaded with foodstuff for New Orleans, off Grant's Pass, Mobile Bay, Alabama. On 18 January 1863, Morning Light, Acting Master John Dillingham now in command, was ordered to blockade off Sabine Pass. Three days later two Confederate "cotton clad" steamers, Uncle Ben and Bell, with artillery and Texas infantry, attacked Morning Light and schooner USS Velocity in a successful effort to destroy the blockade at Galveston, Texas. Due to the calm weather, neither Union sailing ship could evade the Confederate fire, and both were forced to strike their colors. Morning Light, left a riddled wreck, was taken by the Confederates 21 January and burned 2 days late. Very fine. 2 items....................................................$155.00

2030 - A COURT MARTIAL WILL TAKE PLACE OVER THE TAKING OF MONEY TO HELP A GROUNDED SHIP BY THE EX COMMANDER OF OUR SHIP, FARRAGUT HAS LEFT FOR PENSACOLA, DESCRIBES THE REBEL PRISONERS AS UGLY AS DEVILS, USS Morning Light, Ship Island, August 9th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink to his Father by Acting Master Henry W. Washburn. He relates in part...describing the hot weather at hand, describes the late Commander Moore who took illegal money from an Under miters Agent to free a ship grounded for $6000. He divided $1450 among the ship's company giving men $5 to $25, and more to specific officers who are not allowed to take such money...he describes the new Master taking the place of the late Commander Moore as a 'Pimp and rum runner' named Spear. Hears there will be a court martial when the Commodore comes down and the officers who took the money having a good chance of being cashiered. Describes his slow sailing ship but would make a good ship for action because shot would go through her without splinters being so soft in spots rotten. I  hope the North will soon find out that the Rebels are really fighting in earnest and act accordingly. Here they seem to be as ugly as devils if we can take the word of refugees who come over for protection. I took some prisoners over to the mainland a few weeks ago and there was one prisoner who got some water for the crew who were with me and after I left they were mobbing the man who gave us water. While I was there they were supple as deer, for I had the men armed besides having a small rifled gun mounted on wheels. Washburn continues from his previous letter describing the illegal kickback Lt. Moore took for freeing the ship and his contempt for Moore and his sidekick Spear...USS Morning Light (1853) was a sailing ship acquired by the Union Navy during the American Civil War. She was used by the Navy to patrol navigable waterways of the Confederacy to prevent the South from trading with other countries. Morning Light, an 8 gun ship, was built in 1853 by William Cramp and Sons at Kensington, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; launched 15 August 1853; purchased by the Navy 2 September 1861 at New York City; and commissioned 21 November 1861 at New York Navy Yard, Acting Volunteer Lt. Henry T. Moore in command. After fitting out for combat, Morning Light sailed from New York to cruise the lower U.S. East Coast in search of Confederate privateers and blockade runners. Morning Light returned to New York, arriving 28 February 1862. Assigned to Flag Officer David G. Farragut's West Gulf Blockading Squadron, Morning Light departed New York in march with provisions for ships in the Mississippi Sound area. On 15 April Farragut ordered her to remain with bark USS J. C. Kuhn off Ship Island, Mississippi, as protection for the Army command of Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler which provided occupation troops for New Orleans, Louisiana, after Farragut's fleet captured the city 25 April. By 27 May Morning Light was off Pensacola, Florida, performing blockade duties with sloop USS Vincennes. On 19 June sloop USS Florida, temporary tender for Morning Light, intercepted sloop Ventura, loaded with foodstuff for New Orleans, off Grant's Pass, Mobile Bay, Alabama. On 18 January 1863, Morning Light, Acting Master John Dillingham, now in command, was ordered to blockade off Sabine Pass. Three days later two Confederate "cotton clad" steamers, Uncle Ben and Bell, with artillery and Texas infantry, attacked Morning Light and schooner USS Velocity in a successful effort to destroy the blockade at Galveston, Texas. Due to the calm weather, neither Union sailing ship could evade the Confederate fire, and both were forced to strike their colors. Morning Light, left a riddled wreck, was taken by the Confederates 21 January and burned 2 days late. Very fine...........................................................$165.00


RARE DOCUMENTS OF THE 6TH MAINE BATTERY HEROES AT GETTYSBURG

1162 - BVT. GENERAL JOHN CALDWELL TIDBALL, Tidball served all through the Civil War, being brevetted five times for gallant and meritorious conduct on the field, and being complimented personally by President Abraham Lincoln for his work at the Battle of Gettysburg, where he was in command of the Second Brigade Horse Artillery under MG Alfred Pleasonton. He served in most of the major campaigns in the Eastern Theater, from the First Battle of Bull Run through the Siege of Petersburg. At the outbreak of hostilities, he ranked as a first lieutenant and section chief in Captain William F. Barry's Company A, 2nd Regiment of Artillery. After Barry's promotion, Tidball was promoted to captain and became the company commander. Tidball served with his "flying" battery as part of the famed U.S. Horse Artillery Brigade from its inception in 1861 until June 1863. With slow advancement in the ranks of the regular United States Army (especially in the artillery branch). Tidball sought higher responsibilities elsewhere, by accepting a commission in the U.S. Volunteers. He was appointed colonel of the 4th New York Artillery in August 1863, and commanded the artillery of the II Corps of the Army of the Potomac during the Overland Campaign, including the Battle of the Wilderness. He was commandant of cadets at West Point from July through September 1864, and then returned to the field, leading the artillery of the IX Corps from October 1864 until April 1865 in the Appomattox Campaign. He became a brigadier general of volunteers and a brevet major general in 1865. His signature as Colonel Commanding Brigade, December 2nd, 1864, 10" X 16" pre-printed and filled in application for replacement parts for a cannon belonging to the 6th Main Battery, Camp McGilvery, Virginia during the siege of Petersburg. Also signed by Lt. William Rogers who was in command of the battery [6th Maine Battery, Captain Dow in command of the 6th Maine Battery at Gettysburg gives Rogers credit for saving cannons there...Dow Acknowledged Rogers.] "I was ably seconded by Lieut. Rogers, to whom we owe much of our success." According to Dow, Rogers ventured out after the repulse of the Confederates and discovered abandoned cannon. They belonged to Watson's Fifth U.S. Artillery, and had fallen into enemy hands early in the action. Dow summoned as many men as he could spare and sent them under Rogers's command to bring them back. "With the aid of the Garibaldi Guard, of New York, he brought off, under a fire from the enemy's sharpshooters, four 3-inch rifled guns and two limbers," Dow reported, "which we immediately limbered on our caissons and ran to the rear." Dow credited Rogers with saving the guns in his official report. But commanders of the Garibaldi Guard (Thirty-ninth New York Infantry) and Watson's Fifth did not mention Rogers in their reports. The Sixth Maine participated in the repulse of Pickett's Charge the next day, and went on to serve in all the major campaigns with the Army of the Potomac. [Items listed were an elevating box and a rear assembly bolt for a 12# cannon - parts were noted as worn out.] Rogers served with distinction at Gettysburg when the 6th Maine Battery shined during Pickett's Charge. Two nice Gettysburg related signatures, fine.......................................................$195.00

A LISTING OF THE SHOT AND SHELL FIRED BY THE 6TH MAINE BATTERY AT GETTYSBURG

1163 - FANTASTIC ABSTRACT OF STORES USED BY THE 6TH MAINE BATTERY INCLUDING A LIST OF THE SHOT AND SHELL USED AT THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, 10" X 22", pre-printed and filed-in field form listing all the stores used by the 6th Maine Battery in the 3rd Quarter of 1863. On page 1 is listed: "In action at Gettysburg, 120 solid shot for light 12# cannon, 44 shells, 208 spiracle case [shot], and 27 canister shot. On the verso is shown artillery equipment used such as chains, horse show nails, bridle leather, wheel grease, horse shoes, iron chain, roller buckles, files, file handles, etc. All listed by quantity used during that quarter. The 6th Maine Battery was commanded by Captain Edwin Dow. Dow's 6th Maine Battery. Dow's Battery was Battery F of the 6th Maine Light Artillery and was part of the 4th Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve. Dow was attached to McGilvery's 1st Volunteer Brigade during most of the battle. Thrown into action on July 2 as the Federal Third Corps withdrew, the battery fought east of the Trostle Farm. Later it relocated on Cemetery ridge, where it participated in the actions of July 3. The battery brought four 12-pounder Napoleon guns into the battle, and lost none. Eight men of the battery were wounded, and five horses were lost. In the 1867 U.S. adjunct general's report on Gettysburg, said Dow's Battery indeed played a pivotal role in the outcome of the war. "At Gettysburg, under the command of Lt. Dow, the battery won an enviable reputation." It stemmed the Rebel onset when the 3rd Corps fell back. Success was due to the fact that the battery was well directed and produced rapid fire, which both broke the Rebel column and also prevented the Confederates from securing the guns of two batteries they had previously captured. Dow's Battery was just six cannons, or "guns", as they were called: four 12-pound brass Napoleons and two 10-pound parrot rifles. Many of the other units in the area had run short of ammunition, but Dow's Battery had been held back as a reserve unit and was fresh and had plenty of ammunition. His battery was one of the four that destroyed Pickett's Charge on July 3rd, 1863. Dow credited the success of his battery to an abundance of the right kind of ammunition. "What saved me was that I had a whole lot of canister. While those rebels were charging us we were sending 3,000 bullets a minute into them. Though everything was going to smash around us, my battery, somehow, kept in good shape. We lost only fourteen men." A fantastic accounting of the shot and shell fired at the charging Rebels July 2 and 3rd, 1863. Fine, some minor edge fissures - closed................................................$495.00

1165 - 6TH MAINE BATTERY, BEFORE PETERSBURG, CAPTAIN EDWIN DOW OF GETTYSBURG FAME LISTS THE UNSERVICEABLE ITEMS IN HIS COMMAND, 18" X 20" pre-printed and filled-in inventory the unserviceable items in his battery by Captain Edwin Dow of the 6th Maine Battery. The list includes the items deemed unserviceable, how long they were in use, and the condition of the item. Some items includes were 15 sabers in use for two years and "worn out", sponges, spur straps, rifle bayonet, globe lanterns, rubber buckets, cartridge boxes, rubber blankets, saber belts and plates, cap pouches, and many more items. Dow signs this large form along with the brigade inspector. Dated September 5th, 1864 before Petersburg, VA. Dockets on the verso shows referred to General Henry Hunt and approved by his inspector of artillery Lt. Colonel E. L. Warner. Young Edwin Dow was a 26 year old Portland, Maine resident when on February 6, 1862 he was commissioned 2nd Lt. in Freeman McGilvery's 6th Maine Battery. He would rise to the rank of Captain and at Gettysburg his name would be etched in stone as commander of Dow's 6th Maine Battery. Dow's Battery was Battery F of the 6th Maine Light Artillery and was part of the 4th Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve. Dow was attached to McGilvery's 1st Volunteer Brigade during most of the battle. Thrown into action on July 2 as the Federal Third Corps withdrew, the battery fought east of the Trostle Farm. Later it relocated on Cemetery Ridge, where it participated in the actions of July 3. The battery brought four 12-pounder Napoleon guns into the battle, and lost none. In the 1867 U.S. adjunct general's report on Gettysburg, said Dow's Battery indeed played a pivotal role in the outcome of the war. "At Gettysburg, under the command of Lt. Dow, the battery won an enviable reputation. It stemmed the Rebel onset when the 3rd Corps fell back. Success was due to the fact that the battery was well directed and produced rapid fire, which both broke the Rebel column and also prevented the Confederates from securing the guns of two batteries they had previously captured." Dow's Battery was just six cannons, or "guns," as they were called: four 12-pound brass napoleons and two 10-pound parrot rifles. Many of the other units in the area had run short of ammunition, but Dow's Battery had been held back as a reserve unit and was fresh, and had plenty of ammunition. His battery was one of the four that destroyed Pickett's Charge on July 3rd, 1863. Very fine................................................$175.00

1167 - A MEMBER OF THE 6TH MAINE BATTERY BROUGHT UP ON DESERTION CHARGES BUT HE HAD A PREVIOUS TRIAL, ON THE SAME CHARGES, Headquarters Army of the Potomac, Office of Judge Advocate stationary, 3 pages in ink 8" X 10", to General S. Williams by Major George G. Hastings, July 29th, 1864, a legal analysis of the case where Sergeant George S. Henderson of the 6th Maine Battery should be tried again for the charge of desertion requested by General Meade as his first trial was interrupted by a movement of the army and it would be difficult to reassemble the court to continue the first trial. Hastings refers to several army regulations regarding the retrial of Henderson. Hastings determines that no new trial can be ordered. Very detailed. The 6th Maine and Henderson served with distinction at the Battle of Gettysburg on July 2nd and 3rd, repelling Confederate advances including Picketts Charge on July 3rd. Very fine.................................................$175.00

1168 - THE JUDGE ADVOCATE REVERSES HIS DECISION ON THE RETRIAL OF SERGEANT GEORGE S. HENDERSON OF THE 6TH MAINE BATTERY ON CHARGES OF DESERTION, Headquarters Army of the Potomac, Office of Judge Advocate, to General S. Williams from Major George G. Hastings, August 5th, 1864. 3 pages in ink, Hastings reverses his previous decision that Sergeant George S. Henderson of the 6th Maine Battery could not be retried for desertion. He cites that this case does not follow the guidelines of the 87th article of war and the soldier can be retried. Henderson served under Captain Dow at the battle of Gettysburg in the 6th Maine Battery and previous correspondence shows that Dow's superior Colonel McGilvery had pursued the charges against Henderson against the wishes of Dow and had even threatened Dow for his support of Henderson. Quite possibly McGilvery's influence played a part in this reversal. McGilvery died in the next month during surgery after the being administered Chloroform. Docketed by staff members of Hancock and Meade, well written, very fine, Included is the docket wrapper for this document also signed by a multitude of staff officers with a synopsis of the trial of Henderson.....................$185.00


9055 - RARE BROADSIDE ANNOUNCING THE VICTORY AT ANTIETAM, The Ohio State Journal [Columbus, Ohio], September 17 [1862], uniface broadside edition 7" X 18", two column extra broadside with headlines claiming a great Union Victory at Antietam, the Rebel army in retreat, gives details of the forces involved and strengths of the armies, report that D. H. Hill was killed, militia in Pennsylvania in readiness for a possible Rebel attack north, surgeons and medicines being rushed in from Washington, a great number of Rebel prisoners taken, Jackson sending 40,000 reinforcements to Lee. Fighting is mainly by the rear Rebel guard as they are being pushed towards the Potomac. A rare northern paper account of the battles near Antietam/Sharpsburg, fine, un-trimmed............................................$295.00

9058 - A RARE CIVIL WAR LETTER WRITTEN BY A DANISH SOLDIER, April 1862, two pages in ink by a solider who simply signs the letter "Nielson", written in Danish with a reference to "Okolona" and several references to Generals in the Danish text. There were approximately 1000 Danes that served in the Civil War mainly from Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa. Many of these units fought in Mississippi [Shiloh-Corinth]. There were 26 soldiers named "Nielson" listed on the rolls. This letter is very rare regardless of the non-translated text. Old split seam restored, in bold ink and just needs to be translated. The first Danish soldier letter we have ever handled.................................................$150.00


5277 - BLOCKADE RUNNERS GET IN AGAIN, SENT OUT BOATS TO SCOUT THE REBEL FLEET, THE TENNESSEE AND BALTIC LAY AWAITING OUR FLEET BUT THEY MAY ATTACK FIRST, May 21st, 1864, Saturday night [off Mobile], 12 pages in ink by Engineer George P. Hunt on board the USS Metacomet. He relates in part, He has lost a trusted friend McMurray in the "Chenango Affair" who was a 2nd Engineer. He feels that they are being "Blacklisted" doing too much or too little, then overlooked by the authorities. In our case were posted in a very dangerous place and as a gale approached our Captain concluded to enter the sound as the barometer fell rapidly. Captain Jenkins of the "Richmond" sent a boat in after us and gave us the most disagreeable station for 21 days. Close attention needs to be paid to our boilers. News of Grant near Richmond. Last Saturday, a steamer ran out successfully but discovered by our picket boat. But we had problems with signals and she escaped. The "Itasca" lay close to the shore and it was to intercept her and drive her back out in the channel as they always run in close to shore. The "Itasca" got her cable caught on her propeller and signaled "Assistance I need." But at the same time one boat signaled red & white instead of white and red. The confusion allowed the steamer to escape safe while we all attached her running out. The Admiral [Farragut] just arrived on the "Hartford". We go to Pensacola for a few days for coaling. Everyone is scared here about the rebel rams. A deserter came in and reported that they were going to attack our fleet with two gunboats and two rams. Sunday, describes fishing trip nearby where they caught over 600 fish snapper and catfish, most 12 - 13 pounds fish but some up to 60 pounds with our lines. We also caught a 1000 pound shark and when opened it had several cats and dogs inside! The shark struck one man on deck with his tail and he went head over heels. We are laying now facing Fort Morgan and we can see Fort Gaines and Powell. I believe they are evacuating Fort Powell and laying obstruction in the channel. Reports say there are about 6 miles of batteries after passing Fort Morgan and 50 torpedoes; there was a great storm the other night as we almost lost the picket boats as the rolling seas made it difficult to come along side of us. To remain out would have resulted in being driven to shore and captured as the shore is lined with cavalry scouts watching for blockage runners. We succeeded in picking them up but one man suffered a broken leg getting out of a boat. We sent a boat to Dauphin Isle to watch the Bay for rams and ironclads. They saw two, the "Tennessee" and the "Baltic" ironclad rams and the "Selma" and the "Gaines: gunboats." Captain Leroy has made over $100,000 on a prize the "Desoto" captured. I suppose he does not care much for attacking them now. An excellent letter on the affairs in Mobile Bay in late May where blockade runners still came into Mobile quite easily much to the chagrin of Hunt and his ship seeming being out of the action for one reason or another on a "blacklist".....................................................$395.00


100813 - MEDICAL DISCHARGE FROM THE MARINE HOSPITAL AT NEW ORLEANS, 8" X 10", pre-printed and filled in discharge for William F. Hungerford, 156th NYV was discharged for medical reasons, signed by the Surgeon in charge, US Marine Hospital, New Orleans, LA, January 27th, 1863, fine......................................$55.00

72204 - A NEW ORLEANS SHIPPER INSURES HIS SHIPMENTS IN 1864, Home Mutual Insurance Co., of New Orleans, corner Camp and Natchez Streets. 8" X 10" Marine insurance policy tipped into a leather bound folio purchased by Newman Murphy on October 15th, 1864 for goods shipped out of New Orleans in sailing or steam ships. At this time the City was under federal control as the City had fallen to Federal forces in April 1862. Intricate details as to the limits of the coverage are included mentioning exceptions of coverage including blockade and seizure as Confederate riders still sailed in the Gulf of operated in the Gulf of Mexico at this time. Very fine, 50 Cent Revenue stamp affixed........................................................$125.00

7045 - COLONEL W. E. DOSTER, COMMANDER OF THE MOUNTED PROVOST GUARD OF WASHINGTON DISTRIBUTES ARMS AND OTHER GOODS TO CAPTAIN HENRY B. TODD OF THE PROVOST MARSHALL OF WASHINGTON, February 20th, 1863, 2 legal pages of manuscript on Head Quarters Provost Marshall's Office, Washington. Numerous items were turned over to Todd by Doster which probably were captured items from Rebel sympathizers in and around Washington as Doster was in command of 4 infantry regiments, 1 cavalry regiment, and a boat flotilla cruising the Chesapeake...some of the goods Todd took in possession of were: 23 swords, 1 colt rifle, 1 sharps rifle, haversacks, bayonets, gun barrels, liquor, Colt revolvers, knapsacks, medicine, sabers, and much more. Captain Henry B. Todd was a commander of the Lincoln Cavalry in 1861, with the job of guarding the capital. After being captured by the Confederates, Todd was later exchanged for a Confederate prisoner of war, and went on to become provost marshal of Washington, DC. Though he was of no relation to Lincoln's wife, Mary Todd, his CDV was found in Lincoln's personal album. Very fine.......................................................$125.00

7046 - AN ACCOUNTING OF MONEY BELONGING TO THE CONTRABAND FUND AND ITEMS BELONGING TO CAPTURED PRISONERS IN WASHINGTON, DC, Letter sheet, 2 large pages 8" X 13", HEADQUARTERS PROVOST MARSHALL, WASHINGTON, DC, February 20th, 1863, an accounting of items in the office and safe signed by Captain Henry Todd Captain of the Provost Marshall, noted are: Funds turned over by Lt. Colonel W. E. Doster of the 21st Penn. Belonging to the Contraband Fund [$205.67]. Items stored in the iron sale in the office in Washington a pocket book and papers belonging to John Brown a servant of General Geary. $38 in Virginia notes belonging to I. Newman C. C. P. [Capital City Prison - a prisoner], several envelopes containing various amounts of money belonging to Thomas Griffin and Samuel Bell, another containing money belonging to J. W. Litchfield when arrested, another with money forfeited from a Penn. soldier for failure to appear, a pocket book belonging to Samuel and Joseph Jenkins prisoners in Old Capital [Prison], an envelope containing funds from fines received for persons selling civilian clothing to soldiers [afraid this would lead to desertions by soldiers wearing civilian clothing and blending into the population], vouchers and money belonging to the Contraband fund. An Captain Henry B. Todd was a commander of the Lincoln Cavalry in 1861, with the job of guarding the capital. After being captured by the Confederates, Todd was later exchanged for a Confederate prisoner of war, and went on to become provost marshal of Washington, DC. Though he was of no relation to Lincoln's wife, Mary Todd, his CDV was found in Lincoln's personal album, an unusual and lengthy document from the Provost Office in Washington. Captain Henry B. Todd was a commander of the Lincoln Cavalry in 1861, with the job of guarding the capital. After being captured by the Confederates, Todd was later exchanged for a Confederate prisoner of war, and went on to become provost marshal of Washington, DC. Though he was of no relation to Lincoln's wife, Mary Todd, his CDV was found in Lincoln's personal album. Fine.......................................................$125.00

7048 - A LIST OF POTENTIAL WOMEN SPIES IN THE WASHINGTON AREA NOTED ON PROVOST MARSHAL STATIONARY 1862, 8" X 10" on imprinted HEADQUARTERS PROVOST MARSHAL'S OFFICE______62, Washington, DC, notes regarding the activities of three named women and the current information the Provost Marshal has regarding their activities..."Mary "Beauregard" Hepbun of Georgetown, forwarding letters to Mrs. Dishield in Richmond by the latter's brother. Is Secesh and knows the secrets of the mail route. Who is Mrs. D's brother?...Anna Mathews of Georgetown writes to Albert E. M...Richmond, notes about her servant girl Ann, brags about sending letters with the O. C. P staring her in the face, her uncle left Georgetown carrying a large sum of gold...Mrs. Thomas Georgetown, and sister of Mr. Taylor...writes to her daughter at Manassas Junction [Victoria] says Sidney keeps his trunks packed to go to "Dixie" if he is drafted. She has one son James in the South, mentions a husband of a friend who is in the State Dept. at Richmond, the friend is staying with Mrs. Thomas." An interesting Provost Marshal report detailing the activities of potential spies and Rebel sympathizers near Washington. Unsigned manuscript, fine. This information was obviously gathered intercepting mail sent by these individuals........................................................$250.00

7049 - A FEDERAL SPY REPORTS ON THE ACTIVITIES OF HER NEIGHBORS, Headquarters, Provost Marshal's Office, Washington, DC,......62. A manuscript 8" X 10" Launder is know to me...thinks they have eight horses that are required for farming, Mrs. Launder's daughter-in-law Mrs. Fairfax stays there...John Sheckles stays with Mrs. Launders, has eight horses. 3 out of five horses were all out, Mr. Miller's son about one mile towards Blandenburg brought four in [horses]...Henry Dodson is at Mrs. Launders, more on horses owned by Mrs. Landers, Dr. Trufant was back at home last night, Nancy Fox." A local informer reports on the holdings and activities of suspected southern sympathizers in Maryland, some minor archival repairs to verso, otherwise very good.......................................................$175.00

7051 - THE WAR DEPARTMENT DEMANDS TO KNOW WHY THE PROVOST MARSHAL ARRESTED AN INDIVIDUAL AND IMPRISONED HIM, THEN DISCHARGED HIM, November 12th, 1862, 7" X 8" on War Department stationary written and signed by P. H. Watson Asst. Secretary of War to Major Doster demanding him to make an immediate report on the arrest and imprisonment and subsequent discharge of John Regriery. The writer underlines immediate. A corner was restored, bold ink. Possibly Doster failed to pursue charges against the individual or arrested him without due cause. Very good other than restoration......................................$135.00

7052 - A SOLDIER IN THE 2ND INFANTRY ATTESTS TO HIS DRUNKENNESS AND LOSING ALL HIS MONEY AT A FARO GAME IN A WASHINGTON SALOON, Headquarters Provost Marshal's Office, Washington, January 13th, 1863, two page affidavit, page one by the soldier 1st Lt. Abraham Grafius attesting that he lost $350 at the Hammacks Saloon on Pennsylvania Ave in a Faro Game due to being intoxicated, page two a fellow soldier also attests that he saw the Lt. intoxicated and lose about $300 at the Faro Bank at the before named saloon. Records show that Abraham had commendable service but was a chronic alcoholic. Two pages 8" X 10". Obviously the Provost Marshall was concerned about soldiers being allowed to gamble while intoxicated. Very fine, interesting content and commentary on this drunken soldier who lost his money playing Faro in a Washington saloon.........................................................$125.00

7053 - LETTER WRITTEN AND SIGNED BY CAPTAIN HENRY B. TODD TO BVT. GENERAL W. DOSTER REGARDING DOSTER ASSISTING HIM IN A INVESTIGATION OF HIM IN A COMPLICATED SCAM HE WAS INVOLVED IN, February 24th, 1864, 3 page ink letter to Doster describing his innocent involvement in a scam that centered around counterfeit postal currency the counterfeiter, the woman passing the counterfeit notes, jewelry he got involved in with her. Very detailed. Captain Henry B. Todd was a commander of the Lincoln Cavalry in 1861, with the job of guarding the capital. After being captured by the Confederates, Todd was later exchanged for a Confederate prisoner of war, and went on to become provost marshal of Washington, DC. Though he was of no relation to Lincoln's wife, Mary Todd, his CDV was found in Lincoln's personal album. On Todd's personal stationary. Very fine............................................$150.00


121222 - 1ST US CAVALRY LETTER BY JACOB DORMER, COMPANY E, 1ST US CAVALRY WITH HIS WAR PERIOD PHOTO TAKEN BY J. P. BALL OF CINCINNATI, AN AFRICAN- AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHER, 3 page letter in bold pencil to his sister, January 10th, 1864 with cover, Culpepper, VA. In the letter, he relates: mentions that he is now driving a team in the brigade and may re-enlist as the bounty is $804, questions his sister as to the where a bouts of his brother John and who he is serving under. He gets no response to his letters. The Rebels are coming over in our lines all of the time and for my part I wish they would all come over. He tells his sister to tell Miss Jane Reardon to stay single until he comes home and he will make it all right. Accompanying the Letter and cover is a CDV of Dormer standing taken by J. P. Ball of Cincinnati, Ohio. James Presley Ball, Sr. (1825 - May 4, 1904) was a prominent African-American photographer, abolitionist, and businessman. His photographs are very desirable. All three items.......................................$295.00

8012 - 3RD PENNSYLVANIA ARTILLERY, 12" X 22", hand-lined in red and black ink, December 1864. A large listing of articles transferred to officers at Camp Cadwalader in the month of December 1864 and signed by Lt. George P. Kimball, 3rd Penn. Artillery, AAQM includes all sorts of clothing, great coats, woolen blankets, canteens, forage caps, sergeant scales, jackets, etc. Near mint condition and a scarce unit.......................................$85.00

8013 - 14TH OHIO INFANTRY COMPANY I MUSTER OUT ROLL, Huge printed form and filled-in muster roll of dozens of men from Company I commanded by Captains William B. Pugh and J. W. McCabe until September 1864. Dozens of soldiers are listed, some KIA, some wounded, some died of disease, some prisoners, etc. Many were wounded at Chickamauga. This fine document measures 22" X 33" and is excellent condition for muster rolls as they are mostly torn and repaired due to their size. Organized for three months service April, 1861, and for three years on August 16th, 1861, by Col. James B. Steedman. The regiment was raised in the Toledo area. It served in West Virginia and in August 1861 transferred to Kentucky. It did good service in Tennessee and then participated in the battle of Chickamauga. Later it fought at Mission Ridge and the Atlanta campaign, doing good service at Jonesboro. It went with Sherman on the march to the Sea and the Carolina campaigns and mustered out of the service on the 11th day of July 1865. This document shows it was examined on July 6th, 1865 most probably at Louisville where the unit was mustered out of service. Excellent condition.............................................$125.00

8014 - A BRITISH AUTHOR GETS A PASS TO TRAVEL INTO VIRGINIA, Headquarters, Military District of Washington, November 15th, 1862, 6" X 8" manuscript pass on stationary mentioned previously allowing Lt. Colonel Malet [British Service] to pass and Bridge and Ferry to and from Virginia until further notice. This was Charles St. Lo Malet author of the book "An Errand to the South in the Summer of 1862." Over the command of Brig. General Wadsworth Military Governor of the District of Washington and signed by his Aide-de-Camp, Captain Henry B. Todd who was later the provost marshal of the Old Capital Prison in Washington and a member of the Lincoln Cavalry. A unique and scarce document issued to one of the few British observers to McClellan's Army. Very fine...................................$150.00


BVT. GENERAL CLARKE S. EDWARDS, COLONEL OF THE 5TH MAINE INFANTRY

The Fifth Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was one of the first Maine regiments to be mustered in. The regiment consisted of 1046 men (another 500 joined later) from southern and central Maine. Three of the ten companies in the regiment were composed of men from Portland, thus earning the regiment the nickname the Forest City Regiment. (Portland was known as the Forest City). The men left Portland by train in July 1861, stopping briefly in New York where they were presented with a silk flag by Portlanders living in that area. Upon arriving in Washington, the regiment was assigned to the Sixth Corps of the Army of the Potomac. The Fifth fought in 22 battles from First Bull Run (Manassas) to Petersburg. During the battle of Rappahannock Station, the regiment is credited with capturing 4 Confederate battle flags and 1200 prisoners (several of them officers). The Fifth was known as one of Maine's fighting regiments. It captured more prisoners than the number of men who served in the regiment and three times the number of battle flags than any other Maine regiment captured. After three long years only 193 men were mustered out in July 1864. The rest had been killed in action, died from disease, wounded, deserted, or transferred to other regiments. When news of the attack on Fort Sumter reached the small town of Bethel, Maine, Clark S. Edwards was high on a ladder shingling his roof. He immediately climbed down, obtained permission from the appropriate authorities to form a company of men, and set out to gather recruits from Bethel and the surrounding towns. This group became Company I, Fifth Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry with Edwards as its Captain. He rose through the ranks and was appointed Colonel of the regiment following the resignation of Colonel E. A. Scammon in January 1863. He then commanded that regiment from January 1863 until the end of the war. The battles that Edwards commanded the 5th Maine after January 1863.

Chancellorsville

May 2 & 3, 1863

Gettysburg

July 1, 2 & 3, 1863

Rappahannock Station

November 7, 1863

Rapidan Crossing

November 8, 1863

Orange Grove

November 27, 1863

Mine Run

November 29, 1863

The Wilderness

May 5, 1864

Spotsylvania

May 10, 11 & 12, 1864

Cold Harbor

June 1, 1864

Petersburg

June 19-22, 1864

Edwards Archive 1861 - 62

51600 - THEY ARRIVE NEAR WASHINGTON BEFORE BULLS RUN, Monday, July 8th, 1861. Two page letter in pencil from Captain Clark Edwards to his wife [later Colonel of the 5th Maine], no place but in Virginia near Alexandria. He relates in part, a short but newsy note by Edwards mentioning getting paid in Washington and sending money back home as quick as he can, mentions a man shot in a regiment joining them last night, they are near Washington, C. S. Edwards to his wife, [Edwards later becomes the regimental Colonel and later Bvt. General].............................................$65.00

51601 - REGIMENTS ARRIVE IN PREPARATIONS FOR THE FIGHT UPCOMING AT BULLS RUN, Meridian Hill, VA, July 8th, 1861. Two page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards later Colonel of the 5th Maine. He relates in part to her, "I leave here tonight for Falls Church below Alexandria, you will get a good report from me as soon as I get a chance to have a fight and do not get killed, the regiments is in confusion, the 4th Maine is now taking down their tents, more on breaking camp, can't write any more, kiss the children for me."  Edwards abruptly ends the letter without signing but it comes with a postal cover with a partial stamp that Edwards addresses to his wife in Bristol, Maine.....................................$85.00

51605 - A WOMAN SURPRISES HER SOLDIER HUSBAND IN CAMP, Claremont, VA, August 9th, 1861, 4 large pages in ink with a postal cover [partial stamp] addressed to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, later Colonel of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, "left camp, been on guard duty, purchases green corn, peaches, apples, coffee, the government owes him $200, gives an emotional account of the surprise visit from a woman from Lewiston, Maine to her husband at camp, he stood like a ghost at the door of his tent when he saw her and they embraced, the Quartermaster gave up his tent to them, much more about affairs in camp as the 5th Maine was camped near Washington after the Battle of Bulls Run. Letter and cover..............................................$85.00

51606 - THE REGIMENTAL SURGEON HAS JUST RETURNED FROM VISITING THE PRISONERS AT RICHMOND, Near Fort Ellsworth [near Alexandria], August 14th, 1861, 4 large pages in ink by Captain Clark Edwards 5th Maine [later Colonel of the regiment], to his wife. He relates in part, "We expected a fight with the Rebels Sunday night but it did not occur, I don't think there are any Rebels this side of Fairfax, they have 25,000 men near Fairfax, I stopped at the old ground [Bulls Run battlefield] with several of my company. We will move to Fort Ellsworth and join a new brigade, he mentions that the Surgeon has returned from Richmond and reports on wounded men there, mentions a prisoner there who will soon be released, states that the Rebels were beaten at Bulls Run and lost twice the number of men than the Union forces, he feels there will be no more fighting that Fall and they will stay at Fort Ellsworth, we went to a house where the owner is in the Rebel army and plunder it to get some of the items we lost at Bulls Run but I don't like stealing, just found out we will move again tomorrow, that makes six times we have moved since the fight at Bulls Run, much more by Edwards..." included is the postal cover stamp removed addressed to his wife [another autograph]............................................$120.00

51608 - THE 5TH MAINE AWAITS NEW RECRUITS TO REPLACE MISSING MEN FROM BULLS RUN, Camp Vernon, near Alexandria, VA, August 20th, 1861, 4 large pages in ink to his wife from Captain Clark S. Edwards, later Colonel of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, "It will three or four weeks to get some recruits to fill our ranks, would ask for a furlough if I did not fear an attack here and you would know what would be said if that happens, much more on the camp affairs, mentions his servant "Jimmie", news about camp mates, news from home. A very newsy letter written at Camp Vernon which was a short distance away from Mount Vernon." Edwards' regiment is awaiting new recruits to replace the missing at Bulls Run due to injury, death, capture, or desertion...........................................$95.00

51611 - SENDING A FLAG HOME TO MAINE, Camp Vernon, September 6th, 1861, four page letter in ink by Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine to his wife.  He relates in part, "We are in the brigade with the 16th, 26th, and 27th NY under Colonel Davies, will be able to send $200 home, had been out on picket last night in the rain, mentions sending a flag home ]possibly a captured Confederate flag]. Much more news about the camp, commanders, more on the brigade, comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed, two items....................................................$85.00

51616 - HE WILL SOON SEND HIS PICTURE HOME, Mount Eagle, VA, October 1st, 1861, 4 large pages in ink to his wife from Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, I have been out on picket again, and am the officer of the day, notes that the supplies sent all arrived safe except one bottle that broke, the bread was molded so it was thrown away but the cakes and pies were fine. Much about affairs in camp as he is off duty for the first time in three weeks, wants his wife to write three times a week, he will have his picture made and send, he has not shaved since he arrived in Virginia..............................$75.00

51620 - WHILE ON PICKET THE BOYS STOLE PIGS AND HONEY FROM A SECESH HOUSE, Friday, October 25th, 1861, [near Camp near Washington], 4 page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Infantry. He relates in part, Just came in from picket where the boys stole geese, honey, and pigs all belonging to the Secesh. It is very cold here as I will need a stove as it is as cold as Maine, gave away honey this morning, took about 75 pounds out of a hive, I am now field officer with lots to do. All is quiet in camp this morning, mentions not much has happened since Bulls Run......................$85.00

51621 - A FIEND WANTS TO BE A SUTLER, THE NEW YORK TROOPS ARE PLAYING BALL [BASEBALL], Camp Franklin, Sunday Afternoon, October 27th, 1861 [in Virginia], 4 large pages to his wife from Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, He details his job as field Officer in inspecting the different camps of the Brigade, how they are lined up on his arrival, he describes a friend named Chas who wants to be a regimental Sutler. It is a well paying job and you double up on everything you sell. I can see a New York Regiment playing ball. It does not seem like a New England Sunday. The men are washing clothes, cooking, lounging around, some drinking, others playing games [cards/dice]. There are good and bad men in the army. The weather is very cold, frost on the ground, quite cold in our tents. he will send money home as he does not want to keep that much there were him and he is getting paid again soon. A very detailed letter on becoming a regimental Sutler in the Army and a very early comment on the New York troops playing baseball in camp. Comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards postmarked Alexandria, VA..........................................$125.00

51622 - JIMMY HIS SERVANT DOES THE BEST HE CAN IN THE ABSENCE OF A WOMAN TO TAKE CARE OF HIM, Wednesday evening, November 6th, 1861, 8 page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Infantry.  He relates in part, It is cold and rainy in camp, bought a pair of new boots for $65 that he could have bought in Maine for $5,00, it costs a lot to live in camp and have no woman to wash or mend clothing, "Jimmy" his servant does the best he can. He relates about a soldier who went home on furlough feigning illness who has been absent from the Company since August 1st. The Colonel does not want him back neither do other members of the company. he will send home $200 once he pays some borrowed money he owes. Come with a stamped cover [stamp impaired] postmarked Alexandria, VA by Edwards to his wife................................$95.00

51626 - HIS COMPANY WAS THE BEST IN THE REGIMENT AT THE GRAND REVIEW, Monday Morning [November 22nd, 1861], two page letter in ink from Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine to his wife. He relates in part, It is very cold with snow on the ground the citizens here say the cold weather follows the "Yankee". he repeats the accolades that were given to his regiment after the Grand Review. "Slocum's Brigade was the best in the army, the 5th Maine was the best in the Brigade, and his company I was the best in the regiment, describes the cost of milk and butter in camp, will send more money soon home." Letter comes with a cover addressed by Edwards to his wife with the stamp removed....................................................$80.00

51627 - HE WILL GO TO WASHINGTON TO HEAR THE PRESIDENT ADDRESS CONGRESS, Wednesday Evening, November 27th, 1861, 4 page letter to his wife in red ink with a short one page attachment by Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, it is very cold, been out on picket for the first time in a while, I plan to go to Washington when Congress convenes and hear the President's message, John and I plan to go on Monday. John is playing chess with Lt. Packard of Company K, Jimmy is looking at them play [his servant], more on his anticipated visit home to Maine. An attached note informs his wife that he is in command of the Regiment while the Colonel is gone. The letter comes with a stamped postal cover to his wife addressed by Edwards postmarked Washington, three items....................................................$95.00

51629 - HE MISSES THE PRESIDENT ADDRESSING CONGRESS, THE SUTLER IS LEAVING CAMP, Wednesday evening, December 4th, 1861, 4 large pages i ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He went to Washington to hear the President but he did not speak that day, went to a boarding house with a friend and went to the theater, then went to the National Hotel for the night at a cost of $1. We returned to camp the next day. He describes the winter quarters using logs up about three feet being the base of the tents. Mentions that the Bartlett's will soon leave camp [Sutlers] as they have made a great deal of money over the summer selling goods and have a very good trade. Wishes his friend Chas could get the post [Sutler] but another young man is in line for the position. A beautiful morning it is as I have just come in from dress parade.................................................$110.00

51630 - A YANK ENTERS THE CONFEDERATE ARMY AFTER MARRYING A SECESH GIRL, Camp of the 5th Maine Vol., Near White Oak Church, VA, January 9th, 1862, 4 large 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife from Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, Mentions his recent fall from his horse with a minor injury, he knows the children are disappointed that he has not come home, mentions somebody has gone into the Confederate army and has taken a Secesh wife. Mentions that the Surgeon has resigned as well as several other officers in the regiment but several have withdrawn their papers, much more on the affairs in the camp, a very newsy letter. The long letter comes with a postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards postmarked Washington with a DUE 3 stamp applied, two items.............................................$95.00

51631 - WHITE OAK CHURCH, VIRGINIA, Headquarters, 5th Maine Vol., near White Oak Church, January 10th, 1862, six pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards. He relates in part, Captain Walker is dead set about getting the position of Major. The armies of the west have not done a thing since last Spring till the last fight, much about members in his company, several ill, one in Washington, one working on the ambulance train. Includes a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp impaired, 2 items..................$85.00

51632 - HAS LOST A MAN IN THE COMPANY AND HIS BODY SENT HOME, Camp Franklin [VA], January 20th, 1862, 1 large page in ink, to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, Got back to camp and found many sick, poor Dolloff is dead, his body has been sent back home to Gorham and I am sure youhave heard about it. He died last Thursday. He describes his trip back to Virginia via boat through Washington and Alexandria. The weather is very rainy and the mud is knee deep. Have to go on picket so I can't write much more. A postal cover addressed to his wife is addressed by Edwards, stamp has been removed...............................................$85.00

51633 - AN OFFICER IS BLOCKED FOR PROMOTION WILL RESIGN, Leesburg Turnpike, VA, January 22nd, 1862, 3 large pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine Infantry. He relates in part, He mentions an officer who will be blocked in his promotion and has submitted his resignation, have been out on picket, upon my return have found many in the regiment sick including the Colonel in bed, will soon go to Washington to get my pay, the mud is awful, it cost much to return to Virginia, much more on camp affairs. Included is a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edward, stamp impaired......................................................$85.00

51638 - A FATHER GIVES ADVISE TO HIS CHILDREN, Camp Franklin, VA, March 30th, 1862, a two page letter in ink to his children from Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Infantry. He relates in part, It is a great comfort to me to receive a letter from your mother that you are good children. Kate, I am very glad to hear that you are going to school and doing well this spring. I shall find a boy for you in camp if you do not find one before that time. Do you follow at the meeting [religious meeting] as I had expected you to get religion before this time. Frank I am glad to hear that you are learning well. Be good and do not quarrel with your sisters. Quite an unusual letter where Edwards is offering to arrange a suitor for his daughter Kate from his camp if she does not find a suitor beforehand...............................................$75.00

51639 - THE BAND OF THE 5TH MAINE CAN BEAT THEM ALL, Camp Franklin, VA, April 1st, 1862, 4 page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are the only corps left in camp, 40,000 men here, will send you $5.00 and a $5,00 Confederate script, mentions an officer back at home with his beautiful wife, the Surgeon is again back in camp, he does not "trouble the women" but attends to his own business. He can hear the bands playing but the band of the 5th Maine is the best. The letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, some impairment to stamp, DUE 3 stamp, Williamsport, MD. Cancellation, 2 items....................................$89.00

51641 - LEAVING FOR THE RAPPAHANNOCK RIVER AND A FIGHT, Friday Morning, 4th (April 4th, 1862), two page letter in ink to his wife from Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine, Vol. He relates in part, 6 AM, just came into amp a few moments ago to march at 10 o'clock, the boys are all excited to move, I think we will be going by railroad to Washington on the Alexandria RR near the Rappahannock River and will see a little fight in a day or two, we will head to Manassas and on the Warrenton and then over the Rappahannock and into a fight. I wish I could say good by to you face to face, good by to you and all my friends...........................................$85.00

51643 - WE WILL MOVE TOWARDS YORKTOWN, Camp Franklin, VA, April 15th, 1862, 3 pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are expected to down the river tomorrow to Yorktown for the great battle, I am officer of the day and am having a hard time today as they are so many drunk. Saw a friend in a a fort near Falls Church. I am well but having a hard time getting over my march from Catlett Station, later Clark. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards with the stamp removed, 2 items...............................................$89.00

51663 - I HAVE BEEN PROMOTED AS MAJOR OF THE 5TH MAINE, Thursday 2 o'clock, (September 3rd, 1862), two page letter in ik to his wife by Major Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, I am now Major of the 5th Maine and have been so since July 1st as the date of my commission. I went into Alexandria with the Colonel but did not stay long as I had little money to spend. Jimmy [servant] is still with us as our cook. I am getting along fine, more camp details. The long awaited promotion for Edwards has arrived and it appears it had been in the works for months. In spite of his distain for Colonel Jackson and claims he would not serve under him, he apparently now is satisfied that the Colonel had been working in his behalf for a promotion which he has accepted and will not now resign. The undated letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Major Edwards postmarked Alexandria, VA. Postmarked September 3rd and also noted as such 2 items..........................................................................$95.00

51666 - A SOLDIER FATHER WRITES HIS YOUNG SON, Camp of the 5th Maine, near Bakersville, MD, Sunday October 26th, 1862, 4 page letter in ink to his teen age son Frank by Major Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, A "Fatherly letter" to his young son reflecting on a recent letter he had received from his wife that the son was doing well, he is sorry to hear that Frank had to leave school due to his cough, he is pleased that he is in the sheep business with his Uncle Ned and that he will send Frank some extra winter clothes he has, he is pleased that his Mother does not write about Frank quarreling with his sister anymore, he describes his small tent, bunk, and a box to write on and in the center is a small stove. He goes into detail how the tent was constructed, how they built a chimney to vent the smoke, he lacks money to send home right now as he has not been paid since he returned to Washington. Quite a newsy letter............................................$79.00

51667 - MAJOR EDWARDS EXPRESSES HIS DISTAIN FOR THE GOVERNOR OF MAINE ON HOW HIS PROMOTION WAS HANDLED, Tuesday Evening [October 28th, 1862], 4 page letter in ink to his wife by Major Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part from near Hagerstown, MD, He details the meal they have just ate and brags about "Jimmy" their servant cook. he is angry still about being a Major for four months and not finding about his commission until now, writes ill of Governor Washburn of Maine, draws forage for two horses at present, still can't send money home until he finally gets paid, wants her to watch the papers for new of his promotion which it seems is now public, while he has gotten a promotion to Major his pay will not be much more on account of a new tax. The letter comes with a cover postmarked Hagerstown, MD. Addressed to his wife and again signed by Edwards in a free frank as Major of the 5th Maine. Part of the cover to the left is missing but two clear autographs of Edwards survive. Two items...........................................$95.00

51668 - THEY WILL CROSS INTO VIRGINIA AT HARPERS FERRY, Tuesday afternoon, in camp near Bakersville, MD, October 28th, 1862, 4 page letter in ink to his wife from Major Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, We have orders to move out I think to Harpers Ferry and then cross into Virginia and I presume have another fight. Mentions the pelts [animal skins most probably beaver] that are available there and that a friend of his could make a good profit selling them in New York, describes his fine horse which he loves to ride, thinks if he would resign he could go into that business, he must close his letter as the Dress Parade Is about to start. A very newsy letter written in camp before the 5th Maine left to enter Virginia, comes with a free franked postal cover that Edwards addresses to his wife and notes to the top left his name as Major of the 5th Maine, thus two signatures, Washington  DC postal cancellation [Nov. 4th, '62], two items, fine one 3/4" ink stain non detracting.............................................$95.00

51674 - THE NEW SUTLER NEEDS TO CATCH UP TO THE REGIMENT, Thursday PM, [Nov] 20th, 1862, two pages in pen and pencil to his wife by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He had been expecting Chas [his friend who wanted to be the Regimental Sutler] there for some time but they have been on the move, tells him to take the RR to Fredericksburg or find some other conveyance to Brooks Division and he thinks it will be Smith's Corps and Franklin's Grand Corps, Friday morning, still near the courthouse [Strafford CH], describes the rain, the impassable roads, a prologue to the Fredericksburg Campaign. Edwards obviously has arranged for his friend Chas to become the Sutler for the regiment and gives his wife instruction how they can be found. They are in route to the Fredericksburg area and the rains are beginning. The letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, postmarked Washington. The second page in pencil is somewhat light by readable with the most important detail on page one, 2 items..............................................$89.00

51677 - IF HE STAYS IN THE REGIMENT HE SHALL SOON BE IN COMMAND, Camp near Stafford Court House, VA, December 1st, 1862, two pages in ink from Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards to his wife. He relates in part, He still awaits his clothes from Washington, wears a private's coat, he hopes to come home if they don't move towards Fredericksburg, I think if I stay in the regiment another month I shall be in command if it but I do not care about that 'only to cut some few at Bethel'! If I could see some prospect to the end of the war, I would be glad to stay and see it out but it look darken now than a year ago, my paper has come to an end as I must close. The new Colonel implies that he would rather be back at Bethel with his wife than assume the command of the regiment.......................................$95.00

51680 - ONE POOR SOLDIER DIED OF EXPOSURE, Sunday Evening, in camp near White Oak Church, VA, December 22nd, 1862, two pages in ink to his wife by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, he has written his boys a letter in care of her but she must correct some of his errors, none of the boys were killed in the last great fight [Fredericksburg], one poor fellow did die last night by the name of Shedd the Doctor said of exposure as the weather is very cold. Do not worry about me as I have a tend and bedding, I ask myself 'why don't the army move?' The boys are all here now and the sick ones from Bell Plain come up today. He mentions several soldiers by name that are well she knows, Captain W. says he will resign, and otherwise there is no change in the regiment. The 5th Maine was awaiting orders as was the entire army after Fredericksburg. Soon the Mud March would begin. Two large pages, some archival repair to a tear, otherwise very good......................................$75.00

51681 - I WAS INJURED IN A HORSE FALL, BUT AM ALL RIGHT NOW, Wednesday afternoon, December 24th, 1862, two large pages in ink to his wife by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, I have just come off picket and went 10 miles towards the river, I was in charge of the regiment as the Colonel stops in camp. I had a fall from my horse and was hurt a little but am all right now. He tells his wife he is sorry she feels at fault about him not having his winter clothes but a private in the regiment is better dressed than him. He let another soldier go home instead of him because the fellow was needed by his family. The boys in the hospital are well, waiting for his pay and will send what he can but he has debts to pay first. He now has to pay for a servant. The letter comes with a postal envelope addressed to his wife by Edwards with a DUE 3 stamp in lieu of a stamp..................................................$95.00

56183 - THEY PREPARE TO MOVE OUT, BURNSIDE IS PREPARING FOR HIS ILL FATED MOVEMENTS AGAINST THE CONFEDERATES AFTER HIS DEFEAT AT FREDERICKSBURG, Tuesday, December 30th, 1862, two large pages in ink to his wife by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, he took a ride to visit a friend and took dinner, it was a beautiful day that was warmer. The paymaster came and paid them but he has little money at present to send home as he had to buy clothes, a saber belt, shoulder strap for a Lt. Colonel, boots, hat, and a valise. We have orders to prepare several days rations as we will soon move out but I know not where, some say to Aqua Creek, others to Richmond above Fredericksburg. We shall have an awful time and it looks like a large storm. The Rebels are near Alexandria but have not learned the facts about the affair. Edwards ends the letter without signing but the letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife with the stamp removed, 2 items.......................................$100.00

Edwards Archive 1863 - 64

51685 - HE WILL BE MADE COLONEL OF THE 5TH MAINE VOL., Camp of the 5th Maine Rgt., January 3rd, [1863], 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, I am to be the Colonel of the 5th Maine Rgt. and I will take it. He mentions a soldier who went to Washington to get his pay after he left the hospital but it was stopped for his desertion and he had to come down here to get reinstated and his pay and show his discharge papers, mentions the new nasty postage currency, mentions a Sutler who was to join the regiment who he says could make a lot as the boys buy from other Sutlers, he states he could help the Sutler get the position...............................$95.00

51686 - THE COLONEL WRITES TO HIS CHILDREN, January 3rd, 1863, in the woods near Stafford Court House, two large pages in ink to his children by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, Tells his children to write hi, glad they are getting along well in their studies, he hopes to be home for a few days in a month, addresses his children by name, tells them to mind and help their mother, will bring two horses one named Mac [for McClellan] to they can learn to ride, tells his daughter [who obvious has a boy friend in his command] that he will keep the 'Clever fellow' as pure as a virgin. He is still sick in the hospital, very newsy letter to his children at home in Bethel, Maine..............................$85.00

51688 - THE COLONEL'S SON ARRIVES IN CAMP FROM MAINE, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Volunteers, Camp near Wolford Ford, VA, January 5th, 1863, two large page in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, he describes the trip of his teenage son Frank to their camp via Washington and Brandy Station. Upon his return to the regiment he found a couple of the officers had taken drink excessively. I found the horses all right and Jimmy [servant] was waiting for us at the depot. He mentions that hiss son toured New York and Washington on the way to Virginia. He is also Brigade commander while Upton is in Washington. Frank is bedding with Jimmy and is very happy to be here. We are now under marching orders. A small irregular ¼" missing piece by the margin affecting several words, relatively trifling...........................................$89.00

51690 - ON COURT MARTIAL DUTY IN VIRGINIA, Wednesday Evening, January 7th, 1863, 4 pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He reflects on going home and it will not be possible being the new Colonel of the 5th Maine, mentions the resignation of the previous Colonel, am on the Court Martial and had two soldiers charged with drunkenness, he tells his wife she knows he is on roundedness. Yesterday as commander of the regiment I went to Bell Plain and Pratts Landing in hopes of locating my clothes. Must stop as the mail will be going out. Edwards ends abruptly trying to make the mail. The letter comes with a postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards DUE 3 stamp applied along with a MISENT stamp, 2 items.........................................$85.00

51692 - THE OFFICERS DO NOT WANT TO FOLLOW BURNSIDE ACROSS THE RIVER AGAIN, Headquarters 5th Maine, camp near White Oak Church, VA, January 17th, 1863, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, Have received orders to hold my regiment ready to move at a moment's notice, extremely cold for the pickets, it is against the wishes of all the officers to go over the river again under Burnside. I was at General Franklin's camp this morning and his Adj. told me that they hoped it would rain for two or three days so we could not go. I had hoped that I would get my commission. General Franklin has sent me two orderlies to do my running of the regiment I wish I had a smart fellow from Maine as a sutler. He could make a pile of money. A lengthy letter by Edwards adjusting to the new role of Commander of the regiment and expressing his displeasure with the potential move across the Rappahannock by Burnside. The letter comes with a postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards stamped DUE 3, two items...........................................................$135.00

51693 - BURNSIDE INSISTS ON US CROSSING THE RIVER AT FREDERICKSBURG, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., camp near White Oak Church, January 18th, 1863, 6 large pages to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, We have been out on picket, the night is one of the coldest I have seen, we are under marching orders and I think it must be over the river. The army is disheartened. Burnside is bound to cross the river to retrieve his loss but all the Generals are opposed to it. But I will go with the fight and do my duty regardless of others. I had sent my sick off but the hospital tents had not been set up and they were sent back. Moving sick men in this cold weather again is awful. One of our boys we sent to Washington has died. We have lost others in my old company. We have been in a fight before this letter reaches you. Much more about the condition of the men, situation in camp. A long and detailed letter from Colonel Edwards describing the feeling about Burnside's plan to cross the river again to attack the Rebels in spite of the terrible weather conditions of mud, rain, and terrible cold. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife. Large DUE 3 stamp applied, 2 items..............................$145.00

51695 - HIS WIFE ASKS ABOUT THE OPPORTUNITY TO GET A STAR, OR A GENERAL'S STAR, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., near Weldon Ford, VA, January 27th, 1863, four large pages in ink by Colonel Clark S. Edwards to his wife. He relates in part, Rode out from camp with an escort of officers and two orderlies, we have to be careful as the Rebels are near out picket lines. He discusses her possible trip to see him as a Captain's wife is coming down and he wants his wife to come at the same time. His wife mentions the "STAR" [becoming a general]. He has heard that there were 600 names before Congress at this session. Five have been appointed, one for this army and four for black regiments. Many Colonels on the list date back to 1861 while mine only dates back to 1863. The letter comes with a stamped postal cover addressed to his wife by Colonel Edwards with a bulls eye cancellation. Two items................................................$120.00

51696 - HIS OLD COLONEL JACKSON NOW LEADS A BRIGADE AS A GENERAL, Headquarters 5th Maine Rgt., February 1st, 1863, Camp near White Oak Church, VA, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, There are several cases of small pox in camp, we hope to confine it outside the actual camp, a friend has come in from the battery to have dinner with me, had a nice religious meeting with the chaplain of the 16th Maine, General Jackson [Union General Jackson] is at Stafford Court House with a brigade, the dress Parade of the 7th Maine, it's the best his friend has ever saw, much camp news. The letter comes with a stamped cover postmarked Washington addressed to his wife by Edwards. Stamp slightly impaired.........................$95.00

51698 - SOME SUTLERS HAVE BEEN CAPTURED ON THEIR WAY FROM ALEXANDRIA TO THE ARMY, Tuesday Afternoon, [February 3rd, 1863 written near White Oak Church, VA], two large pages in ink from Colonel Clark S. Edwards to his wife. He relates in part, It is very cold this morning and I will include this as the mail has not left, my papers have come back disapproved [request for a leave] but I will send in again. When he does go he will bring "Jimmy" with him [his servant]. He reflects on a friend being a sutler in the regiment, as he says some men have made $10,000 in the business but it is risky as some have had "Free Passes to Richmond" [Captured by the Confederates] trying to come down from Richmond coming down by land. I can furnish him with a team so it will not cost them a great deal to commence with . I will telegraph you from Portland on my way home. Edward's friend is interested in becoming the regimental sutler [they have had a difficult time in having a dependable one]. He states that it is possibly dangerous as some have been captured on their way south. Good sutler related letter. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, DUE 3 stamp, 2 items.........................................$125.00

51701 - VISITED AN OLD SECESH WITH TWO DAUGHTERS TAINTED WITH TREASON, Headquarters 5th Maine Vol., camp near White Oak Church, VA, February 14th, 1863, 4 pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He has been out on picket with his regiment, stopped at a house of an old Secesh who had two beautiful daughters but were tainted with treason. I have just come into camp to see General Sedgwick for orders and to report to him from the picket line. I have heard that General Bartlett has requested General Coburn to forward me my Colonel's commission. I did not go to him for this favor but he did it on his own. Much about other officers on leave, concerned when he can leave due to a lack of field officers in camp, many more details. Comes with a stamped cover address to his wife by Edwards, stamp impaired, strong signature, two items.......................................$115.00

51702 - JACKSON'S FRIENDS TURNED BITTER ENEMIES WHEN HE LEFT OUR REGIMENT, Headquarters 5th Maine, camp near White Oak Church, VA, February 22nd, 1863, 8 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He is extremely dismayed in not being to come home as planned on leave as he has tried several times and failed. The weather has turned quite pleasant there. He expresses his concern over the ability of his commanders; some that were inferior were placed over the superior. He discusses the "boys" who intend to come there as sutlers, as they must come to fill the position that is open. He mentions the old commander of the 5th Maine Jackson who he says was lauded by all when he was here but now that he has gone his pretended friends are now his bitter enemies. He mentions he dined in his tent with two ladies from the Sanitary Commission who do much good for the soldiers. Edwards refers to Nathanial Jackson who had been appointed Brig. General the previous September and was definitely not one of Edwards favorite commanders who he constantly had words with during his subordination to Jackson as Captain, Major, and Lt. Colonel. This extremely long letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed, two items....................................................$1105.00

51703 - HE WILL BRING HIS SERVANT JIMMY HOME WITH HIM ON LEAVE, Saturday Afternoon, February 28th, 1863, [written from near White Oak Church, VA, camp of the 5th Maine, 6 total pages, actually a letter signed and a note signed by Edwards to his wife [Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol.] He relates in part, Still awaiting a leave, our regiment has gained 30 more men, when I come home I will bring Jimmy [one of his servants] as he has been so god to me, much about other officers in the regiment, their coming and goings to Washington and some home to Maine, the Major is leaving in the morning for Maine, Lt. Robertson goes home to be in a battery of the 3rd Maine. Mentions that 2 men out of every 100 are allowed leave, much more. Two signatures of Edwards.....................................$95.00

51704 - MY SERVANT MET ME AT THE LANDING WITH TWO HORSES, Headquarters 5th Maine, March 18th, 1863, Camp near White Oak Church, VA, 4 large pages from Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine to his wife. He relates in part, He has returned from leave and describes his trip through Boston, NY City, Jersey City, and Washington. I sent Jimmy [his servant] ahead of us to ready things. Visited the War department and was promised help in getting his regiment up around Washington. We received a telegram in Washington that Freeman [his traveling companion] wife was dead. He proceeded to Alexandria and stayed at the Segars Hotel. At Falmouth, I found one of my servants with both of my horses. Chas [the new sutler] had some trouble in getting his trunks on the government boats, much more about his arrival back in camp. A very newsy and interesting letter mentioning every facet of his trip back from Maine.....................................$125.00

51705 - THE NEW SUTLER HAS ARRIVED IN CAMP, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., March 24th, 1863, camp near White Oak Church, VA, two large pages in ink to his wife from Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, Have been on picket, Chas [the new sutler] has arrived in camp but may go back to Washington for more goods. Some of the goods I shipped myself from Portland were stopped with Chas items but are now on their way here. Chas is making himself comfortable in camp, Jimmy [his servant is also well. We are under marching orders at present, General Bartlett is away in New York and will return this week, and we will the vacancies in the regiment.........................................$95.00

51707 - THE NEW SUTLER IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., Camp near White Oak Church, VA, April 4th, 1863, six large pages to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, Chas [the new sutler] is ready to open for business and will take a young man from Vermont as a partner. Tell his wife that he is not in danger of getting into a fight. His horse HOOKER is among the finest in the Brigade, General Bartlett has been re-appointed Brig. General which we are all glad of as he is a fine officer. Washington Brown the 1t Sergt, will noon be a Lt., more on other officers in the regiment his wife is familiar with, long and very newsy. The long letter is accompanied by a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, black DUE 3 stamp applied for postage, two items......................................$95.00

51708 - THE SUTLER AWAITS THE REGIMENT GETTING PAID, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., Camp near White Oak Church, VA, April 10th, 1863, four large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine and his sutler friend Chas has included a letter to his sister on the same letter. The Colonel relates in part, We have been to the President's Review and have had a brigade inspection, Chas the sutler is not doing well yet as the regiment has not been paid yet, much more. The sutler Chas relates in part to his sister, mostly family news, he asks many questions about members of his family. Many more details. the Sutler Charles also writes a short note to his sister on the Colonel's letter. Interesting commentary on his slow business as a sutler due to the regiment not being paid as of yet. Comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards. DUE 3 stamp................................................$95.00

AN EXTRAORDINARY LETTER

51713 - HOOKER'S PLANS SEEM TO FOLLOW BURNSIDE'S PLANS - MOVE THE ARMY IN HORRIBLE WEATHER, A GREAT DESCRIPTION ON THE REGIMENTAL SUTLER, Thursday evening, April 23rd, 1863, [near White Oak Church, VA], 4 huge 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, It is raining and raining, our boys think Hooker has got the Burnside almanac [refers to Burnside choosing bad weather in January - the Mud March, as it always rains when Hooker gives an order to move. The sutler Charles has been in business only one week and did $1200 of business. He is still waiting for the boys to get paid as he has bought about $800 more of goods. Edwards goes into a long explanation on what the sutler has bought and sold, his costs, etc. He lists the many sutler items Charles sells Apples, butter, condensed milk, mustard, pickles, cake, figs, oranges, soap, playing cards, brushes, shirts, knives, and more. He mentions that "Jimmy" his servant is first rate and claims that he will drink no more. A great letter giving excellent details on the activites of a regimental sutler, his wares, and the profit he can make. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards with the stamp removed, 2 items............................................$175.00

51716 - THE POLITICS IN APPOINTING THE REGIMENTAL SUTLER, Headquarters 5th Maine Vol., Camp near New Baltimore, VA, August 20th, 1863, 3 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, The Colonel discusses the situation of the regimental sutler. The line officers will vote on the appointment of the sutler. The papers have gone to General Bartlett for the appointment of a new sutler. Levy, the old sutler of the 27th NYV is the one, he is a friend of the General. He will probably be named the sutler. If I had know what was going on I could have stepped in but now it has gone too far. The sutler was being replaced because he never was there. Edwards was for a Maine man named Charles for the post of sutler. 9 out of 10 men would have voted for him. Our cavalry had a little skirmish with the Rebels near the village of Buckland but no one was hurt. The letter comes with a postal cover addressed by Edwards to his wife, two items. God Sutler content!....................................................................$125.00

51725 - WE ARE BUILDING FORTIFICATIONS AND RIFLE PITS NEAR CENTERVILLE, Camp near Chantilly, VA, October 17th, 1863, two pages in pencil to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, There has been a general move of the whole army as we left the Rapidan a week ago. We are near the old Bull Run battlefield near Centerville. We arrived here Wednesday evening and have been fortifying breastworks and rifle pits. We are ready to meet the enemy. There was some fighting upon falling back but the rest of our Corps was not engaged. I hear we captured some 12 hundred prisoners and 11 pieces of cannon. Letter is written in pencil somewhat light in places as he writes in the field. Letter comes with a envelope addressed to his wife by Edwards, no stamp, two pieces........................................$120.00

51729 - THE COLONEL TELLS ALL ABOUT THE POOR LEADERSHIP AT FREDERICKSBURG AND CHANCELLORSVILLE BY BURNSIDE AND HOOKER, Headquarters of the 5th Maine, November 6th, 1863, near Warrenton, VA, 4 large 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards. He relates in part, We may be heading on towards Fredericksburg but he is afraid there is nothing that will be gained by moving north. The forces in Washington are bound that Meade shall either fight or resign. I expect another 10,000 to be transferred to gratify their whims. The papers show that General Warren is the hero of the day. He was chief of Hooker's staff at the Chancellorsville fight the 1st of May. You may remember when the Corps crossed at Fredericksburg. Sedgwick carried the Heights when Burnside failed to do so in last December when he should have stopped, but this same Warren by Hooker's orders ordered us to Salem Heights and then he told Sedgwick there was nothing but a line of skirmishes but we lost 5000 men in that fight from our Corps. So much for the hero that is to be! An excellent commentary of the actions in Fredericksburg the previous December by Edwards. The letter comes with a postal cover with the stamp removed addressed to his wife by Edwards. After occupying Marye's Heights on May 3, Sedgwick's VI Corps marched out on the Plank Road with the objective of reaching Hooker's force at Chancellorsville. He was delayed by Wilcox's brigade of Early's force at Salem Church. During the afternoon and night, Lee detached two of his divisions from the Chancellorsville lines and marched them to Salem Church. Several Union assaults were repulsed the next morning with heavy casualties, and the Confederates counterattacked, gaining some ground. After dark, Sedgwick withdrew across two pontoon bridges at Scott's Dam under a harassing artillery fire. Hearing that Sedgwick had been repulsed, Hooker abandoned the campaign, re-crossing on the night of May 5-6 to the north bank of the Rappahannock.................................................$225.00

51737 - A YOUNG SON WRITES HIS MOTHER ON HIS RECENT TRIP TO VIRGINIA WITH HIS COLONEL FATHER, TWO LETTERS, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., January 10th, 1864, two letters: [a] two pages in pencil and pen to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards and his son, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, he describes his trip back from home through New York and Washington, went to the capital and the Smithsonian. [b] Two large pages dated Sunday Afternoon January 10th, 1864 as a continuance of the first letter to his wife by Edwards. He relates in part, States that his son Frank may contract the small pox as many have had it in the regiment, Frank reads a lot to Jimmy [his servant]. If he does not get a promotion to Brig. General he may leave the service when the term for the regiment expires in several months. Much more about the officers in his regiment, more about the doings of his young son in camp with him. Two letters, one partially written by Frank, the remainder by Colonel Edwards. Frank's pencil letter is somewhat light so we have enhanced it with a darker photo copy. The tow letters come with a postal cover addressed by Edwards to his wife, partial stamp still evident, three items..................................................$95.00

51742 - THEY ARE ABOUT TO HAVE A DRESS PARADE, Headquarters 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Army Corps, March 6th, 1864, 3 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, A good camp letter, he remarks that they are just about ready to have a dress parade, mentions the news he has heard from back at home in Bethel, he received many wives of officers who are at the cap to visit their husbands, much more...........................................$75.00

51746 - SEVERAL SESECH WOMEN WERE AT THE BALL, March 15th, 1864, 8 pages to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine as Brigade Commander of the 2nd Brigade. He relates in part, He intends to go home in June if he lives that long, he gives good details of a ball that night [given by General Bartlett], he is still in command of the brigade as General Upton is still gone, there will be a 'cock' that afternoon, several Sesech women were at the ball that he names, Colonel Carroll is drunk most of the time. He gives a good account of the Brigade Ball hosted by General Bartlett.................................$95.00

51748 - A SOLDIER BROKE THE JAW OF ANOTHER SOLDIER - ON TRIAL, Headquarters 5th Maine Vol., Camp near Welford Ford, VA, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, I am still on court martial duty trying a fellow who broke the jaw of a soldier in Company E, 5th Maine. States that weather is cold and a storm has occurred, but he says more storms less move. He has three more months to serve if he stays in. The Doctor of the regiment is counting the hours until discharge date. Many details about the wives still in camp, the Doctor just got back from New York visiting his wife, many more details. The long letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp missing.........................................$95.00

51749 - HE DOES NOT WANT ANY PART OF COMMANDING COLORED TROOPS, Headquarters of 5th Maine Vol., March 30th, 1864, Welford Ford, VA, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, It rained all night and flooded the plain, Walker's bridge is missing, the boys are all glad of it [they don't have to move], the weather continues to be stormy and squally. I should be content to stay here for the next ten weeks. I am sure they will say [papers] why does not the Army move? The fact of the matter is the Army is not fit to move. Colonel Carroll is sick with the piles [he normally was drunk]. Mentions some officers who may command Colored troops. He states he wants none of that himself. Mentions his servants Jimmy and King, the latter he calls a 'cleaver fellow'. In anticipating the discharge of the regiment in June he mentions where he wants the company flags to go. He thniks they will be allowed to take arms home. The long letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards with the stamp missing, 2 items...............................................$145.00

51753 - A GENERAL THREATENS TO RESIGN, Headquarters 5th Maine Vol., April 22nd, 1864, Welford Ford, VA, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, Mentions that he attended a ball given by General Bartlett, he and several named officers took a pontoon boat and floated down the river, some of the 96th PA and their band were there, they had a 'bully' time. He mentions that some of the people left for the worse of it. The band played constantly, the full moon was shining and we could not help but enjoy ourselves. We went down to serenade the General on his confirmation but he told me he was to resign as they do not date back his rank one to the 2nd of April. I think he has done the right thing. When he got to his place he invited about 40 to 50 officers in from Colonel to Lt. The General's headquarters is situated in a house I can see from my tent. The 18th Mass. has crossed the river and I am still in command of the brigade as Col. Upton has not returned. Colonel Upton has been in Washington looking for his "Star" [General's Star]. Much more personal information to his wife. He refers to General Joseph Bartlett his Division commander. Letter comes with a stamped postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, two items.......................................................$135.00

31711 - PAY VOUCHER, 14TH US INFANTRY, 2ND LT. JAMES HENTON, January 28th, 1862, 15" X 10", pre-printed and filled-in, payment for service in February 1862, also lists a white servant, $102.50 in total pay. Very good...................................$20.00


LETTER ARCHIVE SGT. EDGAR B. BENNETT CO K. 1ST CONN. HEAVY ARTILLERY

1307 - SOLDIERS COMING THROUGH ARE HEADING TO TENNESSEE, Fort Richardson, VA, October 31st, 1863. 3 pages in ink, with stamped cover CDS Alexandria, VA, from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary his fiancée. He relates in part..."A lot of soldiers are coming through here and going to Tennessee. They are mostly veterans. Our officers are trying to get us to re-enlist; he discusses the re-enlistment of the men in January in Connecticut. Edger goes home for Christmas and becomes engaged to Mary"...SILK REMNANTS FROM THE FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag..........................$75.00

1311 - I SENT MY BOUNTY CHECK BY MAIL, Fort Richardson, VA, February 4th, 1864. 2 pages in ink by Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."I decided to send on the 3rd a check for $300. I thought I would risk it by mail. It would apt to be just as safe as by Express, he has very little war news to tell her from where he is," SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag..........................................$65.00

1312 - BEFORE PETERSBURG, VA, February 21st, 1864. 2 pages in ink with stamped cover, CDS Alexandria, VA, to Mary from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."I just got back from my old place from sharp shooting. I had very good luck in getting back but I had to go to Annapolis, MD, so I got on the mail boat at 8 o'clock and got into City Point at 3 in the afternoon," more newsy notes to Mary. SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag..............................$65.00

1315 - EXCUSE THE WRITING AS IT IS DARK IN THESE BARRACKS, Fort Richardson, VA, March 8th, 1864. 2 pages in ink to his "Minnie" [Mary his fiancée]. He relates in part...News is scarce, they are fixing the barracks, it is so noisy one can hardly think, he has to go on guard tomorrow in the rain, please excuse the writing as it is very dark in the barracks, he describes the barracks...80' long, 30' wide, 150 men in them, two rows of bunks three high, the top ones are 6' from the floor, 6 men in a bunk area, 2 in each tier, the aisle through the barracks is 8' wide, we have two stoves in each barracks," a good act of the barracks at Fort Richardson, VA." SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag.................................................$85.00

 

1317 - A HUGE SNOWFALL HAS BURIED THE CAMP AND INTO THE BARRACKS, March 24th, 1864. 2 pages in ink from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, comes with a stamped cover postmarked Alexandria, VA. He relates to Mary in part..."The snow blew into the barracks as bad as it did outdoors, we were all wet even our beds, the blankets were all wet through, everything I have to my name is wet, most of the boys do not have dry blankets to sleep under tonight. It was more than uncomfortable as it was so call I could not get out for roll call this morning. Today we went out and snowballed most of the day. They boys are now around the stoves drying their clothes, many are sick...Charter the drummer is just going to beat the call so I must close." There are light water stains due to the paper being wet before he wrote the letter...Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar.......................................$75.00

 

1319 - REPORTS ON THE BATTLE OF THE WILDERNESS, May 8th, 1864. 2+ pages in ink, stamped cover postmarked Alexandria, VA, from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."We have had plenty of news from the front. They are fighting now and have been fighting for three days [Battle of the Wilderness], the papers say there are severe losses on both sides. It says tonight that there losses are 13,000. His losses [Confederate] wounded is 10,000 and killed 3,000. They say our losses are heavy but don't say how much, the troops on the Peninsular are doing well though, we continue to drill for 2 hours each day"...SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag................................................................$165.00

1320 - WE ARE ON THE MOVE-ON TO PETERSBURG, Camp White, VA, May 10th, 1864. 3 pages in bold pencil with a stamped cover postmarked Alexandria, VA, from Sergt. Edger Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."We have started for the front, we left Fort Richardson today about noon and are in little shelter tents, we carry our houses and beds on our backs but the officers don't, one good thing is they let us leave our dress coats behind, I can't write much as I have nothing to write on but my knee. I can't write with a pen so I hope you can read this. I do not know how quick you will received this as we will travel by water and it may be a week before I can mail it," Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and cover................................................$85.00

 

1321 - WE ARE NINE MILES FROM RICHMOND, Camp near Petersburg, VA, May 15th, 1864. 3 pages in pencil from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery to Mary, comes with a stamped cover postmarked OLD POINT COMFORT, VA. He relates in part..."We have pork and crackers and coffee when we are not too lazy to cook it, we have our siege train with us and are now with General Butler...we expect to be engaged in battle each day, at present we are nine miles from the City of Richmond." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and cover...........................$85.00

12271 - WE ARE IN THE PRINCIPAL POINT FOR THE REBELS TO ATTACK US, PUTTING UP PROTECTION FOR THE GUN, June 9th, 1864, Camp in the field. A hurried pencil 2 page letter by Sgt. Edgar B. Bennett of the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to his fiancée Mary. He relates in part to her..."We are still under the fire of the Rebels, everybody is at work to protect themselves. My detachment is putting up mantelet in front of the gun to protect from fragments of shells coming through the embrasure and killing the men. You perhaps have seen in the papers about General Terry's brigade and about his front having to do all the artillery fighting. General Terry [Alfred Howe terry Brig. Gen.] is commander of the X Corps. He is in our works all the time the firing is going on for we are at the principal point for the Rebs to attack. It is an open field in front of us." Letter comes with the stamped cover as well as SILK FRAGMENTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG OF THE 1ST CONN. HEAVY ARTILLERY...Bennett was later wounded in front of Petersburg by a saber cut and captured in March of 1865. His regiment manned the famous mortar "Dicator" that fired on Petersburg from a railroad car......................................................................$195.00

1324 - CAMP NEAR PETERSBURG, VA, June 20th, 1864. One page letter in pencil to Mary by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery. He relates in this short letter "we have not have had any fighting since Saturday, today it is quite on our front," SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag.............................$75.00

 

1325A - REDAN #2 NEAR THE JAMES RIVER, FIGHTING ALL AROUND US TODAY, June 30th, 1864. Two pages in pencil written in the field by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."I am very anxious here and hope to be able to rejoin my company and am keeping a eye for a company of the 13th NY Artillery to relieve me, there has been hard fighting all around us today, we expect fighting in our front and there is every indication of it now, most of our regiment is a Petersburg...I must go as the officer in charge has sent for me." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar. An interesting letter when his redan was just about to be attacked.......................................$95.00

 

1325B - ALL THE COMPANIES HAVE LOST MEN ON THIS TOUR, WE HAVE CONFIDENCE IN GRANT, Camp in the field [on James River], July 4th, 1864. 3 pages in pencil to Minnie [Mary] by Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..., "The regiment is broken up in several camps, we have lost a number of men, Company I lost 7, Company D has lost 3 or 4, and the other companies more or less. They have been fighting at Petersburg quite hard and the same for Grant here as it was with Old Abe at the fair in Philadelphia. [Lincoln's Philadelphia Speech in June asked for more troops for General Grant's Army] Grant will fight it out on this line if it takes all summer but we all have faith in General Grant." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and stamped cover. 2 items............................$115.00

 

1327 - THE 6TH AND 7TH CONNECTICUT REGIMENTS HAVE BEEN IN ALL THE ENGAGEMENTS, Battery Anderson, VA, August 29th, 1864. 3 pages in ink to Mary by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."The 6th and 7th Regiments have been in all the engagements this side of the James River and the north side too, and they have now gone to Petersburg, he feels that along with many others the war was right." SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter, stamped cover and remnants of the flag............................................$125.00

 

1328 - THE CONFEDERATE BATTERY AT DUTCH GAP THREW SHELLS WEIGHING 200# INTO OUR BATTERY, September 11th, 1864, Battery Sawyer, VA. 3 page letter in ink to Mary from Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."We have not gone to Petersburg yet as we were ordered...as long as I have been in the Army I have never witnessed what I did yesterday...the Rebs have what we call the Howlett House Battery [at Dutch Gap]. It commands the river around Turkey Bend. At about 12 o'clock they with 20# Parrott guns began to shell us in our battery. We had not fired a shot when the Howlett House Battery opened up on us and with the great guns they threw shells that weighted 200 pounds right into our battery. Nothing ever made me afraid before then since I have been in the Army. They continued their fire for two hours...they burst their shells in our battery...we were all covered with dirt several times."  Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, an excellent letter by Bennett.....................................................$165.00

1329 - WE MOVE TO PETERSBURG TOMORROW
, Battery Anderson, VA, September 12th, 1864. Two pages in ink to Mary from Srgt. Edgar Bennett, written on his personal stationary...Company K, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in a short letter to Mary..."We go to Petersburg tomorrow morning the 13th, I must make this short as we are packing for the move in the morning," Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, unique stationary by Bennett, Seal with Eagle, fine........................................
$95.00

 

1330 - THE SHARPSHOOTERS KEEP UP THEIR DEADLY WORK, Battery #10 near Petersburg, VA, September 27th, 1864. Two pages in ink to Mary from Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."We have not heard the particulars from Butler's lines but there has been fighting that has lasted two days...the Sharpshooters keep up their deadly work. They kill three or four each day, Oh it is awful to see how they work for it as it is sure death for the men they take aim at!", Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and stamped cover postmarked Washington, 2 items...............................................$145.00

 

1330A - GRANT HAD TO LEAVE THE DEAD AND WOUNDED ON THE FIELD AS LEE WAS TOO STRONG, October 30th, 1864. 3 pages in ink to Mary, before Petersburg, VA, by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part, "The army has earned me a good lesson I will never forget and many others will not forget either, Grant's move on the left resulted him leaving the field with his dead and wounded on it for Lee was too strong for him to take Petersburg or Richmond. When Grant left the field he left 180 wounded or thereabouts, perhaps more for the Rebels to take care of. Oh how sad it will make the mothers and Sisters of those who were left on the field to die in such a horrible death as they would have to if they died there." Bennett was later wounded in front of Petersburg by a saber cut and captured in March of 1865. His regiment manned the famous mortar "Dictator" that fired on Petersburg from a railroad car, comes with a stamped cover cancelled Washington, 2 items...................................................$170.00

 

1334 - GRANT WAS NOT AS SUCCESSFUL AS HOPED, Before Petersburg, December 16th, 1864. Three pages in ink to Mary by Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."Grant was not as successful as he might have been, no one knows about the great move Grant was going to make to annihilate the Rebel Army, we all want to see our General R. O. Tyler...Colonel Abbott is appointed Brig. General so we will soon have a new Colonel. There are rumors that the Rebels are evacuating Petersburg." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter with stamped cover..............................................$100.00

 

1335 - BUTLER CONTINUES ON HIS CANAL, THE OFFICERS ARE STILL DRUNK, Before Petersburg, January 2nd, 1865. 3 pages in ink to Mary by Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."Yesterday, Sunday was the first time we ever had orders not to fire on Sunday and I think it was on account the Commanding general knew that the officers would get drunk and then try an see what they could do, some of the officers were drunk all Saturday night and they have not gotten sober yet. Such a crowd of officers I have never seen in the Army in my life as we are getting these days for they spend more on whiskey than their pay amounts to...Butler continues on his canal at the James River." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter with stamped cover......................................................$100.00

 

1336 - THE REBELS CAME UP LAST NIGHT AND BUILT A SHANTY IN FRONT OF THE PICKETS, Before Petersburg, VA, January 8th, 1865. 3 pages in ink by Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."The Rebels came out last night, they had the impatience to come out in front of their picket line and put up some sort of a shanty. For what it is for nobody knows. Some think it is for sharpshooters...the muddy conditions are so bad we can hardly wall." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter with stamped cover......................................$100.00

 

1337 - NEWS OF THE PEACE COMMISSIONERS, Before Petersburg, January 11th, 1865. Three pages in ink from Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."He has heard that there is a report of the Peace Commissioners at the camp, talks of the snowfall and the boys playing in the snow before it melts, he mentions that soldiers are being sent to a school," Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter with stamped cover.....................................$70.00

 

1339 - I HOPE FOR A FURLOUGH, Before Petersburg, January 26th, 1865. Two pages in pen to Mary by Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, Co. K, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to his fiancée Mary Marsh. He states that..."his is one of three furloughs pending approval at Headquarters, if he gets one it will be for only 15 days and much of that time will be taken up by traveling back and forth from home, the news is quiet there." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter with cover [stamped removed]..............................................$55.00

 

1340 - THE REBELS ARE HAVING A LARGE NUMBER OF FIRES IN PETERSBURG, Before Petersburg, VA, March 23rd, 1865. Two pages in ink to Mary for Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery. He relates in part to her..."The rebels are having a large number of fires in Petersburg of late. They had two there today...mentions he just got a cat and the boys named her "Sesesh" since she came from Petersburg." Probably the last letter Bennett wrote before his being wounded by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg. This regiment manned the huge mortar called the "Dictator" during the Petersburg siege......................................................$85.00


12268 - 3RD VERMONT INFANTRY, 5TH US CAVALRY, CAMP BELTON, VA, October 31st, 1863. 4 page letter in ink from George M. Harriman 3rd VT Infantry later US 5th Cav., Camp Belton, VA. Mentions they constantly move their camps around, wishes they would get paid soon, those at home state that they wish that they could kill a Rebel as they go out and kill game but if you can see they way they fight your would change their minds for they fight hard and whip us sometimes. The Rebels are only four miles away and a fight will ensue if they don't move across the river. They are only a few miles north of the river and it would be easy for them to get across. 5th US Cavalry:  The regiment's history began in 1855, organizing on 28 May 1855 as the 2nd United States Cavalry Regiment at Louisville, Kentucky. A few months later, on 27 September 1855, under the command of Col. Albert Sidney Johnston, the regiment marched west to Texas to fight in its first Indian Campaign. Later on, Lt. Col. Robert E. Lee succeeded Colonel Johnston as the commander. The regiment fought in a total of thirteen Indian Campaigns, symbolized by the arrow head shaped regimental crest. Other officers of the regiment who became prominent in the American Civil War besides Johnson and Lee were Majors William J. Hardee and George H. Thomas; Captains Earl Van Dorn, George Stoneman, and Edmund Kirby Smith; and Lieutenants John Bell Hood and Fitzhugh Lee. Early in 1861, the regiment went to Carlisle Barracks, where the officers and men loyal to the South left the regiment to serve in the Confederacy. Lieutenant Colonel Lee was replaced by t. Col. George Henry Thomas. In the summer of 1861, the regiment was re-designated as the 5th United States Cavalry; the numerical designation it holds to this day. During the Civil War, the troopers of the 5th Cavalry made a gallant charge at Gaines' Mill on 27 June 1862, saving the Union artillery from annihilation. This battle is commemorated on the regimental crest by the Cross moline, in the yellow field on the lower half of the crest. This letter was written while he served in the 5th US Cavalry. Very scarce unit...........................................................$150.00

8080 - HIS NEPHEW IS A POW IN RICHMOND, HAD THE LOCK SHOT OFF HIS GUN AT THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, Dora, Wabash County, Indiana, April 4th, 1864. 4 page letter to a friend in New Jersey from Thomas Gibb regarding his travels and business endeavors and he relates in detail the fate of his nephew. He relates about his business ventures, he mentions that his brother's youngest son is a prisoner in Richmond now, he was taken with a squad of 27 who were on the advance of duty with Meade on the Rapidan. They were not given notice when the army retreated. The whole squad were left and taken by the Rebels. They have a letter from him and He is well and in good spirits. The same boy fought through the Gettysburg battle. His regiment went into the fight with 600 men and came out with 200. He not gets a scratch. He had the lock shot off his gun in his hand at the barrel, but no harm came to him. Butternuts have been enlisting strongly. A great many have reenlisted. The 47th have gone into Illinois to quell a butternut rising where. Where they will kill and confiscate the whole of them...The Charleston Riot occurred on March 28, 1864, in Charleston, Illinois, after Union soldiers and local Republicans clashed with local insurgents known as Copperheads. By the time the riot had subsided, nine were dead and twelve had been wounded. The terms Copperhead and Butternuts were used to describe the larger movement, which has been known as Peace Democrats. This political affiliation which stirred up support, as David Montgomery points out in Beyond Equality: Labor and the Radical Republicans, by incorporating the fears that the federal government's war effort sought to usurp the constitution. The copperheads incorporated a racial component to their disdain for the Northern war effort, as Montgomery points out, that emancipated Negroes would flood the North, because of the Emancipation Proclamation. Using racially charged rhetoric, Copperheads sought to unite opposition to the Radical Republicans. This had become a national phenomenon during the American Civil War. Southern sympathizers were battling to keep their country from becoming, in their eyes, too radical. A quite interesting war period letter with a stamped cover..................................................$165.00

8081 - "HERE IS A PIECE OF A UNION FLAG THAT WAS CAPTURED BY THE REBELS AND WE RECAPTURED IT AT THE BATTLE OF CEDAR CREEK" - 138TH PA. VOLUNTEERS, Camp of the 138th PV, March 20th, 1865, two well written pages in ink by S. V. D. Wack, Co. C, 138th PA Vol to his sister. He relates in part...I received the paper and handkerchief this morning but will return the latter as it is too nice out here in this Godforsaken country, ENCLOSED PLEASE FIND A PIECE OF A FLAG CAPTURED FROM SOME UNION REGIMENT BY THE REBELS AND RECAPTURED BY THE 138TH AT THE BATTLE OF CEDAR CREEK. Keep it for me...Tell Lizzie I have her blue bow yet and I means to carry it with me as long as I am in the service. Two of Sherman's scouts came into the lines of the 5th Corps last evening but where he is I do not know. They were seven days coming so he must be a long way off yet...mentions he gets a great many letters from ladies in PA and Jersey, S. V. D. Wack, 2nd Brigade 138th PA Vol., 2nd Brigade, 3rd Div. 6 Corps. Via Washington, DC. Srmattas V. D. Wack was a Corporal and enlisted August 26th, 1862. He was wounded at Cold Harbor and at Cedar Creek and finally mustered out with Company June 23rd, 1865. The 138th PA was at Winchester, September 19, Fisher's Hill, September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty at Kernstown until December. Moved to Washington, DC, thence to Petersburg, VA, December. Siege of Petersburg December, 1864, to April, 1865. Fort Fisher, Petersburg, March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28 - April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Danville April 23 - 27, and duty there until May 23. This letter was written from the Petersburg area on March 20th, ATTRACTIVELY FRAMED WITH DOUBLE GLASS TO SHOW BOTH SIDES OF THE LETTER, FLAG REMNANT MEASURES 1" X 4". 8.5" X 14" framed..........................................$695.00


5071 - IOWA TROOPS BEING TRANSPORTED ON THE STEAMBOAT BILL HENDERSON, 8" X 24", preprinted and manuscript manifest where the State of Iowa was paying for passage for men on the Steamboat "Bill Henderson" from April to November in 1862. The passengers are listed by date transported from Dubuque, Clinton, Lyons, and Davenport to cities such as St. Louis, Clinton, Davenport, and Dubuque, Iowa. The preprinted heading "The United States" is scratched out and State of Iowa written in its place. The total passage due the Northern Star Packet Company was $153.50 for which the State received a 25% discount. In researching some of these names, some do not appear on the roster of any Iowa units, but since the state paid their passage, they were probably civil servants. Some soldiers shown are Jerry Elson, 9th Iowa, wounded at Pea Ridge, Sgt. Hiram Buel, lost an arm at Vicksburg, 21st Iowa, Leonard Horr, 21st Iowa, Jesse Hampton, 13th Iowa wounded at Shiloh, Calvin Taylor 45th Iowa. There are at least 45 entries on this steamboat listing of passengers with many more to research. On a quick examination many discharged soldiers, wounded sailors, and new recruits were transported on this boat within the state of Iowa. Some archival repairs due to the size but no loss of paper. A nice Iowa item right at the beginning of the campaigns in Mississippi and through November 1862.........................................................................$125.00

5072 - WE COULD HEAR THE GUNS AT FREDERICKSBURG, HEAR THE WOUNDED GROAN IN WASHINGTON, 4 page letter in pencil, December 24th, 1862, Private David Brett, 9th Mass Light Artillery, and stamped postal cover. He relates in part...had Christmas dinner at the fort, turkeys, oysters, pickles, cakes. I was in Washington all day yesterday with a team of mules, we are fixing up the fort today as the Captain is a Catholic and we are having easy times [Christmas season]...THERE WAS A GREAT BATTLE THE OTHER DAY AT FREDERICKSBURG AND WE COULD HEAR THE CANNONS VERY PLAIN AND THE WOUNDED WERE BROUGHT TO WASHINGTON IN BOATS OF ALL KINDS AND AMBULANCES. SOME OF OUR FOLKS WHO WERE IN WASHINGTON SAID THEY COULD HEAR THEM GROAN AS THEY PASSED IN THE STREETS. WE GOT WHIPPED BADLY AND THAT IS NO MISTAKE. DESCRIBES THEIR CHRISTMAS DINNER ON THE 25TH WITH ALL THE BOYS HAVING PLENTY TO EAT AND HAD A GOOD TIME PLAYING BALL [BASEBALL]. The 9th Mass Artillery was soon to fight at Gettysburg and fight at Trostle's Barn. In the Civil War Times article "The Battery that saved the Union" Hoffsommer says that after Barksdale's forward surge lapped the battery and the 21st Mississippi Infantry engulfed the guns and limbers, the fight became savagely hand to hand with muskets and bayonets against rammers and handspikes. Baker states that "David Brett lost his cap and started back for it; John Ligal took him under his arm and carried him off the field." Brett was only 5'4" and weighed 163 lbs. Brett hurt his foot due to cannon recoil and was carried off the field. The 9th Mass. Light Artillery accompanied the army in its northward march, on July 2, 1863, it reached Gettysburg, and about 4 P.M. was placed in position near the Wheatfield road about 300 yards south of the Trostle farm buildings. Here it assisted in staying the tide of Longstreet's attack, firing by prolonge as it was forced to retire across the field, and finally in a last stand in the Trostle farm yard lost over 50 horses and was forced to temporarily abandon four of its guns. These, however, were brought off the field by the infantry after nightfall. The loss in personnel was 11 officers and men killed and mortally wounded, and sixteen surviving wounded, among the latter being Captain Bigelow. On the following day the remnant of the battery under Lieutenant Milton, consisting of two guns, was engaged at Ziegler's Grove on Cemetery Hill losing five more horses. The letter is well written in pencil with some water stains which do not deter the reader. A good newsy letter from a very good fighting unit............................................................$175.00


4270 - THREE SOLDIERS EXECUTED BY FIRING SQUAD FOR DESERTION, A DETAILED LETTER REGARDING THE EXECUTION, THE BEST EXECUTION LETTER WE HAVE EVER OFFERED - IRISH BRIGADE LETTER, Headquarters near Morrisville, August 29th, 1863. 4 page letter in ink by William A. Smith, Company D, 116th PA [Irish Brigade] to his sister. He relates in part...mentions his brother who is ill on Folly Island in that "hot secesh hole", news arrived that the Stars and Stripes in floating over Fort Sumter and Wagner, soon the battery at Fort Moultrie and then Charleston should be in the next news. Well Molly, there has been a sad fear bin going on here last Friday a week and yesterday...THERE WERE THREE MEN SHOT IN THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, THERE WAS ONE OUT OF THE 71ST PA SHOT FOR DESERTION ON THE 21ST OF THE MONTH, AND YESTERDAY THERE WERE TWO MEN SHOT FOR THE SAME THING - DESERTION IT IS AN AWFUL THING TO SEE OWN MEN SHOT DOWN, IF IT WAS BATTLE IT WOULD BE NOT SO HARD TO SEE THROUGH TO WALK UP AND BRAVE IT AND GET SHOT DOWN LIKE AN OX THERE IS NO USE TALKING ABOUT IT...THEY WERE NOT SHOT FOR COWARDICE AS THEY WERE ALL BRAVE AS LIONS AS THEY ALL WALKED OVER TO WHERE THEY WERE TO BE SHOT RIGHT BEHIND THEIR COFFINS AND KEPT STEP WITH THE MUSIC ALL THE TIME AND THEY STOOD AND SEEN THE MUSKETS LOADED AND WENT AND STOOD BY THEIR COFFINS UNTIL THEY WERE TOLD TO KNEEL DOWN, THEY COOLEY TOOK OFF THEIR COATS AND FOLDED THEM BESIDES THEM AS IF NOTHING WAS GOING TO HAPPEN AND EVEN MARCHED KEEPING IN TUNE WITH THE DEAD MARCH AND THAT IS THE HARDEST THING TO KEEP IN STEP WITH. THEY WERE ORDERED TO KNEEL DOWN ON ONE KNEE AND THEN THE HANKER CHIEFS WERE PUT OVER THEIR EYES AND THEY BRACED THEMSELVES FOR IT AND WHEN THE WORD WAS GIVEN TO FIRE ONE FELL ONE WAY AND ANOTHER THE OTHER WAY, ONE OF THEM THEY HAD TO SHOOT A SECOND TIME BEFORE THEY HAD TO KILL HIM AND IF ANYONE SAYS THEY WERE COWARDS I THINK THEY LIE AS THEY HAD HEARTS AS BIG AS AN OX...William A. Smith. The 116th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, was recruited from among the Irish Americans of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, during the summer of 1862. Dennis Heenan served as its first colonel, St. Clair A. Mulholland as lieutenant colonel, and George H. Bardwell as major. At the end of August 1862, the regiment was ordered to report to Washington, D.C., and was assigned to the Irish Brigade, which was the 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, II Corps, Army of the Potomac. The following month, it was ordered to the Shenandoah Valley, where it saw minor skirmishing. At the Battle of Fredericksburg on December 13, the 116th charged the sunken road. Despite losing many of their officers and men, including Colonel Heenan, they remained at the wall until dark. The regiment had lost so many men that it was consolidated into a battalion of four companies under the command of Mulholland. The 116th performed well at the Battle of Chancellorsville, where it helped rescue the 5th Maine Battery from capture. In this action, Mulholland earned a Medal of Honor. On the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg, the 1st Division was sent into the Wheatfield to support the III Corps, where the 116th engaged in hand-to-hand combat. Caught in a crossfire, the division was forced to retreat. During Pickett's Charge the following day, the regiment supported the 2nd Connecticut Battery but wasn't needed in the fighting. During the following few months, the 116th remained in Northern Virginia. In the spring of 1864, Mulholland was given permission to recruit the regiment back to full strength. Enough men were raised in Philadelphia to form Companies E, F, and G in addition to bringing the four companies at the front to strength, though many of the veterans were consolidated into A Company. Companies H, I, and K were raised in Pittsburg. A large portion of these new recruits were not Irish-Americans, however. Mulholland was promoted to colonel, while Richard C. Dale became lieutenant colonel and John Teed, who had been captured at Gettysburg, major. The 116th fought all through the Overland Campaign, where it continued to lose heavily in officers and men. Mulholland was wounded at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House and Dale was missing in action. Mulholland was wounded again at the Battle of Cold Harbor. Heavy losses continued during the Siege of Petersburg. In July, the Irish Brigade was broken up and the 116th was assigned to the 4th Brigade, 1st Division. After the Appomattox Campaign, the regiment was sent to Alexandria, where, on June 3, Companies A, B, C, and D where mustered out. The remaining companies were mustered out on July 14 in Washington. Well written by Smith, comes with a cover missing the stamp postmarked Washington, DC....................................................$595.00


3018A - SAW A DESERTER SHOT WHILE SITTING ON HIS COFFIN, WE ARE AT WARREN STATION NEAR THE PETERSBURG LINE, 37th Mass. Volunteers, Co. F, Private Williard S. Cooke to his Father, near Petersburg, VA, January 3rd, 1865. Four pages in very bold pencil. He relates in part...He hopes to get detailed to Butler's Dept. in hopes of getting a furlough. We are presently camped near the center of the line on the very spot that the 5th Corps had done such desperate fighting to gain and hold the position on the Weldon Railroad. Nearby there is a large fort that was built by the Corps and perhaps you have seen in pictured in Harpers Weekly. The railroad cuts close to our camp and the station is just a few rods off. We are set at Warren's Station and are set in nice warm houses. We have been papering the inside of the houses with old "New York Heralds" [insulation] and it looks quite gay. I SAW A DESERTER SHOT TODAY. HE WAS SITTING ON HIS COFFIN WHEN HE WAS SHOT. Your Brother, W. S. Cooke [wrote to Father and Brother]. Records show that two Union soldiers were shot at Petersburg on January 6th, 1865 for desertion...Peter Cox of the 4th New Jersey and Michael Wert of the 184th PA. A well written letter by a member of the 37th Mass. The 37th Mass. regiment was formed in July 1862 and served until the end of the war in April 1865, seeing action at many battles including Fredericksburg and Gettysburg, duty in New York City after the draft riot, the Siege of Petersburg and the final pursuit and destruction of General Robert E. Lee's Army. It was formed from volunteers mainly from the western counties of Massachusetts, and it subsequently absorbed members of other units (notably the 7th and the 10th Massachusetts) in May and June 1864. The 37th was one of the first regiments to be issued the new Spencer repeating rifle, on July 15, 1864, increasing their firepower. The 37th Mass was one of the first regiments to enter Petersburg the surrender of the City to Colonel Edwards in command of the Sixth Corps skirmish line...............................................................$165.00

32801 - ILLINOIS SOLDIER WRITES FROM HAY MARKET, KY, PATRIOTIC STATIONARY, November 21st, 1861, to his sister in Kane County, IL. Red and blue Miss Liberty with flag. 4 pages, he relates...we moved to Camp Holman went about 24 miles from West Point and are camped on the roughest type of ground, there are 75,000 soldiers within 12 miles of here, plenty to eat, boys sing each night, have prayer meetings, some light water staining. Comes with cover stamp removed...............................$49.50

32809 - SOME OF MORGAN'S MEN HAVE BEEN CAPTURED, NEWS OF GETTYSBURG, VICKSBURG, AND PORT HUDSON, July 22nd, 1863, Polo, Illinois. 4 page letter to Lt. Oscar Sammis of the 92nd Illinois Mounted Infantry stationed near Chattanooga by his sister. She relates in part...I see by the papers that some of you have been after old Morgan and captured the greatest part of his men, and now it seems that Vicksburg and Port Hudson are taken, and together with Meade's Victory and the capturing of so many of Morgan's men there cannot be a great many left. A newsy home letter regarding the three great victories of July 1863.......................................$48.00

32811 - A FRIEND WANTS A DARKY TO BE SENT UP TO HER FROM TENNESSEE, PART OF UNIT WILL BE GRANT'S BODYGUARD, THE 92ND REGIMENT HAS BEEN MOUNTED AND ATTACHED TO GENERAL WILDER, August 2nd, 1863, Polo, IN. 4 page Illinois home front letter to Lt. Oscar Sammis, 92nd Illinois Mounted Infantry by his sister...We have not heard from you in awhile are you off stealing horses, Mary says send her Darky along as she needs him in this hot weather, we have noticed that the 92nd has been mounted and attached to General Wilder's Division, General Grant has ordered three companies of his regiment [92nd Illinois] to Vicksburg for his body guards...Joseph says that completely uses up that regiment...says there will be nothing left than the 4th Illinois Cavalry. Quite newsy and interesting content.......................................$48.00

32813 - AFRAID THAT THE REBELS MIGHT GET INTO WASHINGTON, Polo, Illinois, July 17th, 1864, from the sister of Lt. Oscar Sammis, 92nd Illinois Mounted Infantry serving near Chattanooga. She relates in part in a 4 page ink letter...you have read in the papers about of the raid into Penn. And Maryland, we felt afraid for awhile that the Rebels might get into Washington and I think there were some near Washington...Sherman has been doing some terrible fighting the past two weeks...the opinion here is that he will soon clear out most of that part of the country. Her letter describes Jubal Early's raid towards Washington June - July 1864, Robert E. Lee was concerned about Hunter's advances in the Valley, which threatened critical railroad lines and provisions for the Virginia-based Confederate forces. He sent Jubal Early's corps to sweep Union forces from the Valley and, if possible, to menace Washington, D.C., hoping to compel Grant to dilute his forces against Lee around Petersburg, Virginia. Early was operating in the shadow of Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, whose 1862 Valley Campaign against superior forces was fabled in Confederate history. Early got off to a good start. He drove down the Valley without opposition, bypassed Harper's Ferry, crossed the Potomac River, and advanced into Maryland. Grant dispatched a corps under Horatio G. Wright and other troops under George Crook to reinforce Washington and pursue Early. Monocacy (July 9) Early defeated a smaller force under Lew Wallace near Frederick, Maryland, but this battle delayed his progress enough to allow time for reinforcing the defenses of Washington. Fort Stevens (July 11 - 12) Early attacked a fort on the northwest defensive perimeter of Washington without success and withdrew back to Virginia...........................................$55.00

32814 - ELMIRA, NY, PROVOST MARSHALL GIVES INSTRUCTIONS ABOUT TWO LISTS OF DESERTERS LIVING IN HIS COUNTY AND WHAT TO DO REGARDING ENROLLING NEW TROOPS, 27th District of NY, Elmira, NY, May 20th, 1863. He writes to the deputy Provost Marshall giving him lists of deserters in Steuben County and to arrest the men on the lists and deliver them to headquarters. Also he gives instructions, oaths of office, blank lists for enrollment, which with the assistance of Surgeon J. B. Graves, you will see transmitted to each enrolling officer in Steuben County and return the oath of office to me. M.J. Green Provost Marshall. An act for "enrolling and calling out the National Forces" was signed into law on March 3, 1863, by President Abraham Lincoln. This, the first effective draft by the federal government, called for all men between the ages of 18 and 45 to be enrolled into local militia units and be available to be called into national service. The draft law exempted men in some occupations, such as telegraph operators, railroad engineers, judges, and certain other government employees. Men with mental disabilities or with certain types of dependents were also exempted. Physical disabilities that would exempt a man included imperfect vision in the right eye, lack of front teeth and molars, and loss of more than one finger of the right hand or more than two fingers of the left hand. By July, the new draft hit high emotions in New York City where a riot where many were killed [especially Negroes], was subdued by Union troops. This Provost Marshall is trying to round up deserters in his district as well as setting the stage for enrolling more volunteers or the drafted men covered by Lincoln's March law. An interesting document, 8" X 10" manuscript..............................................$49.00


32705 - 13TH MAINE, CAMP AND GARRISON EQUIPMENT MANIFEST, August 11th, 1864, Augusta, ME. 8" X 10" printed form and filled in listing received from Lt. R. B. Grover, 13th Maine, lists uniform clothing, 1 forage cap, blouses, trousers [infantry], shirts, drawers, stockings. The 13th Maine participated in the New Orleans Expedition under Butler, the Rio Grande Campaign, Red River Campaign, and back to Virginia in 1864. This document was written while the veterans were on furlough Aug - Sept. 1864. Very fine...........................$28.50

32601 - AN EX CONFEDERATE POW FROM TENNESSEE IS LOOKING FOR HIS GUN AFTER HIS RELEASE FROM JOHNSON'S ISLAND, Whitefield County, Georgia, May 20th, 1866. One page letter in ink to Frank Hammum formerly of the 61st Tennessee who had been released from Johnson's Island late in 1865 by W. J. Johnson. He relates in part...Johnson states he did not received any letter from ex Lt. Hannum before he left Tennessee, states that Lt. Hannum's gun is in the hands of his brother-in-law Morgan Lane and to drop him a note at Whitesburg, Jefferson County, Tennessee..."you say you have not heard from out old regiment, Rader and Davis are now at home, Jackson is in Middle Tennessee somewhere, Rose. I have never heard a word from since he left the Island [Johnson's Island]." This letter is accompanied by a stamped cover with a pen cancellation Vernell's Station, GA, May 22, 1866. An interesting letter from old POW buddies from Johnson's Island. 2 pieces.......$55.00
 
3700 - 10TH MISSOURI INFANTRY ABOUT TO ENGAGE AT
CORINTH, 24" X 30", pre-printed muster roll for Company I, 10th Missouri Infantry, Captain Joel Strong commanding. Dated April 30th, 1862 at Hickman, Kentucky listing over 60 soldiers and their pay received for March and April 1862. The 10th Missouri was en route to Shiloh and then to the siege at Corinth, MS. Strong lists what they have done since leaving Cape Girardeau, MO. He notes...left on March 20th on the transport and reached Birds Point at 5 PM the same day. Embarked on the steamer Thomas S. Dickey and proceeded to Hickman, Kentucky which is our present station which we arrived at daybreak on the 22nd and occupied the town and unfurled the Northern ensign which had not been seen since the breaking out of the Rebellion. The 10th Missouri was at Cape Girardeau, MO, until April 30. Moved to Pittsburgh Landing, TN, April 30, Coffey's Landing, TN, May 2, Siege of Corinth, MS, May 5-30. Action at Farmington May 9 (Reserve). Skirmish on Booneville Road May 29, pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. At Corinth until August, at Jacinto until September 18, Battle of Iuka September 19, Battle of Corinth October 3-4, Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862 to January, 1863. Escort train to Memphis, TN, December 20-30, 1862, guard duty on Memphis & Charleston Railroad at Germantown and near Memphis until March, 1863, expedition to Yazoo Pass and operations against Fort Pemberton and Greenwood March 13-April 5. Moved to Milliken's Bend, LA and duty there until April 25, movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30, Battle of Port Gibson May 1 (In support), Big Black River May 3, Battles of Raymond May 12, Jackson May 14, Champion's Hill May 16, Siege of Vicksburg, MS, May 18-July 4, assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22, Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Strong was wounded in the shoulder at Champion Hill. His photo is shown above, some embellishments light, minor seam strengthening in a spot, otherwise very good..........................................
$225.00

3701 - 10TH MISSOURI INFANTRY, THE 2ND BATTLE OF CORINTH, IUKA, MISSISSIPPI, pre-printed 24" X 30" muster roll of Company I of the 10th Missouri Infantry listing over 50 men and their pay information signed by Captain Joel Strong October 31st, 1862 at Corinth, MS. The roll was for the period June 30th - October 30th, 1862. In the event section, Strong chronicles their actions since the last muster roll. He relates..."September 1st, 1862, at camp near Jacinta [Jacinto], MS. Remaining there until September 14th and on that day marched to Iuka and reached the battlefield on the 19th, the regiment being in reserve, loss 22 in killed and wounded, the next day pursuing the retreating enemy returned to Jacinta [Jacinto] on the 21st and remained in camp until October 1st when the regiment was ordered to camp near Corinth and reached there on the 1st, moved camp on the 2nd at 2 o'clock and received orders to be in the line in thirty minutes all being prompt to time we took up a line of march to Corinth where with the regiment participated in the fight of the 3rd and 4th, the regiment lost 93 killed and wounded and on the 5th pursued the retreating enemy from 15 to 32 miles per day returning on the 11th to Corinth and on the 13th moved to our present position one mile north of Corinth, MS." The 10th Missouri was at Cape Girardeau, MO, until April 30, moved to Pittsburgh Landing, TN, April 30. Coffey's Landing, TN, May 2, Siege of Corinth, MS, May 5-30. Action at Farmington May 9 (Reserve). Skirmish on Booneville Road May 29, pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. At Corinth until August, at Jacinto until September 18, Battle of Iuka September 19, Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862 to January, 1863. Escort train to Memphis, TN, December 20-30, 1862,guard duty on Memphis & Charleston Railroad at Germantown and near Memphis until March, 1863. Expedition to Yazoo Pass and operations against Fort Pemberton and Greenwood March 13-April 5, moved to Milliken's Bend, LA, and duty there until April 25. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30, Battle of Port Gibson May 1 (In Support). Big Black River May 3, Battles of Raymond May 12, Jackson May 14. Champion's Hill May 16, Siege of Vicksburg, MS May 18-July 4, assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22, surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Strong was wounded in the shoulder at Champion Hill. His photo is shown above. A good account of the action of the 10th Missouri at Iuka and Corinth. Some slight seam restoration that is quite usual for these huge folded documents.....................................$295.00


3266 THE RESULTS OF CONFEDERATE ARTILLERY NEAR PETERSBURG, A MAN HAS HIS HEAD BLOWN OFF, near Petersburg, December 9th, 1864, 3 pages in ink by John Smith, Co. I 35th Mass. Volunteers. He relates in part to his wife...The artillery is firing from both sides, three days ago when our pickets were being relieved the Rebels threw a shell into them killing one and wounding three. The one killed was an old man from Company C who had his head blown off and died instantly, he did not know what hit him, another was hit in eight different places and probably will not live, if so he will at least lose an arm and an leg and was also hit in the body.. Another man lost his thumb, another slightly wounded in the side. Last night we had a man wounded by a Minnie ball. The ball passed through his arm but did not break the bone and went into his body. The shelling yesterday from both sides was lively. . There was a group of soldiers standing aside of our battery looking at the effects of our shells on the Rebels when a shell came in and hit into the crowd killing five and wounding others. All belonged to the 39th NY which was a new regiment here. Our losses along the entire line yesterday was heavy was as there was considerable firing on the picket lines. The deserters do not come in as fast as a week ago as I guess their officers keep a better look at them coming over in crowds. . We have heard that Hardie as escaped from Savannah before Sherman could invest the city but he has done considerable enough. I am now making out a report on all the killed, wounded, ill, died and it is considerable…John [John I Smith Co I 35th Mass.] Smith was appointed a 2nd Lt in January 1865. A great accounting of the horrific damage artillery shells did on infantry. Extremely well written........................$350.00

3267 - ONE OF OUR LIEUTENANTS WAS KILLED WHEN WE CROSSED THE RIVER AFTER THE REBELS, 1ST NEW YORK MOUNTED RIFLES, Camp Dodge, Suffolk, VA. 4 long pages in ink by Charles H. Hasting, 1st NY Mounted Rifles, January 1st, 1863. He relates in part...We had a hard rife was in the saddle from 7 AM to 3 AM, the Rebels came across a few times, once in a while we get a shot at them and they return the compliment, quite a number of our men have been wounded, two have died, and one has lost a leg...the cavalry is not as exposed as the infantry, if we move it will be towards Petersburg...the Rebels have a very strong hold at Black Water, if we attempt to cross the river they can pick us off, several of our companies went across the river and drove them 10 miles but returned as they had no infantry to back them up, that was when our Lieutenant was killed. Extremely well written, comes with DUE 3 stamped postal cover NORFOLK CDS of January 10th [1863].................................................$145.00

3268 - A SOLDIER KILLED A LITTLE GIRL IN THE WOODS, Harrisonburg, VA, October 11th, 1863. 3 page letter in ink by Edward Fisher of the 82nd PA Infantry writing to a friend. He relates in part...Am getting along fine but the crackers we have are so hard they are hard to get down without choking on them, we have bread twice a day and in the evening we have crackers and coffee. There has been a great many accidents around here, last week one soldier cut his leg off and broke his shoulder bone. ONE OF THE SOLDIERS WAS DOWN TOWN AND PICKED UP A LITTLE GIRL AND TOOK HER TO A SWAMP AND SHOT HER THROUGH THE NECK AND THEN CUT HER THROAT...THE GIRL WAS ONLY FIVE YEARS OLD AND NOW NO ONE DARES TO GO OUT OF THE CAMP...he discusses payment for boots, many men buy their own food, Edward Fisher. While quite a revealing letter about the murder of a little girl by a soldier, Fisher does not comment about the outcome of the murder - was the soldier identified and caught? The 82nd PA had been very active in the previous months fighting at Gettysburg and in the pursuit of Lee...extremely rare commentary of something unheard of in the Civil War - murder of a child by a soldier....................................................$175.00

3252 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET, East Point, Alabama, April 8th, 1865. Two large pages in ink to his wife by John Haggerty an engineer on the Carondelet. He relates in part...The gunboat Fair Play came up the river last night from Cairo and brought the good news that we are in Richmond, asks his wife to be more careful in writing as her writing is most difficult to read, asks about the recent floods back home he has heard about, family matters. John Haggerty. USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition. Paper has some archival repairs affecting several words...................................................$75.00


3095 - THE OCCUPATION OF LEESVILLE, VA MARCH 1862, Camp Pierpoint, VA, March 8th, 1862. 4 pages in ink to family from a member of the 10th PA Vol. who was artilleryman and was from New Wilmington, PA. He relates in part...My health is good and so is the company's...Professor Vincent of New Wilmington preached for us near the quarters today. He is here on a visit to the 10th Regiment as there are some boys in our company he knows, a friend's brother is there driving the team for our company's Sutler Jim Clark...Colonel Geary [Colonel John Geary] has taken possession of Leesburg. He did not have to fight any to get it. Our troops came into town on one side and their troops went out on the other side...we are under orders for four days rations to be ready to march...we would like to march on and rout them as we go...the more I hear about them [Rebels] the more I went after them...was on guard last night and I was sleepy, the turnpike is dry from here to Washington, describes a falling tree crushing a tent, more on his camp life...signed Jim. Jim was an artilleryman as seen in his June 26th, 1862 letter...Geary's capture of Leesburg was the first Union occupation of that city. The 10th PA was about to move south and participate in the Peninsular Campaign that proved disastrous to McClellan..................................$95.00

3000 - LEAVING FREDERICKSBURG FOR THE CAMPAIGN AGAINST RICHMOND, Camp near Fredericksburg, VA, June 13th, 1863. Three pages in ink to his Father by Pvt. George W. Rogers, 9th PA Reserve Infantry on patriotic stationary [eagle, red, blue edge trim]. He relates in part..."I have been on fatigue duty at Fredericksburg, we are ordered to Richmond, the 1st and 2nd Brigades are already on transports, the 12th and 6th Regiments are on board along with the cavalry and artillery...Jim [his brother] has a Negro to wait on him but I would not have one for there are a nuisance...we had camped out on a Seesch farm about six miles from Fredericksburg on a river. The General told us to tear up the fences for fire and shanties as it was raining...that made the old Rebel roaring mad, he told us that two brigades could camp there but not to molest his fence. He would not sell us milk and said he would just as soon sell us poison and if he could he would cut our throats." Rogers later would be killed at Antietam and his brother Jim seriously wounded. A nice newsy letter just before the Peninsular Campaign began.............................................$125.00


3100 - WHILE GUARDING A HOUSE IN VIRGINIA I SPENT THE NIGHT WITH A SOUTHERN LADY, 4 large pages in ink by Francis Aubin of the 146th NYV, Camp Augur, Upton Hill, VA, February 15th, 1862 to his sister. He relates in part...I must tell you a story about our skirmishing when we went last week between our pickets and the Rebels, we started in the afternoon and got to the Rebel pickets about dark. We skirmished for awhile and about seven o'clock the Captain told me to go to a certain house and guard it...later I was not paying attention to what was in the house and I felt someone taking me by my shoulders--it was an old nigger wench and I got up and was going to hit her with the butt of my gun, she begged me not to hit her and told me that her mistress, the table had been set for supper and asked me to take supper with her and a good looking gal. We had barely eaten half of the supper when the old woman gets up and leaves the room and leaves me with the young gal. I hitched up close to her and I must say I enjoyed myself tip top. I was up all night with her and had a good old gay time. About half past five, I awoke and decided to rejoin my company and asked the gal if I could have a kiss from her sweet lips...then he asked me what kind of soldier I was Secesh or Union. I told her that I was Union to the bone and she told me to get away from her...then there was a bank outside and it was my Captain and I was taken prisoner, more on what the boys said back in camp. Extremely well written by Francis Aubin who had two sons killed in the war [Frank and John]. Rare sexual content. We sold this letter in 2000 for $350 in our catalogue and just bought it again......................................................$395.00

3108 -  THE BATTLE OF KERNSTOWN, VA, STONEWALL JACKSON'S ONLY DEFEAT, April 2nd, 1862. 4 page letter in ink by Elias S. Stone, 83rd NYV [9th NY Militia], Headquarters 9th NY State Militia, 4 miles from Warrenton, VA. He relates in part to his sister...we left Winchester a week ago and have been marching ever since...the Rebels 11,000 strong attacked our forces but they made a mistake and they got badly whipped losing from 1200 to 1500 men in the engagement, we only lost 98 killed and 267 wounded and we also took 1600 prisoners. That is pretty good don't you think so our brigade marched to Centerville and over the battlefield at Bulls Run. The Rebels had 160,000 men there but did not stop to fight they have retreated to Richmond and we are going after them lively. Every time we have a fight they fly in dismay. There are 400 fortifications that they have quit and they bragged that we could never take them. Where McClellan made a move they did not stop and fight. The enemy is on the opposite side of the Rappahannock so we will have to wait until something is done by way of the James River where 2000 troops have gone to attack them from the other side...Direct letters to Washington, DC in General Banks' Division...more, The First Battle of Kernstown was fought on March 23, 1862, in Frederick County and Winchester, Virginia, the opening battle of Confederate Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's campaign through the Shenandoah Valley during the American Civil War. Attempting to tie down the Union forces in the Valley, under the overall command of Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks, Jackson received incorrect intelligence that a small detachment under Col. Nathan Kimball was vulnerable, but it was in fact a full infantry division more than twice the size of Jackson's force. His initial cavalry attack was forced back and he immediately reinforced it with a small infantry brigade. With his other two brigades, Jackson sought to envelop the Union right by way of Sandy Ridge. But Col. Erastus B. Tyler's brigade countered this movement, and when Kimball's brigade moved to his assistance, the Confederates were driven from the field. There was no effective Union pursuit. Although the battle was a Confederate tactical defeat, and in fact Jackson's only defeat in the war, it represented a strategic victory for the South by preventing the Union from transferring forces from the Shenandoah Valley to reinforce the Peninsula Campaign against the Confederate capital, Richmond. The Battle of Kernstown started Jackson on the road to being one of the most celebrated Confederate generals. Stone was killed at 2nd Bulls Run, August 30th, 1862. Well written.......................................$250.00

3086 - 77TH NEW YORK, THE MUD MARCH NEAR FREDERICKSBURG, JANUARY 1863, Two large pages in ink by Albert S. Green, Company K, 77th NY, Camp near Fredericksburg, VA, January 25th, 1863. He writes in part...We received orders to march on the morning of the 20th and we started out with baggage and marched about 14 miles that brought us about 10 miles above Fredericksburg. That night it commenced to rain. We were then about 1 1/2 miles from the river, they started the pontoons and the artillery the next morning but they soon got stuck in the mud. We worked with men, mules, and horses for two days, we got up with the artillery but abandoned the pontoons, and we reached our own camp again on the 23rd. That is the main body, some of them did not get in until last night...Some died on the road...It is such a hard sight to see men, mules, and horses dragged out by the side of the road dead and dying. There is no mercy here for men or beast. What the next move will be, I do not know. I am tired of this, are there any signs of this infernal war being settled? They know [Confederates] every move we make in time to get fortified before we can get to them, Albert S. Green. "The auspicious moment seems to have arrived to strike a great and mortal blow to the rebellion, and to gain that decisive victory which is due to the country." So announced Gen. Ambrose Burnside to his Union Army of the Potomac on the morning of January 20, 1863, as he started out on another great drive to beat Gen. Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and capture the Rebel capitol of Richmond, VA. Burnside's battered soldiers had, but five weeks to recover from their disastrous defeat at the Battle of Fredericksburg, but the government demanded action. The Union and Confederate armies still faced each other across the Rappahannock River at Fredricksburg, and Burnside's plan was to quickly cross the river above Lee's left and assail that flank of the Confederate position. The Union soldiers and their great wagon trains of pontoon boats, artillery, and supplies made a good start clearing their camp and moving up the river. Then the sky started clouding, and by mid-afternoon a slow drizzle had began. By nightfall a steady, relentless rain was falling, not to stop for days. The next morning the great mule-drawn wagons carrying the pontoons churned the road into a quagmire. The wagons sank to their hubs; the artillery sank until only the muzzles were out of the mud. The exhausted horses floundered, as did the men, as each slippery step through the ooze sucked at their shoes and weighed them down. "The whole country was a river of mud," wrote one soldier. "The roads were rivers of deep mire, and the heavy rain had made the ground a vast mortar bed." Whole regiments and triple teams of mules hitched to the wagons and guns failed to move them. Still the rain came down in torrents. By noon, the next day, Burnside's plans to maneuver past Lee's Rebel army were hopelessly stalled, and his own army was exhausted, wet, and cold. Burnside had no choice but to abandon the movement and order his soldiers back to their camps across from Fredericksburg....................................$195.00

3091 - A SOLDIER WRITES HIS WIFE ABOUT SEXUAL ENJOYMENT THAT THEY BOTH MISS, Camp Cloud, VA, February 18th, 1863. 4 large pages in ink by Pvt. Hiram Tweed, Company A, 144th NY. He relates in part to her...My own dear loved one, I love you more and more the longer I am away from you, I yearn for your loving embrace and caress to make us both feel and enjoy our mutual loving desires. Depending where I may go I may consent for you to come to me...If you can I want to see and feel your great sexual enjoyments. You write of such amorous pure loving desires which I think is a credit to a virtuous loving wife than to one who professes or pretends to dislike and takes a disgust of the pleasures of connubial bliss for we are of one flesh and we are to please one another. I desire you and no other one hear [apparently there have been rumors about his faithfulness], is positive of both their marital loyalty while they are away from one another...more on the war, those who are not patriotic, more...Hiram [Tweed]. Quite an unusual letter concerning a situation that was not all uncommon during the War. The loss of sex and the fear of martial indiscretions while spouses are away. Rare content, well written...........................................$195.00


3064 - PROSTITUTES AT WORK IN BALTIMORE TAKING CARE OF THE SOLDIERS, Fort Marshall, Baltimore, MD, February 7th, 1886. Four pages in ink on colored patriotic stationary, red/blue stars...written to his friend Michael Hammons from J. M. Boller, 1st Indiana Heavy Artillery. He relates in part...Things are fine here and hopes are well in Indiana...we have spunky times here, I seldom have to drill, the only duty we have is guard duty and that is once in 10 days...we have time to ramble around town and enjoy ourselves...you may guess how a fellow of my turn would enjoy himself when there are plenty of pretty women about. Baltimore is full of "patriotic young ladies" who devote their entire time to gratify the passions of the soldiers...We are permitted to go into the city every few nights when we have the pleasure to pay our patriotic friends a visit. But I leave you to judge our enjoyment...he describes Baltimore and Fort Marshall with 6 guns and three magazines. Tell the girls that I have forgotten them...had a fight with another soldier...a rare accounting of prostitution in Baltimore which like Washington and Nashville was a hot bed for the "Ladies of the night" during the War. Light stains, otherwise fine and boldly written...The word "hooker" predates the Civil War, but became popularized by Union General Joseph Hooker. After the outbreak of war, the number of brothels in nearby Alexandria, Virginia. A newspaper estimated there were 5000 public women in the District and another 2500 in Alexandria and Georgetown, bringing the total to 7500 by the war's third year "However, it was the towns located just outside the camps where prostitution was most prominent. These small towns were overrun by the sex trade when army troops set up nearby camps. One soldier wrote home to his wife, "It is said that one house in every ten is a bawdy house -- it is a perfect Sodom." Extremely rare content.......................................$295.00

3066 - I MADE YOU A RING FROM A FEET BONE OF A SOLDIER, Headquarters 19th Rgt. [Conn.] also 2nd Ct. Heavy Artillery, Alexandria, VA, December 28th, 1862, William H. Thompson, Company H. 4 pages in ink, patriotic stationary of winged victory. He relates to "Beloved friend" in part...He has been on guard for 24 hours, many sick, 400 on the sick list, two of the best men are gone forever...the rumors are that they will join Siegel and they will be relieved by the 2yth Michigan. His Colonel Wessels is still in the hospital, they have been under the command of General Heintzelman [defenses of Washington]...he has made a ring for her that came from a soldier. It was an old feet bone that I split with my axe and made a hole in it with my bayonet and finished it with my pocket knife...by wearing it, it will glow bright...heavy cannonading from the direction of Centerville, a telegraph just came in that the Rebels were fighting Siegel...Bill Thompson...Real unusual content mentioning making a ring out of human bone. Considering the mores of the day it was probably a Confederate unburied soldier that the bone came from as there were several battlefields near Washington by that date. Rare content, some stains at edge, strong black ink manuscript..........................................$169.00

3067 - AN ACCOUNT OF THE WILSON-KAUTZ, RAID NEAR PETERSBURG, JUNE 1864, 1ST MAINE CAVALRY, Camp near Jones Landing, VA, June 28th, 1864. 4 large pages in bold pencil to his Mother by Elbridge M. Hanson, Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry...We have moved our camp about three miles near Negro quarters on a plantation. There are Negroes left but the owner is prison at Fortress Monroe where he was taken a few weeks prior. To avoid the Rebels getting the wheat crop this year I suppose we will have to destroy it as the government cannot cut it. The government destroyed a large corn crop already. I guess you have heard of the account of Kautz's Cavalry on the advance on Petersburg. Our regiment is in his division and with 5000 infantry and two batteries made the first advance. At midnight, they commenced crossing the pontoon bridge across the Appomattox River just below us and after an advance of about two miles met the Rebels who opened up on our regiment as usual being in the advance. They had some pretty severe skirmishing driving the Rebels before them all day, and the next day the infantry drove them into the entrenchments near Petersburg and a severe battle commenced within a short distance of us. I climbed up on a forage wagon and could see all of the shells bursting in our ranks and the men fall and the musketry sounded like whole bunches of snapping crackers on the 4th of July for about two hours. I moved back into the woods and a shell came in snapping off the top of trees...later our brigade started across the Appomattox and have not heard from them since...the rumors is they will be sent to Elizabeth City, NC...still have some companies on hand and the band near Petersburg...describes the beautiful plantation house, women, and children said all others were gone...we saw three Rebels near the house but did not try to capture them, members of Company A captured a gray backs, several of the 11th PA, were captured by guerillas. On June 22, 5000 Union cavalry and 16 artillery pieces were pulled from the siege of Petersburg and sent, under the command of Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson and August V. Kautz, to destroy the lines of supply the Wilson-Kautz Raid was a cavalry operation in south central Virginia in late June 1864. Occurring early in the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign, the raid was conducted by Union cavalry under Brigadier General James Wilson and August Kautz, who were ordered cut railroads between Lynchburg, VA and the vital Confederate rail supply center at Petersburg. While the raid had the intended effect of disrupting Confederate rail communications for several weeks, the raiding force lost much of its artillery, all of its supply train, and almost a third of the original force, mostly to Confederate capture..............................................$325.00

3069 - THE SIEGE OF PETERSBURG, CONFEDERATE DEFENSES DESCRIBED, CANNOT ATTACK AGAINST THE BREASTWORKS, February 12th, 1864, 6th Maine Battery, Henry F. Howard, 6th Maine Light Infantry, plus pages in ink. Howard writes at the beginning of the Petersburg siege...it is very cold, the wind has blown hard, I was on guard duty last night and it was not very pleasant...the boys have gone to the meeting [religious meeting] about a mile away in a log house...we will be on the move very soon and will make the Johnnies get up and go...there are a great number of deserters coming in every dark night...Petersburg can never be taken by assault but we must flank them. All in front of their works is a stockade built of poles that have been driven into the ground and made sharp at one end as they are driven in slanting to about four feet from the ground. They are put in solid and it would be difficult to pull them out under fire...Howard gives a good description of the stockade stakes placed before the breastworks at Petersburg, well written.................$145.00

3070 - AN OFFICER AT VICKSBURG INFORMS A WOMAN THAT HER FRIEND IS ALIVE, ALTHOUGH WOUNDED, AND WAS SENT TO A HOSPITAL IN INDIANA, Vicksburg, MS, June 21st, 1863. One plus large page letter in ink by Captain W. O. Watson, Co. A., 8th Indiana Volunteers to Miss Jennie Hopkins. He relates in part...Your friend Whitman [Alfred] was severely wounded but his wounds will not result in his death. He describes Albert Whitman in glowing terms as being well thought of in his company. The Captain states that Whitman was sent to a Army hospital in Evansville, IN. Watson, who wrote the letter, was later killed in action at Cedar Creek in 1864. Whitman's records show he was wounded at Vicksburg on May 22nd, 1863 and died at the Evansville, IN hospital on July 26th, 1863. At 10:00 AM on May 22, 1863, brigades from three corps of Grant's army assaulted the city. A long bitter struggle took place and although the assault showed some success at first, the Confederates quickly restored their original lines of defense. The Union army suffered 3,199 casualties, while Pemberton's forces lost less than 500 men. Alfred Whitman was severely wounded on this initial attach on May 22nd, 1863.............................................$100.00

3071 - A RARE POW LETTER FROM COLUMBIA, SC, CASTLE SORGHUM, LT. FRANK STEVENS, 190TH PA CAPTURED AT MALVERN HILL, 8" X 10", letter to his Father on crude "Confederate brown lined paper" by Lt. Frank Stevens, datelined at Columbia, SC, October 16th, 1864. He writes in beautiful manuscript...notes he had written his last letter from Charleston on September 28th [en route from Macon to Columbia]...asks his father for a strong box with specific clothing to be sent to him....boots, pants, hat, shirts, a good pocket knife, a tin plate...also wants $10 in gold to be sent to him by express mail...letters must be confined to private matters, his address to and items to be sent to: Lt. Frank Stevens, Prisoner of War, Columbia, SC in care of Maj. General Foster...A very rare POW letter from a Confederate prison in Columbia, SC known as Castle Sorghum. The box address included Foster's name probably as a aid to getting it there safely as Foster was in command of Union forces. Lt. Frank D. Stevens was a POW twice, once at Gaines Mill 6/27/62, he was released and wounded at Fredericksburg, and again a POW at Malvern Hill 6/13/64. He was sent to Macon, GA and then to Columbia, SC. He saw service in the 41st PA as well as the 190th PA Castle Sorghum was a Confederate prisoner-of-war camp established in 1862 in Columbia. The transportation of large numbers of Union officers to Columbia occurred after Gen. William T. Sherman's Army of the West penetrated deeply into adjacent Georgia and numerous military prisons there were hurriedly evacuated, with their inhabitants transferred to Charleston, South Carolina. On 29 September, Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones decided to transfer the accumulated Federal officers, estimated at 1,400 (some estimates range as high as 1,700), from Charleston to Columbia, escorted by the 32nd Georgia Volunteers and 1 or more companies of the 8th Battalion, South Carolina Senior Reserves. The train ride afforded another opportunity to escape, which many did. It consisted of a 5-acre (20,000 m2) tract of open field, without walls, fences, buildings or any other facilities. A "deadline" was established by laying wood planks 10 feet (3.0 m) inside the camp's boundaries. The rations consisted of cornmeal and sorghum molasses as the main staple in the diet, thus the camp became known as "Camp Sorghum". Due to the lack of any security features, escapes were common. Conditions were terrible, with little food, clothing or medicine, and disease claimed a number of lives among both the prisoners and their guards. Due to the scarcity of supplies for prisoners the military in command there obviously were lenient of what was allowed to be sent to the soldiers. Letters from Confederate POW camps are extremely rare especially from the Deep South camps. Near MINT condition.........................................................$395.00

3073 - SCARCE 69TH NEW YORK ENLISTMENT BOUNTY PAYMENT FOR A SOLDIER WHO DESERT AT PETERSBURG, 5" X 7.5" pink imprinted certificate paying $10 to Benjamin Craig as a new recruit in the service of the United States dated April 15th, 1864. Benjamin enlisted April 16th, 1864 in New York City and deserted at Petersburg February 3rd, 1865. In mint condition. Following Gettysburg, the Irish Brigade ceased to exist as a functioning unit and was disbanded in June 1864. The depleted ranks of the 69th Regiment were filled with new volunteers and draftees from New York's Irish ghettoes. At the end of the summer of 1864, the 69th rejoined its Irish comrades as 1st Regiment of the 2nd Irish Brigade. The brigade served until the end of the war and was present at the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox. Out of more than 2,000 regiments that served with the Union Army, the 69th last more men than all but six regiments. Quite a scarce and desirable regiment.....................$79.00

3074 - CIVIL WAR US ARMY BEAUTIFUL ALLOTMENT CHECK, unissued 3.5" X 7.5", vignette of Secretary of War Edwin Stanton and a vignette of Miss Liberty holding a large flag, all on an attractive green background, 186, "Assistant Treasurer of the United States" New York, only have one. MINT condition.........................................$45.00


3032 - SOME OF THE BOYS GOT INTO A FIGHT WITH THE BUTTERNUTS, SERGT. DAILY SHOT ONE THROUGH THE BOWELS A BULLET BOUNCED OFF HIS HEAD, 4 page letter in ink from Captain Lewis Sims, 89th Indiana to his wife Courtney, September 22nd, 1863. He relates in part...We are still in the fort but are awaiting marching orders and may go to Texas or Chattanooga, probably Texas...will send you some magnolia seeds to plant...some of the boys in the regiment got into a fight with the Butternuts and took some Butternut pins off them. There were 200 of the Butternuts pitched for a fight and only seven soldiers. They got Sergt. Daily separated from the others. Got him down and were beating him and were shooting at him when the others came up and commenced shooting and soon scattered them. Daily got up, one fellow drew his revolver to shoot him, and Daily drew his and they both fired and the Butternut fell shot through the bowels. At the same time, a fellow ran up behind Daily and out a pistol to his head and fired but the bullet glanced upward and did little harm but knocked him down, he soon got up and made at them again, but this was the old soldier that got hurt while the others had 20-30 wounded. They cleaned them out completely. I will quit as I have no good wife to sleep with...A great account of a hand to hand encounter in Tennessee. Sims ends the letter "I will quit as I have no good wife to sleep with." We will include a copy of another Sims letter with his signature to go along with his great letter. Also included is a letter to Sims from his wife with a cover addressed to Sims at via New Orleans. Three items....................................................$195.00

3036 - A CONFEDERATE SHARPSHOOTER SHOOTS A SOLDIER ON A MORTAR AT PETERSBURG, Battery #5, November 30th, 1864. 4 pages in ink to his cousin by C. W. Smith near Petersburg, VA. He relates in part...am in my tent tonight writing his letter, there has been considerable moving the Army for the past 3 days and there is favorable opinion that here will be another battle soon if the weather is favorable. I have never heard a night so quiet and that is a sure sign that the armies are preparing for battle. I asked the movements in Georgia and they implied that he and his whole army could go to hell. Just as I finished your letter an Orderly came into my tent and told me a man had been shot. I went up the battery and a man lay who had been working in the battery where the mortar was that I was firing at the Rebels. He had been shot through the body and did not live long. It was probably done as the result of us killing one of their men when we were firing. Yet it was cold-blooded murder as he was standing on the parapet talking with other men when they shot him...I will go out and talk with the Johnnies before I retire...An excellent letter showing the danger along the Petersburg lines as well as the friendly communications between Federals and Confederates at times.........................$175.00

3037 - THE BATTLES AT GARNETTS AND GOLDING FARM AND SAVAGE STATION, VA, THE SHOT AND SHELL TORE UP THE EARTH AND TREES, OUR BATTERIES MOWED THEM DOWN LIKE SCYTHES, 4 pages in bold pencil with a stamped cover with OLD POINT CONFORT CDS, Orville "Tom" Dewey, 49th NYV in camp near City Point, July 4th, 1862. He relates to his Father in part...Last Saturday [June 28th] while we were at Camp Lincoln near New Bridge [VA], the Rebels shelled us for two hours killing one and wounding four in the 49th, we lay in our rifle pits or they would have cut us up terribly. Under the cover of the artillery, they tried to throw a regiment on us, if fact they got possession of a little breastwork in our front that had been set up to protect our artillerymen. We then opened up on them with shells from "Matt's" Battery and the men of the 33rd NY in our Brigade. In about 10 minutes, we killed 50-60 and wounded about a 100 taking about 30 prisoners. Captain Thad Hamilton was taken; he is the son of Dr. Hamilton of Buffalo and a regular fighter. One of the Rebels said he killed four of them with his revolver before he was taken. Early Sunday morning we retreated through Savage Station when we heard firing from our rear. We hurried back and fought a terrific fight going on. We were immediately ordered into it and away we went. We took the left before we could get to the Rebels they skedaddled...then we burned the bridge that covered the swamp and then we laid in wait for the Rebels who soon made their appearance and commenced such shelling that I have never seen before. Matt's Battery attempted to silence the rebel guns but they were too many for them...their shot and shell tore up the earth and trees...while his battery stood dismounted, one of the pieces killed his horses and men but as usual he stood up until he was able to get his guns off. Then we all fell back in the woods about a half mile, there we formed in line and gave the Rebels fits until night. Our batteries mowed them down like scythes. The roads were so soft it was impossible to drag ourselves through the mud with was from 6" - 18" deep...Orville [Dewey]...The Battle of Savage's Station took place on June 29, 1862, in Henrico County, VA as fourth of the Seven Days Battles (Peninsula Campaign) of the American Civil War. The main body of the Union Army of the Potomac began a general withdrawal toward the James River. Confederate Brig. Gen. John B. Magruder pursued along the railroad and the Williamsburg Road and struck Maj. Gen. Edwin Vose Sumner's II Corps (the Union rearguard) with three brigades near Savage's Station, while Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's divisions were stalled north of the Chickahominy River. Union forces continued to withdraw across White Oak Swamp, abandoning supplies and more than 2,500 wounded soldiers in a field hospital. The account Dewey writes puts the engagements he describes to be on the 28th near Garnetts and Golding's Farm and Savage Station on the 29th of June. The swamp he describes probably is White Oak Swamp [Battle occurred there June 30th]. The cover is addressed to Mrs. William McLean at Buffalo who may have been a friend of his Father. A wonderful series of battle accounts of action during the 7 Day Battles near Richmond..........................................$450.00


2141 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Pottsville, PA October 5th, 1863 one page letter in bold pencil to his wife while on temporary assignment and includes a stamped cover to her...he relates in part, I have received a dispatch ordering me to Rosecrans' Army without delay and I intend on leaving tomorrow and will stay at Norristown but my stay there will be brief as I must hurry to Chattanooga. I hope we will be victorious in the next battle. W. D. Whipple.................$175.00

2142 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Cincinnati, October 28th, 1863, 4 pages in ink with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple, he relates in part...I have received orders to go to General Thomas at the Army of the Cumberland - now all our plans for living together are frustrated...General Rosecrans had a grand reception for him here in Cincinnati. He has many friends throughout the western portion of Ohio. I would have been pleased to be assigned with him had he been given the command. He laments the time he will be away from his family on this new assignment. Letter comes with a stamped cover, as well as the telegram he received confirming his assignment to General Thomas' Staff. 3 pieces well written................$295.00 

2144 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE
,
Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Chattanooga, TN, January 22nd, 1864, 2 page letter in ink to his wife Caroline with a stamped envelope addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple, he relates in part...I had to put your letter away at the offices as I did not want to let anyone see the tears in my eyes...he goes on to describe his room as a parlor on an floor and continues listing the furniture he has...he arises at 8 AM, breakfast at 9 AM with General Thomas and his two aides Captain Willard and Captain Kellogg...we have a Steward and a colored cook as well as our servants...have beef steak, potatoes, hot cakes for breakfast, at dinner beef soup, vegetables, I tend to work late in my office at retire. Whipple gives a good account of his day in this letter which starts off quite tender as his wife's last letter obviously makes him homesick to tears...................................................$275.00

2145 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Nashville, TN, October 27th, 1864, 4 pages ALS by Whipple to his wife Caroline, comes with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple, he relates in part...Whipple gives his wife a description of an entrepreneurial woman about 40 with two memorable daughters presenting applications to him to open a hotel in Chattanooga called "Crutchfield House." She was described as being short and stout on the shortly side of 40. She needed special permission to ship freight on the railroad to ship more than the allowed amount on the railroad as she also wanted to open a store in the hotel to sell wine and liquor. She also wants permission to re-open the "Trout House" in Atlanta which was the finest hotel in Atlanta. He fears that she will not succeed. He wishes he would be free of this miserable war and return to civilization..........................................$265.00

2146 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Nashville, TN, November 6th, 1864, 4 pages in ink to his wife with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple, he relates in part to her...Atlanta was to be our headquarters but a change was made due to HOOD'S movements as it made it necessary to move from Atlanta to Chattanooga. What plans are made I cannot write in this letter which may be captured between here and Louisville. Mrs. Thomas left Nashville for Chattanooga. He stays at the St. Cloud Hotel at $4.50 per day and it is miserable, asks for clothing to be sent. "W". After a short stay in Atlanta Thomas' forces are called back to Nashville due to Hood's movements to the Northwest of Atlanta. Well written, letter and stamped cover.....................................................$275.00

2148 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Chattanooga, TN, January 15th, 1864, 4 pages ALS by Whipple to his wife Caroline with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. H. D. Whipple, he relates in part...He is now riding a fine white horse...yesterday we were greeted by the sound of the first locomotive that has arrived since the occupation began. The rails are now opened north and starvation does not stare us in the face now. No one but someone in the army know how much our troops are suffering for lack of food and clothing and as far as our animals are concerned hundreds and hundreds are lying dead and the living are walking skeletons. As I was going to my quarters last night I saw an old horse attempting to make a meal out of pine weather boards of a house. He would gnaw off a few splinters and I could hear him crunch them between his teeth. He is probably dead by this time. We came to the conclusion that the Rebs were starving also and we could hold out. "W". An excellent letter by General Whipple on the state of affairs in Chattanooga during the winter of 1864...........................................$265.00

2149 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Camp near Cassville, GA, May 22nd, 1864, one page in ink to wife Caroline with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple...he relates in part...We move at 4 AM in the morning stripped for battle in the words of General Sherman's Order received. I do not know when I will be able to write again. The Rebs, I promise, will attack our communications and may succeed and capture some of our letters. He tells his wife to tell their little daughter that he will come and see her once the battles are over. Whipple writes at the start of the Atlanta Campaign as Chief of Staff to General Thomas. ALS and cover.................................................$275.00

2150 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Camp near Kennesaw Mountain, June 21st, 1864, 2 pages in ink to his wife Caroline, comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife, ALS he relates in part...The fight goes on seemingly day and night and still the rain pours. Wagons, when they move at all, move at a snails pace. Horses and mules are in the mud constantly. The eternal sound of splash of persons walking through the mud and water is getting tiresome. Everything is getting moldy and boots taken off at night refuse to be put on in the morning. We gained an important point last night and the Rebels during the light tried several times to retake it but failed each time. Their losses must have been heavy in these repulses at least I hope so. My health is still good and I hope we finish off Johnston's Army..."W". General Whipple writes this account just before the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain [June 27th, 1864].....................$295.00

2151 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Nashville, October 24th, 1864, 4 pages in ink to his wife, he relates...I will stay here awhile and return to that fine spot Chattanooga and there to remain for the winter. I visited the ex Post Master Brown's house who were probably first rate Rebs until the arrival of the Union Army. The Rebel General Pillow is a brother of Mrs. Brown. They have a portrait of him as a Major General in the USA hanging in the parlor. Their son is in the Rebel Army on the staff of General Bushrod Johnson. They claim to be Union people and are mortified at the thought of the loss of their crops and timberland fearing that they may be seized by the government as some already has [other citizens in the area]. Their desire to save their property has them being very polite to Union officers and their house is a favorite meeting place of many of them. As Chief of Staff, they overdid their attempt to please me...she said I was so young, handsome, and distinguished. So much flattery arouses suspicion. Mrs. Baird [wife of General Absalon Baird] is living next door and has not seen her husband yet. She came down with Mrs. Sherman [wife of General William Sherman]..."W". As General Thomas' Chief of Staff Whipple was a go between many citizens and Thomas during Thomas' stay in Nashville before he joined Sherman on the march through the Carolinas, well written, comes with stamped cover addressed "Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple" in Whipple's hand.................................................$295.00

2152 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Eastport, AL, January 16th, 1865, two page letter in ink to his wife, he relates in part...On a military steamboat, there are just a couple of buildings laying on the bank of the river with a good many steamers lying at the bank discharging their cargos. Our troops are moving and the wagons are arriving and departing. The gunboats are lying on the eastern and northern bank. We will remain here until the army is completely ready to take the field then away we go again. We have not left the steamer as we cannot find room to encamp our headquarters. Yesterday we went 10 miles up the river to the camp of the cavalry headquarters...gives hopes that the children are well. Signed "W". Comes with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple. A fine ALS written in preparation of the march towards Savannah by Sherman...................................................$225.00

2154 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Eastport, AL, January 21st, 1865, 3 pages in ink, comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife "Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple", he relates in part...I have received your letter of the 21st as it was directed to Chattanooga and I suppose it was cut off by Hood's Rebel Army. We will never return to Chattanooga again as a headquarters so letters to me should be sent to Nashville. The same mail brought another letter from you giving news of the improving health of the children. We are encamped on a hill overlooking the steamboat landing. This is a pretty place with an excellent view of the river, boats, and surrounding country. The town of Eastport consists of only three dwelling houses but before the war there were probably twelve but the war has destroyed some. It is bleak here and uninviting. Our nearest telegraph station is at Johnsville away down the valley. All the steamboats have to be convoyed up and it is a slow process. We can do nothing with any dispatch. I can't imagine why General Thomas remains here unless he wants to avoid the useless gab of the citizens of Nashville. There is a division I could have General Thomas says if I desire it so I told him I would take it. I have many misgivings about leaving my present position of Chief of Staff especially since General Thomas' command has been increased although General Sherman commands his troops. I fear by taking this command I will miss the opportunity to be stationed at Nashville and he won't be able to be with her but if he fails to take the division it will risk promotional opportunity for him..."W". An excellent ALS by Whipple with his full signature on the envelope...........................................$295.00

2153 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. TWO SEPARATE ALS BY WHIPPLE WRITTEN ON FEBRUARY 27TH, 1865 WITH THE STAMPED ENVELOPES THAT CARRIED THEM...addressed to MRS. GEN. W. D. WHIPPLE, Letter 1, on Stationary Dept. of the Cumberland, Nashville, TN, February 27th, 1865, 1 page to wife Caroline...he obtained a wardrobe, six curtains, and a large carpet and a dining table. The plumber is at work fixing the hot and cold hydrants...there is already a cook and a chambermaid already here in the house..."W", 2nd letter dated February 27th, 1865 at Nashville, TN to Caroline...I have seen General Donaldson today and he will send a quartermaster over tomorrow who will make furniture for our house - such as can be made in the quartermaster's shop and it will be very good. I think we can have the children here in a short time. Do you rather bring them with you or wait? I am going to send to Cincinnati for a mattress or two...yours "W". Two separate letters and TWO covers addressed in his hand...................................................$295.00


2164 - WE ARE TRYING TO PEN UP OLD LEE, Camp by the roadside near Hagerstown, MD, July 11th, [1863]. 1 large bold pencil letter on blue paper by Austin Fenn, 10th Vermont, mentions a friend near South Mountain, since we left there we have traveled about 12 miles and passed the old Antietam battle ground at night as we are trying to pen up Old Lee. If we don't do it, it will not be the fault of us or our Generals. We have brings a man his appetite. I can take a chuck of fat pork and gnaw it a cat gnawing a chicken. I have seen Nate as he come up just as had a side of pork broiled on the end of a stick. I was glad to see him as his regiment passed and I think he will be home soon. The 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th passed here - mentions several soldiers he knows in those units. We are laying awaiting orders. Mentions Sylvanus Winshih who was killed, will send this letter in an envelope...mentions that a friend states in regard to Negro troops. "The Niggers will fight like the devil he has seen for himself." You never can image the size of this army, you can only see one quarter of it at one time. Comes with a copy of another letter by Fenn to verify authorship...a letter written during the attempt to pursue Lee after the Gettysburg Campaign....................................................$125.00

1183 - A SHARPSHOOTER WRITES TO HIS SWEETHEART AFTER BEING UNDER FIRE, 151st New York, Volunteers, actually two letters, one a letter written in poem form by Jesse Benson, Company A [Independent Rifles] 151st NY Vol. Both stamped covers, one on an attractive patriotic letter sheet VICTORY. 1st Letter postmarked September 5th, 1863, patriotic letter sheet with the heading SHARPSHOOTERS and is a letter in poem form detailing the history of his regiment and their Captain, 2 plus pages in ink. 2nd letter, dated October 18th, 1863, 4 pages in ink he relates in part...On picket on Bull Run Creek, our army has been retreating on march for four days and one day we marched 25 miles. We started near Culpepper and now we are within 18 miles of Washington. When we camped on a high hill, there was some skirmishing and was under fire for a half hour, the shells came close, some were hurt in the regiment. As I am writing this, I can see the Rebel pickets by looking down in the hollow. During the four days we marched I could hear the cannons and musket fire, sometimes were close enough to stop us and we drew up in the line of battle, he hopes the War will come to an honorable end, more on the destruction he has seen. Benson's Company [Company A Independent Rifles was Sharpshooter Company] and he was severely wounded in his right arm a month later at Mine Run and had his arm amputated [November 27th, 1863]. Actually two letters with stamped covers. Scarce Sharpshooter group.....................................$325.00

1184 - BATTLE NEAR DINWIDDIE COURT HOUSE, I WAS CAPTURED AND ESCAPED THE REBELS, September 15th, 1864. 2 large pages in pen by H. Roscoe Brackett of the 16th Maine Infantry. He relates in part to friends at home...We knew that the Johnnies were assing in our front for a charge...we had breastworks and were ready for them and we did not have to wait long as they came in three lines of battle. We repulsed them on our front but they tried to break through on our right and the first thing we knew we were outflanked and the bullets came at us from our rear and we were ordered to fall back and we did but the first thing I knew we were surrounded by about a dozen Rebs. I had run right into their lines as did other men. They made me throw down my gun and bayonet which I did as there were so many I knew it was useless to do otherwise. They told me to go to the rear and I started to run with six other men and they kept singing out for me to halt and I heeded them not and kept on running amidst a shower of minnies and case shot bursting all around me from our own batteries. I kept running to the right with others all the time they were after me and I was only two rods from them. I turned to my right and ran into an open field and saw two lines of battle marching towards the woods and knew in a moment it was our men and finally felt safe from the Rebels...we have received a report that Atlanta is ours. The 16th Maine was involved with skirmishing around Dinwiddie Court House in early September 1864, Brackett had been wounded at Fredericksburg and was promoted to Corporal in 1864 after his return to duty. A great letter describing a narrow escape from the Rebels after being overrun by the Confederates..........................................$295.00


9106 - THE WAR IN LOUISIANA, BATTLE BAYOU BORBEAU AND CARRIN CROW BAYOU, NOVEMBER 1863, Berwick [LA], November 10th, 1863. Large 4 page letter in BOLD pencil from Lt. John M. Follett, Company H, 33rd Illinois to his wife with stamped transmittal cover postmarked NEW ORLEANS. He relates in part, "We are again camped on the Atchafalaya River and we marched from New Iberia Sunday morning and marched the first day to Franklin a distance of 30 miles. We got up Monday at 5 AM and marched another 30 miles to this place. We of the Pioneers are camped on the river and my squad is in good humor. Mentions by name several men of the 77th [Illinois]...I must tell you about a recent battle...The next morning after I wrote you our brigade was called up about 2 AM and marched about three miles on the west side of Iberia. The rumor was that the Rebs were coming with 16,000 men to attack us. Our brigade formed in a battle line, the 2nd brigade was closed in one half on each flank on our line of battle and the 3rd brigade was concealed in the timber. The plan was a cute one if old General Lawles did plan it but the Rebs did not favor us with a call. Instead of pitching into us the Rebs sailed into the 1st brigade of General Burbridge's division. The battle was fought on Carrion crow [Bayou]. General Burbridge had sent out some of his division out foraging and had not more than 1000 men engaged and the Rebs came down on him with 8000 men. They mowed down eight rows deep in front and closed in mass on each flank. Burbridge could not retreat without loss and he told his men that no part of the 13th Corps had been whipped and he said that he would not live to have it said that the 4th division was the first to run and the men cheered him and said they would back him up and they stood surrounded on three sides by gray backs and fought like demons. The rebs overpowered then and took over 400 prisoners and killed 57 men. General McGinnis came up with two brigades and so intent were the Rebs trying to take prisoners that they did not see the reinforcements till they came right up to them and there was hand to hand fighting with sword and bayonet and the Rebs had to skedaddle. They left 149 dead on the field besides over 300 wounded and our men took over 300 prisoners. All this was done in two hours. He concludes this lengthy letter apologizing to his wife for unkind comments he had made in past letters and expresses his love and devotion for her and expresses his sorrow for having lost his temper as he misses her so much. With his numerical advantage, it was no chore for Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin to push the Confederates before him as he moved toward the upper Teche in Louisiana. After occupying the Opelousas vicinity, the Union leader found local bayous too dangerous to cross, too difficult for his troops to forage and rain-drenched roads too muddy to travel. By October 26, he had given up the offensive, retracing his steps toward New Iberia. Maj. Gen. Richard Taylor's small army pressed him, but Franklin worried so little about his enemy's attentions that he allowed his divisions to march and encamp far from each other. By November 3, they were scattered over a wide area, with part of the XIII Corps holding a rear guard position near Grand Coteau, on Bayou Bourdeau. Here was the opening Taylor had sought. Just before noon, his advance echelon, 2 divisions of cavalry and 3 infantry regiments under Brig. Gen. Thomas Green, attacked the camp of Brig. Gen. Stephen G. Burbridge's division, the most exposed command. Union sentinels were so lax that the Confederates charged out of a ravine into Burbridge's front and flanks before he could deploy. From his position in the rear, Maj. Gen. Cadwallader C. Washburn rode to he scene, only to discover that many of the troops had broken and were scattered over the field, and the utter destruction or capture of the whole force seemed imminent. Burbridge tried to fight his way out. Directing his attention to the single cavalry brigade and the infantry assailing his front and right, he entrusted the defense of his other flank (threatened by the rest of Green's cavalry) to Lt. Col. Theodore Buehler, the commander of his 67th Indiana. Through what Washburn later called "incompetency or cowardice", Buehler failed to take action till too late; eventually surrounded, he surrendered his regiment en masse to he cavalry. Finding his left "totally gone", Burbridge ordered a retreat. Many of his men had started without him, fleeing 3 miles to the safety of Gen. McGinnis' camp. With the assistance of that division, Burbridge re-formed and stood firm. Fighting vigorously but not making further headway, Green finally drew off, having killed 25, wounded 129, and captured 562 men and one 10 lb. cannon. The day after this galling defeat, the Federals resumed their withdrawal, but with more caution and a healthier regard for Confederate strength, savvy, and opportunism. A great Louisiana battle letter, 2 items, letter and cover..........................................$395.00

56th New York Infantry-Official Company 1 Return Listing a Nurse and a Hospital Steward

Fifty-sixth Infantry -- Cols. Charles H. Van Wyck, Rockwell Tyler, Lieut.-Cols., James Jordan, Frederic Decker, John J. Wheeler, Rockwell Tyler, Eliphas Smith, James Dubois. The 56th Regiment was organized at Newburgh and was composed of eleven companies, two light batteries and two Cavalry troops. The batteries later became the 7th and 8th independent batteries and the cavalry part of the 1st mounted rifles. Co. L was the 5th company of N.Y. sharpshooters. The men were mainly from Orange, Sullivan and Ulster counties and were mustered into the U.S. service at Newburgh, Oct. 28, 1861, for three years. The regiment left for Washington on Nov. 7, 1861, was there assigned to the 1st Brigade, Casey's division, and served in the vicinity of Washington until March, 1862. In the opening of the spring campaign, the regiment, as part of the 1st Brigade, 2nd division, 4th Corps, participated in the siege of Yorktown and was present without loss at Williamsburg, Savage Station and Bottom's Bridge. At Fair Oaks, the loss of the command was heavy--66 killed and wounded and 5 missing. In June, the Brigade, in Peck's division of the 4th Corps, was present during "the Seven Days' battles but not closely engaged, and after the battle of Malvern Hill was withdrawn to Yorktown. In December, the brigade under Naglee was assigned to the 18th Corps and reached South Carolina early in Jan. 1862. The regiment served about Charleston, was active in the siege of Fort Wagner in July, 1863, and the subsequent operations in the vicinity. It was assigned to the 1st Brigade, 3rd division, 18th Corps, in March, 1863, and transferred to the 10th Corps in October. While with the 18th Corps, it was stationed on Folly Island and at Beaufort. In the summer of 1864, the regiment was stationed at James Island; lost 50 men in an engagement at Honeyhill; was active at Coosawhatchie and Boyd's point in December, and shared in the operations at Deveaux Neck, S.C., during the same month with considerable loss. The original members not reenlisted were mustered out at the expiration of the term of enlistment and the regiment remained in the Department of the South, serving in the coast division during the winter of 1864-65 and at Charleston from March, 1865 to Oct. 17, 1865, when it was mustered out. The regiment lost during its term of service 64 by death from wounds and 216 from other causes.

Charles H. Van Wyck: Age, 37 years. Enrolled September 4th, 1861 at New York City. Mustered in as a Colonel, September 4th, 1861 for a three-year tour of duty. Mustered out with regiment October 17th, 1865 at Charleston, S.C.

6131 - COMPANY I, 56 NYV, January 31st, 1863, St. Helena Isle, South Carolina, listed detached men. Absent men in Captain Cox's Company, written and filled in by Lt. Norris Crossman. Lists several men detached as nurses in hospitals and another in a hospital at Yorktown. Printed and filled-in, 10" X 16". Captain Cox was listed as AWOL on the verso of the document. Crossman's diaries have been published. Very fine...................................$65.00

6134 - 91ST PENN. VOLUNTEERS, SERVED IN MOST OF THE BATTLES OF THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC FROM 1861-65 INCLUDING GETTYSBURG, 8" X 10" manuscript order dated January 15th, 1865 by order of Colonel Seller giving sentinels orders how to greet officers when they approach their posts and how to carry their "pieces". Dated from the headquarters of the 91st PA just before they were engaged in the battles of Dabney Mills and Hatchers Run (February 5-7th, 1865). The 91st fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, the "Mud March", Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the "Bristoe Campaign", Mine Run, Cold Harbor, Wilderness, Petersburg, Dabney Mills, Hatcher's Run, Appomattox Campaign..............$45.00

6136 - OFFICIAL FORM FOR HANDLING A COURT MARTIAL, 4 pages in manuscript 8" X 13" detailing the procedures in conducting a court martial trial in the army, dated 186, statement accounts, witness accounts specifications of charges. Obviously done in the field by an officer. This form is very detailed and came with some other documents pertaining to the 91st PA. First one that we have seen like this. Very fine........................................$35.00

6137 - MISSOURI IN THE CIVIL WAR, Headquarters Dept. of the Missouri, St. Louis, February 14th, 1865, General Order #30, three pages printed, the charges and trial of three named Missouri citizens for robbery and larceny, another against a Henry Smith for trying to bribe a Federal officer to free a prisoner...he was sentenced to the Missouri State prison at Jefferson City. The three charged with robbery and larceny were sentenced to 10 years at hard labor by order of J.W. Barnes, Asst. Adj. General. Choice condition......................$45.00

6140 - UNITED STATES ARMIES OPERATING AGAINST RICHMOND, 2 2 patriotic covers by Charles Magnus dated 1865, both covers are deep lavender in color with a gilded imprint, one in silver, one in gold, large eagle with the caption "US Armies Operating against Richmond, VA" with spots to enter the Company, Regiment, Brigade, Division, and Army Corps. The silver printed cover is quite attractive, the gold printed cover has oxidized (print somewhat). These are the first two of this type we have seen, unused and a desirable set of Magnus covers, the pair................................................$85.00


6524 - COMMISSION SIGNED BY WILLIAM DENNISON GOVERNOR OF OHIO FOR AN OFFICER IN THE 16TH OHIO, 8" X 11", pre-printed commission for 1st Lt. Cushman Cunningham of the 16th Ohio Infantry dated May 4th, 1861 when the 16th Ohio was still a Militia unit, nice black seal, fine, some ink bleed from endorsements on the verso. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio as an officer (Captain) and Adjutant into late 1863. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio through the war as an officer and adjutant. The 16th Ohio served in the west from late 1861 to September 1864. Cumberland Gap, Tazewell, The Vicksburg Campaign, and the Red River Campaign. Dennison was instrumental in getting Ohio's troops organized and sent troops into Western Virginia in 1861 as well as becoming Postmaster General under Lincoln..................................................$150.00

6525 - COMMISSION SIGNED BY WILLIAM DENNISON GOVERNOR OF OHIO FOR AN OFFICER IN THE 16TH OHIO, 8" X 11", pre-printed commission for 1st Lt. Cushman Cunningham, December 16th, 1861, nice blue seal, fine. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio as an officer (Captain) and Adjutant into late 1863. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio through the war as an officer and adjutant. The 16th Ohio served in the west from late 1861 to September 1864. Cumberland Gap, Tazewell, The Vicksburg Campaign, and the Red River Campaign. Dennison was instrumental in getting Ohio's troops organized and sent troops into Western Virginia in 1861 as well as becoming Postmaster General under Lincoln..........$150.00

6526 - COMMISSION SIGNED BY GOVERNOR DAVID TOD OF OHIO FOR AN OFFICER IN THE 16TH OHIO, 8" X 11", pre-printed commission for Captain Cushman Cunningham, November 18th, 1862. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio as an officer (Captain) and Adjutant into late 1863. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio through the war as and officer and adjutant. The 16th Ohio served in the west from the late 1861 to September 1864. Cumberland Gap, Tazewell, The Vicksburg Campaign, and the Red River Campaign. A most attractive commission with large eagle and flags. Signed by Tod as Governor...............$150.00

6528 - NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT AS A 1ST LT. IN THE 16TH OHIO REGIMENT SIGNED BY UNION GENERAL C.P. BUCKINGHAM, Pre-printed and filled-in 8" X 10", HEADQUARTERS OF OHIO MILITIA stationary advising Cushman Cunningham that he has been appointed a Lt.  in the 16th Ohio, dated November 25th, 1861. Signed by Buckingham as Adj. General of the State of Ohio. Cushman later became a Captain and severed with the 16th Ohio until 1864. Very fine...............................................$85.00

6530 - MUSTER OUT ROLL FOR ADJ. CUSHMAN CUNNINGHAM OF THE 16TH OHIO NEAR VICKSBURG, MS, 12" X 24" printed and filled in muster out roll dated near Vicksburg, MS for Adj. Cushman Cunningham dated June 5th, 1863 while the 16th Ohio was engaged in the Vicksburg Campaign. The reason for the form was his appointment as Captain of the Regiment. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio as an officer (Captain) throughout the war and Adjutant. The 16th Ohio served in the west from late 1861 to September 1864. Cumberland Gap, Tazewell, The Vicksburg Campaign, and the Red River Campaign. Some archival repairs, otherwise paper is fresh and bold manuscript...................................$75.00

6531 - MUSTER IN ROLL FOR CAPTAIN CUSHMAN CUNNINGHAM OF THE 16TH OHIO NEAR VICKSBURG, 12" X 16" printed and filled in mustering in Captain Cushman Cunningham as a Captain in the 16th Ohio. Dated June 5th, 1863 near Vicksburg where the 16th Ohio was involved in the Vicksburg Campaign. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio as an officer (Captain) throughout the war and Adjutant. The 16th Ohio served in the west from late 1861 to September 1864. Cumberland Gap, Tazewell, The Vicksburg Campaign, and the Red River Campaign. Very good, bold manuscript........................................$75.00

6533 - WOUNDED AND CAPTURED AT GETTYSBURG, COLONEL JOHN F. IRWIN 149TH PENNSYLVANIA, 8" X 10" large pre-printed and filled-in ordnance receipt signed by Irwin as Lt. Colonel of the 149th PA noted "in the field", September 25th, 1864. It appears to be all the accruements and Enfield rife of one soldier. It lists the rifle, bayonet scabbard, cap pouch, cartridge box, plate and belt, gun sling, waist belt, and belt plate. These were turned over to the Colonel by Captain John Batdorff. Quite possibly these were once the property of a dead soldier to be recycled. Irwin was adjutant of the regiment and while acting as major was wounded by a concussion of a shell at Gettysburg on July 1st, 1863. He has a factitious name as Frank Israel when he signed his parole and returned to his regiment. He commanded the 149th in the pursuit of the 149th south. He was officially promoted to Major, then Lt. Colonel. On April 2nd, 1864, he took command of the regiment. Then he was promoted to Colonel on February 2nd, 1864. Very fine............................................$95.00


The Correspondence of Engineer George P. Hunt, US Navy
In the Year 1864
"U.S.S. Metacomet"

Engineer George P. Hunt served in the US Navy from 1861-1887 on numerous ships. His tour on the "Metacomet" in 1864-1865 was highlighted by the action at Mobile Bay but between stations at Mobile his ship went on numerous cruises in search of blockade runners in the Gulf of Mexico. His letters are well written and extremely descriptive. Each letter comes with a copy photo of Hunt.


5270 - CHASING A BLOCKADE RUNNER OFF THE TEXAS COAST
, USS Metacomet, January 1st, 1864. 4 pages in ink by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part, have sent views from New Orleans and Key West, view of the fort and others...have left New Orleans to carry the monitor "Milwaukee" to Mobile, then we sailed down the coast (west) and hit a gale en route like a "north westerner" with bitter cold, vessel pitching and rolling with 2-3 feet of water on the deck, all hatches secured, impossible to stand on the deck without lashing yourself to something. During the gale, we spotted a schooner that might be a blockade runner but due to the heavy seas we did not dare to turn around and chase her, we were disappointed we let a prize go through our fingers however about 3 PM the winds and seas moderated and we turned to chase him and caught him. It was laden with sugar and coffee from Vera Cruz to New Orleans. But since it was 200 miles off course, the papers funny, the Captain condemned her (as a blockade runner), the prize would mean 1/3 of a years pay for Hunt. The capture happened about 85 miles from Galveston, TX. Describes having turkey aboard the past holidays, but some were so seasick they had to dine on "salt horse". A well written letter describing a blockade runner being captured................
$250.00

5275 - REBEL STEAMERS RUN THE BLOCKADE AT MOBILE, ONE GETS AGROUND, BUT WE CANNOT ATTACK IT, IF FARRAGUT WERE HERE IT WOULD BE DIFFERENT, Metacomet off Mobile, April 12th, 1864. 8 pages in ink, with stamped postal cover postmarked New Orleans, written by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part..."Your letter received has gotten me out of the blues. Yesterday two large steamers came on in right under our noses and both escaped. One Clyde built steamer, the other American made. The first a side-wheel steamer, double smokestacks and a little larger than the "Cumberland". They ran along the shore about 3/4 miles from the fort and became aground. We ran up to the flagship "Oneida" and asked permission to go up and shell her before the Confederates could get her off but we were told to go back to our station by the Senior Officer. We had to watch the Rebs bring up steamers and barges to lighten her and she got off by noon. There are 11 vessels now blockading here. The "Itasca", Pinola", "Oneida", "Ossippee", and another lying out to sea. The "Penguin", "Albatros", "Genesee" lay nearer the shore. The "Conemaugh" is in the Secesh Channel. He feels they are stationed in the main ship channel where nothing happens because they are on a black list. The "Pembina" and the "Seminole" lay below us. He remarks about better lookouts on several ships would have prevented the escape and forced them back out to sea. "We could have had a jolly good chase." At daylight, we saw a splendid American made steamer with double smokestacks, side wheels, about 1800-2000 tons, the "Austin" of Havana in the same Secesh channel about 1 1/2 miles from the fort aground. The flag officer would not let me do anything to prevent them from coming with their steamers to tow her off. She got off safe in the afternoon. There are about 40 steamers laying in Nassau waiting to run the blockade. It is provocative to say that if Farragut was here something would have been done. Little is being done to prevent them from running in her. The Rebs may want a few more English rifles and cannon, a few more Whitworth rifles or Brook's cannon which may be mounted in Fort Morgan to greet our ironclads. Says Farragut is in New Orleans. Expects a few more steamers to try to run the blockade when the moon goes down around 1 AM. A great letter regarding blockade running into Mobile just as the fleet was gathering for an attack on the forts.....................................................$350.00

5277 - BLOCKADE RUNNERS GET IN AGAIN, SENT OUT BOATS TO SCOUT THE REBEL FLEET, THE TENNESSEE AND BALTIC LAY AWAITING OUR FLEET BUT THEY MAY ATTACK FIRST, May 21st, 1864, Saturday night [off Mobile], 12 pages in ink by Engineer George P. Hunt on board the USS Metacomet. He relates in part, He has lost a trusted friend McMurray in the "Chenango Affair" who was a 2nd Engineer. He feels that they are being "Blacklisted" doing too much or too little, then overlooked by the authorities. In our case were posted in a very dangerous place and as a gale approached our Captain concluded to enter the sound as the barometer fell rapidly. Captain Jenkins of the "Richmond" sent a boat in after us and gave us the most disagreeable station for 21 days. Close attention needs to be paid to our boilers. News of Grant near Richmond. Last Saturday, a steamer ran out successfully but discovered by our picket boat. But we had problems with signals and she escaped. The "Itasca" lay close to the shore and it was to intercept her and drive her back out in the channel as they always run in close to shore. The "Itasca" got her cable caught on her propeller and signaled "Assistance I need". But at the same time one boat signaled red & white instead of white and red. The confusion allowed the steamer to escape safe while we all attached her running out. The Admiral [Farragut] just arrived on the "Hartford". We go to Pensacola for a few days for coaling. Everyone is scared here about the rebel rams. A deserter came in and reported that they were going to attack our fleet with two gunboats and two rams. Sunday, describes fishing trip nearby where they caught over 600 fish snapper and catfish, most 12-13 pounds fish but some up to 60 pounds with our lines. We also caught a 1000 pound shark and when opened it had several cats and dogs inside! The shark struck one man on deck with his tail and he went head over heels. We are laying now facing Fort Morgan and we can see Fort Gaines and Powell. I believe they are evacuating Fort Powell and laying obstruction in the channel. Reports say there are about 6 miles of batteries after passing Fort Morgan and 50 torpedoes; there was a great storm the other night as we almost lost the picket boats as the rolling seas made it difficult to come along side of us. To remain out would have resulted in being driven to shore and captured as the shore is lined with cavalry scouts watching for blockage runners. We succeeded in picking them up but one man suffered a broken leg getting out of a boat. We sent a boat to Dauphin Isle to watch the Bay for rams and ironclads. They saw two, the "Tennessee" and the "Baltic" ironclad rams and the "Selma" and the "Gaines: gunboats." Captain Leroy has made over $100,000 on a prize the "Desoto" captured. I suppose he does not care much for attacking them now. An excellent letter on the affairs in Mobile Bay in late May where blockade runners still came into Mobile quite easily much to the chagrin of Hunt and his ship seeming being out of the action for one reason or another on a "blacklist"...............................................$395.00

5279 - THE METACOMET CAPTURES THE CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUNNER DONEGEL, Metacomet, off Mobile, June 26th, 1864. 4 pages in ink to Miss Earnes by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...He has just returned from Pensacola [coaling] and he thanks her for the copy of the Proclamation [Emancipation Proclamation]. By now you will have learned of the capture of the "Donegal" [blockade runner by the Metacomet], hopefully we will be successful in getting some more out of the sea. The "Denbigh" ran out after the capture of the "Donegal", some said the "Metacomet" was on a wild goose chase but the "D" was the fastest blockade runner which we caught now they feel that they must watch for us. The next night we discovered the "Denbigh" running in close to shore and we drove her out to sea but it ran through our mist and escaped. The captain of the "Donegal" had ran the "Oreto" [old name for the "Florida"] in and out of Mobile and also headed the party who captured the "Fly Boston" and ran her into Mobile a short time ago. He is now in Fort Pickens and he has tried to bribe them into letting him escape. He said that there was a large amount of gold and silver on the "Donegal" and that was the richest prize yet captured. Two of our officers went to see him to try and find out something. I sent a box of cigars back on the "Union", the only thing I got off that ship. Describes the horrible hospital in Pensacola, common sea rations, no ice, no fruit, no attendants except one nigger boy, about 15 officers there suffering from diarrhea and dysentery, chills and fever. They are tormented to death by and fleas and mosquitoes at night. Some have been there for two years. I visited the hospital and decided I would rather stay on board my ship. [Page 5 is small 3" X 4" blue paper written on both sides where he adds], Tuesday night. A lively time, we stood for the Flagship "Hartford" after maneuvering the fleet again and firing at targets. The Admiral and his staff came aboard as he wanted a good at the Rebel fleet started underway so we ran closed and rounded the fort. There most formidable craft is kind half like the "Atlanta" and half "Merrimac" built as ram. Three guns on either side, the one aft is heavy English gun. The Rebs are at a loss to make of our affair. An excellent letter describing the capture of a blockade runner and after a closer look at the "Tennessee" gives a vivid description of the Confederate ram................................................$395.00

5289 - THEY ARE WAITING FOR THE BLOCKADE RUNNER, DENBIGH, Key West [Florida], November 29th [1864]. Two pages letter in ink from Engineer George P. Hunt of the USS Metacomet. He relates in part, We just arrived after a stormy night and leave in the morning for Havana in wait for the "Denbigh" [blockade runner] that is expected from Galveston, will not know when he will be able to write again as he does not know if he will go with the next prize steamer [he hopes to be sent north with the next captured blockade runner they catch]. If you see anything about the old "Metacomet" boys save it for me, asks that Miss Eames send some candy for him to friends as he has not time to go ashore. Hunt's ship was laying in wait for the blockade runner Denbigh that was known to be heading for Havana from Galveston. The Denbigh that was known to be heading for Havana from Galveston. The Denbigh was run aground on Bird Key, Galveston Bay on May 25th, 1865 and burned by Union blockaders the next morning. Comes with a stamped envelope addressed to Miss C [Cornelia] Eames in Brooklyn, NY. A well written letter by Hunt...................................................$195.00

5292 - ANCHORED OFF THE TEXAS COAST, LOW ON COAL, BLOCKADE RUNNERS LEAVING GALVESTON, Sabine Pass, TX, January 31st, 1865 [aboard the Metacomet]. 4 pages in ink to Miss Eames from Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...The Admiral passes here on his return from the Rio Grande. The mail boat has just brought papers with the news of the capture of Fort Fisher, good for Porter but Butler has gotten himself in dispute. Wishes he could have been at that spot and seen the grand fleet [the one that captured Fort Fisher]. It seems that our luck has played out. We went to Galveston for coal but due to high seas we could not get any and do not have enough to get to New Orleans. When we left Galveston looking for coal there were a number of steamers there ready to run out, one a large cotton steamer laying by the city. He wants to be examined for the upgrade rank of first engineer but fears he may have to wait until he goes north. Word is that the "double enders" may return north. He does not want to leave the "Metacomet" now as everything is working to his satisfaction [engines]. He states that he did not see any ladies in New Orleans well enough to give them his card. I hope to write you some good news from the Campechy Banks, noted on February they are still in anchor at Sabine Pass. The "Metacomet" is awaiting coal in Sabine Pass while the blockade runners apparently are moving out of Galveston with cotton. He hopes to be off the Texas-Mexican coast soon ready to intercept one bound for Havana...Letter comes with a stamped cover postmarked NEW ORLEANS Feb. 6th, '65.....................................................$195.00

5293 - THE METACOMET CAPTURES TWO BLOCKADE RUNNERS, OTHERS ESCAPE FROM GALVESTON, THE REBELS AT MOBILE SEND OUT TORPEDO BOATS, BUILDING UP THE FORTIFICATIONS FOR THE EXPECTED ATTACK, Steamer "Metacomet", Mobile Bay, February 26th, 1865. 10 1/2 pages in ink to Miss Eames by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...We are back anchored near the city [Mobile] and the prospects of a fight or an evacuation as good as months ago. Mentions a fellow friend and sailor who were in a naval fight in an ironclad that burst a gun. I must tell you of our late capture of the "Lily" [not Lily of the Valley] and the "Sea Witch". We captured the "Lily" lying off Galveston waiting for night. She had "gunny bags" and salt and we took her to Sabine Pass. We have sent the "Sea Witch" to New Orleans. Steamers are running in and out of Galveston when they choose. Two nights before we arrived at Galveston two ran out, one got aground but got off. When we got to Galveston, we received orders to return to New Orleans. We traveled with the "Bienville" who was also returning for repair to New Orleans. The officers of the "Bienville" did not think we could keep up with them. We left for New Orleans and soon were 3 1/2 miles ahead of the "B" when we saw two schooners 10 miles distant and on out course. We chased them and "spake" both [hailed both] while the "Bienville" kept on her way. But by the next day we caught up with her as we crossed the bar and beat the "Bienville" to the city of New Orleans. The "Sciota" has just arrived with news that several Mississippi steamers have brought troops from New Orleans [to Mobile] but I do not think an attack is probable. Queried the Chief Engineer about his pending examination and was told to ask for a weeks leave to take it, news from Charleston that the Rebels have evacuated the city. Everybody here has torpedoes on the brain.  The Rebs have two torpedo boats ready to come out and blow somebody up. They rammed the "Octorara" the other night but the torpedo did not explode. Small pox was very prevalent in New Orleans and now has shown up among out troops in Fort Morgan. We have a great many troops there preparing for an attack. General Granger has gone to New Orleans and Rear Admiral Thatcher is in command of the squadron. General Thomas is approaching Montgomery in route for Mobile. I suspect when he gets closer we will have an attack. Sherman has done well and the loss of Charleston is a severe blow to the Confederacy. He does not understand why it is taking so long to attack Mobile or Galveston. He feels that it could be taken with less a force than needed to blockade the cities. Gives details on the sale of the cotton and the blockade runner "Susana" and feels both sold too cheap. Confederate prisoners have been put to work on the fortifications and General Granger has returned. The Confederates had put our men [prisoners] at work on their fortifications so we did the same. A steamer blew up after leaving New Orleans but no appearance of a Rebel attack. The Rebs are receiving reinforcements and building batteries in range of where we lay now. A well detailed letter mentioning the capture of two blockade runners off Galveston, new of the Rebels at Mobile still being aggressive with their torpedo boats, fortifying their position at Mobile for the impending Union attack, comes with a stamped cover postmarked NEW ORLEANS. A well written letter by Hunt.................................................$395.00

5297 - THE ASSASSINATION OF LINCOLN NEWS REACHED MOBILE, RARE COMMENTS ABOUT REPRISALS AGAINST COPPERHEADS AND SECESSIONISTS WHO CHEER LINCOLN'S DEATH, THE DESTRUCTION OF THE CSS WEBB BELOW NEW ORLEANS, USS "Metacomet", May 1st, 1865, Mobile Bay. 12 page letter in ink to Miss Eames from Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...He writes about the surrender of Mobile and thanks her for the papers that she sent on the Capture of Richmond. We fired a salute of 100 guns on the glorious news. He mentioned the Admiral returning from Pensacola with the dreadful news for Washington [Assassination of Lincoln]. On the ship only one man rejoiced at the nation's calamity and if it was not for the Provost Marshal he would have been tied to a lamp post [hung]. General Banks came down on a steamer from Cairo to New Orleans and he made a speech at Baton Rouge and an Illinois Copperhead shouted at him that it was good news [Lincoln's death] he fell dead pierced by 15 bullets. In New Orleans, the same thing occurred when five secessionists or copperheads shouted it was good that the "rail splitter" was dead and the Colored troops would have to return to their masters and the Colored troops shot them. I did not believe the first reports but at last came the confirmation of the assassination of the President but also the brutal murder of Secretary Seward. Who shall be found to take their places? One account says he is still alive. He lauds the diplomatic skills of Seward during the war. Nothing is said who are the assassins but he believes they will be found and this will unite the north. I don't know much about the abilities of Johnson as President but Lincoln seemed to have every confidence in him. If the copperheads had anything to do with this no mercy should be shown to them. President Lincoln has won for himself a name that will exist forever whether a Republican or Liberal Government shall endure. He was simple, warm hearted, honest, and generous to a fault. This Republican President has been cut down in the midst of his glory where can we find a fit successor? The Union will live but oh had he lived enough to have realized the success of his great mission. What the policy of President Johnson towards the rebellious states the leaders will find top their cost that the tenderness of Abraham Lincoln forms no part of Andrew Johnson's character. May 5th [1865], He thanks her for all the papers received. The news has arrived of the arrest of some of the conspirators and the shooting of Booth. He should have been taken alive as his punishment was too light. There is news of the surrender of Dick Taylor; we leave here in a few days on the flagship of Admiral Thatcher for Galveston. Discusses going ashore in Mobile and Pensacola. Wants to take his exam on advancement. News has arrived of the capture of Jefferson Davis at Raleigh. News or rumors persist that General Canby will head for Mexico with 50,000 troops. He describes the destruction of the Rebel ram "Webb" below New Orleans. The "Webb" was bottled up on the Red River and escaped two steamers, the monitor "Manhattan" and "Tennessee" and headed down the Mississippi with over 300 bales of cotton aboard commanded by Lt. Reed of some notoriety [Tacony & Chesapeake fame]. They were trying to run the blockade. The telegraph wires were cut from the Red River and no one in New Orleans knew she was coming but 15 minutes before she passed the gunboats. They fired but she did not return fire. Our shots struck in the city and in Algiers across the river. The tugboat "Hollybock" started after her firing at her, the telegraph wires were cut also below the city. She would have made it to sea but fortunately the "Richmond" had left here the day before and was steaming up the river, and seeing the chase, stopped and rolled out her 11 nine inch guns and waited until she could deliver a broadside that would have sunk her but they instead ran her ashore. Some ran off in the swamp, others set her afire but they caught most of them. The vessel was burnt up. So much for the ram "Webb". A wonderful descriptive letter of the after effects of the Assassination of Lincoln in the South and the feelings Hunt had for the slain President. Much more on Hunt's activities as an engineer on the "Metacomet", and a nice account of one of the last naval encounters on the Mississippi River being the destruction of the "Webb" by the "Richmond"...........................................$595.00

6000 - NAVAL POLITICS IN MOBILE, HIS CAPTAIN WAS CLEARED OF CHARGES IN A COURT MARTIAL BUT IS ON THE BLACK LIST, "Metacomet" Mobile, AL, June 24th, 1865. Four page letter in ink to Miss Eames by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...Boats are going north but not the "Metacomet". His Captain seems to be afraid to come north afraid to face what his next assignment will be as he faced charges at a court martial which were not sustained and he will be on the "black list". Mentions an incident where he almost caused a tip over of a boat that carried the Admiral [Thatcher]. The Captain pleaded sickness as the cause of my actions. I hope I do not see the Gulf for 7-8 years as the heat is terrible as well as the mosquitoes. The 4th of July will soon be here and I shall be in Mobile. We shall fire a salute for the Admiral and Jeff Davis is down. He encloses a Confederate bill for Johnny. Hunt is about to conclude his tour of duty at the Mobile station and gives more insight his Captain is unpopular with the local naval authorities have made it through a court martial. Comes with a nice MOBILE postmarked stamped cover................................................$165.00

6001 - ENGINEER HUNT IS TRANSFERRED TO THE OCTORARO AND WILL BE GOING HOME, "OCTORARO", Mobile, AL, June 28th, 1865. One page letter in ink to Miss Eames from Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates...Not to write to him again until she hears from him as he has joined the "Octoraro" today and she is expected to go north soon. I applied to go north on a ship and yesterday I received the unexpected news of this new assignment. He is hearing rumors about going home and he hopes to arrive home safe and if he does so he will consider himself very lucky. Comes with a nice MOBILE postmarked stamped cover. The "Octoraro" was another ship that had been in Mobile in Farragut's Fleet..................$100.00


5131 - JOHN HUNT MORGAN RAIDS IN TENNESSEE, DESTROYING RAILROADS, CAPTURING UNION SOLDIERS, PURPOSE OF THE WAR TO ABOLISH SLAVERY, February 5th, 1863, near Murfreesboro, TN. 4 page letter in ink by Pvt. George B. Dowsman, Co. H, 75 Indiana Volunteers to friends. He relates, "I have not been well about three weeks...my complaint is chronic diarrhea and having it so long it begins to take me down and I have no strength at all in my arms and legs. About a week ago, I had fear that I would loose the use of my limbs entirely. My right arm was perfectly paralyzed but has got so I can use it again...THERE IS A WILY MAN AROUND THESE DIGGINS CALLED JOHN MORGAN, THE SOLDIERS CALL HIM UNCLE JOHN WHO CUTS SOME MIGHTLY BIG PRANKS AND CAPERS BY THE WAY OF BURNING BRIDGES, TEARING UP RAILROADS AND NOT UNFREQUENTLY HAPPENED THAT IN THE LATTER PART OF THE MONTH OF DECEMBER LAST UNCLE JOHN TO IT INTO HIS HEADS TO TEAR UP THE LOUISVILLE AND NASHVILLE RR SO AT IT HE WENT AND DESTROYED CONSIDERABLE OF THE ROAD...YOU ASKED ME WHAT THEY WERE FIGHTING FOR IF IT WAS TO FREE THE NEGROES. LET ME ASK YOU...THIS WAR IS CARRIED ON FOR NO OTHER PURPOSE...I FEEL CONVINCED THAT THE END CLAIMED AT BY THE AUTHORITIES AT WASHINGTON IS THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY. Morgan was promoted to Brigadier General (his highest rank) on December 11, 1862. He received the thanks of the Confederate Congress on May 1, 1863 for his raids on the supply lines of Union Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans in December and January, most notably his victory at the Battle of Hartsville on December 7th. Dowsman dies of disease 23 days later at Murfreesboro......................................SOLD

5133 - WILSON READIES HIS TROOPS IN ALABAMA TO CATCH FORREST, Camp at Gravelly Springs, Alabama, March 20th, 1865. One large page in ink written by Lt. William Bayard of the 4th US Cavalry to fellow officer Captain Clarence Mauck. He relates..."We have been lying in camp since January 12th, poor Fitz, is dead, he died from the effects of a shell wound in the leg in the late charge near Franklin (TN). Davis is adjutant of the regiments, mentions others at camp by name. Several plan to go into RECRUITING service soon. WE ARE NOW AT WILSON'S HEADQUARTERS; I PASS MY TIME VERY PLEASANTLY AND LIKE WILSON PRETTY WELL. WE EXPECT TO MOVE IN A VERY FEW DAYS, WILSON HAS 12,000 CAVALRY HERE. Major General James H. Wilson, commanding three divisions of Union cavalry, about 13,500 men, led his men south from Gravelly Springs, AL on March 22, 1865. Opposed by Confederate Lieutenant General Nathan B. Forrest, Wilson skillfully continued his march and eventually defeated him in a running battle at Ebenezer Church, on April 1st. Continuing towards Selma, Wilson split his command into three columns. Although Selma was well-defended, the Union columns broke through the defenses at separate points forcing the Confederates to surrender the city, although many of the officers and men, including Forrest and Lieutenant General Richard Taylor, escaped. Bayard was brevetted for gallantry three times during the War. Well written (PB)...............................................$165.00

51310 - BATTLE OF CARRSVILLE, VA, Suffolk, VA, May 24th, 1863. 3 page letter in ink by Lt. Selwyn E. Bickford, Company G, 6th Mass. Infantry. He relates in part to his friend Anderson..."On the 13th, we were ordered on a scout and just returned yesterday and we will probably leave Suffolk and we will probably leave for Lowell next Wednesday or Thursday, letters reached me at Carrsville where we were stationed for four days. I presume the papers have given you an account of our fight at Carrsville as we had a lively one and the regiment did itself much credit. We went in a little after a half past two in the afternoon and came out near six that night. The New York papers give all the credit to the New York troops but we were in the advance nearly all of the time. We had six times the losses of any other regiment tell the story. We had no fighting after the 15th but were traveling about most of the time. When we left camp we were supposed to be back in three days and took clothes accordingly. We stayed out 11 days so you can judge our condition. He requests a room be gotten for him upon his return home at a hotel and thinks he will leave the area before any letter can reach him." An extremely well written letter regarding one of the battles for the defense of Suffolk, VA. At Carrsville, VA, May 14-16, 1863, the regiment was engaged with loss. The siege of Suffolk being ended, on the 26th of May the regiment left for Boston, where it arrived on the 29th. Proceeding to Lowell, on June 3rd it was mustered out of the service..........................................SOLD

2102 - SOLDIER'S COVER FROM MASSACHUSETTS TO SHIP ISLAND TO A COLORED TROOP OFFICER, Postal cover from Attleboro, MA sent to Captain Levi I. Hawes, 74th Mass at Ship Island off the Mississippi coast in July [1864]. 3 cent stamp grid cancelled................................$45.00


2020 -THE DEATH OF ELLSWORTH, May 27th, 1861, Fortress Monroe, VA. Headquarters. Letter in ink, 2 large pages to his sister in Quincy, MA, by Samuel Nightingale, 39th Mass, Vol., hand carried cover. He relates..."The 4th regiment has orders to leave today some place I did not know where. It is thought they will go up the James River about 12 miles towards Norfolk for the purpose of erecting a land battery. All did not go as not all had new muskets. We will go in a few days when we have new muskets. The 4th Regiment has gone and detachment of artillery and a New York regiment. Probably you have heard of the death of Ellsworth of the Ellsworth Zouaves shot in Alexandria while he was pulling down a secession flag. We heard the news from a man in Washington. His company, upon seeing Ellsworth shot, shot the man and ran him through with their bayonets and he was dead before Ellsworth was. The gentleman from Washington said that they had set the city afire in 15 places." Much more on the camp, the person who is carrying th eletter home has been discharged due to illness. Letter comes with a hand-carried cover and Carte de Viste of Samuel Nightingale (39th Mass), G.H. Loomis bm, ink ided on verso, three items.............................................$395.00

2025 - NAVAL LETTER AND SAILOR'S WALLET, Letter written by William H. Allen from the U.S.S. Tritonia at Mobile on October 26th, 1865. Four pages in ink from Allen who was 3rd Asst. Engineer (1864) to his mother discussing two model boats he had completed but had broke the model of the gunboat...he describes the "Bark" he completed and was sending it home with a Navy revolver. He instructs his Mother how to finish off the rigging with a sharp scissors and to inquire as to having carriage painter paint the boat. He gives specific instructions as to the painted required as well as emblems to be added. The Tritonia had been in the West Gulf Blocking fleet and was guarding the rivers and outlets for marauders who were along the coast just after the war ended. The letter comes with Allen's large fold over leather wallet with an old note "This wallet belonged to William H. Allen at the time he was in the Civil War on Farragut's Flagship." Allen had served on the Hartford during the Mobile campaign. Interesting letter and accompanying wallet. 2 items.............................$295.00

2026 - PRIVATE LEWIS PRALL, 30TH PA VOL., FOUGHT AT ANTIETAM AND GETTYSBURG, Three letters included are (1) Camp Near Sharpsburg, October 23rd, 1862. 4 pages in pencil, with stamped cover CDS Hagerstown, MD. to his mother. He relates...send letters to Hagerstown, he has drawn new clothing and is trying for a furlough which is hard to now get, has applied for one to go to Georgetown for three days, all requests have to go to the War Dept. in Washington, awaiting a reply but they may refuse to sign it. A Camp letter written just after he fought at Antietam, (2) Camp Near Union Mills, VA, March 16th, 1863. 4 pages in ink to his sister by Lewis Prall. He relates...it is difficult to seep in the sold nights, has a large fireplace, must sleep with six warm blankets, they get plenty to eat, sugar, beef, fresh bread baked twice a week. The general has called us up expecting General Stuart to make a cavalry raid around here, we are used to hearing about General Stuart and if he comes we will show him how the brave boys from old PA fight...here are two rings made of laurel wood, one for you and one for mother. Stamped postal cover Alexandria, VA, 2 items. (3) Camp at Fairfax Station, VA, April 1st, 1864. 4 pages in pencil to his mother. He relates...went to Alexandria to the Express Office and brought back 21 boxes one being mine, my box was not spilled, everything fine, but 2-3 pies were a little bit moldy, will  never forget the thoughtfulness of home. Thank Mr. Greest for the tobacco and segars, gave a Captain and an orderly some of the goodies, there are four in our tent, left Union Mills on the 14th of last month and went to Centerville, stayed there about to days and came back to Fairfax Court House and found our brigade the next day, we were ordered to pack and marched in the rain to Fairfax Station...may go to Alexandria, do not expect any trouble from the Rebels as there are none near here, mentions Ben Palmer of the 166th who went in as a substitute for $400, stamped cover with Alexandria, VA PM, the three letters and three covers....................$295.00

Letters from Edward Potter - US Navy attack on New Orleans and Vicksburg

712 - WE ARE OFF PETIT'S BAR NEAR MOBILE, USS WISSAHICKON, February 8th, 1862. Four page letter by Edward Potter to his sister, "Went on shore and got some oysters, we see the vessels off Mobile, 12 - 15 miles distance, we are needing coal and will go to Ship Island, describes the discipline of the Captain, newsy letter, missing last page...........................$55.00



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