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The Civil War
 Union Documents and Letters


6191 - THE ACCOUNT OF A FRIEND SHOT DEAD AT THE BATTLE OF CHICKAMAUGA, Private C. V. Bogart, 18th US Army Regular Army, 3 pages in ink, Chattanooga, TN, October 28th, 1863. He writes in part, "Dear Mother, I am still alive and well hope this finds you the same. It is pretty hard to get letters here now and we are having pretty hard times here as we are just a little way from the Rebs, you can hear the cannonading all day as we are trying to drive them off the mountain [Lookout Mountain]. We can see the heels burst from where we are. The boys that are left are all well. But poor Trine he is gone. All I can tell you he was shot in the morning-the ball struck him in the forehead. They say he never groaned after he was shot. He was lying down and raised up to fire his gun when he was shot. He had a great many things with him when he was shot. A watch worth $50 - $60 and a revolver worth $20. They say Bill Atkins has his gun and watch but he is gone and not telling if he was dead or alive but I think he is a prisoner. We did not hold the battleground so there is no telling how he was buried [Trine]. More on other men and mentions a Michigan regiment. C. V. Bogart." The Battle of Chickamauga, fought September 19 - 20, 1863 marked the end of a Union offensive in southeastern Tennessee and northwestern Georgia called the Chickamauga Campaign. The battle was the most significant Union defeat in the Western Theater of the American Civil War and involved the second highest number of casualties in the war following the Battle of Gettysburg. It was the first major battle of the war that was fought in Georgia. Bogart writes this letter to his mother a month after the battle as he notes in his letter that she wanted more particulars on the death of Trine so he had to mention the incident in a previous letter. The 18th was preparing for the upcoming attack on Lookout Mountain. This letter was written the day after General Thomas' attack landing at Brown's Ferry Landing. Well written with good content......................................................$195.00


5277 - BLOCKADE RUNNERS GET IN AGAIN, SENT OUT BOATS TO SCOUT THE REBEL FLEET, THE TENNESSEE AND BALTIC LAY AWAITING OUR FLEET BUT THEY MAY ATTACK FIRST, May 21st, 1864, Saturday night [off Mobile], 12 pages in ink by Engineer George P. Hunt on board the USS Metacomet. He relates in part, He has lost a trusted friend McMurray in the "Chenango Affair" who was a 2nd Engineer. He feels that they are being "Blacklisted" doing too much or too little, then overlooked by the authorities. In our case were posted in a very dangerous place and as a gale approached our Captain concluded to enter the sound as the barometer fell rapidly. Captain Jenkins of the "Richmond" sent a boat in after us and gave us the most disagreeable station for 21 days. Close attention needs to be paid to our boilers. News of Grant near Richmond. Last Saturday, a steamer ran out successfully but discovered by our picket boat. But we had problems with signals and she escaped. The "Itasca" lay close to the shore and it was to intercept her and drive her back out in the channel as they always run in close to shore. The "Itasca" got her cable caught on her propeller and signaled "Assistance I need." But at the same time one boat signaled red & white instead of white and red. The confusion allowed the steamer to escape safe while we all attached her running out. The Admiral [Farragut] just arrived on the "Hartford". We go to Pensacola for a few days for coaling. Everyone is scared here about the rebel rams. A deserter came in and reported that they were going to attack our fleet with two gunboats and two rams. Sunday, describes fishing trip nearby where they caught over 600 fish snapper and catfish, most 12 - 13 pounds fish but some up to 60 pounds with our lines. We also caught a 1000 pound shark and when opened it had several cats and dogs inside! The shark struck one man on deck with his tail and he went head over heels. We are laying now facing Fort Morgan and we can see Fort Gaines and Powell. I believe they are evacuating Fort Powell and laying obstruction in the channel. Reports say there are about 6 miles of batteries after passing Fort Morgan and 50 torpedoes; there was a great storm the other night as we almost lost the picket boats as the rolling seas made it difficult to come along side of us. To remain out would have resulted in being driven to shore and captured as the shore is lined with cavalry scouts watching for blockage runners. We succeeded in picking them up but one man suffered a broken leg getting out of a boat. We sent a boat to Dauphin Isle to watch the Bay for rams and ironclads. They saw two, the "Tennessee" and the "Baltic" ironclad rams and the "Selma" and the "Gaines: gunboats." Captain Leroy has made over $100,000 on a prize the "Desoto" captured. I suppose he does not care much for attacking them now. An excellent letter on the affairs in Mobile Bay in late May where blockade runners still came into Mobile quite easily much to the chagrin of Hunt and his ship seeming being out of the action for one reason or another on a "blacklist".....................................................$395.00

LETTER FROM UNION PRISONER AT FAMED LIBBY PRISON IN RICHMOND, VA INCLUDING HAND MADE EATING UTENSILS MADE OF BONE WHILE IN PRISON

53000 - LEVI LUPTON, was 39 years old, when he enlisted on July 25, 1862 at Columbus, Ohio, as a 2nd lieutenant. He was commissioned into Co. C, 116th Ohio Infantry, on September 19, 1862, at Gallipolis, Ohio. He was promoted to 1st lieutenant on June 13, 1863, but was never mustered at that rank because he was the next day, June 14, 1863, at Winchester, VA. He spent time confined in Libby Prison, Richmond, VA, and at Macon, GA, and Charleston, SC., where he died on September 12, 1864. Levi Lupton married Elizabeth Minor on March 16, 1848, and they were residents of Jerusalem, Ohio. Large one page letter in ink to his wife, dated Libby Prison December 23rd, 1863. He relates to his wife, it had been six months since I have been here and it seems to be a blank in my life, he wishes he could have Christmas dinner with his little family as Christmas is two days away. He will eat his Christmas dinner in Libby Prison. He expects that there will be a prisoner exchange by February 1st. Levi Lupton. Lupton had crafted these eating utensils which included a stylus, eating fork, salt spoon, and small table spoon. Prisoners were famous for converting animal bones to novelty items to occupy their time in confinement. Includes POW letter and 4 bone utensils.........................................SOLD

53001 - USS LEHIGH IRON CLAD OFF CHARLESTON, February 4th, 1864. I would have answered your interesting letter before but as nothing of interest has happened it was impossible. I am very much obliged to you for the pamphlet you sent me & read it with a great deal of pleasure. We have been up firing at a rebel blockade steamer which ran aground three nights since in attempting to run into Charleston. We were the advanced picket on that night & had five or six small boats, besides three tugs, sailing & steaming between us & the shore & none knew anything about it until daylight. She is said to be the Petersburg freighter with drugs & clothing & of course very valuable. We were only a mile & a half from shore so you may see how hard it is to catch them. We never presumed that they would try anything of the kind at this place. We had a good watch on deck looking out for torpedo boats & rebel rams as the report is that they are coming down. I think that you will hear of something interesting soon as all the deserters that come from here bring the same report. It is rumored here that we are going to attack [Fort] Sumter again & if we do I suppose that we will be defeated as they have a battery of very heavy guns on the side towards Charleston, but I sincerely hope that it will be otherwise. While we were firing on the steamer the batteries on Sullivan's Island opened on some tugs alongside of us that were supplying us with ammunition. Most of the shot went over us. One struck our side but did not damage. If they had hit the tugs they would have gone down alongside of us immediately.  The men on the tug did not seem to relish the performance much as they rushed around wildly. I suppose they thought we were better provided for as we could run behind the turret. If anything interesting happens I will write again. It is said that there are eight or nine boats besides the rumors. Give my love to all my friends. I presume you meet my friends in _____ St. *If so just remember me to them. Write soon & give me all the news. Very truly your friend...A. Hedrick* the underscore is representative of the way Hedrick's wrote his letter. He purposely left out the name of the street as though he was protecting its identify. Light age toning and wear. The folds have been repaired with archival document tape. Bold and neatly written. Civil War letters written from iron clad gunboats are extremely difficult to find. This one has excellent content regarding activity off the coast of Charleston, South Carolina. Alfred Hedrick was commissioned 3rd Assistant Engineer, U.S. Navy, May 13, 1861. He was promoted to 2nd Assistant Engineer, February 19, 1863. He resigned from the navy on August 9, 1865. The "List of Officers of the U.S. Navy and of the Marine Corps, 1775 - 1900," adds and "s" to the spelling of his last name. [Hedricks]. The U.S.S. Lehigh was a 1,335 ton "Passaic class" ironclad monitor built at Chester, PA, and commissioned into the U.S. Navy in April 1863. During the ensuring three months she patrolled the waters in the vicinity of Hampton Roads, and the James River, VA she then took part in an expedition up the James River to threaten Richmond. The intention of the mission was to divert Confederate forces away from the Army of Northern Virginia during their invasion of the North which ultimately culminated in the battle of Gettysburg. In August 1863, the "Lehigh" was ordered to join the Union naval forces operating off Charleston, S.C., where she participated in the bombardment of various Confederate fortifications, being struck herself several times by Rebel shells. She also saw action hunting down Rebel blockade runners. In October and November the ironclad attacked Fort Sumter and remained in the Charleston area during the remainder of 1864. Afterwards she was ordered back to the James River where she served until the end of the war.......................................................SOLD


3613 - TWO OATHS OF ALLEGIANCE FOR A TENNESSEAN LOYAL TO THE UNION, George Spurgin apparently was one of the many from East Tennessee that remained loyal to the Union. As early as May of 1864, he signed an oath of allegiance. Included are two oaths signed by Spurgin:  May 21st, 1864, 3" X 7", pre-printed and filled-in oath signed at Knoxville, TN. attesting to his Union loyalty and signed by Lt. Phillip Abbott. Again in October 1866, he signs another oath that at all times he was an unconditional Union man. Spurgin was from Sullivan County, TN. The later oath is also pre-printed and is 6" X 7". Both items, very good - very fine......................................................$195.00

2406 - THE SIEGE OF VICKSBURG, ONE CONTINUAL ROAR OF CANNON, May 30th, 1863, 2 large pages in ink by Lemuel Ratcliff, 24th Iowa, Co. H, to his wife and children. He relates in part, "I am well and recovering from the mumps, I sent you a long letter on the 25th and received one from thee yesterday which was mailed on the 14th of the month. Our regiment had suffered but I had little paper to write this time. We are still fighting and have been since the 20th of the month. It is one continual roar of cannon from morning until night. It is nearly all our side. Our sharpshooters do not give the rebels a chance to do much, you talk in your letter of thee being discouraged but that must never do as thee must keep a good heart. We must be thankful that our lives have been spared. Maybe the war will be soon over. I will send a letter with $10 in it to you and father. May heaven bless my dear wife and my little pets. Excuse the writing but I am writing in a hurry. Lemuel Ratcliff." Ratcliff enlisted August 11th, 1862 and died of disease January 15th, 1864. Large manuscript, very fine...............................................$115.00

2407 - WE WERE SURROUNDED BY THE JOHNNIES, THOUGHT I WOULD BE RUN THROUGH WITH A REBEL BAYONET, THEY STRIPPED THE DEAD IN THE FIELD, In camp in an orchard, Virginia, May 17th, 1862, 4 pages in ink to Miss Susanna by L. S. B. He relates in part, "We have been called forth to face the musket and ball. Hundreds and thousands have been called to try the unalterable laws of an unknown world to us since we left camp we have been under the fire of the enemy's canal weapons for 10 days. There has been no fighting since last Saturday. It is quite today but we not know when we will be engaged. OUR regiment has decreased considerably. We lost seven in our company E. I cannot imagine why I was not killed when so many fell around me. I think it was through the mercy of God. I cannot give you full details it would take 10,000 quires of paper. When I get home I will tell you all about it. On last Friday a week ago I believe [May 9th] we were surrounded by the Johnnies. We were compelled to run or be taken prisoner. They were about two rods from me, I thought every minute they would run a bayonet through me. The Johnnies are getting very barbarous when they take a prisoner. They often kill or strip them. In the orchard which we are now laying I saw several laying dead stripped of their clothes among then was a Colonel. There was an awful slaughter last week. The ground was almost covered with dead bodies principally with the Rebs. We have been pretty successful so far. I am pretty sure this summer will see the downfall of Richmond but as the least the last remains of Confederate authorities. If I get home I will appreciate my life more than I ever did. Would to the Almighty that all the Copperheads would feel disposed to come out like men and should endure some hardships to put down the rebellion they are upholding. I must return to the regiment as I do not know how soon we will leave for if I am not there I will be punished...writing this letter on my knee...Your ever truest friend, L. S. B." While the writer is unknown the dates and position given indicate this letter was written during the Peninsular Campaign and describes action around Ethans' Landing May 7th, 1862. Excellent content...........................................SOLD


100813 - MEDICAL DISCHARGE FROM THE MARINE HOSPITAL AT NEW ORLEANS, 8" X 10", pre-printed and filled in discharge for William F. Hungerford, 156th NYV was discharged for medical reasons, signed by the Surgeon in charge, US Marine Hospital, New Orleans, LA, January 27th, 1863, fine......................................$55.00

100814 - 5TH MAINE VOLUNTEERS NEAR BRADY STATION, 8"X 10", manuscript, a return of ordnance items by Colonel Clark E. Edwards including a Springfield rifle, ammunition, dated November 22nd, 1862. Very fine........................................$55.00

10627 - TWO MEMBERS OF THE 54TH MASSACHUSETTS KILLED BY BOMBARDMENT FROM THE REBELS
, Camp of the Boat Infantry, 127th NYV, Morris Island, SC, July 19th, 1864, three pages in ink by John Allen, Company E, to his fiend George Hancock in New Jersey. On rare imprinted letter sheet, CAMP OF BOAT INFANTRY 127TH NY VOLS., MORRIS ISLAND, SC. He relates in part...he discusses his re-enlistment, furlough just returned from , "We give Sumter some iron each day, the Rebels have tried to shell our camp several items. THEY KILLED TWO MEMBERS OF THE 54TH THE OTHER DAY, we have bomb proofs to get into when they feel like shelling us but they found out that two can play that game...there had been a review of religion in the camp, many have taken up the cross and I hope they will be faithful until death. I see that you are a Little Mac man, if you think he is the man then vote for him as for me I am good for Abe again". An excellent letter mentioning the death of two members of the 54th Massachusetts, the famous Colored Troop regiment................................................
$175.00

72204 - A NEW ORLEANS SHIPPER INSURES HIS SHIPMENTS IN 1864, Home Mutual Insurance Co., of New Orleans, corner Camp and Natchez Streets. 8" X 10" Marine insurance policy tipped into a leather bound folio purchased by Newman Murphy on October 15th, 1864 for goods shipped out of New Orleans in sailing or steam ships. At this time the City was under federal control as the City had fallen to Federal forces in April 1862. Intricate details as to the limits of the coverage are included mentioning exceptions of coverage including blockade and seizure as Confederate riders still sailed in the Gulf of operated in the Gulf of Mexico at this time. Very fine, 50 Cent Revenue stamp affixed........................................................$125.00

7045 - COLONEL W. E. DOSTER, COMMANDER OF THE MOUNTED PROVOST GUARD OF WASHINGTON DISTRIBUTES ARMS AND OTHER GOODS TO CAPTAIN HENRY B. TODD OF THE PROVOST MARSHALL OF WASHINGTON, February 20th, 1863, 2 legal pages of manuscript on Head Quarters Provost Marshall's Office, Washington. Numerous items were turned over to Todd by Doster which probably were captured items from Rebel sympathizers in and around Washington as Doster was in command of 4 infantry regiments, 1 cavalry regiment, and a boat flotilla cruising the Chesapeake...some of the goods Todd took in possession of were: 23 swords, 1 colt rifle, 1 sharps rifle, haversacks, bayonets, gun barrels, liquor, Colt revolvers, knapsacks, medicine, sabers, and much more. Captain Henry B. Todd was a commander of the Lincoln Cavalry in 1861, with the job of guarding the capital. After being captured by the Confederates, Todd was later exchanged for a Confederate prisoner of war, and went on to become provost marshal of Washington, DC. Though he was of no relation to Lincoln's wife, Mary Todd, his CDV was found in Lincoln's personal album. Very fine.......................................................$125.00

7046 - AN ACCOUNTING OF MONEY BELONGING TO THE CONTRABAND FUND AND ITEMS BELONGING TO CAPTURED PRISONERS IN WASHINGTON, DC, Letter sheet, 2 large pages 8" X 13", HEADQUARTERS PROVOST MARSHALL, WASHINGTON, DC, February 20th, 1863, an accounting of items in the office and safe signed by Captain Henry Todd Captain of the Provost Marshall, noted are: Funds turned over by Lt. Colonel W. E. Doster of the 21st Penn. Belonging to the Contraband Fund [$205.67]. Items stored in the iron sale in the office in Washington a pocket book and papers belonging to John Brown a servant of General Geary. $38 in Virginia notes belonging to I. Newman C. C. P. [Capital City Prison - a prisoner], several envelopes containing various amounts of money belonging to Thomas Griffin and Samuel Bell, another containing money belonging to J. W. Litchfield when arrested, another with money forfeited from a Penn. soldier for failure to appear, a pocket book belonging to Samuel and Joseph Jenkins prisoners in Old Capital [Prison], an envelope containing funds from fines received for persons selling civilian clothing to soldiers [afraid this would lead to desertions by soldiers wearing civilian clothing and blending into the population], vouchers and money belonging to the Contraband fund. An Captain Henry B. Todd was a commander of the Lincoln Cavalry in 1861, with the job of guarding the capital. After being captured by the Confederates, Todd was later exchanged for a Confederate prisoner of war, and went on to become provost marshal of Washington, DC. Though he was of no relation to Lincoln's wife, Mary Todd, his CDV was found in Lincoln's personal album, an unusual and lengthy document from the Provost Office in Washington. Captain Henry B. Todd was a commander of the Lincoln Cavalry in 1861, with the job of guarding the capital. After being captured by the Confederates, Todd was later exchanged for a Confederate prisoner of war, and went on to become provost marshal of Washington, DC. Though he was of no relation to Lincoln's wife, Mary Todd, his CDV was found in Lincoln's personal album. Fine.......................................................$125.00

7048 - A LIST OF POTENTIAL WOMEN SPIES IN THE WASHINGTON AREA NOTED ON PROVOST MARSHAL STATIONARY 1862, 8" X 10" on imprinted HEADQUARTERS PROVOST MARSHAL'S OFFICE______62, Washington, DC, notes regarding the activities of three named women and the current information the Provost Marshal has regarding their activities..."Mary "Beauregard" Hepbun of Georgetown, forwarding letters to Mrs. Dishield in Richmond by the latter's brother. Is Secesh and knows the secrets of the mail route. Who is Mrs. D's brother?...Anna Mathews of Georgetown writes to Albert E. M...Richmond, notes about her servant girl Ann, brags about sending letters with the O. C. P staring her in the face, her uncle left Georgetown carrying a large sum of gold...Mrs. Thomas Georgetown, and sister of Mr. Taylor...writes to her daughter at Manassas Junction [Victoria] says Sidney keeps his trunks packed to go to "Dixie" if he is drafted. She has one son James in the South, mentions a husband of a friend who is in the State Dept. at Richmond, the friend is staying with Mrs. Thomas." An interesting Provost Marshal report detailing the activities of potential spies and Rebel sympathizers near Washington. Unsigned manuscript, fine. This information was obviously gathered intercepting mail sent by these individuals........................................................$250.00

7049 - A FEDERAL SPY REPORTS ON THE ACTIVITIES OF HER NEIGHBORS, Headquarters, Provost Marshal's Office, Washington, DC,......62. A manuscript 8" X 10" Launder is know to me...thinks they have eight horses that are required for farming, Mrs. Launder's daughter-in-law Mrs. Fairfax stays there...John Sheckles stays with Mrs. Launders, has eight horses. 3 out of five horses were all out, Mr. Miller's son about one mile towards Blandenburg brought four in [horses]...Henry Dodson is at Mrs. Launders, more on horses owned by Mrs. Landers, Dr. Trufant was back at home last night, Nancy Fox." A local informer reports on the holdings and activities of suspected southern sympathizers in Maryland, some minor archival repairs to verso, otherwise very good.......................................................$175.00

7050 - MAJOR W. E. DOSTER, ALS, PROVOST MARSHAL'S OFFICE IN WASHINGTON, ASKING A ADAMS EXPRESS TO REFUND A SOLDIER'S FEES ON A NON DELIVERED PARCEL. DOSTER LATER DEFENDED THREE OF THE LINCOLN CONSPIRATORS, On Provost Marshal's stationary, September 17th, 1862, two page letter signed by Doster with comments on the verso by the local Adams Express superintendent disavowing their responsibility in a soldier's claim that his parcel was not properly shipped to the destination. Doster's letter is in behalf of the soldier. Doster [later Bvt. General] at the end of the war was appointed by the Advocate General Hold and Bingham to defend Lewis Payne, Powell, and George Atzerodt. His bold signature........................................$135.00

7051 - THE WAR DEPARTMENT DEMANDS TO KNOW WHY THE PROVOST MARSHAL ARRESTED AN INDIVIDUAL AND IMPRISONED HIM, THEN DISCHARGED HIM, November 12th, 1862, 7" X 8" on War Department stationary written and signed by P. H. Watson Asst. Secretary of War to Major Doster demanding him to make an immediate report on the arrest and imprisonment and subsequent discharge of John Regriery. The writer underlines immediate. A corner was restored, bold ink. Possibly Doster failed to pursue charges against the individual or arrested him without due cause. Very good other than restoration......................................$135.00

7052 - A SOLDIER IN THE 2ND INFANTRY ATTESTS TO HIS DRUNKENNESS AND LOSING ALL HIS MONEY AT A FARO GAME IN A WASHINGTON SALOON, Headquarters Provost Marshal's Office, Washington, January 13th, 1863, two page affidavit, page one by the soldier 1st Lt. Abraham Grafius attesting that he lost $350 at the Hammacks Saloon on Pennsylvania Ave in a Faro Game due to being intoxicated, page two a fellow soldier also attests that he saw the Lt. intoxicated and lose about $300 at the Faro Bank at the before named saloon. Records show that Abraham had commendable service but was a chronic alcoholic. Two pages 8" X 10". Obviously the Provost Marshall was concerned about soldiers being allowed to gamble while intoxicated. Very fine, interesting content and commentary on this drunken soldier who lost his money playing Faro in a Washington saloon.........................................................$125.00

7053 - LETTER WRITTEN AND SIGNED BY CAPTAIN HENRY B. TODD TO BVT. GENERAL W. DOSTER REGARDING DOSTER ASSISTING HIM IN A INVESTIGATION OF HIM IN A COMPLICATED SCAM HE WAS INVOLVED IN, February 24th, 1864, 3 page ink letter to Doster describing his innocent involvement in a scam that centered around counterfeit postal currency the counterfeiter, the woman passing the counterfeit notes, jewelry he got involved in with her. Very detailed. Captain Henry B. Todd was a commander of the Lincoln Cavalry in 1861, with the job of guarding the capital. After being captured by the Confederates, Todd was later exchanged for a Confederate prisoner of war, and went on to become provost marshal of Washington, DC. Though he was of no relation to Lincoln's wife, Mary Todd, his CDV was found in Lincoln's personal album. On Todd's personal stationary. Very fine............................................$150.00


4250 - GOD HAS GIVEN US A GREAT VICTORY AT GETTYSBURG, 1ST MASSACHUSETTS SHARPSHOOTERS, Gettysboro [Gettysburg], July 4th, 1863. One page note by C. O. Walcott, 1st Company, Massachusetts, one page note in bold pencil with the transmittal envelope [stamped BOONSBORO, MD] July 11th, [1863] to his wife. "Dear wife, God has given us a great victory and I am alive and well. 30 of company are killed, 5 are wounded in battle. The Rebs retreated and we are after them pell mell. They spiked 75 of their cannon before leaving. Write soon. God bless you all. In great haste, C. O. Walcott." On the postal cover, he has added a final note "After the Rebels, 2 killed and 5 wounded, hasty lines from Gettsboro." The 1st Mass. Sharp Shooters at Gettysburg. The company was commanded at Gettysburg by Captain William Plumer, a Harvard graduate and lawyer from Lexington. He had been wounded in June and rode in an ambulance to Gettysburg. The company brought 50 men to the field, losing two killed and six wounded. Originally formed for Colonel Hiram Berdan's sharpshooter regiments, the two companies of Massachusetts Sharpshooters remained independent when told that they would lose the state enlistment bounty by joining Berdan's Federal regiments. The two companies of Massachusetts Sharpshooters were nominally independent, although each operated with a Massachusetts regiment. The 1st Company operated with the 15th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment. Walcott in his letter was obviously referring to other Massachusetts troops killed and wounded with them. The notation on the cover obviously refers to his direct company's killed and wounded. Walcott was later wounded at Cold Harbor in May 1864 and then discharged in September 1864. Not a long Gettysburg letter but short and to the point, letter and cover, find a Gettysburg content letter cheaper............................................SOLD

4251 - ROSECRANS WILL DISMISS OFFICERS THAT DO NOT FOLLOW THE PROCLAMATION BY LINCOLN ON EMANCIPATION, March 16th, 1863, Corinth, MS, 4 pages in ink by Sergt. Amos Kibbee Co. B, 15th Illinois Cavalry, to his cousin Hattie. He relates in part, "I cannot believe they are fixing up another big scout for us, have no idea where we will go but somewhere south for sure. It will be on a much larger scale than the other one. We will probably have 4 or 5 regiments of mounted infantry with us. Perhaps this might be just contraband news. I have just read over the order by Gen. Rosecrans dismissing dishonorably from the service such officers as are finding fault with the policy of the administration. Seems a great inconsistency in officer who entered the service since the President's proclamation as nearly all the fault finders are in this case. Discusses the copperheads in the north and hopes their fervor will cease." An interesting commentary on the unrest in the army leadership after the Emancipation Proclamation which had just been out in place. Kibbee's Company B later fought in the Vicksburg Campaign. Well written letter..................................$135.00

4252 - THE DESTRUCTION OF CLARENDON, ARKANSAS, A SLAVE OWNER KILLED BY GUERILLAS, Helena, Arkansas, September 28th, 1863, 4 large 8" X 10" pages in ink by Sergt. Amos Kibbee, Company B, 15th Illinois Cavalry to his cousin Hattie Tuttle. He relates in part, "we had been on an expedition to join General Steele at Little Rock and our failure to do so just shows how little the soldiers know of our destination when we set out "upon the wing." We only went as far as Clarenden on the White River and left the train we were guarding and returned here. We will probably winter here and it is the most sickly place on the Mississippi River although my company is healthy although the regiment has 60 - 70 men in the hospital. My health is first rare. He describes the countryside and says he can trace the march of their army. Describes Clarendon has been a flourishing little town of 2000 inhabitants with many pleasant buildings but it has been hardest hit of any town I have ever seen. There are not more than 15 - 20 families living there now. The town bears the mark of both armies and a majority have been torn down or burned. Many have been torn down to build bridges or for firewood and there is hardly a fence within 5 miles of the town. On the first scout we went out on we passed the house of the notorious murderer of Louisville, KY Matt Ward. Perhaps you will remember he killed at schoolmaster for punishing one of his brothers for some misdemeanor at school. He bribed the judge to clear him due to his great wealth but the indignation of all the people caused him and his family to fly the country. He came to Arkansas and bought the most splendid plantation in the state and stocked it with the finest cattle I ever saw and 300 - 400 slaves. He lived here until a year ago but it was not his interest to be loyal to the Confeds or the Unionists. The Rebel cavalry surprised him in bed one morning and led him out and shot him in his own yard. His widow is here now in Helena-the belle of the town. The great 'boa constrictor' is drawing his folds closer and closer around his victims and it seems to me they cannot last much longer. The fighting in this theater is pretty much played out. There is the occasional bushwhacker but they do not carry much weight in the general issue. Rosecrans has met with a temporary reverse. News has reached us of the partial defeat at Chattanooga." One of the most famous cases in the state, and one which aroused much feeling throughout the country, was the Matt Ward case. On November 2, 1853, he alleged to have shot and killed William H. G. Butler, principal of the Louisville High School, and due, according to the evidence, to Professor Butler's chastising Robert J. Ward, Jr. The father of the Wards was Robert J. Ward, Sr. regarded at the time as being the wealthiest man in Kentucky. He evidently spared no expense in retaining legal representation for his son. A total of eighteen lawyers were engaged in his defense and he was acquitted. He later was killed by a Confederate guerilla band in Arkansas. Well written, great Arkansas content.........................................................SOLD

4253 - THE BATTLE OF EZRA CHURCH, GEORGIA, ATLANTA CAMPAIGN, 55TH ILLINOIS, Camp near Atlanta, July 31st, 1864, Pvt. Augustus Goakley, Company C, 55th Illinois Vol., two page letter in ink to his mother. He relates in part, "I have not received a letter from you since I left home although I have written five and this the sixth, I saw brother Michael the other day and we had a three hour visit and I don't think he is any smarter than when he left home, he blows as hard as he ever did. We have had two severe engagements since I last wrote, one on the 20th and another on the 22nd, the Rebels were repelled in both cases. Company C lost none on the first battle but were not as lucky on the second as they had two killed, Oscar Jackson and John Curtis [killed 7-28-64 Ezra Grove, GA] killed and three wounded. There were 311 dead Rebels buried in the front of our division." Well written.............................SOLD

4254 - THE BATTLE OF ARKANSAS POST, DIGGING THE GRANT CANAL AT VICKSBURG, Headquarters, Camp before Vicksburg, January 26th, 1863, 4 page letter in ink on attractive patriotic stationary [large eagle with flags] by Augustus Goakley, Company C, 55th Illinois to his mother. He relates in part, "We have been through severe hardships since we left Memphis four weeks ago. Last Sunday we were under severe fire all day and after leaving here we went up the Arkansas River and had another brush and were successful in taking the fort and between 5000 and 7000 prisoners and a considerable amount of ammunition and all their trains and wagons [Battle of Arkansas Post], we are not back in front of Vicksburg for the purpose digging a canal to change the course of the Mississippi River. We have blocked the river in both directions so they cannot from Vicksburg by way of the river. More about his dislike of hearing about family squabbles over money he sent home and property he left at home." Well written, attractive stationary............................SOLD

4257 - THE BATTLE OF SEVEN PINES, 15TH MASSACHUSETTS VOL., Fair Oaks Station or Seven Pines, June 13th, 1862, Friday 2 o'clock, 4 large pages in ink. He writes to his wife and children, Benjamin Whitcomb, Company B, 15th Massachusetts Infantry. He relates in part, "glad to get her letters and would like one from her every week if possible, I suppose you got my note I wrote before the battle, I thought we would have another one today but I guess not. The Rebels began to throw shell again this morning but did not hit anyone, One shell burst and shells came into out camp, one shell went through one tent and stopped so they found it. Oh Nancy I live to come home and tell you what I have seen here. They are very careless here. Now if I did not have spunk at home I have some here and I think the whole regiment did to stand up and be shot at when the balls whist around our heads like hail. One came so close to neither my face I felt it prickle though it did not hurt any of Company B nor A but some of the other companies lost some. Out of the 15th Regiment there wee 5 killed and 17 wounded but the Rebels fell. Oh to see them the next morning dead and wounded it was a hard sight to see. Nancy I shall never forget the 31st of May 1862 and the 1st of June. I was on picket the 1st [June]. Little General McClellan has been around reviewing his army today. He is a nice looking man. He is in charge of the whole army. I have sworn off swearing. In the line of battle most of them swore every word. We expect another battle every day. Much more about his wishes for hi family, his love for his wife and boys." On May 31, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston attempted to overwhelm two Federal corps that appeared isolated south of the Chickahominy River. The Confederate assaults, though not well coordinated, succeeded in driving back the IV Corps and inflicting heavy casualties. Reinforcements arrived, and both sides fed more and more troops into the action. Supported by the III Corps and Sedgwick's division of Sumner's II Corps (that crossed the rain-swollen river on Grapevine Bridge), the Federal position was finally stabilized. Gen. Johnston was seriously wounded during the action and command of the Confederate army devolved temporarily to Maj. Gen. G. W. Smith. On June 1, the Confederates renewed their assaults against the Federals who had brought up more reinforcements but made little headway. Both sides claimed victory. Confederate brigadier Robert H. Hatton was killed, 4 large 8" X 10" pages in ink, light tone........................SOLD

4258 - USS WISSAHICKON ABOUT TO JOIN FARRAGUT FOR THE ATTACK ON THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER FORTS BELOW NEW ORLEANS, Off Ship Island, Friday March 10th, 1862, on board the U.S.S. Gun Boat Wissachickon, from a Connecticut Union Sailor Augustine Sackett to his sister. He relates in part, on large 8" X 10" pages in ink, "I received two letters from home yesterday and papers, some of which came by "submarine" by falling in the Gulf off Fort Pickens and was fished out and dried so they were not lost and sent on, advises his sister to take care in skating as it is very dangerous for those not skilled, yesterday we received the news of the glorious victories in Tennessee and Kentucky and the rumor that Savannah was taken and the whole north was rejoicing in "rejoining" in consequence. We came up here off the station at "Petit Bois" last Wednesday night for coal and provision. I believe we are to go to Fort Pickens tonight. From there I do not know but it is supposed that we will show the Rebels a fight somewhere this way. I meant this squadron and our boat will take part in it. This morning the steamship Fulton arrived here with 1600 troops and I believe they brought a mail. We have not gotten ours yet if they did. On Sunday night last we had quite a gale, we got up anchor and were underway all night. Later we had another severe storm where we stripped our cable and put out to sea and tried to keep off the shore as we made very little headway. We depended on the engines that night to head to sea or windward to stop rolling when she is not directed. When the stern comes out of the water exposing the propeller and throw the engines in a jerk that makes the ship tremble from ship to stern. This is called the "racing of the engines." I was on the 8-12 watch that night when the storm was at its worse. It rained on torrents but that was no problem as the waves washed over the decks and down the hatches. There were "big seas" that came crashing down in the engine room upon me like buckets of water. How did she roll and pitch. Chairs and other items were thrown about in steerage. The racing of the engines could cause serious problems as the engineer has to carefully watch them keeping the journals cool and checking for loose nuts. His hearing is very important as an experienced engineer can tell by the sound if anything is going wrong with the engines by the sounds they make. We lost our foresail during my watch and had to depend on the engines. If they had given out the ship would have gone ashore. As I said we are going to Fort Pickens tonight and I suspect we will be in a battle in that direction. I send by the Rhode Island a letter and allotment for PA. I also sent a letter a few days ago by the frigate Niagara. I hope to send you and account of a successful battle and I hope you will have the satisfaction of hearing that "We never gave up the ship." USS Wissachickon, a 691-ton Unadilla class screw steam gunboat was built at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Commissioned in November 1861, she initially served in the Gulf of Mexico and on the Mississippi River, where in April - July 1862, she participated in the capture of New Orleans, bombardment of Grand Gulf, two runs past the Confederate fortifications commanding the river at Vicksburg and a battle with the ironclad CSS Arkansas. After repairs at Philadelphia in August - October 1862, Wissahickon joined the blockade of the coasts of South Carolina, Georgia, and eastern Florida. She took part in bombardments of Fort McAllister, Georgia, in late 1862 and early 1862 and in the destruction of the privateer Rattlesnake (ex-CSS Nashville) on 28 February 1862. In March and June 1863, Wissahickon destroyed one blockade running steamer and helped to destroy another. During the summer, she bombarded Forts Wagner and Sumter, off Charleston, South Carolina. An interesting descriptive letter about keeping the gunboat afloat in a severe storm unbeknown to the crew and writer their destination was west towards the Mississippi River for Farragut's attack on the forts below New Orleans. Well written.................................................SOLD


121222 - 1ST US CAVALRY LETTER BY JACOB DORMER, COMPANY E, 1ST US CAVALRY WITH HIS WAR PERIOD PHOTO TAKEN BY J. P. BALL OF CINCINNATI, AN AFRICAN- AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHER, 3 page letter in bold pencil to his sister, January 10th, 1864 with cover, Culpepper, VA. In the letter, he relates: mentions that he is now driving a team in the brigade and may re-enlist as the bounty is $804, questions his sister as to the where a bouts of his brother John and who he is serving under. He gets no response to his letters. The Rebels are coming over in our lines all of the time and for my part I wish they would all come over. He tells his sister to tell Miss Jane Reardon to stay single until he comes home and he will make it all right. Accompanying the Letter and cover is a CDV of Dormer standing taken by J. P. Ball of Cincinnati, Ohio. James Presley Ball, Sr. (1825 - May 4, 1904) was a prominent African-American photographer, abolitionist, and businessman. His photographs are very desirable. All three items.......................................$295.00

121223 - RARE MISSOURI 1862 OATH OF ALLEGIANCE TO THE UNITED STATES, 8" X 14", pre-printed and filled-in oath of allegiance dated November 10th, 1862 detailing the oath taken by Clayton Jacobs, Sheriff of Ray County, Missouri swearing allegiance to the United States and refusal to adhere to the Provisional Government of Missouri or other enemies to the United States. A rare early War Missouri Oath in excellent condition.................................................SOLD


80015 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, THE PEDDLERS ARE KEPT OUT OF CAMP SINCE A MAN WAS POISONED, January 12th, 1862, Camp Hutchins. Two page sin bold pencil from Private John Kay, Company G, 6th Ohio Cavalry. He relates in part to his father and mother, WRITTEN ON RED/BLUE 6TH OHIO CAVALRY STATIONARY WITH LARGE SHIELD AND STARS WITH A MATCHING POSTAL COVER STAMPED..."we will go on dress parade at 3 PM, went over to the 2nd Cavalry as they will leave tomorrow, we will get paid next week as the payrolls are in Columbus, we will get paid up to the 1st of January, he hopes to save as much as he can, we don't eat anything the peddlers bring in camp as one man was poisoned by a pie, they keep all the peddlers out of camp except one old man who brings them in a basket and they make him eat one first as that is the way in examining them. I must stop now as I promised to write a letter for Willie Moore as he can't write Annie...address letters to Camp Dennison...John Kay."...............................................$95.00

80016 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, THE BOYS WERE ABOUT TO TEAR DOWN THE SUTLER'S GROCERY FOR TOBACCO, THE OFFICERS ISSUED SCRIPT TO THE SOLDIERS, Camp Dennison, January 30th, 1862. 4 page letter to Father, Mother, Sister, and Brother by Private John Kay Company G, 6th Ohio Cavalry, in bold pencil on RED/BLUE 6TH OHIO CAVALRY STATIONARY WITH A MATCHING STAMPED COVER. He relates in part to them, "have made straw beds, the company is strapped for money and tobacco, the boys were about to tear the Sutler's grocery if they could not get tobacco. So the officers had to do something so they gave some type of checks like script but only good for 10 Cents and that won't buy postage stamps. The Doctor says we are the healthiest company in the regiment, two batteries left last week from here, dress parade is about to start...will continue, had crackers, rice, and coffey...hard crackers but still good...send stamps as they are scare."....................................................................................$95.00

80017 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, CAMP DENNISON, February 14th, 1862. 3 page letter in pencil to his sister by John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry, attractive red and blue letter sheet of the 6th Ohio Cavalry with large colored shield and stars. He relates to her in part..."Our next pay day is the 1st of March, he tells his brother Davy to put some apples and donuts in a box and send to him, it is his turn to go into the cookhouse, mentions they will have straw beds about 6" deep, also wants his brother to get a couple of licorice stocks to add to the box, a soldier Tom has a 10 day furlough and he can bring back." An early organization camp letter where the 6th Ohio was training. Beautiful letter sheet, crisp paper, some light spots on page 1, otherwise quite legible.................................................$85.00

80018 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, ARTILLERY PRACTICE, HIT THE TARGET TWICE OUT OF SIX TRIES, March 6th, 1862, Camp Hutchins. 4 pages in ink to his Father by John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry. He relates in part, "no news of our leaving, we just sit here, they took one company form our regiment to fill the 2nd Cavalry and the Lord only knows what will become of our regiment. The rest of the regiment has gotten our horses and sabers, mentions going over to the stables to see the horses. The 5th Cavalry left here last week and in their hurry left one of their saddles behind and I had the good luck to find it. In about an hours, I was offered $10 for it. Julius Hill found a new musket the other day while going out for a drink of wine with a soldier...brand new musket. But my saddle is the best as it makes a fine pillow...You would be surprised how much stuff Uncle Sam has to find. Look at one battery of artillery, every time a six pounder shoots it costs $6 for one shot...I was looking at then shooting at a target and the first shot goes about a mile. The first shot fell about 3 feet from the target, the second about 15 feet above, but the next came down on the mark.  They hit it twice out of six times. One day I will go over and dig one out to see how far it went into the ground...J. Kay..." Excellent letter, finding lost supplies in camp, artillery practice with excellent descriptions. ATTRACTIVE 6TH OHIO CAVALRY COLORED STATIONARY WITH A PATRIOTIC COVER STAMPED SHOWING CAMP DENNISON, AN EXCELLENT PAIR..................................................$125.00

80019 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, REBEL PRISONERS COME IN A SON HAS TO GUARD HIS REBEL FATHER, March 25th, 1862. 3 pages in bold pencil by John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry to his Brother, Camp Hutchins. He relates in part, "this week a rifle company was to fill up a rifle regiment that is at Fort Henry. Captain Richard got up a full company and went to headquarters to hand in the names of his men, we were expected and the Captain went over to make out the payrolls and went also to get some printed furloughs to give to men who wanted them. But before he got them an order came from Washington not to transfer any men from the 6th Ohio Cavalry so it was up for the sharpshooters as if we had went I would have been home this week. There were about 100 "ceses" [secessionists/Rebel soldiers] came here last week and a company out of the 69th went to Columbus to guard them. One of the men who went down saw his father dressed in a Rebel uniform, when he saw him he went to shake his hand and it was hard to see him guard his father up at the prison. John Kay." An excellent 6th Ohio Cavalry letter. Patriotic 6th Ohio Cavalry bi-colored stationary with a stamped patriotic cover with two clasped hands with an eagle above, three 1 cent Franklin stamps cancelled [scarce on letters]................................................$145.00

80020 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, CAMP CHASE, THE PRISONERS WERE EXPECTED TO MAKE A BREAK FOR IT, [May] 21st, 1862, Camp Chase. 2 pages in pencil on attractive 6th Ohio Cavalry stationary to his Mother, John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry. He relates in part, "I have been sick with the fever but am feeling better but it broke out around my mouth, I must leave it alone to heal. There is talk of us going to Wheeling next week. Two regiments have left here last week. We have been sent to guard the prisoners [Camp Chase]. Last night we expected the prisoners to make a break due to the fact that two regiments have left the camp. They are getting pretty saucy. They damn the guards in the daylight but are pretty still at night. We have nothing else to do but lay in the tents...needs more postage stamps, John Kay."..............................................$125.00

80021 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, HAVE GOT PISTOLS AND CARBINES, May 24th, 1862. Pages in pencil to his mother by John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry, letter postmarked New Creek Station, VA. He relates in part, "We left Camp Chase day before yesterday and arrived here Mill Creek, VA. We will leave here and go to Franklinton...we have now gotten horses, pistols, and carbines and all the thinks this camp lays on you. The water is the best we have had since we left Camp Hutchins. The ring that I sent was a Rebel ring [must have gotten it from a prisoner at Camp Chase], I send Doug a cap box, tell Davy I got a "starving" good horse. John Kay.".............................................$85.00

80022 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, HAD MY HORSE, SADDLE, AND BLANKET STOLE FROM ME, SOME GOT WOUNDED AT THOROUGHFARE GAP, [August 29th] 1862, Camp Cent. [Centerville, SC Courthouse]. Four pages in bold pencil to is brother Davy on colored patriotic stationary with sailor and soldier, seal of NY, FOR THE UNION flag, comes with matching stamped cover. He relates in part, "Tells his brother about his first horse he had named Old Jim, the fastest horse in the company, he was stolen from me at Slotter Mountain, saw four loose horses in a field and tried to catch one, caught a little mare and rode to camp here in Centerville where I got a saddle and bridle. Took her out on a scout after some Rebels and she kept running so fast she was one of the two fastest horses in the company. When we were in camp near Washington, Srgt. Parrit went to water his horse and saw Old Jim and made the fellow who had him tie him to a tree and sent for me. There he was a perfect pile of bones and I was going to wail him [other soldier who had taken his horse] but did not do so as the Lt. came by. I am doctoring his sore foot. A scouting part left here yesterday for Thoroughfare Gap a distance of 35 miles and we can see it from here...they got some southern bullets and two were wounded, some say they aren't expected to live...John Kay." Elements of the 6th Ohio traveled to Thoroughfare Gap on August 28th, 1862 and had an engagement there with the Rebels.........................................SOLD

80023 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, CENTERVILLE, VA, October 26th, 1862. 1 page letter by John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry to his father, bold pencil. He relates, "I write you to tell you all is well and I am enjoying a soldier's life. I have not much time to write as we have orders to move at a moment's notice. Father I send home $50 in care of Mr. Keller to Youngstown. I was very glad that you sent me those newspapers. No more. From your son, John Kay." At this time, the 6th Ohio was about to go on an expedition on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad [November 10-12]. Well written..................................................$85.00

80026 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, DESCRIBES ALL THE ARMAMENT IN WASHINGTON, January 14th, 1863. Two large pages in ink to his father by John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry. He relates in part, "You wanted to know where I was during the last battle, I was 4 miles Washington in camp with a four horse team as I do not have to fight anymore. At present, I haul hay and grain to headquarters from Washington. The regiment is now at Fredericksburg so you see I am not in much danger now as they don't run wagons where there is danger. My 1st Lt. Roberts got me this place as he is in headquarters. He is in charge of getting arms, horses, and equipment for the brigade. A brigade is composed of 12 regiments and there are 12 companies in a regiment. I wish you were here to go down to the arsenal where all the big guns come from. The yard is full of cannons and shells and mortars. Asks his father to send boots to Washington. John Kay."..................................$95.00

80029 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, I AM IN THE HOSPITAL, I STAGGER WHEN I WALK AM DIZZY, May 22, 1863. 2 pages in ink to his sister by John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry. He relates in part, "I have not heard from you since I sent money home. I am not very well! Have got the "blino" staggers. When I go out in the sun my head just whirls around. Jenny, I just can't write any more. Direct your letters to 2nd Brigade Hospital at Aquila Creek. The division was ordered out this morning and I do not know where it went. My hand is steady when I sit up but my head is dizzy. Write to me and send me a Youngstown paper...when I go around it makes me dizzy. John Kay." Kay apparently suffers from sunstroke and his handwriting is rough and unlevel showing the effects of his dizziness......................................$75.00

80031A - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, Camp near Washington, July 16th, 1863. One page letter in ink with stamped cover to his father and mother by Pvt. John E. Kay, Co. G, 6th Ohio Cavalry. He relates in part, tells his parents that he is doing well and does not need the $5 they were going to send as he can get by all right on his rations. No more now as you will hear the news soon and then I will write the particulars. John Kay. Kay refers to the late Battle at Gettysburg which the 6th Ohio had just participated in two weeks prior. Letter and cover..........................................................$75.00

80032 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, CAMP BETWEEN MILFORD STATION AND THE NORTH ANNA RIVER IN THE WILDERNESS, BATTLE OF HAWES SHOP, VA, [May] 28th, 1864, John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry to his sister Jenny. He relates in part, "the regiment saw them [the Rebs] for the first time in 16 days and had a hard time of it, 45 killed and wounded and missing, one Major was killed his name was Abels and one Captain, do not know if he was killed or not but have not seen him since that raid. That charge the cavalry made was within two miles of Richmond. The regiment dismounted in the advance. Joe Miller was the first to make them smell Yankee lead, he hollowed so we would not shoot our own men, the gray backs began to swarm out of the woods instead of the blue backs, but grape and canister made them scatter back...John Kay." Kay describes the Battle at Hawes Shop, VA, where Major James S. Abell was killed on May 9th, 1864 the first day he received his commission. Kay writes in ink, somewhat light in some spots, crisp fresh paper.................................$225.00

80034 - OFFICIAL PASS FOR PRIVATE JOHN KAY, 6TH OHIO CAVALRY TO TRAVEL TO FAIRFAX STATION ON IMPORTANT BUSINESS, 5" X 7", pre-printed and filled-in pass, HEADQUARTERS 11TH CORPS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Fairfax Court House, VA allowing John Kay to travel to Fairfax Station on "important business." By command of Major General Sigel and signed by Captain John H. Pieitt ADC. November 4th, 1862. Very good, tone at folds..............................................................$95.00

80035 - MY LOVE AS SOLDIER BOY, 5" X 7", song sheet, a patriotic song sheet carried by John Kay, 6th Ohio that is dedicated to a New York soldier mentioning the nine battles they have fought in and the Generals in command...Hooker, McClellan, the heights of Fredericksburg, Manassas, South Mountain. "when we attacked them at South Mountain we were in Hooker's Corps," "We fought a sketch as Hall Springs and last did not succeed," "McClellan was our commander and him we do adore." Kay carried this with him while in service, it was folded, toned, some fissures at folds, completely intact..............................$49.00

80036 - EAGLE DISCHARGE FOR PRIVATE JOHN KAY, COMPANY G, 6TH OHIO CAVALRY AT PETERSBURG, VA, 9" X 11", Eagle vignette, Kay's discharge written at near Petersburg, VA, December 12th, 1864 by reason by expiration of term. Kay was described as 18 years of age, 5' 11", brown eyes, sandy complexion and hair. His occupation was a blacksmith. Bold manuscript, slight fissure at end of fold, otherwise fine....................................$125.00


8011 - CIVIL WAR DIARY OF SERGT. JOHN CHRISTY DOTY, SR., 122 NYV MARCH 1864 - JANUARY 1865, 3" X 5", "Daily Pocket Reminder for 1864", leather covered, pencil entries quite legible to read and covers the period March 1864 through January 1865. Doty was born in 1827 and died at Jordan, NY in 1898. He was a blacksmith by trade and served in Company G, 122nd NYV after enlisting in August 1862. He was promoted to Sergeant and participated in some memorable battles including Gettysburg. In January 1864, the 122 NYV was sent to Ohio to guard Rebel prisoners and then to Virginia in April 1864. Doty was always careful to mention the weather in his entries, the dates and places of all events. Due to his frequent mentions of the hospital, wounded men, burials, etc. He may have served as a medic. Highlights of the diary in part are as follow, [May 6th], Had a fight in the morning and lay in the front line, built breastworks, at sundown the Rebels flanked us, cut our regiment up to pieces, a shot struck my knapsack, chest through the clothes through the clothes under my left arm, cutting my haversack off. [May 8th] Halted at 12 AM near Spotsylvania Court House, had a fight there, lay behind breastworks all night, a very heavy engagement at center at noon, heavy fighting until dark along the line, we took a whole brigade of the enemy at night - 4 miles beyond Fredericksburg, took 9,000 prisoners and 30 pieces of cannon-division surgeon gave me some medicine for fever, read came in wounded in the arm, hospital packed up and moved, lay in the road all day until dark. [May 29th] our division went out with Gregg's cavalry to support them on a scout - 17 miles from Richmond - Rebs tried to shell our train-fighting all day - our division engaged, some wounded and some legs amputated - our regiment escaped - cut to pieces - Foster and Ben Breed killed -  a good many wounded everything [in hospital] filled-sent all of the wounded in the morning to White House Landing. [June 5th] Sharpshooters shooting at us all day - our regiment relieved from the front line - really made a charge at 8 PM - we sent in a flag of truce to bury the dead, it was accepted - the Rebs and our men on top of the rifle pits talking with each other, exchanging papers - then picket fire commenced. [June 19th] marched across the Appomattox, Sergt. Glass Company A killed in the pit, Lt. Hoyt shot in the mouth - killed instantly. [June 22nd] the whole army commenced fighting with skirmishing til night - then moved through the brush and woods - formed a second line of battle on the left of the 2nd Corps - threw breastworks in the front line, heavy cannonading on the right - tore up a mile of the track on the Petersburg RR. [July 12th] skirmishing commenced 6 AM - our brigade went on the right and made a charge, drove the Rebs a half a mile, had a hot fight, lost 5 killed - hung a deserter in the 1st Division - thermometer 93 degrees in the shade, men fell dead all along the road - ambulances full. [Aug. 14th] cavalry skirmishing along the other side, drove the Rebs beyond Strasburg - sharp skirmishing on the left - army started on retreat on the pike towards Winchester, no rations at all -lived on green corn and apples. [Aug. 29th] Rebs drove our cavalry at 3 PM, they got reinforced and went out again at 6 PM, Monroe from Company C got his arm knocked off by a shell - we found the Rebs in force on Oppequan Creek. [Sept. 19th] moved out on the pike towards Winchester - made a charge the whole length of the line - drove them about a mile - charged them again about 3 PM and drove them straight through Winchester - a complete rout - we lost about 40 men - crossed Cedar Creek - the enemy retreated before us - 3 men in our regiment wounded, fight til night. [Sept. 22nd] made a charge at 5 PM the whole line drove everything before us, took 22 pieces of cannon and a pile of prisoners, drove them all night to Woodstock - burnt the enemy's hospital - drove the enemy a mile beyond New Market - burnt them - drove our whole line a Mile - we drove them back across the creek, Major Brower killed - I went and buried Charles Williams - had the corps reviewed by General Sherman. [Sept. 25th] some artillery firing on left at a great distance. [Sept. 30th] burned all hay and grain from Staunton to Harrisonburg. [Oct. 19th] Rebs made a charge on the 8th Corps, drove a hole in our line...much more. The 122 NVY was recruited in the county of Onondaga, rendezvoused at Syracuse and was there mustered into the U.S. service for three years on Aug. 28, 1862. It was under fire for the first time at Antietam, but sustained no losses. In the 1st brigade of Newton's (3d) division, same corps, it was slightly engaged at Fredericksburg, where a few men were wounded. It was engaged on the same field again, in May, 1863, in the battle of Marye's Heights, when the divisions of Newton and Howe carried the heights at the point of the bayonet. At Gettysburg, it went into action with Shaler's Brigade as a support to the 12th corps and sustained a loss of 44 killed, wounded and missing. It was sharply engaged in November at Rappahannock Station, when the 6th corps successfully stormed the enemy's entrenchments, losing 13 killed and wounded in the battle. It then engaged in the Mine Run campaign, and during Jan. and Feb., 1864, it was stationed on Johnson's Island in Lake Erie, rejoining its corps in march, when Shaler's brigade (1st), was assigned to Wright's (1st) division. It encountered the hardest fighting of its experience at the Wilderness, where it lost 119 killed, wounded and missing. At Spotsylvania its losses were 24 wounded and missing, and at Cold Harbor 67 killed and wounded. After taking part in the early assaults on Petersburg in June, it accompanied the veteran 6th corps to Washington, at the time Early threatened the capital. In the 3rd brigade, 2nd division, it was there active at Fort Stevens, joined in the pursuit of Early into Virginia and up the Shenandoah Valley, fighting at Charlestown, the Opequan, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek. Its losses from July 12 to Oct. 30, 1864, aggregated 110 killed and wounded. On Dec. 12, 1864, it was back in the trenches before Petersburg and established its winter quarters near the Weldon railroad. It was actively engaged at Petersburg with the 6th and 2nd corps, when the Confederates attacked Fort Stedman, losing 16 killed and wounded, and closed its active service with the Appomattox campaign, when it was active at the final assault on Petersburg. April 2, 1865, and at Sailor's Creek, where it fought its last battle. Maj. Jabez M. Brower was among the killed at Cedar Creek and Col. Augustus W. Dwight was killed in the action at Fort Stedman. the regiment commanded by Col. Walpole was mustered out near Washington, June 23, 1865. During its term of service it lost by death 6 officers and 86 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded; 3 officers and 85 enlisted men by disease and other causes, a total of 180. Accompanying this diary is a complete transcript of the diary by day as well as copies of his enlistment, discharge, and other papers regarding his record in the Union Army. The diary is written in pencil [as most are] that is not difficult to read, some age tone here and there. A great diary involving many 1864 campaign. This diary had been offered previously by another major dealer at $3,750, we think quite reasonable at our asking price of............................................................................$2,500.00

8012 - 3RD PENNSYLVANIA ARTILLERY, 12" X 22", hand-lined in red and black ink, December 1864. A large listing of articles transferred to officers at Camp Cadwalader in the month of December 1864 and signed by Lt. George P. Kimball, 3rd Penn. Artillery, AAQM includes all sorts of clothing, great coats, woolen blankets, canteens, forage caps, sergeant scales, jackets, etc. Near mint condition and a scarce unit.......................................$85.00

8013 - 14TH OHIO INFANTRY COMPANY I MUSTER OUT ROLL, Huge printed form and filled-in muster roll of dozens of men from Company I commanded by Captains William B. Pugh and J. W. McCabe until September 1864. Dozens of soldiers are listed, some KIA, some wounded, some died of disease, some prisoners, etc. Many were wounded at Chickamauga. This fine document measures 22" X 33" and is excellent condition for muster rolls as they are mostly torn and repaired due to their size. Organized for three months service April, 1861, and for three years on August 16th, 1861, by Col. James B. Steedman. The regiment was raised in the Toledo area. It served in West Virginia and in August 1861 transferred to Kentucky. It did good service in Tennessee and then participated in the battle of Chickamauga. Later it fought at Mission Ridge and the Atlanta campaign, doing good service at Jonesboro. It went with Sherman on the march to the Sea and the Carolina campaigns and mustered out of the service on the 11th day of July 1865. This document shows it was examined on July 6th, 1865 most probably at Louisville where the unit was mustered out of service. Excellent condition.............................................$125.00

8014 - A BRITISH AUTHOR GETS A PASS TO TRAVEL INTO VIRGINIA, Headquarters, Military District of Washington, November 15th, 1862, 6" X 8" manuscript pass on stationary mentioned previously allowing Lt. Colonel Malet [British Service] to pass and Bridge and Ferry to and from Virginia until further notice. This was Charles St. Lo Malet author of the book "An Errand to the South in the Summer of 1862." Over the command of Brig. General Wadsworth Military Governor of the District of Washington and signed by his Aide-de-Camp, Captain Henry B. Todd who was later the provost marshal of the Old Capital Prison in Washington and a member of the Lincoln Cavalry. A unique and scarce document issued to one of the few British observers to McClellan's Army. Very fine...................................$150.00

8017 - 2ND IOWA INFANTRY, CHASING JOHNSTON IN NORTH CAROLINA WITH SHERMAN, BATTLE OF BENTONVILLE, NC, March 27th, [1865], 3 page letter in ink to his father by William C. Holden, 2nd Iowa Infantry. He relates in part, "We arrived here on the 24th and found Schofield's and Terry's forces here and communications open. I wrote you from Fayetteville giving you a brief description of our march through South Carolina. I would continue it tonight if I had any decent place to write. I am seated on the ground and it is rather chilly. We moved on from Fayetteville to [Bennettsville] Bentonville, 23 miles northwest of Goldsboro and met the combined armies of the South under Johnston and defeated them bringing our campaign to a successful termination. We have gone to camp to rest and get clothing and supplies preparatory to another campaign. Our next campaign doubtless will be against Richmond and it will cause the so called Confederacy to tumble to the ground. We want to keep it rolling. There are between 80,000 and 90,000 men concentrated here. The cars are running to Newbern and it is reported we will move within 12 days...address letters to Goldsboro, NC. Will. C. Holden." The soldiers of the 2nd Iowa Infantry Regiment enlisted for three-year terms, with many soldiers fighting until the end of the war. Samuel Curtis was a leader in this unit. Highlights of the service of this regiment include distinguished actions at the Battle of Fort Donelson and at the Battle of Shiloh, where about 80 members of the regiment were casualties, either dead or wounded. The regiment fought in the subsequent Battle of Corinth and later in the Atlanta Campaign, including at the Battle of Atlanta, continuing on to South Carolina and to Goldsboro, North Carolina, in the Carolinas Campaign. With the surrender of the Confederate States Army under Joseph E. Johnston, the 2nd Iowa traveled to Washington, D.C., for the Grand Review of the Armies of the Union on May 23 -24, 1865. The regiment was mustered out on July 12, 1865 and discharged at Davenport, Iowa on July 20, 1865. Fine.................................................SOLD

8018 - 2ND IOWA INFANTRY, JOHNSTON HAS AMASSED A LARGE ARMY BEFORE US4 page letter in ink with a stamped cover by William C. Holden, 2nd Iowa Infantry, April 5th, 1865, Goldsboro, NC. He relates to his father in part, "We raised a Union flag in Savannah, MO in July 1861 [where his father is now], been long since he had heard any Missouri news, we are getting pretty well fitted up again and are expecting orders to march any day, we have fortified this place very strongly and I suppose it will be held as a base during our operations against Raleigh. Johnston has collected a large army in our front in fact he has everything this side f the Mississippi outside of Lee's army and it is fair to suppose he will fight a heavy battle ere he may quietly leave Raleigh but he will be defeated by this army wherever and whenever he chooses to meet it in battle. We are expecting good news from Grant every day as it has been currently reported that he made another flank move and got possession of the Danville Railroad. I see by the Richmond papers that they claim victories over Sherman at Bentonville and Averysboro. Well we are willing that they shall have as many victories as those they may desire. We drove them from their entrenched positions and made them leave their dead and wounded on the field. Will. C. Holden." The soldiers of the 2nd Iowa Infantry Regiment enlisted for three-year terms, with many soldiers fighting until the end of the war. Samuel Curtis was a leader in this unit. Highlights of the service of this regiment include distinguished actions at the Battle of Fort Donelson and at the Battle of Shiloh, where about 80 members of the regiment were casualties, either dead or wounded. The regiment fought in the subsequent Battle of Corinth and later in the Atlanta Campaign, including at the Battle of Atlanta, continuing on to South Carolina and to Goldsboro, NC, in the Carolinas Campaign. With the surrender of the Confederate States Army under Joseph E. Johnston, the 2nd Iowa traveled to Washington, D.C., for the Grand Review of the Armies of the Union on May 23 - 24, 1865. The regiment was mustered out on July 12, 1865 and discharged at Davenport, Iowa on July 20, 1865. 2 items, letter and postal cover............................................................SOLD


BVT. GENERAL CLARKE S. EDWARDS, COLONEL OF THE 5TH MAINE INFANTRY

The Fifth Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was one of the first Maine regiments to be mustered in. The regiment consisted of 1046 men (another 500 joined later) from southern and central Maine. Three of the ten companies in the regiment were composed of men from Portland, thus earning the regiment the nickname the Forest City Regiment. (Portland was known as the Forest City). The men left Portland by train in July 1861, stopping briefly in New York where they were presented with a silk flag by Portlanders living in that area. Upon arriving in Washington, the regiment was assigned to the Sixth Corps of the Army of the Potomac. The Fifth fought in 22 battles from First Bull Run (Manassas) to Petersburg. During the battle of Rappahannock Station, the regiment is credited with capturing 4 Confederate battle flags and 1200 prisoners (several of them officers). The Fifth was known as one of Maine's fighting regiments. It captured more prisoners than the number of men who served in the regiment and three times the number of battle flags than any other Maine regiment captured. After three long years only 193 men were mustered out in July 1864. The rest had been killed in action, died from disease, wounded, deserted, or transferred to other regiments. When news of the attack on Fort Sumter reached the small town of Bethel, Maine, Clark S. Edwards was high on a ladder shingling his roof. He immediately climbed down, obtained permission from the appropriate authorities to form a company of men, and set out to gather recruits from Bethel and the surrounding towns. This group became Company I, Fifth Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry with Edwards as its Captain. He rose through the ranks and was appointed Colonel of the regiment following the resignation of Colonel E. A. Scammon in January 1863. He then commanded that regiment from January 1863 until the end of the war. The battles that Edwards commanded the 5th Maine after January 1863.

Chancellorsville

May 2 & 3, 1863

Gettysburg

July 1, 2 & 3, 1863

Rappahannock Station

November 7, 1863

Rapidan Crossing

November 8, 1863

Orange Grove

November 27, 1863

Mine Run

November 29, 1863

The Wilderness

May 5, 1864

Spotsylvania

May 10, 11 & 12, 1864

Cold Harbor

June 1, 1864

Petersburg

June 19-22, 1864

Edwards Archive 1861 - 62

51600 - THEY ARRIVE NEAR WASHINGTON BEFORE BULLS RUN, Monday, July 8th, 1861. Two page letter in pencil from Captain Clark Edwards to his wife [later Colonel of the 5th Maine], no place but in Virginia near Alexandria. He relates in part, a short but newsy note by Edwards mentioning getting paid in Washington and sending money back home as quick as he can, mentions a man shot in a regiment joining them last night, they are near Washington, C. S. Edwards to his wife, [Edwards later becomes the regimental Colonel and later Bvt. General].............................................$65.00

51601 - REGIMENTS ARRIVE IN PREPARATIONS FOR THE FIGHT UPCOMING AT BULLS RUN, Meridian Hill, VA, July 8th, 1861. Two page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards later Colonel of the 5th Maine. He relates in part to her, "I leave here tonight for Falls Church below Alexandria, you will get a good report from me as soon as I get a chance to have a fight and do not get killed, the regiments is in confusion, the 4th Maine is now taking down their tents, more on breaking camp, can't write any more, kiss the children for me."  Edwards abruptly ends the letter without signing but it comes with a postal cover with a partial stamp that Edwards addresses to his wife in Bristol, Maine.....................................$85.00

51602 - ELLSWORTH'S ZOUAVES ARE CAMPED NEAR US, Alexandria, VA, July 10th, 1861, Aqua Springs, Headquarters Co. J, 5th Maine, 4 pages in ink 8" X 10", by Capt. Clark Edwards, 5th Maine, to his wife. He relates in part, "We set our camps on Meridian Hill, came here across the Potomac from Washington on a government boat, near Arlington Heights. Alexandria is an old looking place and is deserted ever since Colonel Ellsworth was killed, his Zouaves are in camp a few rods from our quarters and they have built a fort near us and it is a hard looking place, I passed the house where Ellsworth was killed, the Mass. 5th is about a mile from us, a man got his arms shot off by an accident in camp, we will go to Richmond and fight soon, we have moved near Fairfax Courthouse where there are 15,000 men................................................$100.00

51605 - A WOMAN SURPRISES HER SOLDIER HUSBAND IN CAMP, Claremont, VA, August 9th, 1861, 4 large pages in ink with a postal cover [partial stamp] addressed to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, later Colonel of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, "left camp, been on guard duty, purchases green corn, peaches, apples, coffee, the government owes him $200, gives an emotional account of the surprise visit from a woman from Lewiston, Maine to her husband at camp, he stood like a ghost at the door of his tent when he saw her and they embraced, the Quartermaster gave up his tent to them, much more about affairs in camp as the 5th Maine was camped near Washington after the Battle of Bulls Run. Letter and cover..............................................$85.00

51606 - THE REGIMENTAL SURGEON HAS JUST RETURNED FROM VISITING THE PRISONERS AT RICHMOND, Near Fort Ellsworth [near Alexandria], August 14th, 1861, 4 large pages in ink by Captain Clark Edwards 5th Maine [later Colonel of the regiment], to his wife. He relates in part, "We expected a fight with the Rebels Sunday night but it did not occur, I don't think there are any Rebels this side of Fairfax, they have 25,000 men near Fairfax, I stopped at the old ground [Bulls Run battlefield] with several of my company. We will move to Fort Ellsworth and join a new brigade, he mentions that the Surgeon has returned from Richmond and reports on wounded men there, mentions a prisoner there who will soon be released, states that the Rebels were beaten at Bulls Run and lost twice the number of men than the Union forces, he feels there will be no more fighting that Fall and they will stay at Fort Ellsworth, we went to a house where the owner is in the Rebel army and plunder it to get some of the items we lost at Bulls Run but I don't like stealing, just found out we will move again tomorrow, that makes six times we have moved since the fight at Bulls Run, much more by Edwards..." included is the postal cover stamp removed addressed to his wife [another autograph]............................................$120.00

51607 - SOLDIERS THOUGHT DEAD TURN UP IN A RICHMOND PRISON, Headquarters of Company L, near Alexandria, VA [5th Maine], August 17th, 1861, 4 large pages in ink from Captain Clark S. Edwards later Colonel of the 5th Maine to his wife. He relates in part, "he has opened a letter from a prisoner in Richmond, good news, mentions several soldiers were prisoners at Richmond and one has the freedom to walk around town as he works for an officer [obviously a Confederate officer], the first word on Marshall was that Marshall had been killed at Bulls run but you can tell his mother that he is a prisoner in Richmond but he will probably stay there quite a while unless he escapes ass our government does not recognize them as a separate confederacy [no prison exchanges in sight]. Mentions signing a discharge or a soldier who was not in the fight at Bulls Run, much more about their camp and men in his company, a very long and newsy letter." News arrives about some friends thought dead now in Confederate prisons in Richmond, excellent letter, very good...................................................SOLD

51608 - THE 5TH MAINE AWAITS NEW RECRUITS TO REPLACE MISSING MEN FROM BULLS RUN, Camp Vernon, near Alexandria, VA, August 20th, 1861, 4 large pages in ink to his wife from Captain Clark S. Edwards, later Colonel of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, "It will three or four weeks to get some recruits to fill our ranks, would ask for a furlough if I did not fear an attack here and you would know what would be said if that happens, much more on the camp affairs, mentions his servant "Jimmie", news about camp mates, news from home. A very newsy letter written at Camp Vernon which was a short distance away from Mount Vernon." Edwards' regiment is awaiting new recruits to replace the missing at Bulls Run due to injury, death, capture, or desertion...........................................$95.00

51609 - HE WAS IN REACH OF THE CANNONS IN BATTLE, Headquarters, Camp Vernon, Alexandria, VA, August 25th, 1861, 12 page letter in ink from Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine, later Colonel of the regiment to his wife. He relates in part, "do not worry about my safety as the same God that governs the universe takes care of me in battle, mentions a friend in camp who is ill and is failing very fast, does not expect a battle again in the near future, mentions a soldier who was in reach of the cannons at Bulls Run and braved the musket balls for nearly two hours, says that "Jimmy" his servant is getting his supper, a report came that the Rebels were near and the camp came to arms, describes the scene on the nearby Potomac, the steamers passing at all hours, the many acres of trees cut down to make fortifications, much more about affairs in the regiment, officers, tent mates." A very long 12 page letter in ink by soon to be Colonel Edmonds of the 5th Maine. Accompanied by a postal cover addressed to his wife by Edmonds, stamp cut out......................................................SOLD

51610 - THE BOYS ARE NOT BACK FROM RICHMOND YET, Camp Vernon near Alexandria, VA, August 30th, 1861, 8 large pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine, later the Colonel of the regiment. He relates in part, "The Lt. I visited at the Washington hospital is getting better, I have worked on his furlough, his servant Jimmy" wants to go home with him to Bethel, the7th Maine is stopping at Baltimore, none of the boys [prisoners] have gotten back from Richmond yet, we have gotten news of Ben Butler's victory in North Carolina, the news will help get the boys spirits up and wipe out the Bulls Run affair. A very long and detailed letter about affairs in camp, traveling to Washington, other officers." Accompanying the letter is the postal cover Edwards addressed to his wife with the stamp removed, two autographs......................$100.00

51611 - SENDING A FLAG HOME TO MAINE, Camp Vernon, September 6th, 1861, four page letter in ink by Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine to his wife.  He relates in part, "We are in the brigade with the 16th, 26th, and 27th NY under Colonel Davies, will be able to send $200 home, had been out on picket last night in the rain, mentions sending a flag home ]possibly a captured Confederate flag]. Much more news about the camp, commanders, more on the brigade, comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed, two items....................................................$85.00

51614 - HIS SERVANT JIMMY TAKES CARE OF HIM LIKE AN OLD BETTY, Mount Eagle, September 22nd, 1861, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol., written near Washington, DC. He relates in part, he has sent $300 home to his wife with Lt. Walker who is returning home after an illness, mentions a soldier who wanted to stay in the hospital but the nurses felt he was well enough as he ate four men's rations, they don't have much charity for him. The trouble in the regiment quieted down after Jackson came [Colonel]. We may have a battle within twenty-four hours and then possibly not. It is hard telling. Describes his servant "Jimmy" as an old Betty in taking excellent care of him. He does not need any instructions in regard to me. Very interesting commentary about Edwards' servant Jimmy who watches over him like a mother hen or "Old Betty", comes with a cover with the stamp removed addressed by Edwards to his wife, two items..............................................................SOLD

51615 - THE REBELS ABANDON MUNSON HILL AND FLEE, Mount Eagle, [VA], September 29th, 1861, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol.  He writes in part, he wants to know if the $2000 in gold and the $1000in notes was delivered to her by a friend returning home. he instructs her to save it until he is out. One brigade took Munson Hill Yesterday. We expected an attack last night but it did not come. But when the Rebels fled Munson Hill yesterday they fled towards either Aquiline Creek or Richmond. They bled like so many sheep. They will not stand in an open fight. When we finish the fort it will be impossible for the Rebels to get in here. Rumors are we may go to Missouri, he mentions the names of several sick soldiers from the company getting discharged, much more...included is a stamped cover addressed by Edwards to his wife, some stamp damage, Alexandria, VA PM................................................SOLD

51616 - HE WILL SOON SEND HIS PICTURE HOME, Mount Eagle, VA, October 1st, 1861, 4 large pages in ink to his wife from Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, I have been out on picket again, and am the officer of the day, notes that the supplies sent all arrived safe except one bottle that broke, the bread was molded so it was thrown away but the cakes and pies were fine. Much about affairs in camp as he is off duty for the first time in three weeks, wants his wife to write three times a week, he will have his picture made and send, he has not shaved since he arrived in Virginia..............................$75.00

51617 - JIMMY HIS SERVANT IS COOKING DUCK AND CHICKEN FOR DINNER, SEVEN SLAVES HAVE COME INTO CAMP, Mount Eagle, VA, October 10th, 1861, 4 large pages in ink to his wife from Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, have just returned from picket, am field officer of the day. He is Senior Captain of the regiment and much work thus falls upon him. He is well pleased on her report about the children, some men have the jaundice. He wants her to send him a bottle of Atwood Bitters. Jimmy [his servant] is making supper of a duck and chicken they had gotten while out on picket. We expect to move soon but not far. I just saw seven slaves come into camp and that number more or less come into camp every day. Edwards reports on an uneventful day in camp near Washington and mentions his colored servant making dinner and a gang of slaves arriving in amp. By this time more contraband slaves were leaving the plantations and finding refuge and food in Union camps, good content, comes with an addressed cover with the stamp removed where Edwards addresses it to his wife, 2 items..........................................SOLD

51618 - WE ARE SURROUNDED BY A HUGE ARMY OF NEAR 75,000 MEN, Wednesday Noon, October 16th, 1861, [Near Mount Eagle, VA], 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We left our beautiful encampment Monday and arrived at this muddy hole, set some tents for the night and in the morning set up the others. We have two new tents for the officers. I could have my own but do not want to, will have a carpet in mine soon, we are still near Alexandria and Washington. We are surrounded by a very large army of 50,000 - 75,000 men and two large forts. We are still in General Slocum's brigade and in General Franklin's Division. We are on the verge of a great battle. i do not think there will be a fight on the Potomac. I have spent too many sleepless nights expecting a fight. He requests some Atwood Bitters for the jaundice as some of the men have that problem, wants news from home as much of it as she can write about, much more. A stamped postal cover postmarked Alexandria accompanies the letter. Edwards had addressed the cover to his wife, ALS and cover.......................SOLD

51619 - THEY STOP AT THE BATTLE SITE OF MUNSON HILL, Camp at Picket, October 22nd, 1861, near Manson Hill, VA, 4 pages in ink and completed in pencil to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are about six miles from camp on picket and Company I is on the ground where some two or three were killed and 15-20 wounded. I am writing in an old house that was deserted by the owner. The inhabitants have left this part of the country and the houses have been stripped of everything of value. I was in a house that there was over a thousand dollars of destroyed furniture. So goes where they army goes. He describes the scavenging of the soldiers, found a bee hive with honey, shot a 200 pound pig, found potatoes, onions. He mentions that a Leslie's artist yesterday had sketched some of the boys leading off a pig. He continues to write in pencil he states on an old table in the middle of a field about the position of the different companies that he has posted in various places, discusses the fruits of the boy's labor yesterday with the pig and other items they found. A very interesting letter written in the field six miles from their main camp mentioning famous Munson Hill where the Confederates held the high ground for months. This all changed during the night of September 28, 1861. The Confederate Army silently withdrew from Falls Church and Munson's Mason's and Upton's hills, and retreated to Centreville, which they fortified. The Union Army, to its extreme embarrassment, discovered the fearsome-looking cannon to be "Quaker guns" - logs painted black. The army was the subject of ridicule throughout the North, where confounded citizens pondered how their army was kept at bay for two months with nothing more than what Mother Nature grew in her own foundry.......................SOLD

51620 - WHILE ON PICKET THE BOYS STOLE PIGS AND HONEY FROM A SECESH HOUSE, Friday, October 25th, 1861, [near Camp near Washington], 4 page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Infantry. He relates in part, Just came in from picket where the boys stole geese, honey, and pigs all belonging to the Secesh. It is very cold here as I will need a stove as it is as cold as Maine, gave away honey this morning, took about 75 pounds out of a hive, I am now field officer with lots to do. All is quiet in camp this morning, mentions not much has happened since Bulls Run......................$85.00

51621 - A FIEND WANTS TO BE A SUTLER, THE NEW YORK TROOPS ARE PLAYING BALL [BASEBALL], Camp Franklin, Sunday Afternoon, October 27th, 1861 [in Virginia], 4 large pages to his wife from Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, He details his job as field Officer in inspecting the different camps of the Brigade, how they are lined up on his arrival, he describes a friend named Chas who wants to be a regimental Sutler. It is a well paying job and you double up on everything you sell. I can see a New York Regiment playing ball. It does not seem like a New England Sunday. The men are washing clothes, cooking, lounging around, some drinking, others playing games [cards/dice]. There are good and bad men in the army. The weather is very cold, frost on the ground, quite cold in our tents. he will send money home as he does not want to keep that much there were him and he is getting paid again soon. A very detailed letter on becoming a regimental Sutler in the Army and a very early comment on the New York troops playing baseball in camp. Comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards postmarked Alexandria, VA..........................................$125.00

51622 - JIMMY HIS SERVANT DOES THE BEST HE CAN IN THE ABSENCE OF A WOMAN TO TAKE CARE OF HIM, Wednesday evening, November 6th, 1861, 8 page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Infantry.  He relates in part, It is cold and rainy in camp, bought a pair of new boots for $65 that he could have bought in Maine for $5,00, it costs a lot to live in camp and have no woman to wash or mend clothing, "Jimmy" his servant does the best he can. He relates about a soldier who went home on furlough feigning illness who has been absent from the Company since August 1st. The Colonel does not want him back neither do other members of the company. he will send home $200 once he pays some borrowed money he owes. Come with a stamped cover [stamp impaired] postmarked Alexandria, VA by Edwards to his wife................................$95.00

51624 - MCCLELLAN AND OLD ABE WILL ATTEND THE GRAND REVIEW, Tuesday Evening, November 12th, 1861, 4 pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Infantry. He relates in part, he has a small stove in the tent which they can cook on, will make some mince pies, discusses a officer who has been gone from the company for months that is shirking his duty, describes the regimental bands playing, the 5th Maine beat them all, four bands went into the camp of the 26th NY and serenaded Colonel Christian as he left for Penn. to get married. We will have a great review, McClellan and OLD ABE WILL BE HERE, WE WILL HAVE A GRAND REVIEW OF THE WHOLE DIVISION, WE EXPECT 12,000 - 20.000 TROOPS HERE, states that the officer who has been away for months is returning but may not have a place anymore. The letter comes with a stamped postal cover postmarked Washington addressed by Edwards to his wife, good content..........................................SOLD

51626 - HIS COMPANY WAS THE BEST IN THE REGIMENT AT THE GRAND REVIEW, Monday Morning [November 22nd, 1861], two page letter in ink from Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine to his wife. He relates in part, It is very cold with snow on the ground the citizens here say the cold weather follows the "Yankee". he repeats the accolades that were given to his regiment after the Grand Review. "Slocum's Brigade was the best in the army, the 5th Maine was the best in the Brigade, and his company I was the best in the regiment, describes the cost of milk and butter in camp, will send more money soon home." Letter comes with a cover addressed by Edwards to his wife with the stamp removed....................................................$80.00

51627 - HE WILL GO TO WASHINGTON TO HEAR THE PRESIDENT ADDRESS CONGRESS, Wednesday Evening, November 27th, 1861, 4 page letter to his wife in red ink with a short one page attachment by Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, it is very cold, been out on picket for the first time in a while, I plan to go to Washington when Congress convenes and hear the President's message, John and I plan to go on Monday. John is playing chess with Lt. Packard of Company K, Jimmy is looking at them play [his servant], more on his anticipated visit home to Maine. An attached note informs his wife that he is in command of the Regiment while the Colonel is gone. The letter comes with a stamped postal cover to his wife addressed by Edwards postmarked Washington, three items....................................................$95.00

51629 - HE MISSES THE PRESIDENT ADDRESSING CONGRESS, THE SUTLER IS LEAVING CAMP, Wednesday evening, December 4th, 1861, 4 large pages i ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He went to Washington to hear the President but he did not speak that day, went to a boarding house with a friend and went to the theater, then went to the National Hotel for the night at a cost of $1. We returned to camp the next day. He describes the winter quarters using logs up about three feet being the base of the tents. Mentions that the Bartlett's will soon leave camp [Sutlers] as they have made a great deal of money over the summer selling goods and have a very good trade. Wishes his friend Chas could get the post [Sutler] but another young man is in line for the position. A beautiful morning it is as I have just come in from dress parade.................................................$110.00

51630 - A YANK ENTERS THE CONFEDERATE ARMY AFTER MARRYING A SECESH GIRL, Camp of the 5th Maine Vol., Near White Oak Church, VA, January 9th, 1862, 4 large 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife from Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, Mentions his recent fall from his horse with a minor injury, he knows the children are disappointed that he has not come home, mentions somebody has gone into the Confederate army and has taken a Secesh wife. Mentions that the Surgeon has resigned as well as several other officers in the regiment but several have withdrawn their papers, much more on the affairs in the camp, a very newsy letter. The long letter comes with a postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards postmarked Washington with a DUE 3 stamp applied, two items.............................................$95.00

51631 - WHITE OAK CHURCH, VIRGINIA, Headquarters, 5th Maine Vol., near White Oak Church, January 10th, 1862, six pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards. He relates in part, Captain Walker is dead set about getting the position of Major. The armies of the west have not done a thing since last Spring till the last fight, much about members in his company, several ill, one in Washington, one working on the ambulance train. Includes a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp impaired, 2 items..................$85.00

51632 - HAS LOST A MAN IN THE COMPANY AND HIS BODY SENT HOME, Camp Franklin [VA], January 20th, 1862, 1 large page in ink, to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, Got back to camp and found many sick, poor Dolloff is dead, his body has been sent back home to Gorham and I am sure youhave heard about it. He died last Thursday. He describes his trip back to Virginia via boat through Washington and Alexandria. The weather is very rainy and the mud is knee deep. Have to go on picket so I can't write much more. A postal cover addressed to his wife is addressed by Edwards, stamp has been removed...............................................$85.00

51633 - AN OFFICER IS BLOCKED FOR PROMOTION WILL RESIGN, Leesburg Turnpike, VA, January 22nd, 1862, 3 large pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine Infantry. He relates in part, He mentions an officer who will be blocked in his promotion and has submitted his resignation, have been out on picket, upon my return have found many in the regiment sick including the Colonel in bed, will soon go to Washington to get my pay, the mud is awful, it cost much to return to Virginia, much more on camp affairs. Included is a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edward, stamp impaired......................................................$85.00

51638 - A FATHER GIVES ADVISE TO HIS CHILDREN, Camp Franklin, VA, March 30th, 1862, a two page letter in ink to his children from Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Infantry. He relates in part, It is a great comfort to me to receive a letter from your mother that you are good children. Kate, I am very glad to hear that you are going to school and doing well this spring. I shall find a boy for you in camp if you do not find one before that time. Do you follow at the meeting [religious meeting] as I had expected you to get religion before this time. Frank I am glad to hear that you are learning well. Be good and do not quarrel with your sisters. Quite an unusual letter where Edwards is offering to arrange a suitor for his daughter Kate from his camp if she does not find a suitor beforehand...............................................$75.00

51639 - THE BAND OF THE 5TH MAINE CAN BEAT THEM ALL, Camp Franklin, VA, April 1st, 1862, 4 page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are the only corps left in camp, 40,000 men here, will send you $5.00 and a $5,00 Confederate script, mentions an officer back at home with his beautiful wife, the Surgeon is again back in camp, he does not "trouble the women" but attends to his own business. He can hear the bands playing but the band of the 5th Maine is the best. The letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, some impairment to stamp, DUE 3 stamp, Williamsport, MD. Cancellation, 2 items....................................$89.00

51640 - ALL THE DEAD ANIMALS WILL BREED CHOLORA OR SOMETHING WORSE, Camp Franklin, VA, April 3rd, 1862, 8 page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, Mentions a solider who has been absent and will probably be court martialed, several more of the company have gone to Philadelphia to the hospitals, it is warm here but the farmers have done little to plant yet, will send money home, we are always ready to move out, 10,000 men of Sumner's Division that were in Alexandria are ready to embark, wants to leave there as there are so many dead animals in the ground that will certain breed the cholera or something worse. The letter comes with a cover with the stamp cut out noted MISENT addressed to his wife by Edwards.....................................................$89.00

51641 - LEAVING FOR THE RAPPAHANNOCK RIVER AND A FIGHT, Friday Morning, 4th (April 4th, 1862), two page letter in ink to his wife from Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine, Vol. He relates in part, 6 AM, just came into amp a few moments ago to march at 10 o'clock, the boys are all excited to move, I think we will be going by railroad to Washington on the Alexandria RR near the Rappahannock River and will see a little fight in a day or two, we will head to Manassas and on the Warrenton and then over the Rappahannock and into a fight. I wish I could say good by to you face to face, good by to you and all my friends...........................................$85.00

51642 - HEADING FOR GORDONSVILLE AND A BIG FIGHT, Fauquier County, VA, Catlett Station, April 10th, 1862, 4 page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We left Manassas Monday and arrived here, rained and snowed, a foot of mud in camp, my feet have not been dry in a week, we are 40 miles from Alexandria on the Alexandria & Orange Railroad, we will stay here for a day or two and then move towards Gordonsville where we expect a big fight. Much more on other officers, the lay of the land............................................SOLD

51643 - WE WILL MOVE TOWARDS YORKTOWN, Camp Franklin, VA, April 15th, 1862, 3 pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are expected to down the river tomorrow to Yorktown for the great battle, I am officer of the day and am having a hard time today as they are so many drunk. Saw a friend in a a fort near Falls Church. I am well but having a hard time getting over my march from Catlett Station, later Clark. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards with the stamp removed, 2 items...............................................$89.00

51647 - YORKTOWN IS TAKEN, DEAD LOUISIANA SOLDIERS ARE BURIED NEAR OUR CAMP, On board the Steamer John Brooks, Sunday Afternoon, May 4th, 1862 [near Yorktown, VA], by Captain Clark S. Edwards to his wife [5th Maine], 4 large pages in ink. He relates in part, we are back on the ship after leaving the ship and pitching tents on shore. The Rebels have left Yorktown. We leave in a few minutes possible up the York River in the pursuit of the devils. The guns kept me awake most of the night. They were two miles away and I could see the flash of the cannons and the shells burst. It was a continual fire all night. On shore around a fence were the remains of 9 of the LA soldiers that belonged to, 5 of them belonged to Company I of the 14th Regiment. There was a plain white board with their names on it. By the description I see they all died in January or February. I just heard that our army took 9000 prisoners at at Yorktown; we hear that Norfolk is taken but I don't believe that, we still have General Slocum with us and we are in Franklin's Division. We are now in possession of Yorktown with a large amount of cannon and ammunition must make the mail before it leave for Fortress Monroe. An excellent letter by Edwards detailing his observations of the attack and capture of Yorktown, VA...............................SOLD

51648 - WE MARCH WITHIN 25 MILES OF RICHMOND, OUR CAVALRY DROVE THE REBELS OFF, Cumberland, New Kent County, VA, May 14th, 1862, 8 pages in ink from Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine, to his wife. He relates in part, We are camped in a large field near Pamunkey River about three miles from the New Kent Courthouse and about 25 miles from Richmond. It was a hared and hot march with the boys all loaded down with overcoats, blankets, clothing, and rations making their load near 50 pounds. Our cavalry had a little brush with the enemy but drove them away, am in a huge corn field, there are 80,000 troops here, I send you $60 by express en route, sending her a book he found in an old Negro hut on the property of a man in the Rebel army. They [Rebels] destroyed things in our path. I have heard that we will move towards Richmond in the morning and expect a great fight at Chickahoming Swamp as the Rebels have made a stand there. The boys have had a hard time on this march, poor food. The letter comes with a stamped cover Edwards addresses to his wife, 2 items. The Army of the Potomac pushed slowly up the Pamunkey, establishing supply bases at Eltham's Landing, Cumberland Landing, and White House Landing. White House, the plantation of W. H. F. "Rooney" Lee, son of General Robert E. Lee, became McClellan's base of operations. Using the Richmond and York River Railroad, McClellan could bring his heavy siege artillery to the outskirts of Richmond. He moved slowly and deliberately reacting to faulty intelligence that led him to believe the Confederates outnumbered him significantly. By the end of May, the army had built bridges across the Chickahominy and was facing Richmond, straddling the river, with one third of the Army south of the river, two thirds north. (This disposition, which made it difficult for one part of the army to reinforce the other quickly, would prove to be a significant problem in the upcoming Battle of Seven Pines). On May 18, McClellan reorganized the Army of the Potomac in the field and promoted two major generels to corps command: Fitz John Porter to the new V Corps and William B. Franklin to the VI Corps. The army had 105,000 men in position northeast of the city, outnumbering Johnston's 60,000, but faulty intelligence from the detective Allan Pinkerton on McClellan's staff caused the general to believe that he was outnumbered two to one. Numerous skirmishes between the lines of the armies occurred from May 23 to May 26. Tensions were high in the city, particularly following the earlier sounds of the naval gun battle at Drewry's Bluff........................................SOLD

51656 - A DESERTER GOES TO CANADA, Sunday Morning, August 3rd, 1862, Camp near Harrison's Landing , VA, 4 huge 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, he mentions a soldier from his company who left the hospital there and went home and reports are now he is in Canada. He was not very sick at the time and with his leaving I am satisfied he has deserted. I would not care if his sentence was to be shot as he was a coward. The Major is being promoted to Lt. Colonel but I will not accept a promotion in this regiment to Major under him [Colonel Jackson]. Two Captains have tried to resign and both applications disapproved two times. He thinks the Colonel will be coming back soon and he will be free to go home on furlough via Washington and Alexandria. Much more about the regimental politics, still on Court Martial duty. Lincoln later ordered the army to return to the Washington, DC, area to support Maj. Gen. John Pope's army in the Northern Virginia Campaign and the Second Battle of Bull Run. The 5th Maine for the time being was camped after the Seven Days Campaign just over with. The letter comes with a postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards stamped DUE 3 in lieu of a stamp. 2 items....................................SOLD

51657 - TWO DIE IN THE HOSPITAL, NO COFFINS AVAILABLE, A TEAM TEARS DOWN A BUILDING TO MAKE COFFINS, Camp of the 5th Maine, August 7th, 1862, near Harrison's Landing, VA, 4 huge 8" X 13" pages in ink from Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, The regiment is still out on picket, I am sad to report that I. C. Ayes died of the dysentery as he was much sicker than the doctor thought, there is much sickness in camp, many will have done their last service to this company, we have 15 in the hospital but about 70 unfit for duty in quarters. One out of every five is sick. It is awful that our water is so bad. Ayers will be buried this afternoon. Six have gone to the landing for a coffin but if they find none we will take some rough boards and build a box but hundreds are buried without any. Blankets are wound around them like a winding sheet. He has a wife and three children. He did not drink or use profanity; he will be a great loss to the company. We have marching orders and have been for three days. We had expected a fight but all is now quiet. Six o'clock. The boys could not locate a coffin at the landing. The government is lack in providing boards or coffins for those who die in the hospitals. I had to send a team out and tear down and old building for boards. Since noon another has died by the name of Morgan. Both are to be buried at 7 o'clock. I must close. Both will be buried in our ambulance and buried side by side. I will send ten men home to recruit. The letter comes with a envelope addressed to his wife by Edwards, the stamp had been removed, 2 items.......................................................................SOLD

51658 - CAPTAIN EDWARDS CONTINUES TO COMMAND THE WHOLE REGIMENT WHILE THE RANKING OFFICERS ARE STILL ABSENT FROM CAMP, Camp in the field, Harrison's Landing, VA, Sunday morning, August 10th, 1862, 4 huge 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, I am still here in command with no field officers, [no Colonel or Major] I am faced with taking care of all the sick in camp and the hospital. The weather has been so hot my clothes are wet with sweat; he is sending home men to recruit. We are under marching orders and have been so for some time but I do not think there will be a fight soon. Colonel Jackson is still not back with the regiment. If he does not return to the regiment I may stay in the regiment. We are looking towards a hard time as we will probably go down the river to Fortress Monroe and perhaps it will be another six days fight. I expect our Corps and Division to be in the rear again and have a good part in the fighting. It is about sunset and none of the absent officer has come. If they do not I shall write the Governor and ask to be released from my present position I do not want to fill the place of all the absent officers with a Captain. I shall not stand for it. Edwards is fed up with the absence of all the ranking officers for such an extended period of time being just a Captain. He has a particular dislike for Colonel Jackson who he feels is a poor leader and coward...............................................................SOLD

51659 - THEY MAY GO TO MALVERN HILL, LOOKING FOR A DESERTER IN MAINE AND HOPES THE COWARD IS BROUGHT BACK, Monday Morning, August 11th, 1862, 2 large pages in ink to his wife from Captain Clark s. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, I am sending home $230 for you by a solider, We leave here this afternoon some say we will go to Malvern Hill, some think it is across the country to Yorktown, some say on the south side of the James River, I think it is down the river on this side but we will have to build a pontoon bridge over the Chickahominy, and I presume fight all of the way. He comments about a deserter being chased by a friend back in Maine who had left the company after a stay in a hospital. His name was Henry Pengree. He hopes he will be bought back as he is a great coward and I think a deserter. He was at the hospital when He left so I do not know for certain. I have a great deal on my shoulders as we go into a fight [he is commanding the entire regiment]. The adjacent leave for Maine today and he has not done a thing since the Colonel left but playing sick. Much more. Good content, Edwards continues to command the entire regiment which wis ready to move into action on some unknown front............................................SOLD

51660 - WE HAVE TO MARCH 75 MILES TO YORKTOWN OR WILLIAMSBURG THROUGH HARD COUNTRY, THE 20TH MAINE IS BEING FORMED, THE GOVERNOR WILL PUT A PET IN CHARGE Wednesday Morning, August 13th, 1862, 4 page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are at the old spot and are packed and ready to move and have been for two days, a great number of the troops have gone to transports but our corps has to march to probably Yorktown or Williamsburg. We will have a hard time as it is 7t miles in bad country. The Colonel and the Lt. Colonel and Chaplain came last night but have not come to camp as of yet. Jimmy [his servant] and I are alone as Sim [another servant] left with the sick of the regiment and is on one of the hospital boats. We shall move slow and perhaps will fight our way. I see that the 20th Maine is being raised and formed. I presume the Governor will have some 'pet' put in command of it. If I don't get a position in another Maine regiment I will try my fortune in another state. It will be a long march as the men carry two days rations and the teams carry six. I am again in command of Company I. No company did better at the fight at Gaines Hill than this one. The Colonel and Lt. Col. Addressed the regiment and the Chaplain said a prayer. The Maine papers state Maine is getting up the 20th regiment but I do not expect to be promoted by the Governor. The letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards. While glad to see Colonel Jackson back, Edwards still has distain for him and won't serve as Major under him. He also feels the Governor of Maine is just a political animal and will appoint a pet officer to command the new 20th Maine regiment. Good content.............................................SOLD

51661 - I SHALL RESIGN IF THERE IS NO FIGHT AHEAD, Camp of the 5th Maine in the field near Harrison Landing, August 14th, 1862, two pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, We are still in camp, the Colonel and the Lt. Col. Here help reduce my responsibility. I shall stay here a day or two more. If the regiment moves I shall go with it. I do not think we will leave here soon as the fight of Pope has changed the whole program. I would not like to leave here in front of a fight. The Colonel and Lt. Colonel say I am in line for a promotion in another regiment. I don't see it! If there is no fight I will resign.  The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards with the stamp removed. 2 items. Edwards is fed up with the promises of another commission and threatens to resign and go home unless his regiment id drawn into battle...................SOLD

51662 - A BRIGADE IN OUR DIVISION WAS ALL CAPTURED, HEAR THE CANNON BOOMING, Camp near Alexandria, VA, August 27th, 1862, 8 pages in ink to his wife from Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are in camp, some of the troops have left for the Rappahannock, one brigade left at daylight and we expect to leave soon, possibly Manassas or Catlett Station. I can hear the booming of the cannon at this moment but it may be as far as Aqua Creek or Fredericksburg. I do not want to leave at this time before a fight as you know folks would talk. News arrived that one brigade in our division was taken prisoner. General Bartlett ordered pickets and the 27th NY were sent out and I was sent with them. I slept with my revolver under my head ready for anything. Much more the affairs near the camp..............................................................$115.00

51663 - I HAVE BEEN PROMOTED AS MAJOR OF THE 5TH MAINE, Thursday 2 o'clock, (September 3rd, 1862), two page letter in ik to his wife by Major Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, I am now Major of the 5th Maine and have been so since July 1st as the date of my commission. I went into Alexandria with the Colonel but did not stay long as I had little money to spend. Jimmy [servant] is still with us as our cook. I am getting along fine, more camp details. The long awaited promotion for Edwards has arrived and it appears it had been in the works for months. In spite of his distain for Colonel Jackson and claims he would not serve under him, he apparently now is satisfied that the Colonel had been working in his behalf for a promotion which he has accepted and will not now resign. The undated letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Major Edwards postmarked Alexandria, VA. Postmarked September 3rd and also noted as such 2 items..........................................................................$95.00

51665 - I HAVE NOT SEEN A BED OR DESK IN TEN DAYS, Warrenton [VA], Sunday October 25th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Major Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are under marching orders to move to the front again and if we do it will mean a fight, explains the reason he had not written for over ten days, had not seen a bed or a desk [late Antietam Campaign], we moved near Warrenton, the rebels are near, some of the boys who were prisoners at Salem Church [May 3rd] have come back, mentions several soldiers that he has still not heard from, advises his wife on how to sell land in the event he is taken away [killed in action], much about plans for land back in Maine. The long letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, postmarked Washington, DC..............................................SOLD

51666 - A SOLDIER FATHER WRITES HIS YOUNG SON, Camp of the 5th Maine, near Bakersville, MD, Sunday October 26th, 1862, 4 page letter in ink to his teen age son Frank by Major Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, A "Fatherly letter" to his young son reflecting on a recent letter he had received from his wife that the son was doing well, he is sorry to hear that Frank had to leave school due to his cough, he is pleased that he is in the sheep business with his Uncle Ned and that he will send Frank some extra winter clothes he has, he is pleased that his Mother does not write about Frank quarreling with his sister anymore, he describes his small tent, bunk, and a box to write on and in the center is a small stove. He goes into detail how the tent was constructed, how they built a chimney to vent the smoke, he lacks money to send home right now as he has not been paid since he returned to Washington. Quite a newsy letter............................................$79.00

51667 - MAJOR EDWARDS EXPRESSES HIS DISTAIN FOR THE GOVERNOR OF MAINE ON HOW HIS PROMOTION WAS HANDLED, Tuesday Evening [October 28th, 1862], 4 page letter in ink to his wife by Major Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part from near Hagerstown, MD, He details the meal they have just ate and brags about "Jimmy" their servant cook. he is angry still about being a Major for four months and not finding about his commission until now, writes ill of Governor Washburn of Maine, draws forage for two horses at present, still can't send money home until he finally gets paid, wants her to watch the papers for new of his promotion which it seems is now public, while he has gotten a promotion to Major his pay will not be much more on account of a new tax. The letter comes with a cover postmarked Hagerstown, MD. Addressed to his wife and again signed by Edwards in a free frank as Major of the 5th Maine. Part of the cover to the left is missing but two clear autographs of Edwards survive. Two items...........................................$95.00

51668 - THEY WILL CROSS INTO VIRGINIA AT HARPERS FERRY, Tuesday afternoon, in camp near Bakersville, MD, October 28th, 1862, 4 page letter in ink to his wife from Major Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, We have orders to move out I think to Harpers Ferry and then cross into Virginia and I presume have another fight. Mentions the pelts [animal skins most probably beaver] that are available there and that a friend of his could make a good profit selling them in New York, describes his fine horse which he loves to ride, thinks if he would resign he could go into that business, he must close his letter as the Dress Parade Is about to start. A very newsy letter written in camp before the 5th Maine left to enter Virginia, comes with a free franked postal cover that Edwards addresses to his wife and notes to the top left his name as Major of the 5th Maine, thus two signatures, Washington  DC postal cancellation [Nov. 4th, '62], two items, fine one 3/4" ink stain non detracting.............................................$95.00

51669 - MAJOR EDWARDS DETAILS THE ROUGH DAYS THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC HAS SEEN, THE HUGE LOSSES INCURRED IN BATTLE, Thursday evening, October 30th, 1862, near Bakersville, MD, 8 pages in ik to his wife from Major Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, He is disturbed by reports that the Army of the Potomac is now called in the press the "Standstill Army." Since the first of April over 150,000 men was in that army the finest army the world has ever seen, but where it is now. The remnants are here but the largest half is gone. Their bones are now whitening in every country town and village on the Peninsular and thousands of them are left at South Mountain and Antietam. Not more than 60,000 are left. We have marched. We have marched a thousand miles and have fought the greatest battle and still since we have not taken Richmond. In their minds, the Army of the Potomac has done nothing. He continues on to show distain for the pundits who have criticized the non taking of Richmond at that date. Thursday evening, the camp is alive as the boys are getting ready to leave, all packing up. We expect a fight soon. Just from the door of his tent in camp is the grave of a poor fellow. Since the 7th Maine was camped there it may be one of them. He mentions a friend who could be the Sutler to the regiment as they will eed one when they enter winter quarters. A long and very descriptive letter giving many more details on the trials and tribulations of the army of the Potomac and his assessment of the press who have criticized the results the Army has had through the 1862 campaigns. With the letter is a free-franked cover signed by Edwards as Major of the 5th Maine and addressed to his wife by him, thus two signatures, 2 items.............................................SOLD

51670 - CROSSED THE POTOMAC INTO VIRGINIA, CANNONS BOOMING THE ADVANCE OF OUR REGIMENT, Camp in the woods about three miles from Snickersville, [VA], November 5th, 1862, 3 large pages in ink to his wife from Major Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We crossed into Virginia at Berlin [MD] on a pontoon bridge. The wooden bridge having been burned by the Rebels a year ago, I should judge the river is a quarter of a mile wide but the water is very low and could have been forded at this place. We came through the villages of Lovettville and Boulington, stuck camp and then moved through a small village named Wheatland, on Monday we marched eight miles and passed the village named Union. There was a little fight here last Sunday but our folks drove the Rebels back to the Gap. We hear the boom of the cannons ahead both at night and during the day but no general engagement. We found the 16th Maine and the 5th Maine Battery when we arrived here. Saw Lt. Twitchell of the 5th Maine Battery and I think he will be Captain soon of that unit. We arrived at a spot where Pleasanton had a fight a day or two before, arrived then at White Plain on the Manassas Gap Railroad. The comes with a postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, Washington CDS and a Bath Maine PM. Also a Due 6 stamp applied due to the weight and lack of a regular 3 Cent stamp, two items.......................................................$125.00

51671 - THE ARMY HEADS TO WARRENTON, VA, Camp near White Plain, VA, November 8th, 1862, four well-written large pages in pencil to his wife by Major Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are heading to Warrenton and I expect we will be in a fight soon, describes that the cold weather is affecting him greatly much more than any other time since he joined the army, needs a winter coat as his are unlined, snow is melting, have sent her a good ring in a letter, he is writing this letter on his old portfolio on his knee in his tent with a few embers. Sunday November 9th, we are moving very slow today through the country that is covered with snow, we are the rear guard for the army, the boys steal all of the hay, pigs, fowl, and horses so the people will be left quite destitute. We should be in Warrenton tomorrow, looking for mail there, heard that our advance guard is at Culpepper and we have taken Petersburg hopes Seymour will be elected governor of New York, thinks that this was it to kill an institution [Slavery] and not to put down a rebellion, he hesitates to say much more. Monday morning we are still at camp at New Baltimore and should reach Warrenton this afternoon, if he stays in the army he will have a lot to buy, sash, saber, etc., he has not been paid yet and complains about the new tax imposed. A very descriptive letter detailing several days traveling south from the Potomac towards Warrenton, VA. The letter comes with a nice free-franked cover that is stamped DUE 3 and addressed to his wife by Major Edwards and also signed by him with rank, Washington CDS, two items........................................................SOLD

51672 - LINCOLN HAS MADE A SAD MISTAKE IN REMOVING MCCLELLAN, GENERAL HOWARD THINKS MY REGIMENT IS THE BEST REGIMENT FROM MAINE, Camp of the 5th Maine, near New Baltimore, VA, Thursday November 13th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink with the last paragraph in pencil to his wife by Major Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He refuses to comment about an officer his wife mentions as he did not really give her specifics as he could on Colonel Jackson as it appears he really must be pushed to speak ill of someone. He does however think ill of Jackson for the way he left the regiment in the past fall. Mentions a officer in Doubleday's Division, he acknowledges his new commission as Lt. Colonel as it gives him neither pleasure or pain. The Governor and General Howard were there last night and the Governor spoke very highly of the regiment and General Howard said it was the best regiment from Maine. He has written her on the removal of McClellan and that Lincoln has made a sad mistake in removing him. He is willing to give his life for his country but does not want to be a target to be shot at to gratify any party. I should resign and go home but if I did that it would be said I did it to get out of a fight. The new Lt. Colonel elaborates on the removal of McClellan and his perception that the move was purely political. He resents the possibility of the army being run by politicians that could cause great injury to the Army. An excellent commentary. The letter comes with an envelope addressed by Edwards to his wife, some stains on the cover, two items....................................................................SOLD

51673 - BURNSIDE IN COMMAND, THE DIRECTION OF THE ARMY HAS CHANGED, Camp at Strafford Court House, VA, November 19th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, He describes their travels to this spot through Catlett Station, rainy weather, cold, in a small tent, little to eat, Jimmy, his servant, found a few small potatoes and boiled them in a coffee pot, he does not get really involved with some of the officers due to their liking to drink. I do not think that a quart of government whiskey a day is necessary but certainly it is drunk by some men who are high in office in this regiment. When Burnside took command of the army he stopped and let the Rebels near Gordonsville. Then our course was changed to this point. What do the papers say as they get little news of what is going on? Edwards continues to be dissatisfied with his commanders of his regiment. He does not get along with the Colonel and states that he had words with him that day, he still threatens to resign although he had been promoted again to Lt. Colonel. The letter comes with a postal cover CDS Washington, addressed to his wife by Edwards and free-franked by his new Major K N. Miller for Edwards. Two items...................................................$95.00

51674 - THE NEW SUTLER NEEDS TO CATCH UP TO THE REGIMENT, Thursday PM, [Nov] 20th, 1862, two pages in pen and pencil to his wife by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He had been expecting Chas [his friend who wanted to be the Regimental Sutler] there for some time but they have been on the move, tells him to take the RR to Fredericksburg or find some other conveyance to Brooks Division and he thinks it will be Smith's Corps and Franklin's Grand Corps, Friday morning, still near the courthouse [Strafford CH], describes the rain, the impassable roads, a prologue to the Fredericksburg Campaign. Edwards obviously has arranged for his friend Chas to become the Sutler for the regiment and gives his wife instruction how they can be found. They are in route to the Fredericksburg area and the rains are beginning. The letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, postmarked Washington. The second page in pencil is somewhat light by readable with the most important detail on page one, 2 items..............................................$89.00

51676 - VISITED REYNOLDS AND DOUBLEDAY'S DIVISIONS, Camp of the 5th Maine, near Strafford Court House, November 25th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, Took a ride into Reynolds Corps and visited Lt. Twitchell of the 5th Maine Battery about 4 miles from here, at 11 went into Doubleday's division and had dinner with Marshall, heard that the paymaster was in camp but he has four regiments before he get to us, will pay my bills and get ready for winter and then send you money. Must get back for dress parade as the Colonel is away somewhere. Tuesday evening, no mail yet awaiting the paymaster, Thanksgiving evening, no mail nor pay from Uncle Sam yet, Friday, some drunk, need a flannel blouse, much more camp news. The letter comes with a envelope addressed by Edwards to his wife franked by his Adj. Miller, postmarked Washington, DC, two items......................................$95.00

51677 - IF HE STAYS IN THE REGIMENT HE SHALL SOON BE IN COMMAND, Camp near Stafford Court House, VA, December 1st, 1862, two pages in ink from Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards to his wife. He relates in part, He still awaits his clothes from Washington, wears a private's coat, he hopes to come home if they don't move towards Fredericksburg, I think if I stay in the regiment another month I shall be in command if it but I do not care about that 'only to cut some few at Bethel'! If I could see some prospect to the end of the war, I would be glad to stay and see it out but it look darken now than a year ago, my paper has come to an end as I must close. The new Colonel implies that he would rather be back at Bethel with his wife than assume the command of the regiment.......................................$95.00

51678 - THE COLONEL IS LIVID WITH HIS WIFE OVER HER NOT SHIPPING HIS WINTER CLOTHES AND IT IS NOW DECEMBER, Camp near Stafford Court Hours, VA, December 3rd, 1862, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, We move about 10 miles in the morning to Bell Plain, the Adj. has sent for a uniform for him at Portland, he is upset that no needed clothes have been sent from home as he had requested, he has sent repeatedly to the express office in Washington but nothing has come. He described the box his Adj. received from his wife filled with clothes, eatables, etc. but nothing for him. Lt. Colonel Edwards is livid with his wife for not shipping him needed items as he sees what one of his officer's wife has sent her husband. He now is in debt for having to buy goods at high prices that could have been bought at home and sent. He has suffered from the cold and is very upset. The letter comes with a partial postal cover [torn] addressed to his wife by Edwards DUE 3 noted, 2 items...................$89.00

51679 - ON THE WAY TO FREDERICKSBURG THROUGH RAIN AND SNOW, Bell Plain, VA, December 6th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We marched from Stafford Court House and I can assure you I never want to see that march again, marched 12 miles over the worst roads I ever saw, yesterday we marched again in a cold rain, marched six more miles on one the damnest roads I ever saw, I cannot describes the awful conditions the men experienced, the men were completely drenched to their skins. Then it began snowing, soon there was 3" on the ground and the snow was flying and storming at a furious rate. The boys were nearly frozen, wet blankets and clothing, and shoes full of mud. I was worried that some would die of exposure. The general allowed the men to go into the woods so they could get some fires going. The officers got beastly drunk. I got to lie in the adjunct's tent in the morning my overcoat was frozen stiff. We are about one half mile from the Potomac River on what is called Potomac Creek at a little landing called Bell Plain Landing. It is about six miles below Aqua Creek. Much of the forage and rations come through this place. There are three steamers at the landing. We are to leave this place in the morning as it is as cold as Greenland. The ground is white with snow and ice. He reflects on his need for additional clothes. A very descriptive letter detailing the hardships his men endured heading towards Fredericksburg in early December 1862. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edward, 2 items.................................................$115.00

51680 - ONE POOR SOLDIER DIED OF EXPOSURE, Sunday Evening, in camp near White Oak Church, VA, December 22nd, 1862, two pages in ink to his wife by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, he has written his boys a letter in care of her but she must correct some of his errors, none of the boys were killed in the last great fight [Fredericksburg], one poor fellow did die last night by the name of Shedd the Doctor said of exposure as the weather is very cold. Do not worry about me as I have a tend and bedding, I ask myself 'why don't the army move?' The boys are all here now and the sick ones from Bell Plain come up today. He mentions several soldiers by name that are well she knows, Captain W. says he will resign, and otherwise there is no change in the regiment. The 5th Maine was awaiting orders as was the entire army after Fredericksburg. Soon the Mud March would begin. Two large pages, some archival repair to a tear, otherwise very good......................................$75.00

51681 - I WAS INJURED IN A HORSE FALL, BUT AM ALL RIGHT NOW, Wednesday afternoon, December 24th, 1862, two large pages in ink to his wife by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, I have just come off picket and went 10 miles towards the river, I was in charge of the regiment as the Colonel stops in camp. I had a fall from my horse and was hurt a little but am all right now. He tells his wife he is sorry she feels at fault about him not having his winter clothes but a private in the regiment is better dressed than him. He let another soldier go home instead of him because the fellow was needed by his family. The boys in the hospital are well, waiting for his pay and will send what he can but he has debts to pay first. He now has to pay for a servant. The letter comes with a postal envelope addressed to his wife by Edwards with a DUE 3 stamp in lieu of a stamp..................................................$95.00

51682 - A TEARFUL GOOD BYE AS THE COLONEL SAYS FAREWELL TO A SOLDIER ON HIS DEATHBED, Camp of the 5th Maine Vol., near White Oak Church, VA, Sunday afternoon December 28th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards. He relates in part, I am in good spirits as you would expect after our late fight [Fredericksburg]. Pauley of my old company died this morning of consumption here in our camp hospital. The poor fellow sent for me to see him for a few moments before he breathed his last, he thanked me for my kindness to him while under my command and asked m to make sure his folks received his pay due from the government. I took him by the hand and bid him a last farewell. It caused a tear to dim my sight but such is Life. I think he has gone to a happier land than this. He should have gone home to Portland months ago but this red tape is fatal sometimes. I think it is an injustice to hold a soldier here when the surgeons know they will be no use to the government but there is a lack of energy in every department. I am making an effort for others [to be sent home] and hope I am successful. His old company is decimated by illness, many in hospitals; others have gone to their last resting place among the dead, mentions soldiers that are well, has been to a religious meeting in the 27th NYV camp, have just come off dress parade, there is the sound of hundreds of axes of soldiers getting fuel for the night, thousands of acres of oak and pine have fallen to the axes. He has still not received his clothes from her but the Sanitary Department has furnished him with under clothes. He reflects about a recent letter he sent her...some in Bethel may think I am turning into politics by some of my letters, but I think I am the same as I ever was. I never was a Negro worshiper and hardly think I will be at present. An excellent letter showing great emotion for a soldier dying in his camp hospital who wanted to see the Colonel, also a political comment about Edward's feelings on the Negro issue. The letter comes with an envelope addressed to his wife by Edwards with a DUE 3 stamp in lieu of a postage stamp, 2 items........................................$150.00

56183 - THEY PREPARE TO MOVE OUT, BURNSIDE IS PREPARING FOR HIS ILL FATED MOVEMENTS AGAINST THE CONFEDERATES AFTER HIS DEFEAT AT FREDERICKSBURG, Tuesday, December 30th, 1862, two large pages in ink to his wife by Lt. Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, he took a ride to visit a friend and took dinner, it was a beautiful day that was warmer. The paymaster came and paid them but he has little money at present to send home as he had to buy clothes, a saber belt, shoulder strap for a Lt. Colonel, boots, hat, and a valise. We have orders to prepare several days rations as we will soon move out but I know not where, some say to Aqua Creek, others to Richmond above Fredericksburg. We shall have an awful time and it looks like a large storm. The Rebels are near Alexandria but have not learned the facts about the affair. Edwards ends the letter without signing but the letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife with the stamp removed, 2 items.......................................$100.00

Edwards Archive 1863 - 64

51685 - HE WILL BE MADE COLONEL OF THE 5TH MAINE VOL., Camp of the 5th Maine Rgt., January 3rd, [1863], 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, I am to be the Colonel of the 5th Maine Rgt. and I will take it. He mentions a soldier who went to Washington to get his pay after he left the hospital but it was stopped for his desertion and he had to come down here to get reinstated and his pay and show his discharge papers, mentions the new nasty postage currency, mentions a Sutler who was to join the regiment who he says could make a lot as the boys buy from other Sutlers, he states he could help the Sutler get the position...............................$95.00

51686 - THE COLONEL WRITES TO HIS CHILDREN, January 3rd, 1863, in the woods near Stafford Court House, two large pages in ink to his children by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, Tells his children to write hi, glad they are getting along well in their studies, he hopes to be home for a few days in a month, addresses his children by name, tells them to mind and help their mother, will bring two horses one named Mac [for McClellan] to they can learn to ride, tells his daughter [who obvious has a boy friend in his command] that he will keep the 'Clever fellow' as pure as a virgin. He is still sick in the hospital, very newsy letter to his children at home in Bethel, Maine..............................$85.00

51687 - THE IMMORTAL 7TH AT ANTIETAM, Saturday Afternoon, near White Oak Church, VA, January 3rd, 1863, two large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine, Vol. He relates in part, I guess you know that the 5th Maine is on the way home do say the NY papers and some of the Maine ones, but we do not see it as the boys say. The sun is warm as summer but the nights are cold and the ground freezes pretty hard. I have just come in from a ride to the picket line and had a nice ride with Colonel Burnham of the 6th Maine as He was also on picket. He gave me an account of the Immortal 7th. He told me of which I have always heard that the fight at Antietam was all they ever saw. I like Burnham as he is a good working man and not a fancy soldier. I will send my trunk to you via Express when I get to Washington. Edwards is referring to the 7th Wisconsin noted as the Immortal 7th. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed, two items....................................................$145.00

51688 - THE COLONEL'S SON ARRIVES IN CAMP FROM MAINE, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Volunteers, Camp near Wolford Ford, VA, January 5th, 1863, two large page in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, he describes the trip of his teenage son Frank to their camp via Washington and Brandy Station. Upon his return to the regiment he found a couple of the officers had taken drink excessively. I found the horses all right and Jimmy [servant] was waiting for us at the depot. He mentions that hiss son toured New York and Washington on the way to Virginia. He is also Brigade commander while Upton is in Washington. Frank is bedding with Jimmy and is very happy to be here. We are now under marching orders. A small irregular ¼" missing piece by the margin affecting several words, relatively trifling...........................................$89.00

51689 - HE STILL IS BRIGADE COMMANDER AS COLONEL UPTON HAS NOT RETURNED, Headquarters 5th Maine Rgt., Camp at Wolford Ford, January 7th, 1863, two large 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, He mentions his son Frank sleeps in the tent with Jimmy and his other servant but soon will share his tent. He bought his son several knives in Washington which he has already sold to soldiers at a $2 profit. He just has about 200 men and field officers with him. He just has three Captains with one ill with the small pox another sick with liquor. He was under arrest while I was gone. I am desperate for officers, about 100 of my regiment has re-enlisted. Much more about the condition of the regiment, more about his son in camp with him. Comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Colonel Edwards. Washington CDS, stamp somewhat impaired. Bulls eye military cancellation, 2 items..................................................$95.00

51690 - ON COURT MARTIAL DUTY IN VIRGINIA, Wednesday Evening, January 7th, 1863, 4 pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He reflects on going home and it will not be possible being the new Colonel of the 5th Maine, mentions the resignation of the previous Colonel, am on the Court Martial and had two soldiers charged with drunkenness, he tells his wife she knows he is on roundedness. Yesterday as commander of the regiment I went to Bell Plain and Pratts Landing in hopes of locating my clothes. Must stop as the mail will be going out. Edwards ends abruptly trying to make the mail. The letter comes with a postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards DUE 3 stamp applied along with a MISENT stamp, 2 items.........................................$85.00

51691 - CONCERNED THAT SMALL POX MAY SPREAD IN THE REGIMENT, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., camp near Welford Ford, VA, January 15th, 1863, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, The ground has snow on it, also some mud, I shall go home with the regiment if I am in the land of the living, we have one case of small pox and he is concerned it will spread in the regiment, gives his account of his son Frank in camp, another boy his age is there also with his father the doctor. He [Frank] will soon be off to Washington on his way home to Maine. A very newsy long letter by Edwards. The letter comes with a stamped postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, Washington CDS, some loss of stamp, two items..........................$95.00

51692 - THE OFFICERS DO NOT WANT TO FOLLOW BURNSIDE ACROSS THE RIVER AGAIN, Headquarters 5th Maine, camp near White Oak Church, VA, January 17th, 1863, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, Have received orders to hold my regiment ready to move at a moment's notice, extremely cold for the pickets, it is against the wishes of all the officers to go over the river again under Burnside. I was at General Franklin's camp this morning and his Adj. told me that they hoped it would rain for two or three days so we could not go. I had hoped that I would get my commission. General Franklin has sent me two orderlies to do my running of the regiment I wish I had a smart fellow from Maine as a sutler. He could make a pile of money. A lengthy letter by Edwards adjusting to the new role of Commander of the regiment and expressing his displeasure with the potential move across the Rappahannock by Burnside. The letter comes with a postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards stamped DUE 3, two items...........................................................$135.00

51693 - BURNSIDE INSISTS ON US CROSSING THE RIVER AT FREDERICKSBURG, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., camp near White Oak Church, January 18th, 1863, 6 large pages to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, We have been out on picket, the night is one of the coldest I have seen, we are under marching orders and I think it must be over the river. The army is disheartened. Burnside is bound to cross the river to retrieve his loss but all the Generals are opposed to it. But I will go with the fight and do my duty regardless of others. I had sent my sick off but the hospital tents had not been set up and they were sent back. Moving sick men in this cold weather again is awful. One of our boys we sent to Washington has died. We have lost others in my old company. We have been in a fight before this letter reaches you. Much more about the condition of the men, situation in camp. A long and detailed letter from Colonel Edwards describing the feeling about Burnside's plan to cross the river again to attack the Rebels in spite of the terrible weather conditions of mud, rain, and terrible cold. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife. Large DUE 3 stamp applied, 2 items..............................$145.00

51694 - BURNSIDE IS REMOVED AFTER THE MUD MARCH, Headquarters 5th Maine, Camp near White Oak Church, VA, January 26th, 1863, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, I wanted to put in for a leave buy all of the Generals are leaving and there will no one to grant a leave for several days, I have just learned that Burnside, Sumner, and Franklin have been relieved of their commands. I am ready to do anything to restore the Union but the last moves I felt to be out of place and reason but no one heard me utter a complaint. Again he reaffirms that the removal of Little Mac was a mistake, they have plenty of mud but no snow. Yesterday the regiment was out to Receive General Slocum. He is one of the best generals and if Franklin does leave I hope he gets the command. I hear that Jackson [his old Colonel], is not doing will with his new small brigade. He writes on his back pay, what he can send hope. Many more details. In January 1863, Burnside launched a second offensive against Lee, but it bogged down in winter rains before it accomplished anything and has been derisively called the Mud March. In its wake, he asked that several officers, who were openly insubordinate, be relieved of duty and court-martialed; he also offered to resign. Lincoln chose the latter option on January 26 and replaced him with Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker, one of the officers who had conspired against Burnside. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, DUE 3 stamp applied, 2 items..........................................$145.00

51695 - HIS WIFE ASKS ABOUT THE OPPORTUNITY TO GET A STAR, OR A GENERAL'S STAR, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., near Weldon Ford, VA, January 27th, 1863, four large pages in ink by Colonel Clark S. Edwards to his wife. He relates in part, Rode out from camp with an escort of officers and two orderlies, we have to be careful as the Rebels are near out picket lines. He discusses her possible trip to see him as a Captain's wife is coming down and he wants his wife to come at the same time. His wife mentions the "STAR" [becoming a general]. He has heard that there were 600 names before Congress at this session. Five have been appointed, one for this army and four for black regiments. Many Colonels on the list date back to 1861 while mine only dates back to 1863. The letter comes with a stamped postal cover addressed to his wife by Colonel Edwards with a bulls eye cancellation. Two items................................................$120.00

51696 - HIS OLD COLONEL JACKSON NOW LEADS A BRIGADE AS A GENERAL, Headquarters 5th Maine Rgt., February 1st, 1863, Camp near White Oak Church, VA, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, There are several cases of small pox in camp, we hope to confine it outside the actual camp, a friend has come in from the battery to have dinner with me, had a nice religious meeting with the chaplain of the 16th Maine, General Jackson [Union General Jackson] is at Stafford Court House with a brigade, the dress Parade of the 7th Maine, it's the best his friend has ever saw, much camp news. The letter comes with a stamped cover postmarked Washington addressed to his wife by Edwards. Stamp slightly impaired.........................$95.00

51698 - SOME SUTLERS HAVE BEEN CAPTURED ON THEIR WAY FROM ALEXANDRIA TO THE ARMY, Tuesday Afternoon, [February 3rd, 1863 written near White Oak Church, VA], two large pages in ink from Colonel Clark S. Edwards to his wife. He relates in part, It is very cold this morning and I will include this as the mail has not left, my papers have come back disapproved [request for a leave] but I will send in again. When he does go he will bring "Jimmy" with him [his servant]. He reflects on a friend being a sutler in the regiment, as he says some men have made $10,000 in the business but it is risky as some have had "Free Passes to Richmond" [Captured by the Confederates] trying to come down from Richmond coming down by land. I can furnish him with a team so it will not cost them a great deal to commence with . I will telegraph you from Portland on my way home. Edward's friend is interested in becoming the regimental sutler [they have had a difficult time in having a dependable one]. He states that it is possibly dangerous as some have been captured on their way south. Good sutler related letter. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, DUE 3 stamp, 2 items.........................................$125.00

51699 - THE 6TH CORPS NOT MOVING WEST, SEDGWICK IN COMMAND, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., camp near Welford Ford, VA, February 4th, 1863, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, Disputes his wife's note that the 6th Army Corps may be moving west as he has not heard anything of the sort, General Sedgwick is in command of this army and has been kept out of the papers. he will send his young son Frank home in several weeks with an officer. He may send him home with his horse Fanny. He questions his wife whether she is coming to visit him, he mentions several PA officers whose wives are visiting their husbands, he comments about Chas coming down [his friend who wants to be the sulter of the regiment]. A newsy long letter mainly involving his wife's intended visit which seems will not happen due to her mother's illness in Maine, comes with a cover addressed by Edwards to his wife, stamp removed..........................................$95.00

51700 - MCCLELLAN WAS REMOVED AT THE WRONG TIME, A WASHINGTON CONSPIRACY TO VILIFY HIM, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., Camp near White Oak Church, VA, February 17th, 1863, 6 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards. He relates in part, He is dismayed in hearing about anti-patriotic feeling back at home in Maine, thinks McClellan was removed at the wrong time. He is a true patriot, Christian, and a better General does not live. He values the life of a soldier today as he did in 1861, much more about McClellan and he should be returned to the army. His return would be more than a dozen victories to the army. He cannot come home now in the face of the enemy. He cannot ask for a leave while the army is on the move Much more on McClellan was being vilified by forces in Washington. He comments that McClellan sees the slavery issue in the same light as always and does not change even in the face of the power at Washington. Colonel Edwards re-affirms his support for McClellan ass being the best General for the job especially after Burnside's disastrous Fredericksburg Campaign two months earlier. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, DUE 3 for postage stamped, two items.......................................SOLD

51701 - VISITED AN OLD SECESH WITH TWO DAUGHTERS TAINTED WITH TREASON, Headquarters 5th Maine Vol., camp near White Oak Church, VA, February 14th, 1863, 4 pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He has been out on picket with his regiment, stopped at a house of an old Secesh who had two beautiful daughters but were tainted with treason. I have just come into camp to see General Sedgwick for orders and to report to him from the picket line. I have heard that General Bartlett has requested General Coburn to forward me my Colonel's commission. I did not go to him for this favor but he did it on his own. Much about other officers on leave, concerned when he can leave due to a lack of field officers in camp, many more details. Comes with a stamped cover address to his wife by Edwards, stamp impaired, strong signature, two items.......................................$115.00

51702 - JACKSON'S FRIENDS TURNED BITTER ENEMIES WHEN HE LEFT OUR REGIMENT, Headquarters 5th Maine, camp near White Oak Church, VA, February 22nd, 1863, 8 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He is extremely dismayed in not being to come home as planned on leave as he has tried several times and failed. The weather has turned quite pleasant there. He expresses his concern over the ability of his commanders; some that were inferior were placed over the superior. He discusses the "boys" who intend to come there as sutlers, as they must come to fill the position that is open. He mentions the old commander of the 5th Maine Jackson who he says was lauded by all when he was here but now that he has gone his pretended friends are now his bitter enemies. He mentions he dined in his tent with two ladies from the Sanitary Commission who do much good for the soldiers. Edwards refers to Nathanial Jackson who had been appointed Brig. General the previous September and was definitely not one of Edwards favorite commanders who he constantly had words with during his subordination to Jackson as Captain, Major, and Lt. Colonel. This extremely long letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed, two items....................................................$1105.00

51703 - HE WILL BRING HIS SERVANT JIMMY HOME WITH HIM ON LEAVE, Saturday Afternoon, February 28th, 1863, [written from near White Oak Church, VA, camp of the 5th Maine, 6 total pages, actually a letter signed and a note signed by Edwards to his wife [Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol.] He relates in part, Still awaiting a leave, our regiment has gained 30 more men, when I come home I will bring Jimmy [one of his servants] as he has been so god to me, much about other officers in the regiment, their coming and goings to Washington and some home to Maine, the Major is leaving in the morning for Maine, Lt. Robertson goes home to be in a battery of the 3rd Maine. Mentions that 2 men out of every 100 are allowed leave, much more. Two signatures of Edwards.....................................$95.00

51704 - MY SERVANT MET ME AT THE LANDING WITH TWO HORSES, Headquarters 5th Maine, March 18th, 1863, Camp near White Oak Church, VA, 4 large pages from Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine to his wife. He relates in part, He has returned from leave and describes his trip through Boston, NY City, Jersey City, and Washington. I sent Jimmy [his servant] ahead of us to ready things. Visited the War department and was promised help in getting his regiment up around Washington. We received a telegram in Washington that Freeman [his traveling companion] wife was dead. He proceeded to Alexandria and stayed at the Segars Hotel. At Falmouth, I found one of my servants with both of my horses. Chas [the new sutler] had some trouble in getting his trunks on the government boats, much more about his arrival back in camp. A very newsy and interesting letter mentioning every facet of his trip back from Maine.....................................$125.00

51705 - THE NEW SUTLER HAS ARRIVED IN CAMP, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., March 24th, 1863, camp near White Oak Church, VA, two large pages in ink to his wife from Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, Have been on picket, Chas [the new sutler] has arrived in camp but may go back to Washington for more goods. Some of the goods I shipped myself from Portland were stopped with Chas items but are now on their way here. Chas is making himself comfortable in camp, Jimmy [his servant is also well. We are under marching orders at present, General Bartlett is away in New York and will return this week, and we will the vacancies in the regiment.........................................$95.00

51707 - THE NEW SUTLER IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., Camp near White Oak Church, VA, April 4th, 1863, six large pages to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine. He relates in part, Chas [the new sutler] is ready to open for business and will take a young man from Vermont as a partner. Tell his wife that he is not in danger of getting into a fight. His horse HOOKER is among the finest in the Brigade, General Bartlett has been re-appointed Brig. General which we are all glad of as he is a fine officer. Washington Brown the 1t Sergt, will noon be a Lt., more on other officers in the regiment his wife is familiar with, long and very newsy. The long letter is accompanied by a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, black DUE 3 stamp applied for postage, two items......................................$95.00

51708 - THE SUTLER AWAITS THE REGIMENT GETTING PAID, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., Camp near White Oak Church, VA, April 10th, 1863, four large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine and his sutler friend Chas has included a letter to his sister on the same letter. The Colonel relates in part, We have been to the President's Review and have had a brigade inspection, Chas the sutler is not doing well yet as the regiment has not been paid yet, much more. The sutler Chas relates in part to his sister, mostly family news, he asks many questions about members of his family. Many more details. the Sutler Charles also writes a short note to his sister on the Colonel's letter. Interesting commentary on his slow business as a sutler due to the regiment not being paid as of yet. Comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards. DUE 3 stamp................................................$95.00

AN EXTRAORDINARY LETTER

51710 - HE HAS SENT TO THE LANDING FOR THE SUTLER CHAS, JIMMY HIS SERVANT HAS BROUGHT TWO HORSES THERE, Tuesday morning, April 14th, 1863, camp near White Oak Church, VA, 4 huge 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine.  He relates in part, We are about to move out tomorrow, the order will be read today at 6 o'clock, we are to have 8 days rations, the cavalry left yesterday to our right, perhaps to Culpepper or Warrenton. All I know is when Hooker says move he means to so. We may not have a fight for awhile or run into a fight. He mentions that the sutler Chas is in Washington and will be back in time for the move. He has not had much success in trading as the regiment is still waiting to be paid. I visited the camp of the 24th Michigan and had dinner with the Colonel and a Captain. Jimmy, his servant, has gone to the landing with two horses to get Chas [his friend the sutler]. The rumor of my regiment being consolidated are false if you see mention of that in the papers. He gets great pleasure on hearing how well Frank and the little ones are doing at home, there is great confusion in the camp now with everyone getting ready to move out, much more on the impeding move. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, DUE 3 stamp, the postage stamp missing, two items....................................SOLD

51713 - HOOKER'S PLANS SEEM TO FOLLOW BURNSIDE'S PLANS - MOVE THE ARMY IN HORRIBLE WEATHER, A GREAT DESCRIPTION ON THE REGIMENTAL SUTLER, Thursday evening, April 23rd, 1863, [near White Oak Church, VA], 4 huge 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, It is raining and raining, our boys think Hooker has got the Burnside almanac [refers to Burnside choosing bad weather in January - the Mud March, as it always rains when Hooker gives an order to move. The sutler Charles has been in business only one week and did $1200 of business. He is still waiting for the boys to get paid as he has bought about $800 more of goods. Edwards goes into a long explanation on what the sutler has bought and sold, his costs, etc. He lists the many sutler items Charles sells Apples, butter, condensed milk, mustard, pickles, cake, figs, oranges, soap, playing cards, brushes, shirts, knives, and more. He mentions that "Jimmy" his servant is first rate and claims that he will drink no more. A great letter giving excellent details on the activites of a regimental sutler, his wares, and the profit he can make. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards with the stamp removed, 2 items............................................$175.00

51716 - THE POLITICS IN APPOINTING THE REGIMENTAL SUTLER, Headquarters 5th Maine Vol., Camp near New Baltimore, VA, August 20th, 1863, 3 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, The Colonel discusses the situation of the regimental sutler. The line officers will vote on the appointment of the sutler. The papers have gone to General Bartlett for the appointment of a new sutler. Levy, the old sutler of the 27th NYV is the one, he is a friend of the General. He will probably be named the sutler. If I had know what was going on I could have stepped in but now it has gone too far. The sutler was being replaced because he never was there. Edwards was for a Maine man named Charles for the post of sutler. 9 out of 10 men would have voted for him. Our cavalry had a little skirmish with the Rebels near the village of Buckland but no one was hurt. The letter comes with a postal cover addressed by Edwards to his wife, two items. God Sutler content!....................................................................$125.00

51719 - CULPEPPER IS A ONE HORSE TOWN, Headquarters of the 5th Maine, Culpepper, VA, September 21st, 1863, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, No passes are granted now, sending home $300, she must pay the mortage, he will send a draft when he feels the path is safe, still on court martial duty, he will try and go to Culpepper, it contains about 2000 inhabitants and sort of a one horse town, queries his wife on the farm, how are the apples, her garden. Much more news about the camp and home. A very newsy long letter. Comes with a postal cover with no stamp addressed to his wife by Colonel Edwards, 2 items........................................$105.00

51720 - THE COLONEL IS DISCOURAGED WITH THE DRUNKARD OFFICERS, Headquarters of the 5th Maine, September 25th, 1863, camp near Culpepper, VA, 4 pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, e mentions that a friend has been put in charge of an artillery brigade, his wife wants him to 'flesh' up but he is fine, yesterday we got orders to move out, we got orders to move out, we got in position to leave but finally pitched our tents again. We do expect orders to move soon but everything is uncertain, they may go into a fight in two days, he reflects on the officers in the various camps staggering around drunk, "This can truly be called an army of drunkards!" He is discouraged when he sees the awful condition of the officers. I am sitting on a case of two drunkard officers "I need not tell you of the verdict!" The letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, 2 items................................................$110.00

51721 - SLOCUM AND HOWARD ARE SENT WEST TO JOIN ROSECRANS, Headquarters of the 5th Maine, September 27th, 1863, camp near Culpepper, VA, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, he has sent his wife a $300 draft and a $3 of a Portland Bank, our communications have been cut by the Rebels last night. The 2nd Corps left Friday to join Rosecrans at Chattanooga. The 11th and 12th, Howard and Slocum are to follow. He feels that this army is not ready to fight. Perhaps our Corps will go into Maryland to guard the Potomac and perhaps the 1st and 2nd Corps will go west. He feels his regiment will be sent back to Washington. A good letter describing the entire troop movements that will result in the Union assault at Chattanooga and Chickamauga. The letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, DUE 3 stamp, 2 items....................................ON HOLD

51723 - ALL OF OUR PRISONERS FROM THE REGIMENT HAVE RETURNED, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., October 20th, 1863, camp near Culpepper, VA, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, It is quiet here now but we may yet get into a fight. We may have a fight unless they drive us back to Washington which I don't feel they will be able to undertake. I have been expecting the conscripts for some time; I now tent with the old Chaplain. It cost too much to live on Sutler goods, one of the divisions left last night to do guard duty between here and Alexandria. The 3rd Corps are now on our left near the Rapidan. I am expecting 13 paroled prisoners here who were taken at Salem Heights on May 3rd. I think all [prisoners] from the regiment have returned. There is nothing here but Negroes and dogs. All the pigs are gone. The Rebels fall back as our army advances. The letter comes with an envelope addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed, 2 items......................................ON HOLD

51724 - MY VIEWS HAVE NOT CHANGED ON THE SLAVERY QUESTION, Sunday AM, October 4th, 1863, camp three miles north of Culpepper Court House, VA. 4 pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol.  He relates in part, We have heard that we are moving to Mitchell's between Cedar Mountain and the Rapidan, if so we may have another fight before this letter reaches you. Our army is small here as the 11th and 12th Corps has left. I am tenting with the Chaplain. He does the praying and I do the scolding! I am about the same as I ever was on religion and politics and have not changed much on the slavery question [He is not in favor of a war to free the slaves]. Much on the cashiering of drunken soldiers in his regiment. The letter comes with an envelope addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed, 2 items included.........................................ON HOLD

51725 - WE ARE BUILDING FORTIFICATIONS AND RIFLE PITS NEAR CENTERVILLE, Camp near Chantilly, VA, October 17th, 1863, two pages in pencil to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We have heard that we are moving to Mitchell's between Cedar Mountain and the Rapidan, if so we may have another fight before this letter reaches you. Our army is small here as the 11th and 12th Corps has left. I am tenting with the Chaplain. He does the praying and I do the scolding! I am about the same as I ever was on religion and politics and have not changed much on the slavery question [He is not in favor of a war to free the slaves]. Much on the cashiering of drunken soldiers in his regiment. The letter comes with an envelope addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed, 2 items included....................................SOLD

51725 - WE ARE BUILDING FORTIFICATIONS AND RIFLE PITS NEAR CENTERVILLE, Camp near Chantilly, VA, October 17th, 1863, two pages in pencil to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, There has been a general move of the whole army as we left the Rapidan a week ago. We are near the old Bull Run battlefield near Centerville. We arrived here Wednesday evening and have been fortifying breastworks and rifle pits. We are ready to meet the enemy. There was some fighting upon falling back but the rest of our Corps was not engaged. I hear we captured some 12 hundred prisoners and 11 pieces of cannon. Letter is written in pencil somewhat light in places as he writes in the field. Letter comes with a envelope addressed to his wife by Edwards, no stamp, two pieces........................................$120.00

51726 - THE SUTLER HAS LOST HIS POSITION, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., October 29th, 1863, Warrenton, VA, 4 pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards. He relates in part, Jimmy is still with me as a servant. We are camped a half mile south of Warrenton, the Lt. Colonel and I have had some trouble but I have him where I want him. It started in regard to the sutler. It is thought through his work Chas has lost his position as regimental sutler. A very long personal letter to his wife. Includes a postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed...........................................ON HOLD

51727 - IT IS FOOLISH TO TRY AND TAKE RICHMOND BY THE RAPPAHANNOCK, October 31st, 1863, Camp near Warrenton, VA, 4 pages in ink to wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, He feels that another battle will be fought near Warrenton, if another battle is fought here and we are victorious the Rebels will fall back into their works. There is nothing to be gained in such a fight. Everyone knows it is useless to get to Richmond by way of the Rappahannock. It would be throwing away lives to try. If the place is to be taken by force it will be taken by the James River and the Peninsular. When the army fell back at Fairfax and Centerville, the Rebels destroyed the Orange and Alexandria RR. from Rappahannock Station to Manassas Junction. Our men have now replaced the road so that cars can come here again. Before the sutler could not get here with anything. I have been to services. The old Chaplain took them to task about their drinking. He relates that a division Colonel was in town drinking and broke the window of a house. The Provost Marshall took him to camp under arrest. Excellent letter on the affairs of the army near Warrenton, VA. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, 2 items.............................................SOLD

51728 - HIS SERVANT JIMMY'S WIFE IS REPORTED DEAD, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., November 5th, 1863, 4 large pages to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relate in part, He relates that he is dismayed that returning soldiers to home are treated like dogs and given the cold soldier. He reports that the boys from the regiment are well; some have returned from the hospital, two soldiers were sent back to Maine to ring conscripts for the regiment. There are 300 men in the regiment besides the officers. He is still on court martial duty. The regiment may stay there for the "Mud Season". His servant Jimmy's wife has been reported dead. It is supposed that she died in a drunken fit. The Chaplain prays for her. The letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, two items.....................................................ON HOLD

51729 - THE COLONEL TELLS ALL ABOUT THE POOR LEADERSHIP AT FREDERICKSBURG AND CHANCELLORSVILLE BY BURNSIDE AND HOOKER, Headquarters of the 5th Maine, November 6th, 1863, near Warrenton, VA, 4 large 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards. He relates in part, We may be heading on towards Fredericksburg but he is afraid there is nothing that will be gained by moving north. The forces in Washington are bound that Meade shall either fight or resign. I expect another 10,000 to be transferred to gratify their whims. The papers show that General Warren is the hero of the day. He was chief of Hooker's staff at the Chancellorsville fight the 1st of May. You may remember when the Corps crossed at Fredericksburg. Sedgwick carried the Heights when Burnside failed to do so in last December when he should have stopped, but this same Warren by Hooker's orders ordered us to Salem Heights and then he told Sedgwick there was nothing but a line of skirmishes but we lost 5000 men in that fight from our Corps. So much for the hero that is to be! An excellent commentary of the actions in Fredericksburg the previous December by Edwards. The letter comes with a postal cover with the stamp removed addressed to his wife by Edwards. After occupying Marye's Heights on May 3, Sedgwick's VI Corps marched out on the Plank Road with the objective of reaching Hooker's force at Chancellorsville. He was delayed by Wilcox's brigade of Early's force at Salem Church. During the afternoon and night, Lee detached two of his divisions from the Chancellorsville lines and marched them to Salem Church. Several Union assaults were repulsed the next morning with heavy casualties, and the Confederates counterattacked, gaining some ground. After dark, Sedgwick withdrew across two pontoon bridges at Scott's Dam under a harassing artillery fire. Hearing that Sedgwick had been repulsed, Hooker abandoned the campaign, re-crossing on the night of May 5-6 to the north bank of the Rappahannock.................................................$225.00

51730 - THE 5TH MAINE'S LOSSES AT RAPPAHANNOCK STATION AND RAPIDAN CROSSING, Monday Evening, November 16th, 1863, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are still at Milford Ford Crossing running to Brooks Station three miles from here. I did not see much about our last fight in the Maine papers but the fact that there was not enough killed. If I had lost 200 men it would have been the talk of things. I only lost about 35 men and took 1200 prisoners. I do not like to see my command robbed of the honor they deserve. Three of my wounded have died since we left the Rappahannock and our loss is now 13 dead and there will be some more to go that way. I am drawing rations for 282 men with officers now. We total a little over 300 men. Much more details about the condition of the regiment. Edwards comments on hi losses November 7-8th at Rappahannock Station and Rapidan Crossing. At Rappahannock Station in all, 1,670 confederates were killed, wounded, or captured in the brief struggle, more than eighty percent of those engaged. Union casualty figures, by contrast, were small: 419 in all. For the North the battle had been "a complete and glorious victory," an engagement "as short as it was decisive," reflection "infinite credit upon all concerned." Maj. Gen. Horatio G. Wright noted that it was the first instance in which Union troops had carried a strongly entrenched Confederate position in the first assault. Brig. Gen. Harry Hays claimed to have been attacked by no less than 20,000 to 25,000 Union soldiers--a figure ten times the actual number.[3] The battle had been as humiliating for the South as it had been glorious for the North. Two of the Confederacy's finest brigades, sheltered behind entrenchments and well supported by artillery, had been routed and captured by an enemy force of equal size. Col. Walter H. Taylor of  Lee's staff called it, "the saddest chapter in the history of this army," the result of "miserable, miserable management." An enlisted soldier put it more plainly. "I don't know much about it," he said, "but it seems to be that our army was surprised." Lee would later call on subordinates to submit reports on the battle in an effort to determine what had gone wrong, but on the night of November 7 more pressing matters demanded his attention. Loss of the bridgehead destroyed his plans for an offensive and left his army dangerously extended on a now indefensible front, Meade, acting quickly, might pin Lee's army against the Rapidan River just as Lee had tried to pin Maj. Gen John Pope's army against the Rappahnnock River one year earlier in the Second Batttle of Bull Run. Lee immediately canceled his plans for an attack on French and within hours had his army marching south. This letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards....................$225.00

51731 - THE COLONEL WRITES THE FATHER OF A DEAD SOLDIER, THE LOSSES OF HIS REGIMENT AT RAPPAHANNOCK STATION, THE SWORD OF A DEAD 4TH MAINE OFFICER IS RETURNED HOME AFTER BEING PREVIOUSLY CAPTURED BY A REBEL, November 20th, 1863, 4 pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, It is quiet in camp and I hear the tread of the lone sentry as he walks his beat in front of my tent, I have just closed a letter to Mr. William Tubbs in regard to his son who so glorious fell at the Rappahannock Station. He was a brave and noble soldier and his loss is great to us. I have a Washington paper that gives an account of four of our wounded which were buried with three from the noble 6th [Maine Infantry] in one grave. At first we thought our loss was light but 14 have already gone and still there are others to follow. It is sad to loose so many of these noble soldiers but I am proud to add that Maine has never lost any braver or true soldier or none more willing to give up their lives to save the country from ruin. It is an honor to lead such men in a fight. He is requesting the regiment by ent home for recruiting . I do not know of a regiment from Maine that has been in more fights than the gallant old 5th. Her sons lay in almost every battlefield in Virginia. She can inscribe on her banner 16 battles and what regiment can do as much! He feels they are moving towards the Rappadan and not to Richmond. He mentions about a captured sword he gave the Chaplain of the 4th Maine that was taken at Rappahannock Station that was inscribed to a Lt. of the 4th Maine that was killed at 1st Fredericksburg last December. I assume you see it in the papers. A wonderful letter regarding a dead soldier, the recent losses in the regiment and interesting commentary about a Union officer's sword obviously captured at Fredericksburg and recaptured from a Confederate at Rappahannock Station. In checking records only one officer from the 4th Maine was killed at Fredericksburg, 1st Lt. George F. Bournre who was killed December 13th, 1862. An excellent letter by Edwards. The letter comes with a addressed cover to his wife by Edwards, partial stamp, two items..................................$250.00

51732 - THE COLONEL SEND HOME TWO CAPTURED CONFEDERATE COLONEL'S SWORDS IDENTIFIED TO THE COLONELS, Saturday Morning, November 21st, 1863, [near Welford Ford, VA], 4 page letter to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, He mentions to his wife that she will see letters in the press [papers] about action on the 7th, have been on the move, the boys have little chance to write home from their little shelter tents, he rates his regiment higher than any of the other Maine regiments in the Corps. I sent home two Colonel [Confederate] swords to Maine yesterday. One I took from a Colonel Murchison of the 54th North Carolina and the other from Colonel Peen of Louisiana. He mentions an adjacent apparently in a hospital at Washington who has had "his clothes wounded in the last fight." If the regiment goes home this winter, I want the Company I flag sent home. He wants a staff made for it stained cherry or painted brown and varnish. He remarks that he has run out of room and will finish now. An excellent letter regarding Edwards send two captured Confederate swords home that belonged to two Colonels. The Colonel of the 54th NC was Colonel Kenneth M. Murchinson and the Colonel from Louisiana was Colonel David B. Penn of the 7th Louisiana Infantry. Both were captured at Rappahannock Station, VA. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed, two items..............................................................$225.00

51733 - HE SEND TWO CAPTURED CONFEDERATE SWORDS HOME TO HIS ON, EDWARDS CORRECTS THE NEWSPAPER REPORTS ON WHAT HAPPENED AT RAPPAHANNOCK STATION EARLIER THAT MONTH, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., November 23rd, 1863, near Welford Ford, VA, 4 large pages in ink, 8" X 13". He relates in part, He sent his son Frank two captured swords [Confederate] by his friend Fenderson, one he took from a Colonel Webb, the other from a Colonel Merchison, the latter is very fine. He also has an overcoat of English manufacture [which he also obviously took from a Confederate prisoner]. we are on marching orders and I think it will be in the direction of Fredericksburg, we have 15 days rations so it will be a long march. He discusses the newspaper reports on the late battle at Rappahannock Station. They stated that the 6th Maine and the 5th Wisconsin took the redoubt and Wheaton Brigade taking the pits. I say that Wheaton's Brigade was not engaged for the day also that brigade belonging to the 3rd Division of our corps and none of the division was engaged, neither was the 2nd Division brought into the fight. It was the 2nd brigade and two regiments of the 3rd, in fact there was but four regiments of the whole that went near the works at the station. The 5th Maine, 6th Maine, 5th Wisconsin, 121 NY, and there were about 1800 prisoners taken in all. We took about 1400 prisoners and the 6th took about 250 and the 121 NY took the rest. Those taken at Kelley Ford was another concern and four miles from the station by the 3rd Corp under General French. A wonderful account firsthand of the battle at Rappahannock Station by Colonel Edwards. the letter has many more details. Included is a cover, stamp removed addressed to his wife by Edwards, two items...................................................................$295.00

51734 - THE MUD IS STOPPING US FROM GETTING TO THE REBELS, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., Camp near Welford Ford, VA, November 24th, 1863, 4 large 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark s. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, The army has not moved today due to the rain. We had orders to move at early light but the weather was too bad. Meade wanted to wait another day. The 1300 prisoner swe took we moved them. His old company is having a custom Corps badge made for him. It will be engraved with all the battles to date. It will cost $75.00. He still has his servant Jimmy and another servant now. His name is "King." A very fine fellow. Jimmy has not said much about the death of his wife. The mud is so deep we cannot get to the Rebels. The letter comes with a stamped cover postmarked Washington, DC addressed to his wife by Edwards, two items...............................................$125.00

51735 - LEE WAS JUST TRYING TO LOCATE OUR POSITION, Headquarters 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Camp near Welford Ford, VA, December 6th, 1863, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are under new marching orders and I thought we would fallback but it seems that Lee was only trying to find out our army's position. A small force of his crossed at the US Ford on reconnoitering party of our army. I am still in command of the brigade and will be relieved sometimes this week. He mentions that he will send several "memorials" home to be framed. They list all the battles of the 5th Maine. Locust Grove will have to be added. I do not believe that there is any regiment in the army that has been in so many fights. I have seen too many fights. I know you would like me to be "one peg higher" but it will take some political influence to bring that about. I will not be beholding to anyone at home to get a promotion in the army. I have done enough to earn a 'star' but there are too many "big men's" sons in the army for me to rise high. I will try to get a leave for Christmas and New Year. he has bought five pairs of gloves from the sutler for $6.00. An excellent letter about the situation describing Lee's attempts to gain some information on the intentions of the army after the disaster at Rappahannock Station the previous month and the politics involved on becoming a General. The letter comes with a cover with the stamp removed addressed to his wife by Edwards, two items........................................$145.00

51736 - THE COLONEL IS DISMAYED WITH THE COMMANDING GENERAL CHANGES OVER THE LAST YEAR, SENT CAPTURED CONFEDERATE SWORDS HOME, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., December 9th, 1863, Welford Ford, VA, 4 large pages to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards. He relates in part, He recalls Burnside's move a year ago past that same date, they have received orders to move in the morning, he laments about the change in the army as there are thousands now sleeping in death that were once with us, he recalls the many battles they have been in, both Fredericksburg battles, Salem Church, Gettysburg, Funk Town Heights, Rappahannock Station, and Locust Grove. What changes in the army, first Burnside, then Hooker, then Meade, now the reports say Pleasanton? Meade is shelved with McClellan, he would like to write a few words [about the direction of the army] but he will hold his place. He refers to captured Confederate swords that he had sent home should be displayed. He mentions a belt and sword that a Maine Colonel took home [captured from a Confederate soldier], he refers to a letter from the Governor regarding the regiment re-enlisting, a bounty for re-enlisting, the 10th Maine is now laying at Baltimore and Harpers Ferry. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp missing, two items.................................................$165.00

51737 - A YOUNG SON WRITES HIS MOTHER ON HIS RECENT TRIP TO VIRGINIA WITH HIS COLONEL FATHER, TWO LETTERS, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., January 10th, 1864, two letters: [a] two pages in pencil and pen to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards and his son, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, he describes his trip back from home through New York and Washington, went to the capital and the Smithsonian. [b] Two large pages dated Sunday Afternoon January 10th, 1864 as a continuance of the first letter to his wife by Edwards. He relates in part, States that his son Frank may contract the small pox as many have had it in the regiment, Frank reads a lot to Jimmy [his servant]. If he does not get a promotion to Brig. General he may leave the service when the term for the regiment expires in several months. Much more about the officers in his regiment, more about the doings of his young son in camp with him. Two letters, one partially written by Frank, the remainder by Colonel Edwards. Frank's pencil letter is somewhat light so we have enhanced it with a darker photo copy. The tow letters come with a postal cover addressed by Edwards to his wife, partial stamp still evident, three items..................................................$95.00

51738 - ONE ASE OF SMALLPOX IN CAMP WILL LEAD TO OTHERS, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., January 16th, 1864, 4 large 8" X 13" pages to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He relates much about the present camp of the 5th Maine, there has developed in camp one case of the small pox but they suspect more will occur, lots more news of the affairs in the camp. There is a stamped postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards included, 2 items.....................................$85.00

51739 - IT IS THE MUDDY SEASON, HIS OVERCOAT WEIGHS 50 POUNDS, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., Welford Ford, VA, January 19th, 1864, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, It is the rainy season and the rain has soaked his overcoat where it must weigh 50 pounds, they have to travel everywhere in the mud, many of the officers are drunk most of the time, he details information about officers of the 5th Maine who are back at home, many are in debt, much more details about the 5th Maine. The letter comes with a stamped cover postmarked Washington DC, addressed to his wife by Edwards, two items.......................................$95.00

51740 - THE COLONEL'S WIFE WILL VISIT HIM IN THE FIELD, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., Camp near Welford Ford, VA, February 1st, 1864, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, He makes plans for his wife's visit as he will meet her in Washington. He is getting his quarters ready. He comments that hundreds of wives have visited their husbands, several from the 20th Maine have done so. he asks his wife for plumes for his hat, informs her to take $50, what trains to take and when, costs of tickets, arrival times. He is certainly excited about her impending visit to see him in the field. The letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, two items.................................................$95.00

51741 - HE RECEIVES HIS BEAUTIFUL CORPS BADGE FINALLY, In camp at the old place Welford Ford, VA, February 8th, 1864, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, His long awaited Corps badge has arrived [presented to him by his old Company in the 5th Maine], it is a splendid thing! General Bartlett had one presented to him that cost $200, he is still on court martial duty, is trying a Lt. of the 96th PA for drunkenness while on duty, WOE TO HIM!, he mentions about a friend who has lost the use of his right hand, he will run the brigade again as Colonel Upton is off again. The officer he sent back to Maine after conscripts will be back this week. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed, 2 items..............................................$95.00

51742 - THEY ARE ABOUT TO HAVE A DRESS PARADE, Headquarters 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Army Corps, March 6th, 1864, 3 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, A good camp letter, he remarks that they are just about ready to have a dress parade, mentions the news he has heard from back at home in Bethel, he received many wives of officers who are at the cap to visit their husbands, much more...........................................$75.00

51743 - TWO COLONELS WERE ON A DRUNK YESTERDAY, Headquarters 2nd Brigade, March 8th, 1864, 4 pages in ink to his wife from Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, There are festivities in camp, many ladies are here [wives of officers], the officers are having a horse race, mentions that Colonel Carroll and Leslie went out on a drunk yesterday, the Chaplain is still at work on his new chapel. Much more from 2nd Brigade headquarters where Edwards is temporarily in command while General Upton is gone. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards with the stamp missing, two items.............................................$95.00

51744 - HE WILL DRESS HIS LITTLE SON LIKE A SOLDIER, Headquarters of the 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Corps, March 10th, 1864, 4 page letter in ink to his son and his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, The new chapel is about done, tells his son Frank he has a cap for him, a sash, and pistols so he would look like a soldier, he plans to travel to Culpepper tomorrow but not to worry as the Rebels will not get him. Comes with a cover addressed to his son, stamp cut out, two items..........................$75.00

51745 - THE COLONEL AS BRIGADE COMMANDER ENTERTAINS THE BRIGADE STAFF OFFICERS, Headquarters of the 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 6th Corps, March 13th, 1864, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, He had a chat with General Sedgwick, he had a 'muddy' time on the line [picket line] yesterday, mentions numerous officers dining with him, gives a good menu of the dinner fare, mentions that General Bartlett's Adjacent was just in camp to see him, the new chapel was dedicated today by the Chaplain, much more......................................$89.00

51746 - SEVERAL SESECH WOMEN WERE AT THE BALL, March 15th, 1864, 8 pages to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine as Brigade Commander of the 2nd Brigade. He relates in part, He intends to go home in June if he lives that long, he gives good details of a ball that night [given by General Bartlett], he is still in command of the brigade as General Upton is still gone, there will be a 'cock' that afternoon, several Sesech women were at the ball that he names, Colonel Carroll is drunk most of the time. He gives a good account of the Brigade Ball hosted by General Bartlett.................................$95.00

51747 - WHILE FIGHTING HAS CEASED, PARTIES, BALLS, AND GAMES OCCUPY THE SOLDIERS' TIME, Headquarters of 2nd Brigade, 8 pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine, acting Brigade Commander. He relates in part, There is now an order for all ladies to leave the camp. Wednesday evening, we went to General Bartlett's Ball, it was splendid affair not less than 200 couples. Our band led off the ball; we went in five ambulances to the ball. About 75 couples would dance at one time. I also went to a cock fight at Division Headquarters that last about one half hour. There was a great deal of betting by the owners of the cocks. We have had balls, horse racing, cock fighting, parties, and raffles. There also was a temperance meeting in camp and boys signed the pledge. We have just received orders to get ready to move with three days rations. A very long and detailed letter about all the camp activities enjoyed by the officers of the brigade........................................................SOLD

51748 - A SOLDIER BROKE THE JAW OF ANOTHER SOLDIER - ON TRIAL, Headquarters 5th Maine Vol., Camp near Welford Ford, VA, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, I am still on court martial duty trying a fellow who broke the jaw of a soldier in Company E, 5th Maine. States that weather is cold and a storm has occurred, but he says more storms less move. He has three more months to serve if he stays in. The Doctor of the regiment is counting the hours until discharge date. Many details about the wives still in camp, the Doctor just got back from New York visiting his wife, many more details. The long letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp missing.........................................$95.00

51749 - HE DOES NOT WANT ANY PART OF COMMANDING COLORED TROOPS, Headquarters of 5th Maine Vol., March 30th, 1864, Welford Ford, VA, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, It rained all night and flooded the plain, Walker's bridge is missing, the boys are all glad of it [they don't have to move], the weather continues to be stormy and squally. I should be content to stay here for the next ten weeks. I am sure they will say [papers] why does not the Army move? The fact of the matter is the Army is not fit to move. Colonel Carroll is sick with the piles [he normally was drunk]. Mentions some officers who may command Colored troops. He states he wants none of that himself. Mentions his servants Jimmy and King, the latter he calls a 'cleaver fellow'. In anticipating the discharge of the regiment in June he mentions where he wants the company flags to go. He thniks they will be allowed to take arms home. The long letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards with the stamp missing, 2 items...............................................$145.00

51751 - GOING TO WASHINGTON TO SEE THE REBEL FLAGS, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., Camp near Welford Ford, VA, April 4th, 1864, 4 large pages in ink. He relates in part, He expects to be out in 75 days and will travel through Portland, goes into detail about General Bartlett's Ball, dancing with the ladies, went to a horserace at the camp of the 17th Maine, he is thinking of going to Washington to see all the captured rebels flags there, it is again raining, few hopes to move now. Comes with a cover postmark Washington, addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed.......................................$90.00

51753 - A GENERAL THREATENS TO RESIGN, Headquarters 5th Maine Vol., April 22nd, 1864, Welford Ford, VA, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, Mentions that he attended a ball given by General Bartlett, he and several named officers took a pontoon boat and floated down the river, some of the 96th PA and their band were there, they had a 'bully' time. He mentions that some of the people left for the worse of it. The band played constantly, the full moon was shining and we could not help but enjoy ourselves. We went down to serenade the General on his confirmation but he told me he was to resign as they do not date back his rank one to the 2nd of April. I think he has done the right thing. When he got to his place he invited about 40 to 50 officers in from Colonel to Lt. The General's headquarters is situated in a house I can see from my tent. The 18th Mass. has crossed the river and I am still in command of the brigade as Col. Upton has not returned. Colonel Upton has been in Washington looking for his "Star" [General's Star]. Much more personal information to his wife. He refers to General Joseph Bartlett his Division commander. Letter comes with a stamped postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, two items.......................................................$135.00

51754 - BURNSIDE'S ARMY RETURNS TO THE EAST, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., Camp near Welford Ford, VA, April 29th, 1864, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, Have visited Culpepper to see the Adj. It was a pleasant visit but his camp is not as nice as ours, visited Lt. Kimball's tent as he is command of a battery in our Corps and lies near the 20th Corps. I also was at Brandy Station the same day, mentions that a Captain Gorton was cleared of charges in his recent arrest, he is sending his overcoat to Alexandria by Dr. Warren as he is going up with the sick. He will leave it at Segars Bookstore near the Marshall House. Tell his son that he sold his horse Fanny for $180 and he was just as attached to Fanny as his son was to Mac [his horse that he sold when going blind]. He mentions a Captain making money on gambling in camp and selling liquor to the soldiers. They may move soon and heard that Burnside's Army may come this way. Some of his army is here now doing guard duty in their rear while the old army does the fighting. We had a review and parade today with General Wright, one year ago today we were crossing the river below Fredericksburg. Burnside was ordered to take the IX Corps back to the Eastern Theater, where in Annapolis, Maryland, he built it up to strength of over 21,000 effectives. The IX Corps fought in the Overland Campaign of May 1864 as an independent command, reporting initially to Grant; his corps was not assigned to the Army of the Potomac because Burnside outranked its commander, Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, who had been a division commander under Burnside at Fredericksburg. This cumbersome arrangement was rectified on May 24 just before the Battle of North Anna, when Burnside agreed to waive his precedence of rank and was placed under Meade's direct command........................................................$120.00

51755 - BURNSIDE TROOPS ARE MARCHING UP TO RELIEVE HISS REGIMENT, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., May 1st, 1864, Camp near Welford Ford, VA, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, I am writing on a sideboard I use as a table in my tent, yesterday was a mustering day the last the 5th will ever have. He mentions he will be able to bring home $1000, and will bring home two horses home. It is very expensive for him to live these days with the high cost of items, 70 cents for butter, 50 cents for cheese, and 25 cents for sugar [per pound]. They hope to be out of the service in 45 days. He does not know when they will move, the Dr. who returned from Alexandria said Burnside is still marching through Alexandria. It will them toake a day or two to reach us and relieve us. They do the guard duty in the rear while the old troops do the fighting. It is what I expected, the old fellows whose time is about up take to the front. He mentions all is well with some named soldiers, his two servants Jimmy and King and his two horses. The comes with a stamped cover [stamp damaged] addressed to his wife by Edwards, Washington, DC CDS, bulls eye cancellation, DUE 6 in manuscript, two items.................................................$110.00

51756 - WE TRIED TO MAKE A CHARGE ON THE ENEMY BUT THEY WERE TOO STRONG, June 18th, 1864, Camp near Bermuda Hundred, 4 pages to his wife in ink by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, I am in the land of the living as we left Cold Harbor last Sunday evening and have come up by the way of White House and are across the Chickahominy at Lunburg by the John Tyler Plantation which is near Charles City Court House by the river. We took steamer there and came to City Point, but did not land at Bermuda Hundred. We are five miles from the landing and 7 miles from Petersburg. This morning at one o'clock we were turned out to make a charge but found the enemy too strong to undertake it and returned here just at daylight. Our time is out next Thursday and will take a boat to Washington. I have not last any men since I last wrote you unless some poor fellow has died in the hospital. I will telegraph you from Washington about meeting me in Boston. John Tyler's house or Sherwood Plantation - In the spring of 1862 the house was occupied by Union soldiers during McClellan's Peninsula Campaign of 1862 and again during Grant's Overland Campaign in 1864. During the latter, the Battle of Wilson's Wharf was fought nearby. When an Ohio regiment vacated the house in 1864, they attempted to raze it with fire as a punishment for Tyler's support of the Confederacy. The fire was quickly extinguished by a loyal slave and did little damage to the house. The letter comes with a stamped cover addressed by Edwards to his wife, stamp has trifle blem, Washington CDS, two items...................................................$155.00


5140 - ARMY APPOINTMENT SIGNED BY COLONEL JULIUS GARESCHE, WHO HAD HIS HEAD TORN OFF BY A CANNON SHOT AT STONES RIVER, when the American Civil War broke out, he declined a commission as brigadier general of volunteers, and was made chief of staff, with the rank of Lieutenant colonel in the regular army, to Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans. In this capacity, he participated in the operations of the Army of the Cumberland at the Battle of Stones River. Riding with General Rosecrans toward the Round Forest, Garesché was decapitated by a cannonball. The battle was his first combat during the Civil War. General Philip H. Sheridan soon afterward happened upon the lifeless body and removed Garesché's West Point ring and personal Bible. Garesché signs as AAG the appointment of Captain Charles Cambell to the 13th Regiment of Infantry, June 18th, 1861. He was ordered to report to Col. W. T. Sherman at Jefferson Barracks, MO. A scarce signature..........SOLD

31711 - PAY VOUCHER, 14TH US INFANTRY, 2ND LT. JAMES HENTON, January 28th, 1862, 15" X 10", pre-printed and filled-in, payment for service in February 1862, also lists a white servant, $102.50 in total pay. Very good...................................$20.00


LETTERS OF SGT. WILLIAM TITTLE, CO. H. 55TH OHIO INFANTRY [All letters have 100% typed transcripts]

1317 - A FIRSTHAND ACCOUNT OF THE ACTIONS OF THE 55TH OHIO AT SECOND BULLS RUN, A BLOW BY BLOW OF THE CARNAGE PVT. WILLIAM TITTLE SAW DURING THE LATE BATTLE, Camp near Georgetown, September 14th, 1862, 6 pages in pencil with stamped cover by Pvt. William Tittle, 55th OVI to his brother. He relates in part..."I wrote to Allen on the 11th and thought I would write more today. There is a great change in the war lately as the Rebels are going just where they want to go but I am not scared as the old flag will soon by victorious and I think the Rebels will run against a snag soon. Things look dark now. When we went to Bulls Run it was thought that it would be the hardest battle of the war. We got there Thursday evening and Company F was out on picket that night. We though we had a large force and they kept coming in Friday and Saturday. There was no fear that we would gain that day as the ground was covered with soldiers. We would have gained that day as the ground was covered with soldiers. We would have gained that day if they Generals had managed right. I think it is safe to say that there were not more than one third was in the fight. Siegel was very much dissatisfied about the management of things and I am glad McClellan has now got command as there is something wrong about Pope as he issued some strange orders but the 55th got in a fight at last. I SHOT 15 TIMES, SOME OTHER SHOT MORE OR LESS. COLONEL LEE ACTED VERY BRAVE AS HE RALLIED THE REGIMENT THREE TIMES AND THE 4TH TIME TOOK US OFF THE FIELD. HENRY TALMAN WAS SHOT DEAD BY A MUSKET BALL, THERE WERE SEVERAL OF THE BOYS THAT WERE NOT IN THE FIGHT. THE KILLED IN COMPANY H IS W.H. TALMAN SHOT THROUGH THE HEAD, JOHN CONGER WAS KILLED BY A PIECE OF SHELL THAT HIT HIM IN THE NECK, EMORY CASE SHOT THROUGH THE BREAST. A ROSS WAS SHOT IN THE THIGH, WILLIAM NIGLE IN THE ARM, DENNIS SPURRIER IN THE HIP BUT NOT VERY BAD, BARNEY WEIGEL IN THE LEG, JAMES BOSTON IN THE LEG, ENOCK WATSON IN THE HEAD, SIRENAS DEGANE IS MISSING. WHEN WE STOPPED A CANNON BALL TOOK THE HEAD OFF A COLOR BEARER. It was a hard sight, and then we went back about a mile with cannon balls and shells whistling over us all the time. When we advanced we were behind a little rise in ground, there were bullets coming which caused some dodging but the fire was so hot we fell back in a little piece of woods then the Colonel rallied them together and went forward but the fire was to hot they done it this way three times and the fourth time we left the field. There were only 125 men in the regiment when we got off the field and stragglers came in for several days. We then marched a little ways across Bull Run and laid down for a hard fight that afternoon on that road but drove the Rebels back. He continues on to describe Georgetown, sees the Capital across the river. Makes mention of the 64 pound gun near Washington. The biggest guns at Bull Run were 20 pounders, much more by Tittle." The Second Battle of Bull Run or Second Manassas was fought August 28-30, 1862. It was the culmination of an offensive campaign waged by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia against Union Maj. Gen. John Pope's Army of Virginia, and a battle of much larger scale and numbers than the First Battle of Bull Run (First manassas) fought in 1861 on the same ground. Following a wide-ranging flanking march, Confederate Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson captured the Union supply depot at Manassas Junction, threatening Pope's line of communications with Washington, D.C. Withdrawing a few miles to the northwest, Jackson took up defensive positions on Stony Ridge. On August 28, 1862, Jackson attacked a Union column just east of Gainesville, at Brawner's Farm, resulting in a stalemate. On that same day, the wing of Lee's army commanded by Maj. Gen. James Longstreet broke through light Union resistance in the Battle of Thoroughfare Gap and approached the battlefield. Pope became convinced that he had trapped Jackson and concentrated the bulk of his army against him. On August 29, Pope launched a series of assaults against Jackson's position along an unfinished railroad grade. The attacks were repulsed with heavy casualties on both sides. At noon, Longstreet arrived on the field from Thoroughfare Gap and took position on Jackson's right flank. On August 30, Pope renewed his attacks, seemingly unaware that Longstreet was on the field. When massed Confederate artillery devastated a Union assault by Maj. Gen. Fitz John Porter's V Corps, Longstreet's wing of 25,000 men in five divisions counterattacked in the largest, simultaneous mass assault of the war. The Union left flank was crushed and the army was driven back to Bull Run. Only an effective Union rearguard action prevented a replay of the First Manassas disaster. Pope's retreat to Centreville was nonetheless precipitous. An outstanding chronicle of the 2nd Manassas Campaign and the charges of the 55th Ohio...............................$795.00

1320 - WE WERE WITHIN THREE MILES OF FREDERICKSBURG, TERRIBLE FIGHTING THERE, DO NOT KNOW HOW BURNSIDE MADE OUT, Letter started at Chantilly December 9th, 1862 and then he continues at Stafford Court House December 20th, 1862, 4 page letter in ink by Pvt. William Tittle, 55th OVI to his sister with stamped postal cover. He relates in part, "We left Chantilly and marched to Fairfax Court House and camped for the night on the 11th. We then marched towards Fredericksburg for 9 miles and passed Fairfax Station on the 12th. We then marched to Dumfries and heard the first cannonading from Fredericksburg on the 14th. We then marched to Aqua Creek and camped on the 15th. Then we marched to Stafford Court House a distance of 11 miles, then marched for 3 miles and camped on the 16th. We then moved to Potomac Creek crossed the creek and set up camp in the woods. In snow, we moved back to Stafford Court House, very cold, just have thin tents, have set up stoves at the end of the tents, we were within three miles of Fredericksburg where they was terrible fighting but how Burnside made out I do not know. It is reported he got whipped but I do not believe that or Sigel's Corps would have come back. We can't believe anything we here, roads are terrible. While at Chantilly a detail of men were taken out of this brigade for SHARPSHOOTERS, they detailed five privates and one corporal out of the company. I was asked to go but said I would rather stay and be a Corporal in my company."  A descriptive letter from Tittle as his regiment was in reverse near Fredericksburg. Very fine.....................................................SOLD

1343 - PONTOONS LOADED ON CARS TO GO TO FALMOUTH, Sunday April 29th, 1863, Camp near Brooks Station, VA, 5+ pages in ink with a stamped postal cover to his brother by William Tittle. He relates in part, "We drew 5 days rations with orders to put them in our knapsacks and not eat any of them as to be ready to march at any time, we have now 8 days rations and that will be middling heavy in our knapsacks. I think we will soon leave this place as yesterday they took some pontoons past here to Brooks Station to take them on cars to Falmouth. When we got marching orders all the sick were sent to other hospitals, have a good Chaplain named Doctor Wheeler, we had preaching outdoors, more on officers of the 55th." On the 28th, Hooker began crossing the Rappahannock in the Wilderness area upstream from Fredericksburg trying to outflank the Confederates in the city. Letter and cover.......................................................$120.00

1345 - THE LOSSES AT CHANCELLORSVILLE, THE CONDITION OF THE WOUNDED, THE PRISONERS TAKEN, OUR MAJOR WOUNDED IN THREE PLACES, WE WENT TO COLLECT THE WOUNDED ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE RIVER, Camp near Brooks Station, VA, May 17th, 1863, 4 pages in ink with stamped postal cover by William Tittle, 55th OVI to his brother. He related in part, "We should be thankful that our lives have been saved through all the dangers we have been exposed to, I supposed you have heard that Major Stevens is badly wounded and the Rebels hold the battlefield. Our men and the Rebels had a written agreement that we could put down the pontoons and cross on them to fetch all of the wounded one and use them for nothing else and all who crossed over were sworn not to tell nothing what I have seen and they could not take anything or molest anything that belonged to the Confederates and as soon as all the wounded were taken the pontoons were to be taken up. They commenced taking up the wounded last Wednesday. Stevens was fetched last Thursday and I went down to see him Friday morning. His left arms were off above the elbow and he has a flesh wound in his side. He does not know if it was the same ball that hit his arm and side or not but it happened about the same time. Then he was shot through his right leg, he had his knee bent and the ball passed through the leg below the knee but there are no bones broken in his leg. He is having a hard time and I am afraid it will go middling bad for him but he looks and feels as good as can be expected. He said the Rebel officers used him middling well but not others as get one to go and get him a sheet and said he would give him $5. The fellow fetched the sheet and since Stevens had nothing but $10 he gave him the money to get change but that was the last he saw of him. He paid $5 for 1 day of eggs and one pound of butter. Butter is worth 15 cents a pound here. The wounded are up at a division hospital about a mile from here. It is hard to see the wounded, some with one leg off, and some with one arm. They are wounded in  all places. There has been ssome found that were missing. Corporal Eri Mesnard was reported killed but he is here wounded in the shoulder and Corporal E. S. Morse was missing but wounded here. Corporal Dejanes was missing but he is here with one leg amputated below the knee. Private Charles Dudrow and Isaac Livens Barger is both here wounded in the leg. George Runner is wounded in the small of his back and his case is doubtful. All these were taken prisoner and paroled. Phillip Livensbarger & Samuel Starn and James Linn and A. D. Faulkner and John B. York, nothing is known of these five, some of them is likely killed. A little above Fredericksburg our pickets is close to shore and the Rebels are close to the other side, the Rebels had four line seines just above Fredericksburg and they were busy firing but they did not catch many." More details, Sedgwick withdrew across the Rappahannock at Banks Ford during the pre-dawn hours of May 5. When he learned that Sedgwick had retreated back over the river, Hooker felt he was out of options to save the campaign. He called a council of war and asked his corps commanders to vote about whether to stay and fight or to withdraw. Although a majority voted to fight, Hooker had enough, and on the night of May 5-6, he withdrew back across the river at U.S. Ford. It was a difficult operation. Hooker and the artillery crossed first, followed by the infantry beginning at 6 a.m. on May 6. Meade's V Corps served as the rear guard. Rains caused the river to rise and threatened to break the pontoon bridges. Couch was in command on the south bank after Hooker departed, but he was left with explicit orders not to continue the battle, which he had been tempted to do. The surprise withdrawal frustrated Lee's plan for one final attack against Chancellorsville. He had issued orders for his artillery to bombard the Union line in preparation for another assault, but by the time they wee ready Hooker and his men were gone. This letter was written from Union lines across the Rappahannock after the Federals were allowed to retrieve the wounded behind Confederate lines.............................$650.00

1349 - WE ERE CALLED OUT TO THE BREASTWORKS THIS MORNING FOR A FIGHT, Camp near Brooks Station, VA, June 11th, 1863, two page letter in ink to his sister with stamped postal cover by William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part, I was on guard duty at headquarters on the 2nd and had my likeness taken, he descries different poses he took, they cost one dollar each, all ha been quiet in this department since the fight this morning, we were called out at 3 this morning with everything but our tents and went out to the breastworks and stayed until about 6 o'clock and went back to camp, I don't know what scared them [officers to call them out], will send some money home, Colonel Stevens is better, I hope we will live to meet again Sarah." There is continual concern that Lee would make a move towards Washington around Hookers fortifications along the Rappahannock  River, letter and cover.......................................................$85.00

1362 - THE REBELS POUNCED ON THE 12TH CORPS, Camp near Chattanooga, TN, November 1st, 1863, two pages in pencil with stamped Nashville CDS cancellation to his brother by Sergt. William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part, "We left Bridgeport last Sunday evening and marched to Shell mound on the road to Chattanooga 7 miles from Bridgeport. We marched on and had a skirmish with the Rebels and drove them off. Part of the 12th Corps came in that night and the Rebels pounced on them and the fight lasted most of the night and the Rebels didn't gain anything. We lay about four miles from Chattanooga about a half of mile from the foot of Lookout Mountain. We are strongly entrenched and may force a big fight at anytime. I have not heard from since we left Bristoe [VA]. We get little mail here." Letter and cover.................................$145.00


1368 - THEY ARE BUILDING A WAGON ROAD UP LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN, BLASTING ROCK, Camp in Lookout Valley, February 3rd, 1864, 4 page letter and cover written to his sister by William Tittle now of the 136th NYV. He relates in part, "about the poor quality of the regimental surgeon as another surgeon examined them and was not satisfied with the first surgeon's findings. The boys are very well dissatisfied with the officers in the 136th NY. Hopes that the Governor of Ohio will do something about getting them to a Ohio regiment. They are building a wagon [road] up round the point of Lookout Mountain and they are blasting rock all the time, also building ovens at the station to bake soft bread. Hooker is in command of the 11th and 12th Corps, Steinwehr commands the 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 11th Corps. Howard is still at home and Schurz commands the 11th Corps. Colonel Smith sent home with the 93rd Ohio. There were a good many barefooted soldiers, it looked hard but was no help for them." Many more details not mentioned...............................$139.00

1371 - THE 55TH AND 73RD OHIO ARE BACK, Camp in Lookout Valley, TN, March 9th, 1864, two page letter in ink by William Tittle [still in the 136th NYV] with stamped cover to his brother. He relates in part, "The old 55th got back here on the 3rd and proceeded to build cap, the 73rd Ohio had previously arrived, both have about 100 new recruits, the boys all said they had a good time when home in Ohio, I went out on two day picket and got in yesterday at noon and in the afternoon our brigade was reviewed by General Howard, it was a nice thing to see such well drilled troops, went over to the old regiment to see Albean Lee, several cases of smallpox here lately." Tittle was still assigned to the 136th NYV and had hopes with the 55th Ohio returning to Tennessee and the Corps he would be returned to his old regiment....................................................$79.00

 

1372 - REBEL DESERTERS ARE COMING IN OUR LINES, WE WENT TO HEAR A COLORED MAN PREACH, Camp in Lookout Valley, TN, March 13th, 1864, 2 plus pages in ink with a stamped postal cover to his brother by William Tittle, 136th NYV. He relates in part, "A good many deserters are coming in from the Rebel Army, I can't see their army getting any stronger with their conscripting by the way their men are deserting. I am glad to see them come in as that is less that we have to fight. I have just been to lookout Station it is a little more than a mile from our camp. WE WENT TO HEAR A CULERD [colored] man preach he is from Athens, it is reported here that the 11th and 12th Corps is going back to Virginia. I expect to leave very soon for the Invalid Corps, I don't like that very well, a new division of all Western troops coming to the 11th Corps from Nashville." While assigned to the 136th NY he had been declared unfit to serve and was awaiting transfer to the Invalid Corps, interesting commentary about hearing a Colored man preach to the troops.....................................................SOLD

 

1377 -  I HAVE ONLY FIVE MINUTES TO WRITE AS WE EXPECT A BIG BATTLE, Camp in Georgia, May 12th, 1864, one page not with stamped postal cover by William Tittle, 55th Ohio to his nephew. He jots down this quick note, I take my pen in hand to let you know I well and received your last letter. I HAVE ONLY FIVE MINUTES TO WRITE AS WE EXPECT A BIG FIGHT SOON!" W. Tittle, write soon. Tittle refers to the impending big battle at Resaca, GA as the 55th was moving in position for that battle. A rare pre-battle note.................................................$85.00

 

1378 - THE BATTLE OF NEW HOPE CHURCH, MAY 25TH, 1864, In the line of Battle near Dallas, GA, May 30th, 1864, two pages in pencil with stamped postal cover to his sister by William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part, "We have been closed in on the Rebels all the time and here the 25th they have been fighting all day. Our brigade got here at 3 PM and at 5 PM we moved forward with the 3rd Regiment in the 1st line and 2nd in the reserve. The 55th was in the front and center. A short time the regiment on our right and left became engaged and lost middling heavy. The 55th lost only three wounded as the fight was in thick woods and the Rebels in the breastworks. The nettle lasted until dark. It rained during the night and we were relieved and went back one mile. Thursday we moved to the front and then moved behind breastworks and remained there. There was heavy skirmishing along the line last night and a little to our left the Rebels made a charge on out works and were repulsed and then they tried the extreme right at the same time and met the same fate. Rebel sharpshooters bother us all day long until it gets dark. The 49th Ohio has been engaged on our left and lost heavy." The battle of New Hope Church was fought May 25-26, 1864, between the Union force of Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman and the Confederate Army of Tennessee under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston during the Atlanta Campaign of the American Civil War. The battle was a result of an attempt by Sherman to outmaneuver Johnston. After Johnston retreated to Altoona Pass on May 19-20, Sherman decided that he would most likely pay dearly for attacking Johnston there, so he determined to move around Johnston's left flank and steal a march toward Dallas. Johnston anticipated Sherman's move and shifted his army into Sherman's path, centering a new line at New Hope Church. Sherman mistakenly surmised that Johnston had a token force and ordered Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker's XX Corps to attack. Advancing with his three divisions in parallel routes, Hooker pushed the Confederates back for three miles, before coming to Johnston's main line. Difficult terrain prevented Hooker from coordinating his corps' attacks effectively, causing his men to suffer severe casualties, especially from canister and shrapnel. On May 26, both sides entrenched, and skirmishing continued throughout the day. At the end of the battle, Confederate Captain Samuel T. Foster reported that 703 Union soldiers had been killed, as well as 350 had been taken prisoner. The next day, the Union army concentrated its efforts in this area towards the northern end of the Confederate line, resulting in the Battle of Pickett's Mill................................................................$295.00

 

1380 - THE BATTLE AT MARIETTA GEORGIA, Camp near Marietta, GA, June 20th, 1864, 4 pages in pencil with a stamped postal cover to his sister by William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part, "on the 15th the rebels fell back and at noon we started and marched slowly awhile then formed in the line of battle with skirmishing going on all the time and at half paast six we moved forward in line of battle, that day our brigade was in the third line and we went a little ways until the Rebels opened up with their artillery with grape and canister. We moved within rifle shot of their breastworks and lay down. There was timber between us and them with skirmishing all the time. We laid there until dark and built breastworks. We did not lose many in our brigade but the front line lost heavy. Brisk skirmishing and cannonading went on day after day until the night of the 16th when the Rebels left at daylight and our men started in pursuit and drove them two miles where they made another stand. There was sharp skirmishing and cannonading that evening and that night the Rebels attacked our line to our left three time but was handsomely repulsed. The 18th continued with a continual roar of cannon and skirmishing all day. The 19th, the Rebels left last night during all the rain we had. We came about three miles and came to the line and formed here. Our brigade was in the front and Company H & K were deployed as skirmishers and we moved forward through a thick woods and just before we got through the woods we came across their skirmishers, we drove them across a cornfield through a shower of bullets to another piece of woods then through them and established our line. There was brisk skirmishing all the time. We were then relieved. Thomas Fox was the only one hurt in the company as he left his left arm. I do not know how many in the regiment were hurt but I think not many. News from Virginia is good, hear that Lincoln has been nominated and the choice for vice president is satisfactory...Cannonading and skirmishing is heard all the day." The Battle of Marietta was a series of military operations from Jun 9 through July 3, 1864, in Cobb County, Georgia, between Union and Confederate forces. The Union forces, led by Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman, encountered the Confederate Army of Tennessee, led by Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, entrenched near Marietta, Georgia. Several engagements were fought during this four-week period, including the battles of Pine Mountain (June 14), Gilgal Church (June 15), Kolb's Farm (June 22), and Kennesaw Mountain (June 27). Sherman forced Johnston to withdraw partially on June 10 to protect his supply lines, but the Union forces were not fully victorious until July 3. Pencil, a trifle light in spots but quite readable. Great Atlanta Campaign battle content.....................................................$395.00

1381 - UNION ATTACKS JUST PRIOR TO THE BATTLE OF KENNESAW MOUNTAIN, A FRIEND KILLED AS HE WAS DRIVING AMMUNITION WAGON, Camp in line of battle near Marietta, GA, June 30th, 1864, three pages in pencil with a stamped postal cover, to his sister by William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part, "on the 22nd Butterfield's division moved out and formed in line in our Brigade in the front line at noon. We charged across a cornfield and forced our line along a little ridge in a piece of woods and built breastworks. We done this under a brisk skirmish fire, Company H lost one Sergeant killed and Clark Kline slightly wounded in the wrist and he is with the company. I do not know how many were lost that day but we have lost 126 in killed and wounded since we have left Lookout Valley. I do not know how many we have left but the regiment is very small. We were relieved by the 11th Corps that night. We moved to the right two miles and camped in the line of battle the 23rd at 2 o'clock in the morning and I went out on the skirmish line at 10 am. We were relieved again and we moved one mile to the right and our brigade formed in the second line and built breastworks, skirmishing brisk and in the evening there was heavy firing and skirmishing. On the 24th skirmishing all day with brisk firing on our left in the evening, the skirmishing all last night of the 25th and all day Sunday. The 26th clear and skirmishing all day. The 27th at 4 o'clock we were relieved and moved and cannonading was brisk until about noon. To our left one division of the 4th Corps charged on the Rebel works at little to the left where our division was on the 22nd with heavy losses. Yesterday some our boys went over to see the 49th and 101's [Ohio] but they were not in the fight. Our men had sent in a Flag of Truce to get the dead and wounded. The boys said it looked strange to see our men and the Rebels together between the works and no shooting but in our front there was brisk skirmishing all day. Last night there was some hard fighting on our left and it is reported that the Rebels charged the 14th Corps twice and were repulsed with heavy losses. A good many prisoners were in the same place today, skirmishing is the heaviest on our right last night. General Butterfield started home on a leave of absence and General Ward took command of the division. Gust Crum was killed the 26th by a stray bullet as he was driving a team in the Division ammunition train. He was going over to the 101st Ohio to see his brother and I think it was near that regiment that it happened and he was shot through the breast and I think he lived but a little while but his brother got to see him before he died. Poor Gus he was a good hearted fellow." Sherman's 1864 campaign against Atlanta, Georgia, was initially characterized by a series of flanking maneuvers against Johnston, each of which compelling the Confederate army to withdraw from heavily fortified positions with minimal casualties on either side. After two months and 70 miles of such maneuvering, Sherman's path was blocked by imposing fortifications on Kennesaw Mountain near Marietta, Georgia, and the Union general chose to change his tactics and ordered a large-scale frontal assault on June 27, 1864. Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson feinted against the northern end of Kennesaw Mountain, while his corps under Maj. Gen. John A. Logan assaulted Pigeon Hill on its southwest corner. At the same time, Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas launched strong attacks against Cheatham Hill at the center of the Confederate line. Both attacks were repulsed with heavy losses, but a demonstration by Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield achieved a strategic success by threatening the Confederate army's left flank, prompting yet another  Confederate withdrawal toward Atlanta and the removal of General Johnston from command of the army..........................................................$595.00

 

1382 - THE REBELS EVACUATED KENNESAW MOUNTAIN, WE ARE IN PURSUIT OF THEM, Camp near the Chattahoochee River, July 12th, 1864, 4 pages in ink to his nephew with a stamped postal cover by William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part, "Well the war goes bravely on the night of the 2nd the Rebels left their position on Kennesaw Mountain and at daylight the 3rd our men started in pursuit. The Rebels had four lines of works and some of the strongest works I have ever seen. It would have been impossible to take them by storm. At 10 o'clock out advance came on the Rebels and the shelling was brisk a little while and the Rebels started at noon. We came to where they were fortifying and we formed in a line and built temporary breastwork. The Rebels threw a few shells but nobody was hurt. At 11 o'clock we were relieved by the 14th Corps and our division moved to the right 2 miles and camped in a line of battle. The next morning was the 4th. With some cannonading on our left at 11 o'clock we moved to the right for 2 miles and built breastworks. it was said that the Rebels were coming to attack us before we had the line formed but they did not come and the Rebels fell back. On the morning of the 5th it was very warm and we marched very slow and we camped in a piece of woods in the rear of the 1st Division 20th Corps. There was some skirmishing and cannonading most of the day, the rebels were in our way 6 miles ahead so we did not go faster. We had orders to march at a moments notice and we marched five miles and camped. There was some skirmishing and cannonading most all day and we are in the same place yet. The Rebels had crossed the river and our picket line is on the north side and the Rebels on the other. We camped two miles from the river and the railroad cards run within two miles of the river. the boys who have been out front says the last works the Rebels left is by odds the strongest they have ever seen and I don't know what kind of works they will build next. The corn fields are mostly destroyed. They have fetched one of the boys from the skirmish line he is wounded in the leg, a flesh wound below the knee and it was done by a sharpshooter from a post. James Linn died in a hospital in Chattanooga June the 27th with the typhoid fever." Much more information. The opposing forces spent five days facing each other at close range, but on July 2, with good summer weather at hand, Sherman sent the Army of the Tennessee and Stoneman's cavalry around the Confederate left flank and Johnston was forced to withdraw from Kennesaw Mountain to prepared positions at Smyrna. On July 8, Sherman outflanked Johnston again--for the first time on his right--by sending Schofield to cross the Chattahoochee near the mouth of Soap Creek. The last major geographic barrier to entering Atlanta had been overcome. Alarmed at the imminent danger posed to the city of Atlanta, and frustrated with the strategy of continual withdrawals, Confederate President Jefferson Davis relieved Johnston of command on July 17, replacing him with the aggressive John Bell Hood, who was temporarily promoted to full general.......................................................$425.00

 

1384 - THE BATTLE OF PEACHTREE CREEK, ARTILLERY SHELLING ATLANTA, A SUPERB ACCOUNT, In line of battle near Atlanta, July 25th, 1864, 4 pages in ink with stamped cover to his sister by William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part describing the prelude to the battle and the battle itself, "Well we have had another fight Sunday the 17gh, we started from camp at 11 o'clock and marched up the Chattahoochee River and crossed the river I mile east of the Chattanooga & Atlanta Railroad then marched 4 miles and camped for the night a distance of eight miles. The morning of the 18th we started at 9 o'clock and marched in line of battle through thick woods one mile to a creek here we stopped at 3 o'clock and we marched about four miles most of the way in line of battle and through the woods then we formed in line and camped for the night. There was some skirmishing most of the day the 19th and we did not move. There was some skirmishing all day the 20th. We had orders to march at daylight but did not start until 8 o'clock. We marched two miles and crossed PEACH TREE CREEK and formed a line on the right of the 4th Corps. The skirmish line advance some but we did not move up. The day was terribly warm and we had no shade. At 4 o'clock the Rebels made the attack and drove our skirmish line back but were in line ready for them. Our Regiment was in the second line and we met them in the open filed and drove them back to where our skirmish line was and held it. Firing was heavy in this engagement and the Rebels were badly beaten and the loss in the 20th Corps is estimated at 1784 killed, wounded, and missing. Our front was well covered with dead and wounded Rebels. Most of the prisoners said they knew they could not drive us back but they had to try it. The loss in the 55th was 3 killed and 22 wounded. Company H lost 7 wounded. At dark I had to go to the rear because of blindness. The 21st there was skirmishing all day and we held our position on the 22nd. Last night the Rebels fell back and we advanced our line 1 mile in our front but our right advanced a good deal more. We formed in line and built strong works. In the evening there was some shelling after dark. The Rebels made a light attack on the 23rd. Today at noon our Brigade moved to the right of our Corps and our position is the right of our regiment on the east side of the Chattanooga & Atlanta Railroad. We are only 2 miles from Atlanta and can see the town. Saturday evening our men commenced throwing shells in Atlanta with a 20# Parrot gun and threw one shell every five minutes all nigh and all day yesterday. They would not have a very quiet Sunday in Atlanta today as there is considerable cannonading from both sides. The Rebels lost two major Generals and Stevenson [20th Corps] was killed. Reports are that Hardee is mortally wounded and a prisoner and has died. I think they will soon leave this place. Major General McPherson is reported killed on our side. I hope it is not true. His command is between Atlanta and Augusta and he has destroyed the railroad. My eyes are no better as I cannot see at night. The Surgeon says he can do nothing for me nor can anything be done for me in the service. Lieut. Beaver still has command of our company and he will do all that he can for me." An outstanding account of the days leading up to and the Battle of Peachtree Creek. Throughout the morning of July 20, the Army of the Cumberland crossed Peachtree Creek and began taking up defensive positions. The few hours between the Union crossing and their completion of defensive earthworks were a moment of opportunity for the Confederates. Hood committed two of his three corps to the attack: Hardee's corps would attack on the right, while the corps of General Alexander P. Stewart would attack on the left. Meanwhile, the corps of General Benjamin Cheatham would keep an eye on the Union forces to the east of Atlanta. The Confederate attack was finally mounted at around four o'clock in the afternoon. On the Confederate right, Hardee's men ran into fierce opposition and were unable to make much headway, with the Southerners suffering heavy losses. The failure of the attack was largely due to faulty execution and a lack of pre-battle reconnaissance. On the Confederate left, Stewart's attack was more successful. Two Union brigades were forced to retreat, and most of the 33rd New Jersey Infantry Regiment (along with its battle flag) were captured by the Rebels, as was a 4-gun Union artillery battery. Union forces counter attacked, however, and after a bloody struggle, successfully blunted the Confederate offensive. Artillery helped stop the Confederate attack on Thomas' left flank. A few hours into the battle, Hardee was preparing the send in his reserve, the division of General Patrick Cleburne, which he hoped would get the attack moving again and allow him to break through the Union lines. An urgent message from Hood, however, forced him to cancel the attack and dispatch. Cleburne to reinforce Cheatham, who was being threatened by a Union attack and in need of reinforcements. The Union lines had bent but not broken under the weight of the Confederate attack, and by the end of the day the Rebels had failed to break through anywhere along the line. Estimated casualties were 6,506 in total; 1,710 on the Union side and 4,796 on the Confederate............................................................$1,200.00

 

1386 - THE ACTION AT UTOY CREEK AUGUST 5-7TH, 1864, ATLANTA CAMPAIGN, In line of battle near Atlanta, GA, Sunday August 7th, 1864, 4 pages in ink with a stamped cover to his sister by William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part, "It isn't a very pleasant place to write with the bullets whistles past here occasionally. We have advanced out line some since I last wrote. Our Division came on this line the afternoon of the 5th and our division is in a open field in plain view of the Rebel works, but we have pretty strong works and have put up shades. We are about three quarters of a mile from a Rebel fort. When we came to this place the Rebels shelled considerable until dark, and then yesterday in the forenoon they threw a few shells. Some they throw are 64# shells. They make a loud noise when they explode but as luck would have it they have not done us much harm. On July 29th, our division marched to the extreme right a distance of 11 miles. The 30th we moved ¾ mile further to the right as the line was extended. Our brigade camped in the rear to support the flank. The 31st at noon our brigade marched without tents and knapsacks. We went on a reconnaissance to support Davies Division. The 2nd of August at 5 o'clock our division marched back to our Corps. The Rebels still hold Atlanta yet but I don't think they can hold out much longer for our right is getting closer to East Point and that is there last railroad. I heard their cars running this morning. We have lost our brave Hooker why he left I do not know. We hear all kind of reports that he will take command of what General Meade has. I don't care as long as they get the right Generals in the right place. Needs stamps, running out of paper and envelopes, need to camp where a Sutler is located."  After failing to envelop Hood's left flank at Ezra Church, Sherman still wanted to extend his right flank to hit the railroad between East Point and Atlanta. He transferred Schofield's Army of the Ohio from his left to his right flank and sent him to the north bank of Utoy Creek. Although Schofield's troops were at Utoy Creek on August 2, they, along with the XIV Corps, Army of the Cumberland did not cross until August 4. Schofield's force began its movement to exploit this situation on the morning of August 5, which was initially successful. Schofield then had to regroup his forces, which took the rest of the day. The delay allowed the Confederates to strengthen their defenses with abatis, which slowed the Union attack when it restarted on the morning of August 6. The Federals were repulsed with heavy losses and failed in an attempt to break the railroad. On August 7, the Union troops moved toward the Confederate main line and entrenched. They remained there until late August.......................................................$295.00

 

1387 - IN THE LINE OF BATTLE NEAR ATLANTA, MANY MEN LOST, In line of battle near Atlanta, GA, August 14th, 1864, 2 pages in ink with stamped postal cover by William Tittle, 55th OVI to his sister. He relates in part, "Tells his sister of the letters he has sent and received. My eyes are better than they were but seeing at night I see very light, we have established two new lines in front of what we was, we are middling close to the Rebel works and there are brisk skirmishing all the time and some heavy cannonading sometimes, we lose men every day. It is not much use for me to write about the war as you get the papers and know what happens as soon as we do except what happens close to us."..................................................................$150.00

 

1388 - BATTLE OF TURNERS FERRY, GA, ATLANTA CAMPAIGN, August 29th, 1864, Camp in line of Battle of Turners Ferry on the Chattahoochee River, GA, 2 page letter in ink with stamped postal cover from William Tittle, 55th OVI to his nephew. He relates in part, "Since I last wrote one line has changed for which I hope for the better, on the 25th at 3 o'clock we left our lines in front of Atlanta and fell back to the ferry, the left all fell back to the river. We marched about 5 miles and got here a little before daylight. They had come the day before to build temporary works. We have been working most of the time since and now. We are strongly entrenched. The first day we were here it was very quiet all I only heard 2 or 3 shots but the 27th at noon the Rebels made the attack and drove in our pickets and blasted two 12# guns back about half a mile and shelled our works briskly and in a little while they left. They were just a small force. They came to find where we had went. Company H had 1 killed and 1 wounded. Yesterday it was quite every once in a while we would hear a shot and there were small squads of Rebels seen in our front. My eyes have gotten better. I think it was caused by the heat." Threatening East Point, GA south of Atlanta, Schofield's Federals massed and demonstrated as other units of Sherman's Army came into position endangering Hood's last entry lines in and out of Atlanta. Battles took place at Turner's Ferry and Pace's Ferry along the Chattahoochee River........................................................$285.00


LETTER ARCHIVE SGT. EDGAR B. BENNETT CO K. 1ST CONN. HEAVY ARTILLERY

1304 - FORT RICHARDSON, VA, MEN ARE DRAFTED AND MAY NEVER SEE THEIR HOMES AGAIN, September 2nd, 1863. 3 pages in ink to his fiancée Mary, by Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part, "I will not worry about the draft although my Uncles have been drafter, but I cannot help thinking and feeling bad about those who have come here against their wills and leave their homes to have their wives and children mourn their loss if they should never return and many will never know how they died or where they are buried...You can't believe the War news here, one day Charleston is taken the next day it is not taken." SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag...........................................SOLD

1307 - SOLDIERS COMING THROUGH ARE HEADING TO TENNESSEE, Fort Richardson, VA, October 31st, 1863. 3 pages in ink, with stamped cover CDS Alexandria, VA, from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary his fiancée. He relates in part..."A lot of soldiers are coming through here and going to Tennessee. They are mostly veterans. Our officers are trying to get us to re-enlist; he discusses the re-enlistment of the men in January in Connecticut. Edger goes home for Christmas and becomes engaged to Mary"...SILK REMNANTS FROM THE FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag..........................$75.00

1308 - THE BOYS ARE ALL SNOWBALLING, Fort Richardson, VA, January 11, 1864. 3 pages to Mary, Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part upon his arrival back in camp, "We are building barracks, drilling the recruits which is keeping the Sergeants and Corporals busy day and night, we received 15 more recruits today, there are 7 men in our shanty instead of five, there is so much noise that it is difficult to write, the boys are all snowballing and having a time of it." SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag, light water stains, pages 2/3 light but readable....................................................$60.00

1311 - I SENT MY BOUNTY CHECK BY MAIL, Fort Richardson, VA, February 4th, 1864. 2 pages in ink by Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."I decided to send on the 3rd a check for $300. I thought I would risk it by mail. It would apt to be just as safe as by Express, he has very little war news to tell her from where he is," SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag..........................................$65.00

1312 - BEFORE PETERSBURG, VA, February 21st, 1864. 2 pages in ink with stamped cover, CDS Alexandria, VA, to Mary from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."I just got back from my old place from sharp shooting. I had very good luck in getting back but I had to go to Annapolis, MD, so I got on the mail boat at 8 o'clock and got into City Point at 3 in the afternoon," more newsy notes to Mary. SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag..............................$65.00

1313 - THE WAR DEPARTMENT WILL PAY US $16 PER MONTH, Fort Richardson, VA, February 26th, 1864. 2 pages written in red ink from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary..."The War department has concluded that they will pay the soldiers $16 per month," more news to his fiancée Mary. SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag....................................$55.00

1315 - EXCUSE THE WRITING AS IT IS DARK IN THESE BARRACKS, Fort Richardson, VA, March 8th, 1864. 2 pages in ink to his "Minnie" [Mary his fiancée]. He relates in part...News is scarce, they are fixing the barracks, it is so noisy one can hardly think, he has to go on guard tomorrow in the rain, please excuse the writing as it is very dark in the barracks, he describes the barracks...80' long, 30' wide, 150 men in them, two rows of bunks three high, the top ones are 6' from the floor, 6 men in a bunk area, 2 in each tier, the aisle through the barracks is 8' wide, we have two stoves in each barracks," a good act of the barracks at Fort Richardson, VA." SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag.................................................$85.00

 

1317 - A HUGE SNOWFALL HAS BURIED THE CAMP AND INTO THE BARRACKS, March 24th, 1864. 2 pages in ink from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, comes with a stamped cover postmarked Alexandria, VA. He relates to Mary in part..."The snow blew into the barracks as bad as it did outdoors, we were all wet even our beds, the blankets were all wet through, everything I have to my name is wet, most of the boys do not have dry blankets to sleep under tonight. It was more than uncomfortable as it was so call I could not get out for roll call this morning. Today we went out and snowballed most of the day. They boys are now around the stoves drying their clothes, many are sick...Charter the drummer is just going to beat the call so I must close." There are light water stains due to the paper being wet before he wrote the letter...Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar.......................................$75.00

 

1319 - REPORTS ON THE BATTLE OF THE WILDERNESS, May 8th, 1864. 2+ pages in ink, stamped cover postmarked Alexandria, VA, from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."We have had plenty of news from the front. They are fighting now and have been fighting for three days [Battle of the Wilderness], the papers say there are severe losses on both sides. It says tonight that there losses are 13,000. His losses [Confederate] wounded is 10,000 and killed 3,000. They say our losses are heavy but don't say how much, the troops on the Peninsular are doing well though, we continue to drill for 2 hours each day"...SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag................................................................$165.00

1320 - WE ARE ON THE MOVE-ON TO PETERSBURG, Camp White, VA, May 10th, 1864. 3 pages in bold pencil with a stamped cover postmarked Alexandria, VA, from Sergt. Edger Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."We have started for the front, we left Fort Richardson today about noon and are in little shelter tents, we carry our houses and beds on our backs but the officers don't, one good thing is they let us leave our dress coats behind, I can't write much as I have nothing to write on but my knee. I can't write with a pen so I hope you can read this. I do not know how quick you will received this as we will travel by water and it may be a week before I can mail it," Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and cover................................................$85.00

 

1321 - WE ARE NINE MILES FROM RICHMOND, Camp near Petersburg, VA, May 15th, 1864. 3 pages in pencil from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery to Mary, comes with a stamped cover postmarked OLD POINT COMFORT, VA. He relates in part..."We have pork and crackers and coffee when we are not too lazy to cook it, we have our siege train with us and are now with General Butler...we expect to be engaged in battle each day, at present we are nine miles from the City of Richmond." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and cover...........................$85.00

12271 - WE ARE IN THE PRINCIPAL POINT FOR THE REBELS TO ATTACK US, PUTTING UP PROTECTION FOR THE GUN, June 9th, 1864, Camp in the field. A hurried pencil 2 page letter by Sgt. Edgar B. Bennett of the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to his fiancée Mary. He relates in part to her..."We are still under the fire of the Rebels, everybody is at work to protect themselves. My detachment is putting up mantelet in front of the gun to protect from fragments of shells coming through the embrasure and killing the men. You perhaps have seen in the papers about General Terry's brigade and about his front having to do all the artillery fighting. General Terry [Alfred Howe terry Brig. Gen.] is commander of the X Corps. He is in our works all the time the firing is going on for we are at the principal point for the Rebs to attack. It is an open field in front of us." Letter comes with the stamped cover as well as SILK FRAGMENTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG OF THE 1ST CONN. HEAVY ARTILLERY...Bennett was later wounded in front of Petersburg by a saber cut and captured in March of 1865. His regiment manned the famous mortar "Dicator" that fired on Petersburg from a railroad car......................................................................$195.00

1323 - VIRGINIA IS QUITE A GRAVE YARD, MORE WILL DIE IF GRANT MOVES AGAIN THIS MONTH, Camp in the field near Petersburg, VA, June 12th, 1864. 3 pages in bold pencil by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."The Signal Officers say that Grant will try and move again this week, a lot of soldiers will get killed or wounded if he does. The 2nd Connecticut Vol. Infantry has lost 385 men in their regiment...we get two loves of soft bread a week and the rest is crackers, Virginia has to be quite a grave yard! I got to go outside our lines to see the Rebel shells they have thrown over here and not burst. They could be picked up by the wagonloads but no ones dare to touch them. It is a sad sight to see the headboards of dead soldiers from our regiment...when the Rebs are quite we go to the steam and wash up." Comes with a stamped cover postmarked OLD POINT COMFORT, VA. SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter, cover and remnants of the flag........................................SOLD

1324 - CAMP NEAR PETERSBURG, VA, June 20th, 1864. One page letter in pencil to Mary by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery. He relates in this short letter "we have not have had any fighting since Saturday, today it is quite on our front," SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag.............................$75.00

1325 - THERE IS FIGHTING ON BOTH SIDE OF US, CANNONS CAN BE HEARD FOR MILES, Camp in the field near Petersburg, VA, June 27th, 1864. 3 pages in bold pencil [very light stains], to Mary from Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part, "Myself and 13 other men were moved to what is called a redon and about 300 yards from the Rebel pickets. Our company is the only one left here as the rest of the regiment has gone to Petersburg...yesterday they were fighting on both sides of us and very hard. The cannon can be heard for miles. Our Colonel has left us and is now on General Grant's staff and our Major is now on General Terry's Staff so we have but one staff officer. The other day they gave us pickles and onions, peppers and cabbages and soft bread. We have plenty to eat and drink and some fresh beef...sometimes draw him and bacon, we do not know where Grant is?" Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter comes with a stamped postal cover postmarked OLD POINT COMFORT, VA, an excellent letter and cover.......................................SOLD

 

1325A - REDAN #2 NEAR THE JAMES RIVER, FIGHTING ALL AROUND US TODAY, June 30th, 1864. Two pages in pencil written in the field by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."I am very anxious here and hope to be able to rejoin my company and am keeping a eye for a company of the 13th NY Artillery to relieve me, there has been hard fighting all around us today, we expect fighting in our front and there is every indication of it now, most of our regiment is a Petersburg...I must go as the officer in charge has sent for me." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar. An interesting letter when his redan was just about to be attacked.......................................$95.00

 

1325B - ALL THE COMPANIES HAVE LOST MEN ON THIS TOUR, WE HAVE CONFIDENCE IN GRANT, Camp in the field [on James River], July 4th, 1864. 3 pages in pencil to Minnie [Mary] by Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..., "The regiment is broken up in several camps, we have lost a number of men, Company I lost 7, Company D has lost 3 or 4, and the other companies more or less. They have been fighting at Petersburg quite hard and the same for Grant here as it was with Old Abe at the fair in Philadelphia. [Lincoln's Philadelphia Speech in June asked for more troops for General Grant's Army] Grant will fight it out on this line if it takes all summer but we all have faith in General Grant." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and stamped cover. 2 items............................$115.00

 

1326 - THERE HAS BEEN HARD FIGHTING ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE JAMES RIVER, THE SOLDIERS DON'T LIKE ABE, Battery Anderson, VA, August 20th, 1864. 3 pages in ink to Mary by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, letter and stamped cover OLD POINT COMFORT, VA. He relates in part..."There has been hard fighting on the north side of the James River for several days past. We still remain in our battery...Petersburg is the same it has been for the past two months. There is a great deal of talk of politics here and most of the soldiers in for McClellan. THERE IS LITTLE SAID IN FAVOR OF ABE, THEY DON'T LIKE HIM AT ALL." SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter, cover and remnants of the flag.............................SOLD

 

1327 - THE 6TH AND 7TH CONNECTICUT REGIMENTS HAVE BEEN IN ALL THE ENGAGEMENTS, Battery Anderson, VA, August 29th, 1864. 3 pages in ink to Mary by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."The 6th and 7th Regiments have been in all the engagements this side of the James River and the north side too, and they have now gone to Petersburg, he feels that along with many others the war was right." SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter, stamped cover and remnants of the flag............................................$125.00

 

1328 - THE CONFEDERATE BATTERY AT DUTCH GAP THREW SHELLS WEIGHING 200# INTO OUR BATTERY, September 11th, 1864, Battery Sawyer, VA. 3 page letter in ink to Mary from Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."We have not gone to Petersburg yet as we were ordered...as long as I have been in the Army I have never witnessed what I did yesterday...the Rebs have what we call the Howlett House Battery [at Dutch Gap]. It commands the river around Turkey Bend. At about 12 o'clock they with 20# Parrott guns began to shell us in our battery. We had not fired a shot when the Howlett House Battery opened up on us and with the great guns they threw shells that weighted 200 pounds right into our battery. Nothing ever made me afraid before then since I have been in the Army. They continued their fire for two hours...they burst their shells in our battery...we were all covered with dirt several times."  Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, an excellent letter by Bennett.....................................................$165.00

1329 - WE MOVE TO PETERSBURG TOMORROW
, Battery Anderson, VA, September 12th, 1864. Two pages in ink to Mary from Srgt. Edgar Bennett, written on his personal stationary...Company K, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in a short letter to Mary..."We go to Petersburg tomorrow morning the 13th, I must make this short as we are packing for the move in the morning," Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, unique stationary by Bennett, Seal with Eagle, fine........................................
$95.00

 

1330 - THE SHARPSHOOTERS KEEP UP THEIR DEADLY WORK, Battery #10 near Petersburg, VA, September 27th, 1864. Two pages in ink to Mary from Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."We have not heard the particulars from Butler's lines but there has been fighting that has lasted two days...the Sharpshooters keep up their deadly work. They kill three or four each day, Oh it is awful to see how they work for it as it is sure death for the men they take aim at!", Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and stamped cover postmarked Washington, 2 items...............................................$145.00

 

1330A - GRANT HAD TO LEAVE THE DEAD AND WOUNDED ON THE FIELD AS LEE WAS TOO STRONG, October 30th, 1864. 3 pages in ink to Mary, before Petersburg, VA, by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part, "The army has earned me a good lesson I will never forget and many others will not forget either, Grant's move on the left resulted him leaving the field with his dead and wounded on it for Lee was too strong for him to take Petersburg or Richmond. When Grant left the field he left 180 wounded or thereabouts, perhaps more for the Rebels to take care of. Oh how sad it will make the mothers and Sisters of those who were left on the field to die in such a horrible death as they would have to if they died there." Bennett was later wounded in front of Petersburg by a saber cut and captured in March of 1865. His regiment manned the famous mortar "Dictator" that fired on Petersburg from a railroad car, comes with a stamped cover cancelled Washington, 2 items...................................................$170.00

 

1334 - GRANT WAS NOT AS SUCCESSFUL AS HOPED, Before Petersburg, December 16th, 1864. Three pages in ink to Mary by Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."Grant was not as successful as he might have been, no one knows about the great move Grant was going to make to annihilate the Rebel Army, we all want to see our General R. O. Tyler...Colonel Abbott is appointed Brig. General so we will soon have a new Colonel. There are rumors that the Rebels are evacuating Petersburg." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter with stamped cover..............................................$100.00

 

1335 - BUTLER CONTINUES ON HIS CANAL, THE OFFICERS ARE STILL DRUNK, Before Petersburg, January 2nd, 1865. 3 pages in ink to Mary by Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."Yesterday, Sunday was the first time we ever had orders not to fire on Sunday and I think it was on account the Commanding general knew that the officers would get drunk and then try an see what they could do, some of the officers were drunk all Saturday night and they have not gotten sober yet. Such a crowd of officers I have never seen in the Army in my life as we are getting these days for they spend more on whiskey than their pay amounts to...Butler continues on his canal at the James River." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter with stamped cover......................................................$100.00

 

1336 - THE REBELS CAME UP LAST NIGHT AND BUILT A SHANTY IN FRONT OF THE PICKETS, Before Petersburg, VA, January 8th, 1865. 3 pages in ink by Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."The Rebels came out last night, they had the impatience to come out in front of their picket line and put up some sort of a shanty. For what it is for nobody knows. Some think it is for sharpshooters...the muddy conditions are so bad we can hardly wall." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter with stamped cover......................................$100.00

 

1337 - NEWS OF THE PEACE COMMISSIONERS, Before Petersburg, January 11th, 1865. Three pages in ink from Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."He has heard that there is a report of the Peace Commissioners at the camp, talks of the snowfall and the boys playing in the snow before it melts, he mentions that soldiers are being sent to a school," Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter with stamped cover.....................................$70.00

 

1339 - I HOPE FOR A FURLOUGH, Before Petersburg, January 26th, 1865. Two pages in pen to Mary by Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, Co. K, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to his fiancée Mary Marsh. He states that..."his is one of three furloughs pending approval at Headquarters, if he gets one it will be for only 15 days and much of that time will be taken up by traveling back and forth from home, the news is quiet there." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter with cover [stamped removed]..............................................$55.00

 

1340 - THE REBELS ARE HAVING A LARGE NUMBER OF FIRES IN PETERSBURG, Before Petersburg, VA, March 23rd, 1865. Two pages in ink to Mary for Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery. He relates in part to her..."The rebels are having a large number of fires in Petersburg of late. They had two there today...mentions he just got a cat and the boys named her "Sesesh" since she came from Petersburg." Probably the last letter Bennett wrote before his being wounded by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg. This regiment manned the huge mortar called the "Dictator" during the Petersburg siege......................................................$85.00


12265 - 34TH MASS INFANTRY, DEFENSES OF WASHINGTON, PATRIOTIC STATIONARY, October 17th, 1862. 4 pages letter from Diedric M. Day, Co. G., 34th Mass. Rose colored Miss Liberty patriotic stationary with horn of plenty in arms. To his Mother...He has learned that a great battle has been fought in Tennessee and the Rebels have been badly whipped and many of their officers killed and captured, another battle in Kentucky. He expects a great battle to be fought soon in Virginia and a force of about 8000 are moving towards Richmond, he understands 10,000 Rebel cavalry are in this valley marching upon Alexandria. We have not seen them yet although our outposts have been driven in once, he mentions the strings of forts around the city, many thousands of Union soldiers and artillery are in position around Washington, if they come they will meet with a warm reception........................................SOLD

12266 - GREAT PATRIOTIC LETTERSHEET, BREAKING UP JEFF DAVIS' BALL, October 9th, 1864, West Point, VA. Three pages ink letter by Lt. David S. Harpet, 179th PA, fantastic letter sheet "How the Veterans broke up Jeff Davis' Ball", great vignettes with 6 eight line stanzas, the letter vividly describes his visit to Washington, the post office, Treasury, the Capital and the Whitehouse..."went into Old Abe's room but he was not there and had just left about five minutes before but some of the boys saw him...moved down the Potomac by boat to City Point and then threw up breastworks, the trench is about 10 miles long, they are within 15 miles of Richmond, the Rebels are within three miles, heavy cannon firing, they have a report that General Butler took two rebel gunboats, feels safe where they are...he will never desert...remarks that the substitutes are used hard and sent to the hardest places, carloads after carloads are being sent to the front. Comes with a cover with Harpel's name and address as he abruptly ends the letter without signing it.............................................................................$125.00

12267 - 1ST CONNECTICUT CAVALRY, JACKSON HAS TO RETREAT FROM MANASSAS AND HAS TO COME THIS WAY, Datelined Camp Duryea 1862, patriotic stationary "The War for the Union", red and blue battle scene. 4 page bold pencil letter from Lucius E. Holcomb, Company A, 1st Connecticut Cavalry. He relates in part..."There is one regiment here with us now with two cannons, there was other cavalry here the other day and had five Rebel prisoners, they crossed the river and put the stars and stripes on the courthouse, there has been about 100 of them taken [prisoners], there were 12 taken in one night. We are camped on the property of an old secessionist and he offered us $1000 not to camp on his farm, and we made him take the Oath of Allegiance. We expect that General Jacson [Jackson] has to retreat from Manassas and that he has to come this way..." Although this letter is just dated "1862", Holcomb died on July 30th, 1862 thus the letter was probably written from April-July 1862 based on Jackson's movements during that period. Nice letter sheet..............................................................................$125.00

12268 - 3RD VERMONT INFANTRY, 5TH US CAVALRY, CAMP BELTON, VA, October 31st, 1863. 4 page letter in ink from George M. Harriman 3rd VT Infantry later US 5th Cav., Camp Belton, VA. Mentions they constantly move their camps around, wishes they would get paid soon, those at home state that they wish that they could kill a Rebel as they go out and kill game but if you can see they way they fight your would change their minds for they fight hard and whip us sometimes. The Rebels are only four miles away and a fight will ensue if they don't move across the river. They are only a few miles north of the river and it would be easy for them to get across. 5th US Cavalry:  The regiment's history began in 1855, organizing on 28 May 1855 as the 2nd United States Cavalry Regiment at Louisville, Kentucky. A few months later, on 27 September 1855, under the command of Col. Albert Sidney Johnston, the regiment marched west to Texas to fight in its first Indian Campaign. Later on, Lt. Col. Robert E. Lee succeeded Colonel Johnston as the commander. The regiment fought in a total of thirteen Indian Campaigns, symbolized by the arrow head shaped regimental crest. Other officers of the regiment who became prominent in the American Civil War besides Johnson and Lee were Majors William J. Hardee and George H. Thomas; Captains Earl Van Dorn, George Stoneman, and Edmund Kirby Smith; and Lieutenants John Bell Hood and Fitzhugh Lee. Early in 1861, the regiment went to Carlisle Barracks, where the officers and men loyal to the South left the regiment to serve in the Confederacy. Lieutenant Colonel Lee was replaced by t. Col. George Henry Thomas. In the summer of 1861, the regiment was re-designated as the 5th United States Cavalry; the numerical designation it holds to this day. During the Civil War, the troopers of the 5th Cavalry made a gallant charge at Gaines' Mill on 27 June 1862, saving the Union artillery from annihilation. This battle is commemorated on the regimental crest by the Cross moline, in the yellow field on the lower half of the crest. This letter was written while he served in the 5th US Cavalry. Very scarce unit...........................................................$150.00

11240 - MORGAN'S OHIO RAID 1863 PAYMENT FOR REPELLING INVASION, it was one of the boldest cavalry operations of the Civil War. In July of 1863, General John Hunt Morgan led 2,500 Confederate cavalryman on a daring, three-week raid through Indiana and Ohio. Morgan and his men eluded pursuing Federal cavalry, diverted Federal troops and resources and delayed important Northern military operations. In the beleaguered South, news of Morgan's Raid boosted morale. Morgan and his cavalrymen were relentlessly pursued by determined Federal cavalry commanded by Generals Edward H. Hobson and Henry M. Judah. They met staunch resistance by Midwestern civilians throughout the length of their raid. In Montgomery, Ohio -- a village near Cincinnati -- Morgan's Raiders received a chilly reception from defiant townspeople. With Northern forces closing in, Morgan's harried troops pushed on across Ohio. Five days after Morgan's men entered Montgomery, Hobson's and Judah's Federal troops overtook the Rebel raiders at Buffington Island, Ohio and captured approximately 700 Southern soldiers. Morgan and his men raced northward, but were finally cornered in northeastern Ohio near the Pennsylvania border. There, on July 26, 1863, Morgan was faced to surrender his command near West Point, Ohio -- barely 70 miles from Lake Erie. Although Morgan would daringly escape from imprisonment and return to Confederate command, he would be mortally wounded on another raid. In the South, his exploits would become part of the legacy of the Lost Cause. In Ohio, generations to come would recall the days when the citizens of the Buckeye State defied the Rebel Raiders in the alarming time of Morgan's Ohio Raid. This raid also resulted in destruction of farms and loss of stock as a result of Morgan's foraging of the countryside as well as destroying important inter structure to hinder pursuit. The Treasurer's disbursement voucher below was used in payment for militia soldiers [citizen volunteers] who rose up to defend the State from Morgan's Invasion. Morgan struck 49 Ohio towns during his infamous raid. These vouchers were issued in Columbus in 1864 well after a year from the date of Morgan's Invasion and are noted "for repelling Invasion." Very fine examples...................$75.00/each


8080 - HIS NEPHEW IS A POW IN RICHMOND, HAD THE LOCK SHOT OFF HIS GUN AT THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, Dora, Wabash County, Indiana, April 4th, 1864. 4 page letter to a friend in New Jersey from Thomas Gibb regarding his travels and business endeavors and he relates in detail the fate of his nephew. He relates about his business ventures, he mentions that his brother's youngest son is a prisoner in Richmond now, he was taken with a squad of 27 who were on the advance of duty with Meade on the Rapidan. They were not given notice when the army retreated. The whole squad were left and taken by the Rebels. They have a letter from him and He is well and in good spirits. The same boy fought through the Gettysburg battle. His regiment went into the fight with 600 men and came out with 200. He not gets a scratch. He had the lock shot off his gun in his hand at the barrel, but no harm came to him. Butternuts have been enlisting strongly. A great many have reenlisted. The 47th have gone into Illinois to quell a butternut rising where. Where they will kill and confiscate the whole of them...The Charleston Riot occurred on March 28, 1864, in Charleston, Illinois, after Union soldiers and local Republicans clashed with local insurgents known as Copperheads. By the time the riot had subsided, nine were dead and twelve had been wounded. The terms Copperhead and Butternuts were used to describe the larger movement, which has been known as Peace Democrats. This political affiliation which stirred up support, as David Montgomery points out in Beyond Equality: Labor and the Radical Republicans, by incorporating the fears that the federal government's war effort sought to usurp the constitution. The copperheads incorporated a racial component to their disdain for the Northern war effort, as Montgomery points out, that emancipated Negroes would flood the North, because of the Emancipation Proclamation. Using racially charged rhetoric, Copperheads sought to unite opposition to the Radical Republicans. This had become a national phenomenon during the American Civil War. Southern sympathizers were battling to keep their country from becoming, in their eyes, too radical. A quite interesting war period letter with a stamped cover..................................................$165.00

8081 - "HERE IS A PIECE OF A UNION FLAG THAT WAS CAPTURED BY THE REBELS AND WE RECAPTURED IT AT THE BATTLE OF CEDAR CREEK" - 138TH PA. VOLUNTEERS, Camp of the 138th PV, March 20th, 1865, two well written pages in ink by S. V. D. Wack, Co. C, 138th PA Vol to his sister. He relates in part...I received the paper and handkerchief this morning but will return the latter as it is too nice out here in this Godforsaken country, ENCLOSED PLEASE FIND A PIECE OF A FLAG CAPTURED FROM SOME UNION REGIMENT BY THE REBELS AND RECAPTURED BY THE 138TH AT THE BATTLE OF CEDAR CREEK. Keep it for me...Tell Lizzie I have her blue bow yet and I means to carry it with me as long as I am in the service. Two of Sherman's scouts came into the lines of the 5th Corps last evening but where he is I do not know. They were seven days coming so he must be a long way off yet...mentions he gets a great many letters from ladies in PA and Jersey, S. V. D. Wack, 2nd Brigade 138th PA Vol., 2nd Brigade, 3rd Div. 6 Corps. Via Washington, DC. Srmattas V. D. Wack was a Corporal and enlisted August 26th, 1862. He was wounded at Cold Harbor and at Cedar Creek and finally mustered out with Company June 23rd, 1865. The 138th PA was at Winchester, September 19, Fisher's Hill, September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty at Kernstown until December. Moved to Washington, DC, thence to Petersburg, VA, December. Siege of Petersburg December, 1864, to April, 1865. Fort Fisher, Petersburg, March 25, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28 - April 9. Assault on and fall of Petersburg April 2. Sailor's Creek April 6. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. March to Danville April 23 - 27, and duty there until May 23. This letter was written from the Petersburg area on March 20th, ATTRACTIVELY FRAMED WITH DOUBLE GLASS TO SHOW BOTH SIDES OF THE LETTER, FLAG REMNANT MEASURES 1" X 4". 8.5" X 14" framed..........................................$695.00


7TH RHODE ISLAND INFANTRY

HERBERT DANIELS CORRESPONDENCE

Hebert Daniel enlisted as a Private in the 7th Rhode Island Infantry in 1862 and served throughout the war until his discharge in June 1865. His correspondence is directed to Mrs. Salina Waterson who apparently was a widow with two young daughters. Either the husband died of natural causes or she was the widow of John Waterson of the 18th NY who died in July 1861 at Fairfax Courthouse [the only KIA possibility]. Her husband is never mentioned in any letters by Herbert from 1862-65. While Herbert did not write "blood and guts" letters, his letters are filled with sexual connotations which are rare in Civil War correspondence. Either the soldier was too prudish to write such passages, or if he did, the woman on the receiving end destroyed the correspondence for fear of embarrassment at a later date by the letters being read by others. A photograph of Herbert is shown to the right from the regimental history of the 7th Rhode Island Infantry. The letters begin with enlistment camp, his travels in Kentucky, Maryland, and finally in Virginia. In nearly every letter, he expresses his desires for Salina to be with him in his or her bedroom.

51901 - THE 7TH RHODE ISLAND GAINING RECRUITS, TWO SMALL DRUMMER BOYS AMONG THE NEW ADDITIONS TO THE REGIMENT, DESCRIBES OUTFITTING THE TROOPS, MEDIAL EXAMINATIONS, Providence, RI, June 1st, 1862, 8 bold pages. A nice lavender stamped cover is included, by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island to his sweetheart Salina. He relates in part, there is confusion in camp, 5 recruits were brought in, no doctor to examine them, no officer to swear them in, including two little drummer boys there are seven new recruits, we later found the young soldiers at the wharf at Fox Point, he gives details how the new soldiers were finally processed and clothed - they got blankets, overcoats, underclothing - they strapped on their knapsacks and marched into camp - he looked after the two young drummer boys who had not yet been sworn in. They say they are used to the routine as they served 9 months in the 29th Mass. and were in the Balls Bluff fight. An excellent early letter about the filling of ranks with new recruits for the 7th RI Infantry by Daniels...............................................SOLD

51902 - DESCRIBES UNION SOLDIERS SACKING FREDERICKSBURG, February 22nd, 1863. 8 pages in ink with a postal cover OLD POINT CONFORT, VA, CDS, DUE 3 in manuscript by Pvt. Herbert Daniels to his lover Salina. Daniels was in the 7th RI Infantry. He relates in part...he describes the cold weather and on picket duty, terrible weather with rain and snow, a terrible wind storm his camp, makes a mentions of the soldiers trying to haul items out of Fredericksburg, some got as far as the bridge with items, they tried to take the whole city, some got sofas and carpets for their tents, there was houses demolished for their bricks for fireplaces in camp...I went there I could not even find nails, others were digging up the foundations for chimneys, loaded with many more details. After the battle of Fredericksburg the weather turned horrible in the following two months with thousands of Union troops camped in the vicinity many obviously took advantage of the town's proximity to acquire materials for making their miserable camp life more bearable, a great commentary on the sack of  Fredericksburg in January - February 1863................................SOLD

51904 - HOOKER HAS BEEN FIGHTING THEM FOR A WEEK, Near Richmond, KY, April 22, 1863. 3 page letter in ink from Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Vol., to Salina. He relates in part...He describes their new camp near a peaceful cemetery, they are 26 miles from Lexington, news that Hooker has been fighting them for a week and at last succeeded in driving them from the heights of Fredericksburg...his Captain went and got his letters as the mail is backed up, the brigade and the ambulances arrived yesterday from Newport News. "If you came here you should be afraid if being kissed to death, many officers have been without a tent for a week, it is a great undertaking to move an entire army." Daniels had arrived first with the commanding officers as he was the regimental clerk, the remainder of his regiment was in transit to Kentucky, comes with a nice stamped cover cancelled RICHMOND, KY.........................................SOLD

51905 - A LOVE SICK SOLDIER GET A BOX FROM HOME, Wednesday, August 11th, 1863. Three pages in ink from Lexington, KY by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Vol., to his sweetheart Salina...mentions that the "box" came that morning and he is still going over his treasures, Lt. Bates has been re-appointed, he has not been home or taken off his shoulder straps, mentions taking photos, tins in particular, an officer friend has a splendid photo album, he goes over the contents of the box, ate some of the food at the top, compliments her about a fine vest she has sent. Wishes you were here to put your arm around my neck and give me a sweet kiss, I mean a thousand...good night with a kiss. The letter is accompanied by a stamped envelope postmarked Lexington, KY. Well written.............................................$75.00

51906 - IF YOU COME HERE WE CAN HAVE BREAKFAST IN BED AND HAVE A LITTLE "NIG" BRING IT TO US
, October 15th, 1863. 4 page letter in ink with a stamped cover postmarked Lexington, KY by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Volunteers to his sweetheart Salina. He relates in part...An officer saw Salina's photo and asked who she was and Daniels replied that it was his aunt to continue to hide his relationship "I was very glad to get your picture but I must say I like the original", he describes in detail his clothing needs..."If you are here I will get you breakfast in bed or we can have a little "Nig" bring it to us, bought milk in town in a tin pail and it was sour by the time he got back to camp. Much camp news, well written.........................................$75.00

51907 - WE MAY LEAVE FOR TENNESSEE, October 18th, 1863. 6 pages in ink with a postal cover stamped and cancelled LEXINGTON, KY by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Infantry to his sweetheart Salina. He describes his camp in detail, lots of camp news, mentions her recent visit to Crab Apple, they are hearing reports that they may go to Tennessee. A very newsy letter with a nice stamped cover from Kentucky. Well written by Daniels.............................................$59.00

51908 - THE REGIMENT IS TOO WEAK TO GO TO KNOXVILLE, MANY ILL, THE OFFICERS ARE DOING EVERYTHING TO REVERSE THE ORDER TO LEAVE, October 22nd, 1863. 3 pages 8" X 10" on imprinted stationary OFFICE OF MILITARY COMMANDANT, LEXINGTON, KY by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Vol. He relates in part...he is now in the office of the Post Commandant in Lexington, they have a fear that the regiment will be sent to Knoxville but the regiment has 15% on the sick list and many others could not make an ordinary march. The officers are trying everything they can to get the order revoked...describes the situation where his friend "P" was under arrest for a month last May involving a young lady from the Female Seminary near Crab Orchard, he said it was the result of a Secsh trying to cause trouble, however the Colonel endorsed his statement and he was cleared of charges. The letter is accompanied by a nice stamped postal cover postmarked Lexington, KY...........................................$95.00

51909 - COLONEL GRIFFIN HAS INFORMED GENERAL BURNSIDE THE REGIMENT SHOULD NOT BE MOVED, October 23rd, 1864, 8" X 10" stationary OFFICE OF MILITARY COMMANDANT, LEXINGTON, KY. 3 large pages by Pvt. Herbert Daniels to Salina. He relates in part...He has received the Boston papers and Harpers Weekly...Captain Joyce has had a conversation with Colonel Griffin acting Brig. General and the Colonel has telegraphed General Burnside that it would be of no use to move us now and he is awaiting the General's reply. The officers say we could not move more than 25 men to Knoxville. Makes a naughty note "Where shall I hide my head when I get home." Letter comes with a nice stamped postal cover postmarked Lexington, KY. Well written by Daniels.............$85.00

51910 - HE WILL PUT THIS LETTER IN A VERY SMALL ENVELOPE SO YOU CAN PUT IT YOU KNOW WHERE - WHEN I WISH I WAS AT THIS MOMENT, Lexington, KY, November 1st, 1863. 8 pages in ink by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Infantry to his sweetheart Salina. He relates in part...It is Sunday at 9 AM the bells are ringing like home except for the fort guards with three or four little drums and fifes and a base drum which is in harmony with the bells...the guards from the 7th will be here soon with three or four drums and fifes. They come to the headquarters to be inspected every morning...the pills care safely the other day. I would like to be with you in your sitting room...two officers were placed under arrest by the General...Peckman [an officer] found out who made charges against him and if he gets to Lexington he will make him recant or horsewhip him...they entered 'forbidden territory' I SHALL PUT THIS LETTER IN A SMALL ENVELOPE SO YOU CAN PUT IT YOU KNOW THERE...I WISH I WAS THERE AT PRESENT - DON'T YOU. A very detailed letter and Daniels concludes the letter with a sexual overtone as he probably means that she would put the letter in her bosom where he would like to be. Well written........................................SOLD

51911 - NEWS ARRIVES BY TELEGRAPH THAT FORT SUMTER IS TAKEN, WHEN HE RETURNS HOME HE WANTS HER ALONE, 4 pages in ink, November 8th, 1863 [Lexington, KY stamped cover included] by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Vol., near Lexington, KY probably Fort Nelson, to Salina...He has just received the papers the Boston Journal and the Providence Press, mentions that his friend "P" sits on a Court Martial Coroner's Jury, notes that it is Sunday and people are going to meetings as couples as he wishes he could, when he returns home it may be late at night and he wants her alone, there will be no problem unless you take S.W. in my place [another suitor], did you hear that Fort Sumter is taken as the telegraph operator just brought the news, time to retire to my lonely couch. 2 items, letter and stamped cover. Well written...................................$75.00

51913 - THE DRESS PARADE IS GOING ON, WIVES OF OFFICERS IN ATTENDANCE, HE WISHES ONE MORE LADY COULD BE THERE, November 22nd, 1863. 4 page letter in ink to Salina from Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Vol., with stamped cover postmarked Lexington, KY. He relates in part...the Dress Parade is going on with the band playing, the wives of the officers are in attendance, he wishes she was there but he would rather have her in bed at his elbow, mentions something that the Deacon had done Nancy back home, mentions the bombardment of Fort Sumter and that it is being bombarded night and day. Good content, 2 items...........................................$75.00

51914 - REBELS BURN THE MOUNT STERLING, KY COURTHOUSE, THEY ARE REPORTED TO COME OUR WAY, December 13th, 1863. 4+ pages in ink [letter has several pages cross written in lighter ink to allow for easy reading], from camp near Lexington, KY, Sunday afternoon from Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Vol. to Salina. He recounts the last battle they were in five months previous near Jackson, MS, had a dinner of turkey and cranberries, a week before last a band of guerillas entered Mount Sterling and burned down the courthouse and for several days it was reported they were coming this way and we had numbers of the force from 35 to 14,000 and we had orders to be ready for them at any moment day or night...we sent our pickets every night for fear of them burning the town and leaving again, at Mount Sterling there was a regiment of infantry and 600 cavalry within a mile of the town but the Rebs escaped. We need recruits in our regiment...IF YOU WERE HERE I FEAR THAT WE WOULD NOT SLEEP MUCH AND HAVE ALL THE KISSES WE WANTED. A good commentary on the raid on Mount Sterling in November of 1863 by Daniels and a closing devoted to his sweetheart and his wishes for a joyful meeting with her, comes with a stamped postal cover...............................................$175.00

51916 - WE ARE AT THE FORKS OF THE CUMBERLAND RIVER IN KENTUCKY, BAD ROADS, TERRIBLE COLD, MY INK FROZE ON MY PEN, January 6th, 1864. Two large pages in bold pencil [his ink froze], datelined Port Isabel, KY from Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Vol. He relates in part...we have been moving all the time, we have seen no mail since we left Camp Nelson, the mail was supposed to go to Somerset, stopped at a house and had dinner and sat by a huge fireplace that almost burned me with the heat. It is so cold that my ink froze on my pen [thus he wrote in pencil], it is the coldest it has been in 16 years. This must be a beautiful place in the summer, we are at the fork of the Cumberland River where there is only a camp and no town, the roads are so bad we had to slide an ambulance down a hill removing the horses, will write again Thursday...Herbert. Comes with a stamped cover SOMERSET, KY cancellation, well written.....................................$85.00

51918 - GENERAL FOSTER HAS MOVED TO LEXINGTON, I WISH I COULD SLEEP BETWEEN YOUR "WARM STONES", Somerset, KY. 2 large pages in ink, January 15th, 1864 from Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Infantry to his sweetheart Salina. He relates in part...General Foster has moved his headquarters to Lexington, our regiment can't re-enlist this Spring as we must wait until we serve two years....the Colonel's wife is arriving and they will set up housekeeping in the woods...I WISH I COULD SLEEP BETWEEN YOUR WARM STONES AND I WISH I WAS THERE TODAY...WISHES THEY HAD A TELEGRAPH OR SPEAKING TUBE BETWEEN THEM - IF I WAS THERE WE WOULD BE IN BED TIL NOON. Daniels lets Salina know in no uncertain terms that he would like to be lying in her bosom and in bed until noon, quite explicit sexual statements.............$135.00

51922 - A NEAR DEAD DESERTER IS BROUGHT TO THE HOSPITAL AND THEN ESCAPES AFTER HE IS MARRIED IN THE GUARDHOUSE, February 20th, 1864, Somerset, KY. 4 page letter in ink with stamped cover [Somerset, KY], by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Infantry. He relates to his sweetheart Salina....all boats have left here. The deserter that was captured was very sick with consumption, some thought he would die and the doctor ordered him carried to the hospital - he improved so well that he was missing and has not been seen since. He and a woman were married while in the guardhouse by the guard who happened to be a minister. They say she was going to have a baby soon...it is near 9 o'clock and I must retire to my lonely couch and you to yours...is it not lovely to have two young women to sleep with [her children] and I don't. I should not mind having one though, even all three or if I could not do any better I would take your place with your two little 'stoves'...I have taken Lt. Peckham's place in Percy's tent while Lt. P is at work on the road. A newsy letter giving a great description of the escapades of a deserter who escaped from the guardhouse after being married by the guard...........................................$145.00

51924 - I HAVE NO FEAR THAT I SHALL RECEIVE AS MUCH HAPPINESS AS I GIVE, March 6th, 1864, 4 pages in ink, Somerset, KY from Pvt. Herbert Daniels of the 7th Rhode Island Vol. to his sweetheart Salina. He relates in part...He is not getting her letters, possibly nobody knows were "Point Burnside" is, he jokes and holds her responsible for his missing bundle that was promised..."How I wish I was there tonight and I could do a great bit in squaring accounts before morning as I have no fear that I should receive as much happiness as I give", an officer is constantly getting "tight" at night and the Colonel has sent for him to inquire about his conduct...more romantic notes on how he wishes she would be in his tent. Comes with a postal cover cancellation Somerset, KY.................................$95.00

51925 - 7TH RHODE ISLAND VOLS. AT POINT ISABELLA, KY, A SOLDIER WANTS TO HAVE HIS SWEETHEART VISIT HIM, IF SHE STAYS ALL NIGHT HE WILL DEVOTE HIS WHOLE TIME TO MAKING THEM BOTH HAPPY, Headquarters, 7th Rhode Island Vols., Camp Burnside, Point Isabella, KY, March 15th, 1864, comes with a stamped cover post marked Somerset, KY. 4 page letter in ink by Private Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island to his sweetheart Salina. He relates in part...he soon will have his tent all to himself as the adjacent is moving out if you come tomorrow night. WE WILL HAVE A NICE BATH TOGETHER AND IF YOU STAY ALL NIGHT I WILL DEVOTE MY WHOLE TIME TO MAKING YOU HAPPY AND MYSELF TOO. THE COLONEL IS OFF TO ENJOY HIMSELF WITH HIS BRIDE...General Fry commands the post at Camp Burnside, more on camp news, about officers, etc. Daniels has this continual fantasy about Salina appearing from Worcester, Mass. to visit him. Well written with a stamped cover and interesting sexual overtones................................................$110.00

51926 - ELLA BISHOP IS THERE WITH HER HUSBAND, THE YOUNG WOMAN WHO WRESTLED AWAY HER FLAG FROM THE FAMOUS JOHN MORGAN, Sunday, March 20th, 1864, 4 pages in ink, with a postal cover postmarked Somerset, KY, by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Vol., to Salina at home. He relates in part...He has not received a letter in two weeks, in the future put Somerset, KY on the envelope, I have been lying on my bed wishing that you would come in and lie down by my side, would you like to? Perhaps you are lying in your own bed wishing the same ["P" his friend] is going home on furlough and his girlfriend is named Ella - he asks Salina, Has Ella gone to school yet? If so "P" won't have a pleasant time if he depends upon her for pleasure. The Quaker school and Aunt Harriet's house are the worst places for them to take comfort together in. They would be watched every minute. THE FLAG IDENTICAL TO THE ONE WRESTLED FROM THE NOTORIOUS JOHN MORGAN IN THE PRESENCE OF HIS GANG BY MISS ELLA BISHOP OF LEXINGTON HAS JUST BEEN RAISED. SHE IS HERE NOW WITH HER HUSBAND CAPTAIN RANSOM. General Fry has just received an order to send forage and rations to Chitwood, half way between here and Knoxville, for troops coming this way that being the 9th Corps. If that is so we shall come east within the month...Miss Ella Bishop is famous for defying John Hunt Morgan and wrapping the American flag she had around her body to prevent seizure. Camp Ella Bishop was named in her honor in Kentucky. Well written letter with his usual sexual notations that time about his friend "P" and his girlfriend...............................................$195.00

51929 - I WILL HAVE THE BED WARM FOR YOU WHEN YOU COME, WOULD LIE LISTENING TO THE RAIN WITH YOU OR WOULD YOU LET ME? I WILL WAIT TIL I CAN HAVE A BATH WITH YOU, April 16th, 1864, 4 pages in ink, stamped Annapolis postal cover bulls eye cancellation, from Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Infantry to his sweetheart Salina. He relates in part...I WILL WAIT TO HAVE A BATH TIL PLEASURABLE WEATHER ARRIVES OR UNTIL I CAN HAVE A BATH WITH YOU, mentions his Captain who is going home on furlough for a birth of a child...I would like to come home on the same business but I would not tell of it...I wish I was in my own bed with my own xxxx listening to the rain OR WOULD YOU LET ME? No I would not be listening to the rain...he mentions a friend who has not had sex with his wife for 18 months...Have my letters had the same effect upon you as yours have had upon me? I will have the bed warm for you when you come...Love and kisses Hxxxxxxx. Daniels is preparing himself for her proposed visit to see him in Maryland, many sexual overtones....................................$145.00

51930 - I AM READY FOR OUR BED, TO BE IN YOUR ARMS, READY TO PLAGUE YOU, TICKLE YOU, PUNISH AND LOVE YOU ALL NIGHT, ARE YOU READY TO BE SERVICED AND SERVE ME THE SAME, Annapolis, MD, April 20th, 1864, 2 bold pages with stamped cover from Private Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island to his sweetheart Salina. He relates in part...Burnside was here this morning and told the Doctor that we will move in two days but Burnside thinks the campaign will be short. The 57th came in today and camped in the next field with the 56th...he mentions a fellow officer who has attended several lectures of "Fowlers lecture on excessive indulgence and maternity" [too much sex], mentions a lady friend who may travel south with the initial "E", he advises her not to travel among the soldiers much...I AM READY FOR OUR BED TO BE IN YOUR ARMS TO PLAGUE YOU, TICKLE YOU, PUNISH YOU, LOVE YOU ALL NIGHT - WISH I COULD...ARE YOU READY TO BE SERVICED AND SERVE ME THE SAME...It is now 11 and where are you now in bed asleep dreaming of your absent H...I would send him to you if I could. Good night my darling, my own precious love...H. Daniels fantasies are manifested in this letter dreaming of his future sexual encounter with Salina. Very rare content.......................$195.00

51931 - TWO OFFICERS ARE DEEMED UNFAVORABLE INFLUENCES, DETAILS SENT TO THE GENERAL, HE HOPES IT WILL RESULT IN THEIR DISMISSAL, A POSSIBLE HOMOSEXUAL RELATIONSHIP EXPOSED, Tuesday afternoon, October 11th, 1864, 4 pages in ink by Pvt. Herbert Daniels to Salina, stamped envelope with Washington CDS, bulls eye cancellation. He started a letter and knocked over water and ruined it so he went to bed the night before without writing, the paymaster came Sunday and kept him very busy...Potter and Hunt have just came in and asked for the doctor the first thing - They are as gentle as lambs and look rather sheepish. The order sending Hunt to his regiment before said he was not entirely well but it was thought best for him and the service to remove him certain unfavorable influences at Annapolis, you can guess perhaps what that means. I stayed up late Saturday night writing a long statement about them and mentioned the "unfavorable influences" and "P" carried it to General Potter himself [he refers to Capt Percy Peckham]. That night and I was in hopes that would result in their dismissal, mentions a Major who had gone home to be "cured by his wife again." Do you think you could cure me in 20 days? There is very heavy cannonading in the distance...made charges out against the quartermaster for drunkenness...PS Potter has just brought me Percy's clock as he can't bear to hear it tick as he is very nervous, he and Hunt sleep together with Wilbur in "P's" tent, goodnight Hxxxx. A very interesting letter with overtones of these two officers caught in some illicit sexual act and Daniels has reported them to the General. His comment about Potter being so nervous that night he could not bear to hear a clock tick shows someone who is awaiting some action by a superior officer. Records show Captain Hunt was detached from the 7th on October 15th and Captain Potter detached later in the year in December. Extremely rare content..................................................$295.00

51932 - THE SAGA OF TWO DISGRACED OFFICERS CONTINUES, POTTER IS TRYING TO RESIGN AND HUNT A LEAVE OF ABSENCE, Wednesday, October 12th, 1864, 2 pages in ink with a stamped cover postmarked Washington, Pvt. Herbert Daniels of the 7th Rhode Island writes to Salina...It is 11 o'clock, he complains about the time letters take to get to Washington [they are near Annapolis]. He refers to the ongoing case involving Captains Potter and Hunt [see letter of October 11th copy] that implies both have been accused of some offense which is probably illicit sex between them...Potter is going to try and resign and Hunt obtain a leave of absence 'both in account of ill health'. If it was not for such folks I should not know what to do with my time...I must go now my precious love...I wish I was with you this very minute just where you are - Are you there [in bed]...Are you ready for your Hxxxxx. See the copy provided of the letter of October 11th which gives more insight on what is going on between Potter and Hunt and Daniels seems right in the middle of it...........................................$155.00

51933 - I HAVE A NICE BED MADE AND IF YOU WOULD COME WE WOULD HAVE A CHEERFUL FIRE, October 15th, 1864, 4 pages in ink with a stamped postal cover to his lover Salina by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th RI Infantry. He relates in part...I have made a nice bed for...I would surely come I could have a cheerful fire built...mentions a officer whose resignation has come back from Washington disapproved, he wrote several statements about Potter yesterday...mentions a friend's brother in our company with the Sutler, mentions a captured Rebel officer, much more about camp news. Daniels was in some conflict with an officer Potter and his reports were obviously negative concerning Potter's actions within the regiment. Well written...................................$85.00

51934 - HE TRIES TO GET A FURLOUGH, LONGS TO SEE HER, November 6th, 1864, three plus pages in ink written near Annapolis by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Vols., to his sweetheart Salina. He describes the tribulations of getting mail, he feels there is a slim chance he will get a 30 day furlough, if he gets one perhaps he could get a further extension...Potter has gotten a 15 day furlough and I hope he never can come back...If I could I would send your whole Herbert to you and he would no longer suffer for the want of his xxxxx. Well written stamped Washington CDS envelope comes with the letter......................................................$75.00

51937 - NEWS OF THE SURRENDER OF WILMINGTON, DESERTERS COMING IN EACH NIGHT, PETERSBURG ABOUT TO BE EVACUATED, February 23rd, 1865, 4 large pages in ink written near Petersburg, VA, with a nice stamped cover Washington CDS, by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Infantry. He relates to his sweetheart Salina...He wants to "plague her", you may do the same when you get a chance, I will do the bed warming for you...last night we were on alert for the Johnnies and the men were ordered to keep their equipment on...we will build a breast works that the Rebs will not be able to drive us away...news has come about the capture of Wilmington and the regiment gave a cheer to let the Johnnies know, 100 guns were fired in the rear. There was a great fire last night [Petersburg] they are burning everything they can't carry and they are getting ready to evacuate Petersburg, a great many deserters came over, they say they were greatly scared and feared an attack...our large guns and mortars opened up and saw that they had carried away their batteries and mortars...we soon found that they had gone, we exchanged salutes with the Rebels. Much more content on their future lovemaking, well written on large pages with stamped cover..........................................$175.00

51938 - A SOLDIER'S SEXUAL FANTASIES TAKES UP ALL HIS LETTER HOME, March 2nd, 1865 with a stamped cover postmarked Washington by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Vol., to his lover Salina. He relates in part...Don't you wish I could come to you now? Why did you leave the door unfastened when you were alone? I would like to find then unfastened when I come. When I come I will put you where you belong in a hum. I wish to take my bath with you now that you have discovered the way to do it. Shall you sleep with all your clothes when you expect me? More on his fantasy expectations at their first meeting. Letter and stamped cover..................................................$95.00

51939 - PETERSBURG, WATCHING MORTAR SHELLS EXPLODE, MORE CANNONADING IN THE DISTANCE, BEDTIME TALK WITH SWEETHEART SALINA BACK HOME, March 30th, 1865, 3 pages in ink with a stamped envelope Washington, DC CDS, by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Vol., stationed near Petersburg. He relates in part to Salina...last night the Rebs were unusually quiet which made us suspicious and watchful and then they commenced with a volley. The regiment went to the breastworks and saw the fun. At midnight, I was watching the mortar shells in the distance and they looked like shooting stars...9 o'clock Friday evening...the regiment got orders not to undress last night...would like to wear one of her night shirts with her in his arms...the pickets are calling 10 o'clock...I sit underground in a linen coat and slippers...Saturday...I have been looking at the Johnnies with "P's" glass and can see the peach trees in full bloom, more on camp outside of the Petersburg lines.......................................................$135.00

51941 - A SOLDIER'S LOVER WRITES HIM, WILL HEAR A COLORED LAWYER SPEAK, DR. JOHN ROCK FAMOUS BLACK LAWYER, FIRST TO PRACTICE BEFORE THE SUPREME COURT, March 28th, 1865 from Salina to Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Vol. 3 pages in ink. She relates to Herbert...Mr. Rock, the colored lawyer, is to lecture Thursday evening. The "Spy" [Massachusetts Spy newspaper] gives news of the battle the 9th Corps took part...was the 7th engaged? I hope you were not in harm's way. The list of the killed and wounded of the 57th have come - two or three of them I know I suppose that the battle was near you...I did not know you were half way to Richmond...John Swett Rock. In 1865, Rock, a former physician, of Massachusetts became the first African-American lawyer admitted to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court. Rock had abandoned his medical practice to study law in 1861. He also became the first African-American to be invited to the floor of Congress in 1865. Rare commentary on Dr. John Rock's lectures....................................................SOLD

51942 - SEXUAL OVERTONES FROM A LOVE SICK SOLDIER NEAR RICHMOND TO HIS SWEETHEART, Sunday evening, April 19th, 1864, 3 pages in ink with a stamped postal cover CDS Washington by Pvt. Herbert Daniels of the 7th Rhode Island Vol. stationed near Richmond. He relates to Salina...he describes sleeping in a huge tower of pine boughs on a carpet of pine needles, he discusses a friend who had gone back home and visited his sweetheart noted as "P" and "E"...he wonders if "E" lost anything more than hair pins...thought they were perfectly safe on the lounge or the bed and leave them alone for if they have resisted temptation before they can again and if they have not it won't hurt them to try it again...I wish I was there to take the lounge with you but should not want "E" to witness our happiness...but never mind we will have it all sometime...Darling I must go to bed now and I do wish I was there to XXXXXXXXXX...how happy I should be...good night with 1000 kisses...Hxxxxxx...PS Smith's Palace is not as quiet and genteel a place as Rocky Point but I never heard it called a xxxx house before. Very respectful people used to go there. Rocky Point is much more pleasant for a lady...I would like to spend tonight in your arms most anywhere. A very descriptive letter from Daniels about a visit home by one of his friends to visit a lady and to what outcome their visit went - whether they had an sexual encounter or not. He continues his fantasies about what Salina and he will do on the same lounge if he was there and it is quite obvious but his x's the outcome would be a sexual interlude...in reference to the Smith's Palace. Daniels answers her query as to the character of the house as he states he has never hear of it being called a xxxx house which refers to a "whore" house. They are trying to arrange a place to meet when he gets a furlough or gets discharged. Letters with sexual content are RARE in Civil War correspondence as many soldiers just did not write about such matters and if they did the woman on the other end destroyed the correspondence trying to avoid embarrassment - it was a different time then.................................................$225.00

51943 - BOTH ARMIES ARE PASSING NIGHT AND DAY, [Near Richmond], April 14th, 1865, 2 page bold letter in pencil from Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Infantry to his sweetheart Salina. We have not moved and there is no news from here...both armies are passing night and day, a romantic letter by Herbert to Salina, letter is accompanied by a beautiful rose colored stamped cover. Richmond was now in Union hands after the terrible fires that swept the city on the departure of the Confederate Army. Daniels refers to the Union troops continuing to enter the city and paroled Confederates leaving the city. He writes this letter the day Lincoln was assassinated in Washington as there were much news to come his way the following day.............................................$75.00

51944 - YOU HAVE HEARD OF LEE'S SURRENDER BEFORE WE DID, LETTER WRITTEN AFTER LINCOLN'S ASSASSINATION AND THE TROOPS IN CAMPS HAVE HEARD NOTHING, April 15th - 17th, 1865, 4 pages in ink [Burksville, VA] with a stamped cover PM Washington...Pvt. Herbert Daniels of the 7th Rhode Island Infantry writes home to Salina...mentions they have just moved near Burksville [VA] states that she had heard about Lee's surrender before they did, goes into details on where they will settle after the war, possibly Boston will suit them the best, maybe the west. There are no signs of coming home although the war has ended. There is obvious communications problems as by the 17th of April Daniels makes no mention of the assassination in Washington of Lincoln. Well written with cover.................................................$85.00

52947 - ABOUT TO BE DISCHARGED, HE PLAN THEIR FIRST MEETING, WANTS TO BE ALONE WITH HER, NO CHILDREN, May 25th, 1865, Alexandria, VA, 3 pages letter with stamped cover from Alexandria, VA by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island. He relates to his sweetheart Salina...We may come home sooner than you expect, I hope you will be alone when I come, he wants to be alone when they have their first joyful meeting all to ourselves, he wants to have long talks, lips close to one another, he wants her to come to Providence to be alone with her but no children to "share the pleasure". Herbert is getting antsy about their meeting and wants to meet her away from where she lives without any children. Well written..............................................................SOLD


5071 - IOWA TROOPS BEING TRANSPORTED ON THE STEAMBOAT BILL HENDERSON, 8" X 24", preprinted and manuscript manifest where the State of Iowa was paying for passage for men on the Steamboat "Bill Henderson" from April to November in 1862. The passengers are listed by date transported from Dubuque, Clinton, Lyons, and Davenport to cities such as St. Louis, Clinton, Davenport, and Dubuque, Iowa. The preprinted heading "The United States" is scratched out and State of Iowa written in its place. The total passage due the Northern Star Packet Company was $153.50 for which the State received a 25% discount. In researching some of these names, some do not appear on the roster of any Iowa units, but since the state paid their passage, they were probably civil servants. Some soldiers shown are Jerry Elson, 9th Iowa, wounded at Pea Ridge, Sgt. Hiram Buel, lost an arm at Vicksburg, 21st Iowa, Leonard Horr, 21st Iowa, Jesse Hampton, 13th Iowa wounded at Shiloh, Calvin Taylor 45th Iowa. There are at least 45 entries on this steamboat listing of passengers with many more to research. On a quick examination many discharged soldiers, wounded sailors, and new recruits were transported on this boat within the state of Iowa. Some archival repairs due to the size but no loss of paper. A nice Iowa item right at the beginning of the campaigns in Mississippi and through November 1862.........................................................................$125.00

5072 - WE COULD HEAR THE GUNS AT FREDERICKSBURG, HEAR THE WOUNDED GROAN IN WASHINGTON, 4 page letter in pencil, December 24th, 1862, Private David Brett, 9th Mass Light Artillery, and stamped postal cover. He relates in part...had Christmas dinner at the fort, turkeys, oysters, pickles, cakes. I was in Washington all day yesterday with a team of mules, we are fixing up the fort today as the Captain is a Catholic and we are having easy times [Christmas season]...THERE WAS A GREAT BATTLE THE OTHER DAY AT FREDERICKSBURG AND WE COULD HEAR THE CANNONS VERY PLAIN AND THE WOUNDED WERE BROUGHT TO WASHINGTON IN BOATS OF ALL KINDS AND AMBULANCES. SOME OF OUR FOLKS WHO WERE IN WASHINGTON SAID THEY COULD HEAR THEM GROAN AS THEY PASSED IN THE STREETS. WE GOT WHIPPED BADLY AND THAT IS NO MISTAKE. DESCRIBES THEIR CHRISTMAS DINNER ON THE 25TH WITH ALL THE BOYS HAVING PLENTY TO EAT AND HAD A GOOD TIME PLAYING BALL [BASEBALL]. The 9th Mass Artillery was soon to fight at Gettysburg and fight at Trostle's Barn. In the Civil War Times article "The Battery that saved the Union" Hoffsommer says that after Barksdale's forward surge lapped the battery and the 21st Mississippi Infantry engulfed the guns and limbers, the fight became savagely hand to hand with muskets and bayonets against rammers and handspikes. Baker states that "David Brett lost his cap and started back for it; John Ligal took him under his arm and carried him off the field." Brett was only 5'4" and weighed 163 lbs. Brett hurt his foot due to cannon recoil and was carried off the field. The 9th Mass. Light Artillery accompanied the army in its northward march, on July 2, 1863, it reached Gettysburg, and about 4 P.M. was placed in position near the Wheatfield road about 300 yards south of the Trostle farm buildings. Here it assisted in staying the tide of Longstreet's attack, firing by prolonge as it was forced to retire across the field, and finally in a last stand in the Trostle farm yard lost over 50 horses and was forced to temporarily abandon four of its guns. These, however, were brought off the field by the infantry after nightfall. The loss in personnel was 11 officers and men killed and mortally wounded, and sixteen surviving wounded, among the latter being Captain Bigelow. On the following day the remnant of the battery under Lieutenant Milton, consisting of two guns, was engaged at Ziegler's Grove on Cemetery Hill losing five more horses. The letter is well written in pencil with some water stains which do not deter the reader. A good newsy letter from a very good fighting unit............................................................$175.00

5073 - EXPLORED THE BATTLEFIELD AT CHANTILLY, BONES OR MEN AND HORSES ON THE GROUND, THE PLACE WHERE KEARNEY WAS KILLED, HOOKER FOUGHT ALL DAY YESTERDAY AND LOST 14,000 MEN, 4 pages, three in pen and page four in pencil by Pvt. David Brett, 9th Mass. Light Artillery. He relates in part from Centerville, VA, April 30th, 1863. He describes conditions at camp near Centerville, most of the houses are burned down, the fences are all gone, about 4 miles north is Chantilly. GENERAL KEARNEY WAS KILLED THERE AND SOME OF OUR BOYS HAVE GONE TO SEE THE BATTLEFIELD, THERE ARE MEN AND HORSE BONES ON THE GROUND PARTIALLY COVERED AND THEY BROUGHT HOME ONE SKULL. 2000 OR 3000 MEN WERE KILLED IN THE BATTLE. AS IT WAS SOME TIME AGO. YESTERDAY WE HAD TARGET PRACTICE, TODAY. A Chaplain of the 126th NY will have a meeting. I never advise a man to come out here [join the army] unless he was very tough as we have to be exposed to it enough to kill a well man...JOE HOOKER FOUGHT ALL DAY YESTERDAY AND LOST 14,000 MEN WE HEAR AND DROVE THE REBS THAT WAY FOR 9 MILES, THEY ARE FIGHTING ALL AROUND US...WE EXPECT WARRENTON IS THE PLACE WE EXPECT TO GO AS THEY ARE FIGHTING THERE AND IS 23 MILES OVER THE MOUNTAINS. IF JOE HOOKER HAS THEM WHERE HE SAYS HE DOES HE WILL WHIP THEM...David Brett. General Kearney was killed September 1st, 1862 at Chantilly while attempting to escape Confederate capture. Baker in his history of the 9th sstates that on April 29th the battery held target practice with the Keystone Battery and at 3/4 miles for smooth bores and 1 3/4 miles for rifled guns. The 9th Battery was declared the best shots. Brett refers to Hooker's operations at Fitzhugh Crossing or at Franklin's Crossing which preceded the Battle of Chancellorsville. The 9th Mass Artillery was soon to fight at Gettysburg and fight at Trostle's Barn. In the Civil War Times article "The Battery that saved the Union" Hoffsommer says that after Barksdale's forward surge lapped the battery and the 21st Mississippi Infantry engulfed the guns and limbers, the fight became savagely hand to hand with muskets and bayonets against rammers and handspikes. Baker states that "David Brett lost his cap and started back for it; John Ligal took him under his arm and carried him off the field." Brett was only 5'4" and weighed 163 lbs. Brett hurt his foot due to cannon recoil and was carried off the field. The 9th Mass. Light Artillery accompanied the army in its northward march, on July 2, 1863, it reached Gettysburg, and about 4 P.M. was placed in position near the Wheatfield Road about 300 yards south of the Trostle farm buildings. Here it assisted in staying the tide of Longstreet's attack, firing by prolonge as it was forced to retire across the field, and finally in a last stand in the Trostle farm yard lost over 50 horses and was forced to temporarily abandon four of its guns. These, however, were brought off the field by the infantry after nightfall. The loss in personnel was 11 officers and men killed and mortally wounded, and sixteen surviving wounded, among the latter being Captain Bigelow. On the following day the remnant of the battery under Lieutenant Milton, consisting of two guns, was engaged at Zeigler's Grove on Cemetery Hill losing five more horses. Well written by Brett..................................................$225.00

5074 - A PRELUDE TO THE 9TH MASS. LIGHT ARTILLERY MOVING TO GETTYSBURG, HIS CONCERN ON THE STRENGTH OF THE REBELS, LEE MOVING THAT WAY WITH 100,000 MEN, 3 pages well written in pencil with a stamped cover, Centerville, VA, June 15th, 1863 by Pvt. David Brett, 9th Mass. Light Artillery. He relates in part...We buried a man last week his name was Babson, he was sick for three days and was taken in a fit and never knew anything after...JOE HOOKER'S TROOPS HAVE ALL COME ARE COMING HERE. IT SEEMS THAT THEY WAS NO END TO THEM AS WE COULD HEAR THE WAGONS ALL NIGHT. LEE, WE EXPECT IS COMING THIS WAY AND HE HAS GOT ALMOST 100,000 MEN. I THINK THERE WILL BE ANOTHER BULL RUN BATTLE IF SO I SHALL SEE OR BE IN IT. IT LOOKS AS THOUGH THIS WAR WILL NEVER BE OVER THE REBS ARE STRONGER THAN WE THINK FOR THEY HAVE MORE TO EAT AND IT IS ALL NONSENSE ABOUT THEY HAVE A SHORTAGE OF FOOD AS THE PRISONERS DO NOT SHOW IT. THE TROOPS DO SHOW THAT THEY HAVE SEEN HARD TIMES. THERE ARE 20 OR 30 BATTERIES HERE THE TROOPS COME UP THE BULL RUN ROAD AND WE COULD SEE A CLOUD OF DUST ALL ALONG FOR MILES JUST AS FAR AS WE COULD SEE. David Brett writes just before the advance to Gettysburg where his battery was heavily engaged at Trostle's Farm. In the Civil War Times article "The Battery that saved the Union", Hoffsommer says that after Barksdale's forward surge lapped the battery and the 21st Mississippi Infantry engulfed the guns and limbers, the fight became savagely hand to hand with muskets and bayonets against rammers and handspikes. Baker states that "David Brett lost his cap and started back for it; John Ligal took him under his arm and carried him off the field." Brett was only 5'4" and weighed 163 lbs. Brett hurt his foot due to cannon recoil and was carried off the field. The 9th Mass. Light Artillery accompanied the army in its northward march, on July 2, 1863, it reached Gettysburg, and about 4 P.M. was placed in position near the Wheatfield Road about 300 yards south of the Trostle farm buildings. Here it assisted in staying the tide of Longstreet's attack, firing by prolonge as it was forced to retire across the field, and finally in a last stand in the Trostle farm yard lost over 50 horsses and was forced to temporarily abandon four of its guns. These, however, were brought off the field by the infantry after nightfall. The loss in personnel was 11 officers and men killed and mortally wounded, and sixteen surviving wounded, among the latter being Captain Bigelow. On the following day, the remnant of the battery under Lieutenant Milton, consisting of two guns, was engaged at Zeigler's Grove on Cemetery Hill losing five more horses. Well written by Brett......................................SOLD

5075 - THE MINE RUN CAMPAIGN, MEADE'S MEN RETREAT IN THE COLD, 3 pages in ink with a stamped cover by Pvt. David Brett, 9th Mass. Light Artillery, Brandy Station, VA, December 29th, 1863. He relates in part...WE HAVE OUR LONG HOUSES ABOUT DONE, THERE ARE FOUR BATTERIES IN THIS BRIGADE, MENTIONS A PAST TENT MATE WHO HAD BEEN KILLED AT GETTYSBURG, OUR HORSES ARE ALL LINED UP IN A ROW ABOUT 100, THE COUNTRY IS ALL FULL OF TROOPS FOR MILES AROUND HERE, THE DAY BEFORE THANKSGIVING WE STARTED FOR RAPPAHANNOCK STATION AND GOT ABOUT THREE MILES IN A SOUTHEASTERLY DIRECTION FROM BRANDY STATION AND HAD TO STOP ALL NIGHT AS IT WAS SO MUDDY. WE STAYED IN A REB CAMP THEY HAD BUILT FOR WINTER AND THE NEXT DAY WE MARCHED TO THE RAPIDAN AND ENCAMPED ON THIS SIDE. THE NEXT MORNING , WE CROSSED ON PONTOONS FROM THERE THE ROAD IS BUILT ON PLANKS TO RICHMOND AND IS VERY MUCH OUT OF REPAIR...WE MARCHED ABOUT FOUR MILES AND THEN TURNED TO THE RIGHT TOWARDS ORANGE COURT HOUSE, OUR TROOPS WERE FIGHTING ALL DAY IN FRONT. WE MARCHED UNTIL NIGHT AND GOT CLOSE TO THE REBS BUT THEY FELL BACK IN THE NIGHT. THE NEXT DAY, WE EXPECTED TO OVERTAKE THEM AND FIGHT THEM BUT WE FOLLOWED THEN UNTIL THEY GOT INTO THEIR ENTRENCHMENTS WHICH WERE SO STRONG IT WOULD BE IMPOSSIBLE TO TAKE THEM AND WE STAND THERE ALL DAY LOOKING AT THEM. OUR BATTERY WAS ABOUT A QUARTER OF A MILE FROM THE FRONT BUT WE COULD GO AND SEE THEM BUT NOT WITHOUT SOME RISK AS THERE WAS FIRING ALL DAY. THAT NIGHT WE STAYED IN SOME PINE WOODS AND IT WAS VERY COLD, THE NEXT MORNING WE HAD ORDERS TO FALL BACK WHICH WE DID DOUBLE QUICK AND CROSSED THE RAPIDAN THAT NIGHT. IT IS ALL CONFUSION WHEN AN ARMY FALLS BACK OR RETREATS AS IT IS EVERY MAN FOR HIMSELF A PART OF THE TIME OR HE WILL GET HURT BUT ON THE WHOLE I WOULD RATHER BE ON A MARCH THAN STAY IN CAMP. I HAVE NO BOOTS TO WEAR AND IN FACT MOST OF THE MEN ARE IN WANT OF CLOTHING. IT IS RAINING, WHISKEY HAS BEEN ISSUED TO THE MEN WHO WANTED IT. Brett writes about the Mine Run Campaign, November 26th - December 2nd, 1863 where little was accomplished for the Union except great suffering by Meade's men from the rain that froze as it fell. The 9th Mass. Light Artillery saw no direct action during that ill fated campaign. In the Civil War Times article "The Battery that saved the Union", Hoffsommer says that after Barksdale's forward surge lapped the battery and the 21st Mississippi Infantry engulfed the guns and limbers, the fight became savagely hand to hand with muskets and bayonets against rammers and handspikes. Baker states that "David Brett lost his cap and started back for it; John Ligal took him under his arm and carried him off the field." Brett was only 5'4" and weighed 163 lbs. Brett hurt his foot due to cannon recoil and was carried off the field. The 9th Mass. Light Artillery accompanied the army in its northward march, on July 2, 1863, it reached Gettysburg, and about 4 P.M. was placed in position near the Wheatfield Road about 300 yards south of the Trostle farm buildings. Here it assisted in staying the tide of Longstreet's attack, firing by prolonge as it was forced to retire across the field, and finally in a last stand in the Trostle farm yard lost over 50 horsses and was forced to temporarily abandon four of its guns. These, however, were brought off the field by the infantry after nightfall. The loss in personnel was 11 officers and men killed and mortally wounded, and sixteen surviving wounded, among the latter being Captain Bigelow. On the following day, the remnant of the battery under Lieutenant Milton, consisting of two guns, was engaged at Zeigler's Grove on Cemetery Hill losing five more horses. Well written by Brett......................................................SOLD

32820 - FEDERAL TROOP CARRIER ON THE RED RIVER/MISSISSIPPI RIVERS IN LOUISIANA, Built in 1850, the St. Charles ran the Shreveport - New Orleans route and was among the fastest boats of her day. The property of the RED RIVER PACKET CO. the St. Charles was sequestered by the US Government at New Orleans and used to ferry troops and supplies, sold in 1864 and off the rolls in 1865. A nice postal cover with an embossed 3 cent postal emblem over stamped STEAM with a red packet stamp in an oval RED RIVER PACKET ST. CHARLES [1853]..........................................................SOLD


4270 - THREE SOLDIERS EXECUTED BY FIRING SQUAD FOR DESERTION, A DETAILED LETTER REGARDING THE EXECUTION, THE BEST EXECUTION LETTER WE HAVE EVER OFFERED - IRISH BRIGADE LETTER, Headquarters near Morrisville, August 29th, 1863. 4 page letter in ink by William A. Smith, Company D, 116th PA [Irish Brigade] to his sister. He relates in part...mentions his brother who is ill on Folly Island in that "hot secesh hole", news arrived that the Stars and Stripes in floating over Fort Sumter and Wagner, soon the battery at Fort Moultrie and then Charleston should be in the next news. Well Molly, there has been a sad fear bin going on here last Friday a week and yesterday...THERE WERE THREE MEN SHOT IN THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, THERE WAS ONE OUT OF THE 71ST PA SHOT FOR DESERTION ON THE 21ST OF THE MONTH, AND YESTERDAY THERE WERE TWO MEN SHOT FOR THE SAME THING - DESERTION IT IS AN AWFUL THING TO SEE OWN MEN SHOT DOWN, IF IT WAS BATTLE IT WOULD BE NOT SO HARD TO SEE THROUGH TO WALK UP AND BRAVE IT AND GET SHOT DOWN LIKE AN OX THERE IS NO USE TALKING ABOUT IT...THEY WERE NOT SHOT FOR COWARDICE AS THEY WERE ALL BRAVE AS LIONS AS THEY ALL WALKED OVER TO WHERE THEY WERE TO BE SHOT RIGHT BEHIND THEIR COFFINS AND KEPT STEP WITH THE MUSIC ALL THE TIME AND THEY STOOD AND SEEN THE MUSKETS LOADED AND WENT AND STOOD BY THEIR COFFINS UNTIL THEY WERE TOLD TO KNEEL DOWN, THEY COOLEY TOOK OFF THEIR COATS AND FOLDED THEM BESIDES THEM AS IF NOTHING WAS GOING TO HAPPEN AND EVEN MARCHED KEEPING IN TUNE WITH THE DEAD MARCH AND THAT IS THE HARDEST THING TO KEEP IN STEP WITH. THEY WERE ORDERED TO KNEEL DOWN ON ONE KNEE AND THEN THE HANKER CHIEFS WERE PUT OVER THEIR EYES AND THEY BRACED THEMSELVES FOR IT AND WHEN THE WORD WAS GIVEN TO FIRE ONE FELL ONE WAY AND ANOTHER THE OTHER WAY, ONE OF THEM THEY HAD TO SHOOT A SECOND TIME BEFORE THEY HAD TO KILL HIM AND IF ANYONE SAYS THEY WERE COWARDS I THINK THEY LIE AS THEY HAD HEARTS AS BIG AS AN OX...William A. Smith. The 116th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, was recruited from among the Irish Americans of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, during the summer of 1862. Dennis Heenan served as its first colonel, St. Clair A. Mulholland as lieutenant colonel, and George H. Bardwell as major. At the end of August 1862, the regiment was ordered to report to Washington, D.C., and was assigned to the Irish Brigade, which was the 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, II Corps, Army of the Potomac. The following month, it was ordered to the Shenandoah Valley, where it saw minor skirmishing. At the Battle of Fredericksburg on December 13, the 116th charged the sunken road. Despite losing many of their officers and men, including Colonel Heenan, they remained at the wall until dark. The regiment had lost so many men that it was consolidated into a battalion of four companies under the command of Mulholland. The 116th performed well at the Battle of Chancellorsville, where it helped rescue the 5th Maine Battery from capture. In this action, Mulholland earned a Medal of Honor. On the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg, the 1st Division was sent into the Wheatfield to support the III Corps, where the 116th engaged in hand-to-hand combat. Caught in a crossfire, the division was forced to retreat. During Pickett's Charge the following day, the regiment supported the 2nd Connecticut Battery but wasn't needed in the fighting. During the following few months, the 116th remained in Northern Virginia. In the spring of 1864, Mulholland was given permission to recruit the regiment back to full strength. Enough men were raised in Philadelphia to form Companies E, F, and G in addition to bringing the four companies at the front to strength, though many of the veterans were consolidated into A Company. Companies H, I, and K were raised in Pittsburg. A large portion of these new recruits were not Irish-Americans, however. Mulholland was promoted to colonel, while Richard C. Dale became lieutenant colonel and John Teed, who had been captured at Gettysburg, major. The 116th fought all through the Overland Campaign, where it continued to lose heavily in officers and men. Mulholland was wounded at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House and Dale was missing in action. Mulholland was wounded again at the Battle of Cold Harbor. Heavy losses continued during the Siege of Petersburg. In July, the Irish Brigade was broken up and the 116th was assigned to the 4th Brigade, 1st Division. After the Appomattox Campaign, the regiment was sent to Alexandria, where, on June 3, Companies A, B, C, and D where mustered out. The remaining companies were mustered out on July 14 in Washington. Well written by Smith, comes with a cover missing the stamp postmarked Washington, DC....................................................$595.00


4253 - A GREAT DESCRIPTION OF THE TOWN OF MURFREESBORO, TENNESSEE FREED NEGROES AS REFUGEES BEING FED AT THE EXPENSE OF THE GOVERNMENT, THEY CONSTANTLY COME THROUGH OUR LINES, IN ALMOST COUNTLESS NUMBERS, Murfreesboro, TN, April 20th, 1863. 3 pages in ink to his Father by Aaron Eley, 5th Wisconsin Light Artillery. He relates in part...the health of the army is good we are camped near the depot at Murfreesboro. It is that of the general opinion that General Rosecrans will lay here with the greater part of his army until Vicksburg is disposed of. They are building some very strong fortifications here and mounting some heavy siege guns and mortars in them. If the Rebels evacuate Vicksburg and reinforce Bragg at Shelbyville, it is more than likely that these fortifications will be of use to the army. Refugees from Bragg's army represent Bragg's army as being pretty well starved. The citizens are out on equality with the soldiers and are allowed soldiers rations only. You ought to see the different specimens of humanity that fill the streets of Murfreesboro. They are filled at all times all of the day with paroled prisoners, refugees, deserters from the Rebel army, citizens and officers and soldiers from the Federal army. Among those citizens can be found the American citizens of African decent in almost countless numbers, but these last being named are kept at the depot where they are fed at the expense of the government...these American citizens of African decent come into out lines by the dozens young and old, mentions a friend at Benton Barracks at St. Louis...Aaron Eley. An excellent letter describing the thousands of contrabands around Murfreesboro that came from the surrounding areas as the Union army took control of the area. Well written..............................................................SOLD

4254 - SLAVERY IS DEAD, THE PRESIDENT HAS THE PHYSICAL FORCE TO CARRY OUT THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION, BRAGG AND LONGSTREET HAVE FALLEN BACK, North of Chickamauga, TN, December 15th, 1863. 4 pages in ink by Aaron Eley, 5th Wisconsin Light Artillery to a friend. He relates in part...We are still in camp eight miles above Chattanooga...the farmers here were compelled to give 1/10 of their grain raised to the Confederate Government. One can not imagine the great deal of destruction that has and is being destroyed, the army leaves its mark wherever it goes, the land is laid to waste, houses and fences burned, the Union looks well and the Rebels look played out. The election in the loyal states has done much to discourage them; they cannot look for help from a divided North while in the field they were defeated with a heavy loss of men and artillery. Bragg and Longstreet were forced to fall back leaving the very center of the Confederacy almost unprotected and open to an invasion to Grant's whole army. I have talked with some of the citizens in this vicinity and some admit that slavery is dead. They have got their eyes open to see that the President has the physical force at his disposal to carry out the Emancipation Proclamation and slavery, which was the only disturbing element in our society, will be settled forever. Mentions his quilt was left back at the battery as he loaned it to another soldier who had no blanket, no stamps, nearest place they can be gotten is Nashville...Aaron Eley. The Chickamauga Campaign was followed by the Battles for Chattanooga, sometimes called the Chattanooga Campaign, including the reopening of supply lines and the Battles of Lookout Mountain (November 23) and Missionary Ridge (November 25). Relief forces commanded by Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant broke Bragg's grip on the city, sent the Army of Tennessee into retreat, and opened the gateway to the Deep South for Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman's 1864 Atlanta Campaign. Well written........................................................SOLD

4256 - THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, STANDING IN THE LINE OF FIRE, MEN FELL TO THE LEFT AND RIGHT, BURYING THE DEAD, DOCTORS TAKING OFF LEGS AND ARMS, 4 page letter and stamped postal cover from Pvt. David Brett, 9th Massachusetts Light Artillery, Berlin, Maryland, July 17th, 1863. He relates in very bold pencil to his wife. He relates in part...I am well as usual and we are now just below the Ferry crossing the Potomac River chasing the Rebels as they are going back to Richmond as fast as they can. Our army has been marching every day for three weeks after them. Mentions his friend Frank who is foot sore and not very well...You ask me how I spent the 4th...WE WERE IN A FIELD ABOUT A MILE FROM THE BATTLEFIELD AT GETTYSBURG AND PART OF OUR MEN WHEN TO BURY THE DEAD BUT THE REBELS WOULD SHOOT AT US IF AN MAN STOOD IN ONE PLACE A MINUTE AS WE COULD NOT GET THEM ALL. THEY CAN KILL WITHIN A HALF A MILE WITH RIFLES. WE HEARD THAT ALL WERE BURIED AFTERWARDS. MOST OF MY TIME WAS SPENT LOOKING AROUND THE BARNS AS THEY WOUNDED LAY ALL ABOUT IN THEM AND UNDER THE DOCTORS HAD AS MUCH AS THEY COULD DO TAKING OFF ARMS AND LEGS AND DRESSING WOUNDS, SOME OF THE WOUNDED WERE NOT CARED FOR THREE OR FOUR DAYS...AT THE BATTLE - I FELT RATHER BAD WHEN WE WERE ORDERED TO ADVANCE TO THE FRONT BUT AFTER WE GOT TO FIRING  I DID NOT THINK MUCH ABOUT IT. WE HAD BEEN FIRING FOR ABOUT ONE HALF HOUR BEFORE ANYONE GOT HURT...WE COULD HEAR THE BULLETS PASSING, FINALLY A MAN DROPPED ON MY RIGHT AND ANOTHER RIGHT BEHIND. 6 MEN WERE KILLED WITHIN A ROD OF ME...FENN WAS DROPPED DEAD AND HE NEVER KNEW WHAT HURT HIM, SOME OF OUR WOUNDED WILL NEVER RECOVER. WE FOUGHT WITH OUR GUNS UNTIL THE REBS COULD PUT THEIR HANDS ON THE GUNS, THE GENERAL SAID WE FOUGHT WELL AND I HOPE NEVER TO SEE ANOTHER TIME BUT CANNOT TELL...I GO TO BED WET AND SLEEP IN THE WATER. I LOST MY CAP AND CANTEEN AND HAD MY FOOT RUN OVER AND IT WAS LAME BUT I AM GETTING OVER IT. WE LEFT OUR WOUNDED AT GETTYSBURG AND WHERE THEY HAVE GONE I DO NOT KNOW...A BALL PASSED THROUGH THE ARM OF JOE HURST ABOVE HIS ELBOW AND CUT THE CORDS, IT IS DOUBTFUL THAT HE WILL EVER GET THE USE OF IT AGAIN...D. Brett. July 18th, we are now 15 miles inside Virginia and on the way to Richmond. Lee is in full retreat and we fight him all the way along, some days we march 30 miles and I walk all the way with no trouble, Sunday we will march today further into Virginia...D. B. In the Civil War Times article "the Battery that saved the Union" Hoffsommer says that after Barksdale's forward surge lapped the battery and the 21st Mississippi Infantry engulfed the guns and limbers, the fight became savagely hand to hand with muskets and bayonets against rammers and handspikes. Baker states that "David Brett lost his cap and started back for it; John Ligal took him under his arm and carried him off the field." Brett was only 5'4" and weighed 163 lbs. Brett hurt his foot due to cannon recoil and was carried off the field. The 9th Mass. Light Artillery accompanied the army in its northward march. On July 2, 1863, it reached Gettysburg, and about 4 P.M. was placed in position near the Wheatfield Road about 300 yards south of the Trostle farm buildings. Here it assisted in staying the tide of Longstreet's attack, firing by prolonge as it was forced to retire across the filed, and finally in a last stand in the Trostle farm yard lost over 50 horses and was forced to temporarily abandon four of its guns. These, however, were brought off the field by the infantry after nightfall. The loss in personnel was 11 officers and men killed and mortally wounded, and sixteen surviving wounded, among the latter being Captain Bigelow. On the following day, the remnant of the battery under Lieutenant Milton, consisting of two guns, was engaged at Zeigler's Grove on Cemetery Hill losing five more horses. An outstanding letter from an important regiment at the Battle of Gettysburg. Superb content..............................................................SOLD

More on the actions of the 9th Mass. Light Artillery: on July 2, 1863, Major General Daniel Sickles (who was later was seriously injured, near the Trostle barn, by a Confederate shell, which caused his leg to be amputated) moved his troops to an exposed position on Emmitsburg Road. Due to mounting pressure by the Confederate Army, the Union troops began retreating from the area of Peach Orchard. Their goal was to make it to Cemetery Ridge. The path of their retreat included the farm lane, noted above, located on the Trostle Farm. Most of the batteries were able to reach the ridge. One exception was the "green" 9th Massachusetts Light Artillery Battery. This was to be their first battle. Captain John Bigelow commanded this battery. Captain Bigelow sustained severe wounds to his side and hand during the battle at the Trostle Farm. Reportedly the troops took cover in the Trostle building, waiting for the ranks of the Rebel Army to get closer. As the enemy troops approached over the knoll, the 9th Massachusetts Battery opened fire. The Confederates continued their advance on the farm. The battery was now trapped inside by the 21st Mississippi Infantry. The Rebels then began shooting the horses, who were still strapped to their harnesses. The reasoning for this was so that the cannons could not be pulled out. The 9th Mass. Battery continued to fight, in the end, the remaining survivors fled, leaving behind their guns, limbers and also the wounded and dead, both man and animal alike. During this battle, the 9th Massachusetts Battery lost five of it's six guns and reportedly 80 of their 86 horses. Their guns were later regained by Union Troops.


3015 - OLD JACKSON HAS LEFT WINCHESTER AND BANKS IS RIGHT BEHIND HIM, 62ND OHIO INFANTRY, LATER KILLED AT DARBYTOWN ROAD, March 15th, 1862, Pvt. William Smutz, 62nd Ohio, Headquarters of the 62nd Ohio, Frederick County, MD. Two legal sized pages that he took from a storekeeper's ledger book. He states he is writing in a store 5 miles from Winchester. He relates in bold pencil, We left by train from Fort Kimball, the track was torn up for four miles...arrived in Martinsburg and found half the town flying Union colors from their windows and the rest of the town mourning for the dead heroes of the rattlesnake banner, we are five miles from Winchester and I am writing in a store on a clerk's ledger book paper, Old Jackson has left Winchester and Banks is right behind him, Banks is pouring into him as we can hear the cannonading, they have been reinforced from Strasburg, some bodies lay in the area with dead horses, some Negro contrabands camp into camp last night and the officers naturally adopted them. Smutz died at Darbytown Road in 1864. Coves with a stamped patriotic cover postmarked Hanover, MD. With a colored vignette of Miss Liberty...PROTECT THE UNION in a banner. On the 11th Banks cautiously advanced his left to Berryville 10 miles east of Winchester by a good stone road. Jackson again drew up his little army in front of Winchester covering the three roads by which Banks would advance his whole army and all day awaiting the attack from the large force that came within four miles of his position. When this did not result in combat, he late in the day followed his trains to the vicinity of Newton. Jackson determined that they should make an attack on Bank's advance force at Stephenson's before daylight the next morning. However, his army was within five miles from Winchester too far to recall for a night march and attack. He later followed his army and bivouacked in its rear. The next day he marched to Strasburg 18 miles from Winchester where he halted on the 15th. Banks occupied Winchester on the 12th, but Turner Ashby, with his cavalry kept him so occupied in protecting the rear and flanks of his army as well as its front, that he did not follow after Jackson until the 18th when he started Shield's Division in pursuit. Jackson with Ashby as his sentinel fell back to Woodstock 12 miles and then to Mt. Jackson 24 miles from Strasburg. Letter and cover.....................$175.00

3017 - THE REBELS ARE CONTINUALLY DESERTING BUT THE PICKETS ON EITHER SIDE WILL NOT SHOOT THEM, 37th Mass. Volunteers, Private Willard S. Cooke to his Father, Headquarters 37th Mass. Volunteers, February 17th, 1865. Four pages in ink with a stamped cover [impaired at bottom edge]. He relates in part...It is raining quite hard tonight just the right time for the Johnnies to desert into our lines, last night 19 came into our lines into our brigade while usually the number has been six or seven. Every hour throughout the night we can hear a volley of musketry fired by the Rebel pickets towards some of their men who are coming over to us. But it is a mutual understanding between the two that not one of them has been known to be shot in an attempt to desert. They either have no ball in their guns or fire over their heads. They are obliged to shoot however far if they do not they are accused and punished for complicity in the desertion. Some times an officer will take a gun and shoot at them and the Johnnies hollow to our pickets to lie down so they won't get shot. More of them have just come in as I heard a volley that is a sure sign. There is utmost friendliness between the pickets on both sides as they seldom fire under any circumstances. The deserters tell us that more would come over but they are told by the officers that we will put them in our army. They say however that two thirds of their army will come over before another campaign even if they would be put into our ranks. They say they can fight better on a full stomach than the way they are now half starved as they are. I saw some that came in the other night and a happier set of dirty ragged fellows you never saw. Our boys give them all that they can eat and it gives a soul good to see them stuffed...W. S. Cooke. The 37th Mass. regiment was formed in July 1862 and served until the end of the war in April 1865, seeing action at many battles including Fredericksburg and Gettysburg, duty in New York City after the draft riot, the Siege of Petersburg and the final pursuit and destruction of General Robert E. Lee's Army. It was formed from volunteers mainly from the western counties of Massachusetts, and it subsequently absorbed members of other units (notably the 7th and the 10th Massachusetts) in May and June 1864. The 37th was one of the first regiments to be issued the new Spencer repeating rifle, on July 15, 1864, increasing their firepower. The 37th Mass. was one of the first regiments to enter Petersburg. The surrender of the City to Colonel Edwards in command of the Sixth Corps, skirmish line..........................................$195.00

3018A - SAW A DESERTER SHOT WHILE SITTING ON HIS COFFIN, WE ARE AT WARREN STATION NEAR THE PETERSBURG LINE, 37th Mass. Volunteers, Co. F, Private Williard S. Cooke to his Father, near Petersburg, VA, January 3rd, 1865. Four pages in very bold pencil. He relates in part...He hopes to get detailed to Butler's Dept. in hopes of getting a furlough. We are presently camped near the center of the line on the very spot that the 5th Corps had done such desperate fighting to gain and hold the position on the Weldon Railroad. Nearby there is a large fort that was built by the Corps and perhaps you have seen in pictured in Harpers Weekly. The railroad cuts close to our camp and the station is just a few rods off. We are set at Warren's Station and are set in nice warm houses. We have been papering the inside of the houses with old "New York Heralds" [insulation] and it looks quite gay. I SAW A DESERTER SHOT TODAY. HE WAS SITTING ON HIS COFFIN WHEN HE WAS SHOT. Your Brother, W. S. Cooke [wrote to Father and Brother]. Records show that two Union soldiers were shot at Petersburg on January 6th, 1865 for desertion...Peter Cox of the 4th New Jersey and Michael Wert of the 184th PA. A well written letter by a member of the 37th Mass. The 37th Mass. regiment was formed in July 1862 and served until the end of the war in April 1865, seeing action at many battles including Fredericksburg and Gettysburg, duty in New York City after the draft riot, the Siege of Petersburg and the final pursuit and destruction of General Robert E. Lee's Army. It was formed from volunteers mainly from the western counties of Massachusetts, and it subsequently absorbed members of other units (notably the 7th and the 10th Massachusetts) in May and June 1864. The 37th was one of the first regiments to be issued the new Spencer repeating rifle, on July 15, 1864, increasing their firepower. The 37th Mass was one of the first regiments to enter Petersburg the surrender of the City to Colonel Edwards in command of the Sixth Corps skirmish line...............................................................$165.00

3019 - 2ND IOWA CAVALRY, ENEMY THREATENING NASHVILLE, Charles P. Hutchinson, Co. K, 2nd Iowa Cavalry to his brother's home in Illinois, at camp near Nashville, TN, December 10th, 1862. 4 pages in ink on attractive patriotic stationary [Washington standing by flag-green imprint]. He relates in part...about some in His company, one has died, the enemy is out in great force and they may try and take Nashville, skirmishing is going on at the present time and they have driven in our pickets today and our men are waiting for the enemy to come a little closer...we had a fight with them last week and made an attack on them at 4 AM on Thanksgiving morning and drove in their pickets killing 20 of them and only having three wounded. The new troops are dying off pretty fast just like last winter in Rolla [MO] when we buried  60 of our regiment. Letter comes with a patriotic cover with the stamp cut out. He refers to Bragg moving towards Nashville near Murfreesboro, TN. Well written on attractive stationary.............................................$125.00

3020 - 34TH IOWA SURGEON RELEASES HIM TO REJOIN HIS REGIMENT, June 25th, 1863, 4 pages in ink to his sister by Milton Hutchinson Co. F, 34th Iowa...he expects to start for his regiment that evening as the Surgeon has given him clearance to go. He is sending home $16 with a soldier who is going home on furlough...tells his sister that the money can be used to hire a hand to put up for the winter. Has heard from the boys at Vicksburg, direct letters to Cairo, IL, Company F, 34th Iowa. He was soon to join his regiment at Vicksburg and was later killed in action at Fort Blakely, AL in April 1865. Well written in ink, with stamped cover PM St. Louis, CDS bullseye cancellation......................................$75.00

3021 - A STEAMBOAT EXPLODED, SOLDIERS JUMP OVERBOARD, WIVES AND MOTHERS OF SOLDIERS ON BOARD, ONE WOMAN IS KILLED IN THE BURNING WRECK, A 34TH IOWA SOLDIER WRITES..., Morganza, LA, October 8th, 1863, 3 pages in ink on attractive green paper by Milton Hutchinson, 34th Iowa to his sister and cousin. He relates in part...We are camped at Morganza on the banks of the Mississippi River, mentions a fellow soldier named Jasper who had died of disease and had died in the "FAITH". He writes that the Rebels in the neighborhood are reported gone, a part of our army had come in the rear of them, they may have chased them out, have heard cannonading this morning down the river, don't know if it is near Port Hudson. There has been a great destruction of steamboats on the river this fall. Seven have been burnt the past month and a half. A few days ago there was a member of our company coming down the river on the ROBERT CAMPBELL [steamboat] and just at Milliken's Bend it took fire to the rear end in the hull. The fire ran up and burned the ropes so they could not get her ashore. She was within 100 yards of shore when they thought there was danger her boiler would blow up. Then there was a rush to the water and a member of my company jumped into the water and a deckhand helped save him and they swam to shore. About 40 lives were lost. There were several women on board going to see their sons and husbands who were in the army. One was sick in bed and burned to death, several others were saved by the men. An outstanding letter describing the destruction of the steamboat ROBERT CAMPBELL. Numerous steamboats, he writes, had burned on the river the previous month. Confederate agents had been burning steamboats on the river and the testimony of William Murphy in St. Louis in 1865 stated that a man named Ayleshire was paid $5000 by the Confederate Government to burn the ROBERT CAMPBELL. Other boats were named as being burned by Confederate agents and other boats mentioned by Hutchinson were probably burned by other agents rather than just accidents. The testimony of Murphy was designed to prove complicity of Jefferson Davis as acts of terror by burning the boats during the war. An important letter by Hutchinson. He later died at Fort Blakely, AL in April 1865..........................................................................$250.00


32605 - 34TH OHIO, PIATT'S ZOUAVES, OUR REGIMENT IS SPREAD OUT ALL OVER VIRGINIA, WE ARE IN THE DEFENSE OF WASHINGTON NOW, 200 MEN ARE POW'S IN RICHMOND, THE REGIMENT THAT WAS ONCE A FINE REGIMENT IS NO MORE, 4 page letter in ink to his cousin by John Sherrick, Company E, 34th Ohio, Camp near Centerville, VA, August 1st, 1863. He relates in part...One year ago I was within 4 miles of this place and ready to pack up to start for the front and we took the advance of Pope's Army and in 27 days we were driven back into Washington, since then I have knocked around Virginia and have seen some hard fighting, great deal of picket duty and run a great many risks. The unit had 800 fighting men and since then we have received 400 recruits and today where are they? Colonel Duffras [Duryea] is a General and is Burnside's Chief of Cavalry, 200 men ate at Richmond as prisoners of war, 100 men are at the front with Colonel Thompson, about 80 are here under Captain Baker. Conscripts will be arriving and it will be just drill, drill, drill. We have to scout and picket, returned last night from a 24 hour ride, this squad is in the defense of Washington under General Heintzelman...much more. Sherrick continues on from the bottom of page four to a postscript at the top of page one but does not put a signature. We will include a copy of another Sherrick letter with his signature [this letter is not incomplete, just unsigned]. The 34th Ohio Volunteer Infantry Regiment (or 34th OVI) was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It primarily served in the Eastern Theater in what is now West Virginia and in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley region. They are well known for wearing on Americanized Zouave uniform which consisted of: A dark blue jacket with red trimming, a pair of sky blue baggy trousers with two stripes of red tape going down vertically, a pair of tan gaiters, and a red ottoman styled fez with a blue tassel. They are known at Piatts Zouaves. A very good letter........................................................................$125.00


32801 - ILLINOIS SOLDIER WRITES FROM HAY MARKET, KY, PATRIOTIC STATIONARY, November 21st, 1861, to his sister in Kane County, IL. Red and blue Miss Liberty with flag. 4 pages, he relates...we moved to Camp Holman went about 24 miles from West Point and are camped on the roughest type of ground, there are 75,000 soldiers within 12 miles of here, plenty to eat, boys sing each night, have prayer meetings, some light water staining. Comes with cover stamp removed...............................$49.50


32805 - 8TH INDIANA LETTER SHEET, THE BATTLE OF CEDAR CREEK
, 3 page letter by an anonymous soldier, March 14th, 1865 to his sister. The letter sheet has great artillery graphics in red and is a poem by C. A. Savage, Co. K, 8th Indiana from Camp near Petersburg, VA. The letter deals with camp news, will go to City Point to mail an express package, more personal news. A great colorful letter sheet...................................................
$75.00




32807 - EAGLE FLYING FROM MOUNTAIN, TATTERED CONFEDERATE FLAG, US FLAG IN FOREGROUND
, Moreheadville, Erie Co., June 25th [62]. 7 page letter home in ink, great patriotic graphics, home news..........................
$50.00


32809 - SOME OF MORGAN'S MEN HAVE BEEN CAPTURED, NEWS OF GETTYSBURG, VICKSBURG, AND PORT HUDSON
, July 22nd, 1863, Polo, Illinois. 4 page letter to Lt. Oscar Sammis of the 92nd Illinois Mounted Infantry stationed near Chattanooga by his sister. She relates in part...I see by the papers that some of you have been after old Morgan and captured the greatest part of his men, and now it seems that Vicksburg and Port Hudson are taken, and together with Meade's Victory and the capturing of so many of Morgan's men there cannot be a great many left. A newsy home letter regarding the three great victories of July 1863.......................................
$48.00

32810 - NEWS OF THE DRAFT RIOTS IN NEW YORK, NEGROES KILLED IN THE STREETS BY THE IRISH, JEFF DAVIS CALLS OUT EVERY MAN BETWEEN 18 AND 45 INTO THE CONFEDERATE ARMY, July 26th, 1863, home front letter written to Lt. Oscar Sammis of the 92nd Illinois Mounted Infantry. 4 pages in ink. She related in part...We are all rejoicing on all the recent victories our army has had and we hope it will continue. They are drafting in some parts of the state, we expect it will soon commence here...they had a great riot in New York on account of the draft, it was mostly by the Irish, they set buildings on fire, plundered and stole a great deal and worst of all they picked at the Negroes killing them and beating them whenever they came across them. They killed about 20 or 30 before they were put down. Other riots have been threatened but they have been put down before they went. Jeff Davis called on every man between the ages of 18 and 45 to go into the service...well I guess we can match Jeff yet awhile so let him call on...we have plenty of men yet at home...your friend Caroline. The New York City draft riots (July 13 to July 16, 1863; known at the time as Draft Week) were violent disturbances in New York City that were the culmination of discontent with new laws passed by Congress to draft men to fight in the ongoing American Civil War. The riots were the largest civil insurrection in American history apart from the Civil War itself. President Abraham Lincoln sent several regiments of militia and volunteer troops to control the city. The rioters were overwhelmingly working class men, resentful, among other reasons, because the draft unfairly affected them while sparing wealthier men, who could afford to pay a $300.00 Commutation Fee to exclude them from its reach. Initially intended to express anger at the draft, the protests turned ugly and degraded into "a virtual racial pogrom, with uncounted numbers of blacks murdered on the streets." The conditions in the city were such that Major General John E. Wool stated on July 16. "Martial law ought to be proclaimed, but I have not a sufficient force to enforce it." The military suppressed the mob using artillery and fixed bayonets, but not before numerous buildings were ransacked or destroyed, including many homes and an orphanage for black children..........................................SOLD

32811 - A FRIEND WANTS A DARKY TO BE SENT UP TO HER FROM TENNESSEE, PART OF UNIT WILL BE GRANT'S BODYGUARD, THE 92ND REGIMENT HAS BEEN MOUNTED AND ATTACHED TO GENERAL WILDER, August 2nd, 1863, Polo, IN. 4 page Illinois home front letter to Lt. Oscar Sammis, 92nd Illinois Mounted Infantry by his sister...We have not heard from you in awhile are you off stealing horses, Mary says send her Darky along as she needs him in this hot weather, we have noticed that the 92nd has been mounted and attached to General Wilder's Division, General Grant has ordered three companies of his regiment [92nd Illinois] to Vicksburg for his body guards...Joseph says that completely uses up that regiment...says there will be nothing left than the 4th Illinois Cavalry. Quite newsy and interesting content.......................................$48.00

32813 - AFRAID THAT THE REBELS MIGHT GET INTO WASHINGTON, Polo, Illinois, July 17th, 1864, from the sister of Lt. Oscar Sammis, 92nd Illinois Mounted Infantry serving near Chattanooga. She relates in part in a 4 page ink letter...you have read in the papers about of the raid into Penn. And Maryland, we felt afraid for awhile that the Rebels might get into Washington and I think there were some near Washington...Sherman has been doing some terrible fighting the past two weeks...the opinion here is that he will soon clear out most of that part of the country. Her letter describes Jubal Early's raid towards Washington June - July 1864, Robert E. Lee was concerned about Hunter's advances in the Valley, which threatened critical railroad lines and provisions for the Virginia-based Confederate forces. He sent Jubal Early's corps to sweep Union forces from the Valley and, if possible, to menace Washington, D.C., hoping to compel Grant to dilute his forces against Lee around Petersburg, Virginia. Early was operating in the shadow of Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, whose 1862 Valley Campaign against superior forces was fabled in Confederate history. Early got off to a good start. He drove down the Valley without opposition, bypassed Harper's Ferry, crossed the Potomac River, and advanced into Maryland. Grant dispatched a corps under Horatio G. Wright and other troops under George Crook to reinforce Washington and pursue Early. Monocacy (July 9) Early defeated a smaller force under Lew Wallace near Frederick, Maryland, but this battle delayed his progress enough to allow time for reinforcing the defenses of Washington. Fort Stevens (July 11 - 12) Early attacked a fort on the northwest defensive perimeter of Washington without success and withdrew back to Virginia...........................................$55.00

32814 - ELMIRA, NY, PROVOST MARSHALL GIVES INSTRUCTIONS ABOUT TWO LISTS OF DESERTERS LIVING IN HIS COUNTY AND WHAT TO DO REGARDING ENROLLING NEW TROOPS, 27th District of NY, Elmira, NY, May 20th, 1863. He writes to the deputy Provost Marshall giving him lists of deserters in Steuben County and to arrest the men on the lists and deliver them to headquarters. Also he gives instructions, oaths of office, blank lists for enrollment, which with the assistance of Surgeon J. B. Graves, you will see transmitted to each enrolling officer in Steuben County and return the oath of office to me. M.J. Green Provost Marshall. An act for "enrolling and calling out the National Forces" was signed into law on March 3, 1863, by President Abraham Lincoln. This, the first effective draft by the federal government, called for all men between the ages of 18 and 45 to be enrolled into local militia units and be available to be called into national service. The draft law exempted men in some occupations, such as telegraph operators, railroad engineers, judges, and certain other government employees. Men with mental disabilities or with certain types of dependents were also exempted. Physical disabilities that would exempt a man included imperfect vision in the right eye, lack of front teeth and molars, and loss of more than one finger of the right hand or more than two fingers of the left hand. By July, the new draft hit high emotions in New York City where a riot where many were killed [especially Negroes], was subdued by Union troops. This Provost Marshall is trying to round up deserters in his district as well as setting the stage for enrolling more volunteers or the drafted men covered by Lincoln's March law. An interesting document, 8" X 10" manuscript..............................................$49.00


32705 - 13TH MAINE, CAMP AND GARRISON EQUIPMENT MANIFEST, August 11th, 1864, Augusta, ME. 8" X 10" printed form and filled in listing received from Lt. R. B. Grover, 13th Maine, lists uniform clothing, 1 forage cap, blouses, trousers [infantry], shirts, drawers, stockings. The 13th Maine participated in the New Orleans Expedition under Butler, the Rio Grande Campaign, Red River Campaign, and back to Virginia in 1864. This document was written while the veterans were on furlough Aug - Sept. 1864. Very fine...........................$28.50

32706 - 5TH IOWA CAVALRY AT FORT HENRY, KENTUCKY, HAS BEEN VACCINATED TWO OR THREE TIMES BEFORE IT TOOK, April 27th, 1862, 7 pages in ink by Lorenzo P. Roe, Company C, 5th Iowa Cavalry who was a bugler. He relates to his mother in excellent manuscript in ink...he has been vaccinated two or three times but it never took and it finally took - the small pox on the last day of February...he had a very light [case of smallpox] but it has left scarcely a mark on him, he was kept at Paducah about seven weeks to help with the sick at the hospital. He weighs 140 pounds which is more than he ever weighed before...we are located in a beautiful grove on the western side of the Tennessee River about three miles from directly across from Fort Henry...we live in tents ours being a large one taken by the Secesh and accommodates 12 men, we lay on the ground as straw and hay are scarce and we can get nothing but corn for our horses, describes the hard tack they have to eat, we get a little fresh beef and bacon, describes their other food stuffs, bean soup, biscuits, coffee, dried fruits, describes their mess kits, accessories...mentions the great battle that will soon be at Corinth will be a decisive one and then 50,000 cavalry will be discharged. He gives his address as "Curtis Horse Band, Ft. Henry, KY". A very scarce letter describing vaccinations for small pox in the Army. Poe later was discharged for a disability in July 1864 at Nashville, TN. Smallpox was more feared than the enemy's bullets. When the Civil War began, vaccines that used human scabs as their source were an unperfected new product. The procedure for administering the vaccine was itself so crude that it often created problems. Each man would wait in line for a doctor to cut his arm three or four times with a knife, then put a little of the vaccine into the wounds. The doctors "wholesale slashing and cutting of arms" gave the men sore arms for 10 days. Smallpox thrived in dirty conditions and affected soldiers and civilians alike. Prisoners of war on both sides died of the disease. Many poor blacks living in dirty refugee camps on the outskirts of Washington, D. C., also perished of smallpox. Their clothes were often sold to secondhand shops, thereby spreading the virus, which could live in the clothes for 18 months. The Confederate army saw their first cases of smallpox after contact with Yankees at Sharpsburg. With an outbreak threatening their army, all Confederates were ordered to be vaccinated. Doctors went out and vaccinated healthy children and then used the scabs to make some vaccines for their soldiers. Many soldiers, not willing to wait for the doctors, vaccinated one another using dirty pocketknives and scabs from fellow soldiers. Their contaminated, large cuts often resulted in nasty infections.....................................................$135.00

32707 - THE 34TH NEW YORK JUST AFTER MANASSAS JULY 1861, HIS DEALINGS WITH A SUTLER ISSUING SHIN PLASTERS, Washington, D.C., July 30th, 1861, four pages in ink on irregular paper by Frank [Francis] Bailey, 34th NY Infantry, [Herkimer Regiment]. He relates to his sister and brother in part...we are about to leave here for some place unknown and I and the rest of the boys feel anxious as we don't think we will get such as good place as this for water and conveyances, our Captain has gone to Herkimer to get recruits to fill our regiment to 1,000 men, describes Sutler as he gives them tickets of 3 - 5 and 10 cents to pass [Sutler chits] describes the prices the Sutler charges for tobacco, cheese, and butter - we call them shin plasters...one soldier got a letter stating it was reported that 14 of our boys were shot while bathing - he denies that report, mentions others in the unit - Adam Ruffins, tell Riley Wait he can come here and get a rifle...Frank [Francis Bailey]. Excellent commentary on an early Sutler in the war. The Adam Rubbins he referred to was William Rubbins who later died at Antietam..............................................................$89.00

32712 - 40TH MASSACHUSETTS, MINERS HILL, VA, THE WOODEN GUNS OF THE CONFEDERATES, October 22nd, 1862. 4 pages in bold pencil by Edwin A. Lane to his Father at Miners Hill, VA on patriotic stationary large colored star. He relates in part...we moved from Fort Ethan Allen to Munson Hill, the Rebels had their wooden guns, we see their fort as it is 75' high on a hill. The fort is made of barrels all around filled with dirt to make the fort, have been to Falls Church and have been on picket now at Miners Hill, we are right on top of the hill, wants a box sent to him filled with ginger snaps and cakes, he has not been paid and is need of gloves and stockings. Have gotten the mumps and one side of my face is swollen up the size of two fists, we are in General Robert Cowden's brigade who was the Colonel of the 1st Mass...Edwin A. Lane, Co. H, 40th Mass. Lane describes Confederate "Quaker guns" and the very important position of Miner's Hill which the Confederates had held until their arrival. Lane later died at Petersburg on June 24th, 1864. Some age tone, bold pencil.......................................................$100.00


32600 - KENNERVILLE, LOUISIANA [WEST OF NEW ORLEANS ON THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER], (PRESENT DAY KENNER, LA), January 12th, 1865. 3 page letter in ink with a Union Patriotic cover [writing somewhat faded due to a water stain, THE WAR FOR THE UNION PATRIOTIC - stamped], written it his cousin Sophia by Oscar Brothers, 47th Indiana and unusually written by a friend of his as he notates after his signature....he is finally answering a letter written to him a month ago as he had been setached away from his regiment and had received the letter while he was at St. Charles [next Parish 15 miles away]. He had been sent up the river from St. Charles to Duvall's Bluff and then to Little Rock and had then been sent up the Arkansas River to guard a boat up to Fort Smith that was loaded with rations for Fort Smith. The water was so low they only got up the river 150 miles while he lay for three weeks...while there they got to go in the country to see the young ladies and had parties but it was not as nice to be among the Southern girls as it would have been to be with the ladies of freedom of the north...we are now camped about 19 miles above the City of New Orleans on the east bank of the Mississippi River in a large cotton field, the camp has been very wet and muddy. On nice warm days, I have made myself a "washwoman" as I have been washing clothes for the boys for amusement, Oscar Brothers 47th Indiana.........................................................SOLD

32601 - AN EX CONFEDERATE POW FROM TENNESSEE IS LOOKING FOR HIS GUN AFTER HIS RELEASE FROM JOHNSON'S ISLAND, Whitefield County, Georgia, May 20th, 1866. One page letter in ink to Frank Hammum formerly of the 61st Tennessee who had been released from Johnson's Island late in 1865 by W. J. Johnson. He relates in part...Johnson states he did not received any letter from ex Lt. Hannum before he left Tennessee, states that Lt. Hannum's gun is in the hands of his brother-in-law Morgan Lane and to drop him a note at Whitesburg, Jefferson County, Tennessee..."you say you have not heard from out old regiment, Rader and Davis are now at home, Jackson is in Middle Tennessee somewhere, Rose. I have never heard a word from since he left the Island [Johnson's Island]." This letter is accompanied by a stamped cover with a pen cancellation Vernell's Station, GA, May 22, 1866. An interesting letter from old POW buddies from Johnson's Island. 2 pieces.......$55.00


3700 - 10TH MISSOURI INFANTRY ABOUT TO ENGAGE AT CORINTH, 24" X 30", pre-printed muster roll for Company I, 10th Missouri Infantry, Captain Joel Strong commanding. Dated April 30th, 1862 at Hickman, Kentucky listing over 60 soldiers and their pay received for March and April 1862. The 10th Missouri was en route to Shiloh and then to the siege at Corinth, MS. Strong lists what they have done since leaving Cape Girardeau, MO. He notes...left on March 20th on the transport and reached Birds Point at 5 PM the same day. Embarked on the steamer Thomas S. Dickey and proceeded to Hickman, Kentucky which is our present station which we arrived at daybreak on the 22nd and occupied the town and unfurled the Northern ensign which had not been seen since the breaking out of the Rebellion. The 10th Missouri was at Cape Girardeau, MO, until April 30. Moved to Pittsburgh Landing, TN, April 30, Coffey's Landing, TN, May 2, Siege of Corinth, MS, May 5-30. Action at Farmington May 9 (Reserve). Skirmish on Booneville Road May 29, pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. At Corinth until August, at Jacinto until September 18, Battle of Iuka September 19, Battle of Corinth October 3-4, Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862 to January, 1863. Escort train to Memphis, TN, December 20-30, 1862, guard duty on Memphis & Charleston Railroad at Germantown and near Memphis until March, 1863, expedition to Yazoo Pass and operations against Fort Pemberton and Greenwood March 13-April 5. Moved to Milliken's Bend, LA and duty there until April 25, movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30, Battle of Port Gibson May 1 (In support), Big Black River May 3, Battles of Raymond May 12, Jackson May 14, Champion's Hill May 16, Siege of Vicksburg, MS, May 18-July 4, assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22, Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Strong was wounded in the shoulder at Champion Hill. His photo is shown above, some embellishments light, minor seam strengthening in a spot, otherwise very good..........................................$225.00

3701 - 10TH MISSOURI INFANTRY, THE 2ND BATTLE OF CORINTH, IUKA, MISSISSIPPI, pre-printed 24" X 30" muster roll of Company I of the 10th Missouri Infantry listing over 50 men and their pay information signed by Captain Joel Strong October 31st, 1862 at Corinth, MS. The roll was for the period June 30th - October 30th, 1862. In the event section, Strong chronicles their actions since the last muster roll. He relates..."September 1st, 1862, at camp near Jacinta [Jacinto], MS. Remaining there until September 14th and on that day marched to Iuka and reached the battlefield on the 19th, the regiment being in reserve, loss 22 in killed and wounded, the next day pursuing the retreating enemy returned to Jacinta [Jacinto] on the 21st and remained in camp until October 1st when the regiment was ordered to camp near Corinth and reached there on the 1st, moved camp on the 2nd at 2 o'clock and received orders to be in the line in thirty minutes all being prompt to time we took up a line of march to Corinth where with the regiment participated in the fight of the 3rd and 4th, the regiment lost 93 killed and wounded and on the 5th pursued the retreating enemy from 15 to 32 miles per day returning on the 11th to Corinth and on the 13th moved to our present position one mile north of Corinth, MS." The 10th Missouri was at Cape Girardeau, MO, until April 30, moved to Pittsburgh Landing, TN, April 30. Coffey's Landing, TN, May 2, Siege of Corinth, MS, May 5-30. Action at Farmington May 9 (Reserve). Skirmish on Booneville Road May 29, pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 12. At Corinth until August, at Jacinto until September 18, Battle of Iuka September 19, Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862 to January, 1863. Escort train to Memphis, TN, December 20-30, 1862,guard duty on Memphis & Charleston Railroad at Germantown and near Memphis until March, 1863. Expedition to Yazoo Pass and operations against Fort Pemberton and Greenwood March 13-April 5, moved to Milliken's Bend, LA, and duty there until April 25. Movement on Bruinsburg and turning Grand Gulf April 25-30, Battle of Port Gibson May 1 (In Support). Big Black River May 3, Battles of Raymond May 12, Jackson May 14. Champion's Hill May 16, Siege of Vicksburg, MS May 18-July 4, assaults on Vicksburg May 19 and 22, surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Strong was wounded in the shoulder at Champion Hill. His photo is shown above. A good account of the action of the 10th Missouri at Iuka and Corinth. Some slight seam restoration that is quite usual for these huge folded documents.....................................$295.00


3262 UNION BATTERIES OPPOSITE FREDERICKSBURG, REBELS TRY TO CAPTURE THE BATTERIES, 4TH US ARTILLERY, 3 large pages in ink by Sergt. Major John Hunter, 4th US Artillery to friend Rapp, March 11th, 1863, position off Fredericksburg. He relates in part…I was detailed as Sergt. Major of the Headquarters Reserve, was arrested and sent to his battery and out in charge of a detachment as “Chief of Piece”, mentions a girl involved with the commanding officers, desires his friend buy him an Italian/English dictionary. last night we heard of a attempt the Rebels were to make to make a raid across the river and spike our cannons. So we set a trap and loaded with canister waiting for them but they failed to come. A boat crossed below us with 15 Rebels which were all captured. We are ready for them tonight’s with our ‘pieces’ being drawn back 80 yards and ready to take them if they enter our camp. Perhaps we shall have some sport one of these dark nights. I have a Corporal [gunner] and 22 privates in my detachment. Our gun will speak for itself and give a good account. The weather is still not settled and the roads are still dreadful. Mentions that he received the Brevet of Sergeant for “gallant and meritorious service” last Saturday. He will kill all Rebels that approach him with hostile intent. John Hunter. Hunter was brevetted for his gallant service at the Battle of Chapel Hill and was later made 1st Lt. in October 1864. He served in the regular army until 1871. An extremely well-written letter on the banks of the Rappahannock River several months after Fredericksburg and Burnside’s ill fated ‘Mud March”............................................SOLD

3263 THREE HEARTY CHEERS FOR THE LADIES AND THE UNION, THE MARCH IN AND THROUGH BALTIMORE BY THE 21ST NEW YORK REGIMENT, 4 pages in ink and pencil [3/4 ink], Ansel W. Dumphrey, 21st NY Vol., July 3rd, 1861. He relates in part...Only the favorites will be promoted no matter how gallant others are, the 3rd day after we arrived in Washington we flew through hill and dale stopping at Williamsport…the ladies had a huge lunch spread out for us, away we sped and changed cars in Baltimore marching through the center of the city, the people there did not have the inclination to attack us on the contrary told us we were a noble looking regiment…the road was well guarded with Federal troops…bridges temporary built where the Rebels had burned them down…we were cheered by men women and children…we marched to a beautiful place that is our camp…we take a Rebel every now and then…it is expected that General Scott will take a force to take Richmond- that will take the blues out of the boys…we could not get a sight of Uncle Abe- Pres [when in Washington]. Ansel W. Dumphrey. A well written newsy letter about the early travels of the 21st NY through Baltimore…...............................................$95.00

3264 REBEL PROPERTY HAD BEEN PROTECTED UNTIL NOW IN KENTUCKY, REBELS ARE BEING ROUTED OUT, SENATOR DAVIS OF KENTUCKY DESIRES HARD PUNISHMENT FOR TRAITORS, 4 large pages in ink by Captain John O. Campbell, 45th PA., Vol., to his friends, Paris, Ky., April 9th, 1863. He relates in part about their entry and camping in Kentucky...we are under to join our brigade at Camp Dick Robinson…although the footprints of war are evident in Kentucky the county side is magnificent.. There are many loyalists here but there are some excessively bitter Rebels here principally the ‘softer sex”. The Federals have been stripped by the likes of John Morgan, Kirby Smith, Marshall and others while the property of the Rebels have been protected while the Federal authorities are present. I am happy to say that this is about to change. Scouts searched houses and ho knowledge of any Rebels was known, four Rebels spies were found [one of whom could not be moved] and were brought to the town jail. Our government has acted as a fool long enough. Senator Davis lives in the suburbs of the town [Paris]. He desires to see the whole town freed of all disloyalty and the leading men shot and the women sent to military prisons and compelled to wait on themselves instead of having servants with them. The Senator can see what is good for Kentucky but did not endorse a measure that would give us character in the eyes of Europe - The Emancipation Proclamation. We are camped in the Bourbon County fairgrounds, describes the camp and the large facilities used by the soldiers. The “Clay’s are a very minimum here with some three or exceptions are loyal. Mentions a Unionist school teacher named Bacon who is a valuable supporter but owns 4-5 blacks, invited officers to a wonderful dinner at their house, John O. Campbell. A wonderful letter on Kentucky politics and the situation within the towns Unionists vs Rebels, Extremely well written. Campbell died of wounds he suffered at the Battle of the Wilderness 5/6/64. Senator GarrettDavis was opposed to secession, however, and supported the Constitutional Union Party ticket in 1860. This convinced him to reenter politics, and he was elected as a Unionist in 1861 to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the expulsion of John C. Breckinridge. He was reelected as a Democrat in 1867 and served from December 10, 1861 until his death in Paris, Kentucky in 1872. He served as chairman of the Committee on Private Land Claims. He was interred in Paris Cemetery.................$195.00

3266 THE RESULTS OF CONFEDERATE ARTILLERY NEAR PETERSBURG, A MAN HAS HIS HEAD BLOWN OFF, near Petersburg, December 9th, 1864, 3 pages in ink by John Smith, Co. I 35th Mass. Volunteers. He relates in part to his wife...The artillery is firing from both sides, three days ago when our pickets were being relieved the Rebels threw a shell into them killing one and wounding three. The one killed was an old man from Company C who had his head blown off and died instantly, he did not know what hit him, another was hit in eight different places and probably will not live, if so he will at least lose an arm and an leg and was also hit in the body.. Another man lost his thumb, another slightly wounded in the side. Last night we had a man wounded by a Minnie ball. The ball passed through his arm but did not break the bone and went into his body. The shelling yesterday from both sides was lively. . There was a group of soldiers standing aside of our battery looking at the effects of our shells on the Rebels when a shell came in and hit into the crowd killing five and wounding others. All belonged to the 39th NY which was a new regiment here. Our losses along the entire line yesterday was heavy was as there was considerable firing on the picket lines. The deserters do not come in as fast as a week ago as I guess their officers keep a better look at them coming over in crowds. . We have heard that Hardie as escaped from Savannah before Sherman could invest the city but he has done considerable enough. I am now making out a report on all the killed, wounded, ill, died and it is considerable…John [John I Smith Co I 35th Mass.] Smith was appointed a 2nd Lt in January 1865. A great accounting of the horrific damage artillery shells did on infantry. Extremely well written........................$350.00

3267 - ONE OF OUR LIEUTENANTS WAS KILLED WHEN WE CROSSED THE RIVER AFTER THE REBELS, 1ST NEW YORK MOUNTED RIFLES, Camp Dodge, Suffolk, VA. 4 long pages in ink by Charles H. Hasting, 1st NY Mounted Rifles, January 1st, 1863. He relates in part...We had a hard rife was in the saddle from 7 AM to 3 AM, the Rebels came across a few times, once in a while we get a shot at them and they return the compliment, quite a number of our men have been wounded, two have died, and one has lost a leg...the cavalry is not as exposed as the infantry, if we move it will be towards Petersburg...the Rebels have a very strong hold at Black Water, if we attempt to cross the river they can pick us off, several of our companies went across the river and drove them 10 miles but returned as they had no infantry to back them up, that was when our Lieutenant was killed. Extremely well written, comes with DUE 3 stamped postal cover NORFOLK CDS of January 10th [1863].................................................$145.00

3268 - A SOLDIER KILLED A LITTLE GIRL IN THE WOODS, Harrisonburg, VA, October 11th, 1863. 3 page letter in ink by Edward Fisher of the 82nd PA Infantry writing to a friend. He relates in part...Am getting along fine but the crackers we have are so hard they are hard to get down without choking on them, we have bread twice a day and in the evening we have crackers and coffee. There has been a great many accidents around here, last week one soldier cut his leg off and broke his shoulder bone. ONE OF THE SOLDIERS WAS DOWN TOWN AND PICKED UP A LITTLE GIRL AND TOOK HER TO A SWAMP AND SHOT HER THROUGH THE NECK AND THEN CUT HER THROAT...THE GIRL WAS ONLY FIVE YEARS OLD AND NOW NO ONE DARES TO GO OUT OF THE CAMP...he discusses payment for boots, many men buy their own food, Edward Fisher. While quite a revealing letter about the murder of a little girl by a soldier, Fisher does not comment about the outcome of the murder - was the soldier identified and caught? The 82nd PA had been very active in the previous months fighting at Gettysburg and in the pursuit of Lee...extremely rare commentary of something unheard of in the Civil War - murder of a child by a soldier....................................................$175.00

3251 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET, East Port, Alabama, March 18th, 1865. Two page letter to his wife by John Haggerty and engineer on the USS Carondelet. He relates in part...he refers to family matters and states that he has sent $10 to her as well as a photo of the boat, states that he has sent letters to his two children and has not heard back from them. Family matters continues. John Haggerty. USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition...................$75.00

3252 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET, East Point, Alabama, April 8th, 1865. Two large pages in ink to his wife by John Haggerty an engineer on the Carondelet. He relates in part...The gunboat Fair Play came up the river last night from Cairo and brought the good news that we are in Richmond, asks his wife to be more careful in writing as her writing is most difficult to read, asks about the recent floods back home he has heard about, family matters. John Haggerty. USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition. Paper has some archival repairs affecting several words...................................................$75.00

3254 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET, East Port, AL., April 24th, 1865. Four pages in ink to his wife by John Haggerty an engineer on the USS Carondelet. He relates in part...A gunboat came up with a convoy this morning with the mail aboard, there has been a problem with the mail as of late, the Rebels are about played out, any soldier or sailor who says anything about Abe Lincoln is punished severely...a still tongue makes a wise head...They will head to Mound City for repairs and will probably stay on the Mississippi River...John Haggerty...USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition............................................$125.00

3255 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET, Off Paducah, KY, May 11th, 1865. Four pages in ink by John Haggerty an engineer on the USS Carondelet to his wife back in Pittsburgh. He relates in part...He has enclosed $10 and mentions that the Mississippi Squadron will be reduced to 25 boats and there are presently 115 in the squadron. The Carondelet is a good boat in need of much repairs, her boilers had been examined and condemned so we expect to be one of the first boats to be discharged, the newspapers are brought on the boat by the newsboys in skiffs so we are kept informed of the events of the war, hopes to be home by July 4th, send letters to Cairo, Illinois, John Haggerty. A well written letter discussing the pending de-commissioning of the gunboat as the navy designs to compress the Mississippi Squadron. USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition.............................................SOLD

3256 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET, Off Paducah, KY, May 14th, 1865. 4 large pages to his wife by John Haggerty, an engineer on the Carondelet. He relates in part...that he has not any letter since her last scalding letter regarding him giving his Father things and hopes she will have no trouble with him coming home, lack of mail service made the Captain send a man to Cairo to tell the postmaster to get their mail sent up, I look for letters every time I see smoke coming down the river, he had sent a newspaper account of all the hard fighting the Carondelet had been in last December at Nashville and many a poor Rebel fell from the shot and shell from the old Carondelet and the whole western army spoke well of her, much more on family issues, John Haggerty. USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition..................$95.00

3257 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET,  May 18th, 1865, off Paducah, KY. 4 pages in ink by John Haggerty to his wife. He relates in part...The largest mail has come today, there are five letters from you and a newspaper, I just had a photo taken for my sister ashore, he is tired of the scolding letters his wife Margaret has been sending, if you can't send peaceful letters send none! I feel bad enough about being away from home without these letters...John Haggerty. While most letters from home were loving during the war to soldiers, obviously his wife's letters were just the contrary. USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition...................$75.00

3258 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET, Off Paducah, KY, May 20th, 1865. 4 large pages in ink by John Haggerty an engineer on the USS Carondelet. He relates to his wife in part...Had Negroes scrubbing the engine room, states that the last letter he had received was the first one in a long time that made him happy as the previous scolding letters she had sent him made him near crazy being so far away from home, describes the activities on the ship, they do not drill anymore, there are boats loaded with Rebel soldiers bringing them home and he wonders when he will go home, he goes in details about her scolding letters in the past to him, more on family matters, John Haggerty. A good newsy letter giving insight that all letters from home during the war were not loving letter. USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition...................SOLD

3259 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET,  Off Paducah, KY, May 26th, 1865. 4 large pages to his wife by John Haggerty an engineer on the Carondelet. He relates in part...he has sent clothing home that was of no use to him, coats, describes his mess mates as mostly from Pittsburgh and he eats with the men in the Engineer room, they have plenty to eat, potatoes, flour, beef, he has saved money that he will bring home, describes the little he buys on the boat so there is opportunity to save his pay. There is a Priest on board taking names to go to Confession at 8 AM tomorrow..."He is like other Priests - fond of money", one of the men struck an officer and he was put in the brig in double irons. A good newsy letter from the Carondelet heading back at the war's end...USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition...................$95.00

3260 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET, Off Mound City, Illinois, May 31st, 1865. Four pages in ink to his wife by John Haggerty an engineer on the Carondelet. He relates in part...we got orders to move to Mound City and came in sight of the flagship of the Mississippi Squadron and fired a salute of 9 guns from the old Carondelet. There are 21 gunboats here and more coming. We will soon be discharged. They are keeping only the good boats in the service and putting two and three year men on them, it is unusually hot tonight in the engine room as we have run all day...more...John Haggerty. USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition...................$95.00

3261 - ON BOARD THE GUNBOAT CARONDELET, June 6th, 1865, Off Mound City, IL. Four pages in ink by John Haggerty to his wife. Haggerty is an engineer on the Carondelet. He relates in part...They are going to take the guns off the boat, we are waiting for a boat to come aside and take them to New Orleans, he is awaiting his discharge, the Admiral is awaiting orders from Washington when to pay them [final pay] I am on watch in the engine room and it is 4 AM in the morning of June 6th. There is a great deal of gunboats here and more arriving each day, the river is black with them. More on family matters, John Haggerty. USS Carondelet, a 512-ton Cairo class ironclad river gunboat, was built at Saint Louis, Missouri, for the U.S. Army's Western Gunboat Flotilla. Commissioned in January 1862 with Commander Henry A. Walke, USN as her captain, Carondelet quickly entered combat, taking part in the captures of Forts Henry and Donelson, Tennessee, in February 1862. In March and April, she played an important role in the campaign to capture the Confederate fortress at Island Number Ten, on the Mississippi River. This was followed by operations against Fort Pillow and Memphis, TN, during April - June 1862. With the upper Mississippi now under Union control, Carondelet spent much of the following year in the long campaign against Vicksburg, MS. On 15 July 1862, while in the Yazoo River, she was badly damaged in an engagement with the Confederate ironclad Arkansas. Along with the other units of the Army's Western Rivers "navy", she was formally transferred to the U.S. Navy in October 1862. In April 1863, Carondelet was a member of the ironclad force that ran past Vicksburg and later bombarded Grand Gulf, MS. In May, combined Army-Navy operations that led to that fortified city's surrender on 4 July 1863. Thereafter, she was involved with a variety of expeditions and patrol operations, among them the March-May 1864 Red River expedition.................................................$95.00


3095 - THE OCCUPATION OF LEESVILLE, VA MARCH 1862, Camp Pierpoint, VA, March 8th, 1862. 4 pages in ink to family from a member of the 10th PA Vol. who was artilleryman and was from New Wilmington, PA. He relates in part...My health is good and so is the company's...Professor Vincent of New Wilmington preached for us near the quarters today. He is here on a visit to the 10th Regiment as there are some boys in our company he knows, a friend's brother is there driving the team for our company's Sutler Jim Clark...Colonel Geary [Colonel John Geary] has taken possession of Leesburg. He did not have to fight any to get it. Our troops came into town on one side and their troops went out on the other side...we are under orders for four days rations to be ready to march...we would like to march on and rout them as we go...the more I hear about them [Rebels] the more I went after them...was on guard last night and I was sleepy, the turnpike is dry from here to Washington, describes a falling tree crushing a tent, more on his camp life...signed Jim. Jim was an artilleryman as seen in his June 26th, 1862 letter...Geary's capture of Leesburg was the first Union occupation of that city. The 10th PA was about to move south and participate in the Peninsular Campaign that proved disastrous to McClellan..................................$95.00

3096 - MECHANICSVILLE, VA, THE BATTLE IS ABOUT TO START, THE REBELS HAVE HID THEIR GUNS SAY THE DESERTERS, SKIRMISHING THE DAY BEFORE THE BATTLE, Camped at Mechanicsville, VA, June 26th, 1862. Four large pages by an artilleryman of the 10th PA known as Jim. He writes on the day the Battle of Mechanicsville began about the days leading up to the battle...He comments on the health of the company, he has to be up and hitched each morning by 3 AM and some nights sooner [at night]. The Rebs come up on us at night when we are unaware, but they will have to get up real early to catch us. Our quarters is at a big farm house, we have plenty of water, pens in the yard, and stands in a nice white oak grove. There has no fighting here for some time but there are preparations for a good one...the Rebs are evacuation Richmond but is hard to tell, they are trying to do something...we have fired on them every day, but Sunday since we came here but they never replied once. They had four guns that we could see, deserters day they have others we can't see, deserters say they have others we can't see masked...yesterday they came out and hitched their teams to them [four guns] and took them away. We fired a few shells at them and they started out double quick and they ran in every direction. The Generals that have been here to see us praise us saying it is the best firing that has ever been done...we have shot a good bit now and now have the range and can put them just where we want...Two companies crossed the bridge on Monday under fire and drove in their pickets. They were fired on by the pickets as soon as they past out of the woods. There was no one hurt except one Sergt. in Company C of the 9th Regiment. He got a flesh wound in his right arm. He walked back to his side before he told anyone and was pretty weak from loss of blood. Our pickets and the Rebels exchanged newspapers the other day. The Reb came onto the bridge and waved a paper and our picket waved his and started out on the bridge, after a short conversation they exchanged papers and returned. It was a Richmond paper and said something that JEFF DAVIS wanted to leave and the people objected and said he had gotten them into this and he had to stay and get them out of it. It also spoke on the condition of their army...We can't get medicine and the deserters say the same...Sorry to hear that Calvin is dead after making it through so many hard battles. If I have to die I hope it will be on the battlefield and not in a hospital. Jim does not sign it but ends with "My Love to all" and then continues on for one sentence. We will include a copy of another letter written and signed by the same soldier written in March 1862, which he just signs Jim...The Battle of Beaver Dam Creek, also known as the Battle of Mechanicsville or Ellerson's Mill, took place on June 26, 1862, in Hanover County, Virginia, as the first major engagement [4] of the Seven Days Battles during the Peninsula Campaign of the American Civil War. It was the start of Confederate General Robert E. Lee's counter-offensive against the Union Army of the Potomac, under Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan, which threatened the Confederate capital of Richmond. Lee attempted to turn the Union right flank, north of the Chickahominy River, with troops under Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, but Jackson failed to arrive on time. Instead, Maj. Gen. A. P. Hill threw his division, reinforced by one of Maj. Gen. D. H. Hill's brigades, into a series of futile assaults against Brig. Gen. Fitz John Porter's V Corps, which occupied defensive works behind Beaver Dam Creek. Confederate attacks were driven back with heavy casualties. Porter withdrew his corps safely to Gaines Mill..............SOLD

3000 - LEAVING FREDERICKSBURG FOR THE CAMPAIGN AGAINST RICHMOND, Camp near Fredericksburg, VA, June 13th, 1863. Three pages in ink to his Father by Pvt. George W. Rogers, 9th PA Reserve Infantry on patriotic stationary [eagle, red, blue edge trim]. He relates in part..."I have been on fatigue duty at Fredericksburg, we are ordered to Richmond, the 1st and 2nd Brigades are already on transports, the 12th and 6th Regiments are on board along with the cavalry and artillery...Jim [his brother] has a Negro to wait on him but I would not have one for there are a nuisance...we had camped out on a Seesch farm about six miles from Fredericksburg on a river. The General told us to tear up the fences for fire and shanties as it was raining...that made the old Rebel roaring mad, he told us that two brigades could camp there but not to molest his fence. He would not sell us milk and said he would just as soon sell us poison and if he could he would cut our throats." Rogers later would be killed at Antietam and his brother Jim seriously wounded. A nice newsy letter just before the Peninsular Campaign began.............................................$125.00

3009 - PRISONER AT ANDERSONVILLE, KILLED IN THE EXPLOSION OF THE STEAMSHIP SULTANA, PRIVATE VALMORE LAMBERT, COMPANY D, 100TH OHIO, 100th Ohio, Company D, POW August 6th, 1864 at Utoy Creek, GA, POW at Andersonville, GA, paroled and died on the explosion of the Steamboat SULTANA on April 27th, 1865. TWO letters back to back to his Parents...1st letter dated July 9th, 1863, Stanford, KY, one large page in ink. He relates in part...I suppose you have heard of our march to Somerset in rain and mud all the way, I gave out on the evening of the first day, marched 23 miles and camped alone in a wheat shock, threw away some of my clothes...Stanford is quite a town in a fine country. We have a heavy force here with several batteries so I think the Rebels would do well to keep out of here...we are on provost duty and seldom get our mail, we do get papers which give us glorious news...letter #2 he writes on the verso, July 12th, Stanford, KY. Mentions the lack of food, but have gotten reinforcements so there is relief on guard duty. The forces have left here for Danville except our brigade. The 9th Army Corps is coming back here having gone a few weeks from Vicksburg...the guerillas burned a train at Crab Orchard night before last but our boys are picking up stragglers all of the time. There was a train about 10 miles long with the forces that left here yesterday. We are 28 miles from Nicholasville and a good pike [road] all the way. The supplies went there today, concerned over a lack of letters he has received...V. L. [Valmore Lambert] Lambert served with the 100th Ohio through the Knoxville Campaign, Cumberland Gap, Sherman's movement towards Atlanta and was captured at Utoy Creek, GA in August 1864, sent to Andersonville Prison, then paroled and sent home via the Mississippi River steamboat Sultana which exploded and Lambert was among the dead. A rare letter from a Sultana casualty. The SS Sultana was a Mississippi River steamboat paddle wheeler destroyed in an explosion on April 27, 1865. This resulted in the greatest maritime disaster in United States history. An estimated 1,800 of the 2,400 passengers were killed when three of the ship's four boilers exploded and the Sultana sank near Memphis. This disaster received somewhat diminished attention, as it took place soon after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln and during the closing weeks of the Civil War. The wooden steamship was constructed in 1863 by the John Lithoberry Shipyard on Front Street in Cincinnati, and intended for the lower Mississippi cotton trade. Weighing 1,719 tons, the steamer normally carried a crew of 85. For two years, the Sultana ran a regular route between St. Louis and New Orleans. The steamship was frequently commissioned by the War Department to carry troops............................................................$395.00

3011 - PRISONER AT ANDERSONVILLE, KILLED IN THE EXPLOSION OF THE STEAMSHIP SULTANA, PRIVATE VALMORE LAMBERT, COMPANY D, 100TH OHIO, 100th Ohio, Company D, POW August 6th, 1864 at Utoy Creek, GA POW at Andersonville, GA paroled and died on the explosion of the Steamboat SULTANA on April 27th, 1865, Knoxville, TN, February 28th, 1864. 4 pages, 2 large legal in ink to his Parents. He relates in part...describes a pain he still has in his breast but the climate is wonderful, describes the ravaged countryside due to the War, destroyed fences, timber, people are hospitable that are left as have few slaves as near all the men with slaves have enlisted. Some of the locals are enlisted and becoming officers in Colored regiments. LONGSTREET has been forced to leave in a hurry leaving all that he could not carry with the men, even his pontoon at the Plains was left. We have got the Knoxville bridge done except for some little notions, the teams commenced to cross yesterday. Tomorrow we go to the Plains to rebuild the bridge there that our Generals so imprudently ruined. There is great effort to get our company back into the regiment. Our Colonel came back yesterday and told Mr. Carter he needed us but Mr. Carter told him he could not get along without us [Company had been assisting in re-constructing bridges around Knoxville]. The troops have nearly all gone back to the front - Grant will shake the Confederacy to the very center...the war is nearly over but I tell you that the war will not end until we humble ourselves to Almighty God...Lambert continues on for over 60 lines on his religious beliefs and the need to be humble as followers of that blessed lamb who died on the cross...V. Lambert. Lambert served with the 100th Ohio through the Knoxville Campaign, Cumberland Gap, Sherman's movement towards Atlanta and was captured at Utoy Creek, GA in August 1864, send to Andersonville Prison, then paroled and sent home via the Mississippi River steamboat Sultana which exploded and Lambert was among the dead. A rare letter from a Sultana casualty. The SS Sultana was a Mississippi River steamboat paddle wheeler destroyed in an explosion on April 27, 1865. This resulted in the greatest maritime disaster in United States history. An estimated 1,800 of the 2,400 passengers were killed when three of the ship's four boilers exploded and the Sultana sank near Memphis. [1] This disaster received somewhat diminished attention, as it took place soon after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln and during the closing weeks of the Civil War. The wooden steamship was constructed in 1863 by the John Lithoberry Shipyard on Front Street in Cincinnati, and intended for the lower Mississippi cotton trade.  Weighing 1,719 tons, the steamer normally carried a crew of 85. For two years, the Sultana ran a regular route between St. Louis and New Orleans. The steamship was frequently commissioned by the War Department to carry troops...well written in ink in good style..............................................................$450.00


3100 - WHILE GUARDING A HOUSE IN VIRGINIA I SPENT THE NIGHT WITH A SOUTHERN LADY, 4 large pages in ink by Francis Aubin of the 146th NYV, Camp Augur, Upton Hill, VA, February 15th, 1862 to his sister. He relates in part...I must tell you a story about our skirmishing when we went last week between our pickets and the Rebels, we started in the afternoon and got to the Rebel pickets about dark. We skirmished for awhile and about seven o'clock the Captain told me to go to a certain house and guard it...later I was not paying attention to what was in the house and I felt someone taking me by my shoulders--it was an old nigger wench and I got up and was going to hit her with the butt of my gun, she begged me not to hit her and told me that her mistress, the table had been set for supper and asked me to take supper with her and a good looking gal. We had barely eaten half of the supper when the old woman gets up and leaves the room and leaves me with the young gal. I hitched up close to her and I must say I enjoyed myself tip top. I was up all night with her and had a good old gay time. About half past five, I awoke and decided to rejoin my company and asked the gal if I could have a kiss from her sweet lips...then he asked me what kind of soldier I was Secesh or Union. I told her that I was Union to the bone and she told me to get away from her...then there was a bank outside and it was my Captain and I was taken prisoner, more on what the boys said back in camp. Extremely well written by Francis Aubin who had two sons killed in the war [Frank and John]. Rare sexual content. We sold this letter in 2000 for $350 in our catalogue and just bought it again......................................................$395.00

3102 - THERE ARE DEAD MEN'S FEET STICKING OUT OF THE GROUND, Camp of the 211th PA, camped near Petersburg, VA, December 2nd, 1864. 3 page ink letter by Morgan Hofius, Company D. He relates in part to his Parents...We have been on the march, went first to Petersburg then to the extreme left of the line which is about seven miles left of here where we were put into the 9th Corps. Then we marched here which is about 2 miles to the right of Petersburg and only a half a mile from the Rebel line. There is a railroad that runs from City Point to the front of our line and it is ply a short distance from our camp. The report is that we belong to the Corps that is going to Charleston. Burnside is the commander of our army and he wants to fight in Virginia. It is a curious place here. There have been big fights here since the war started and graves are as thick as can be in some places. The dead men's feet are sticking out of the ground. I have not heard from J. Graham since he was taken prisoner. Signs the letter Morg. [Morgan Hofius]. He was later wounded at Petersburg on April, 1865. A good letter from a unit that had just been formed and sent to Petersburg...................................................SOLD

3103 - THE GREAT NEWS OF THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG AND VICKSBURG, Putnam, OH, July 8th, 1863. 4 pages in ink by J. N. McBee to his children [he appears to be involved in enrolling men in several towns in Ohio]. He relates in part...describes a merchant he has visited as being a COPPERHEAD, finished enrolling two townships a week ago yesterday, but was somewhat annoyed by some BUTTERNUTS who had lies and evasion but I believe I got them all...I was 2 days employed [enrolling]. We have had striving times here especially since last Saturday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great account of the news from Gettysburg and Vicksburg as sporadic new reports hit this Ohio town. Meade stops short of destroying Lee's army and allows them to escape into Maryland...great Gettysburg content. Good event letters such as these on Gettysburg are rare...........................................SOLD

3108 -  THE BATTLE OF KERNSTOWN, VA, STONEWALL JACKSON'S ONLY DEFEAT, April 2nd, 1862. 4 page letter in ink by Elias S. Stone, 83rd NYV [9th NY Militia], Headquarters 9th NY State Militia, 4 miles from Warrenton, VA. He relates in part to his sister...we left Winchester a week ago and have been marching ever since...the Rebels 11,000 strong attacked our forces but they made a mistake and they got badly whipped losing from 1200 to 1500 men in the engagement, we only lost 98 killed and 267 wounded and we also took 1600 prisoners. That is pretty good don't you think so our brigade marched to Centerville and over the battlefield at Bulls Run. The Rebels had 160,000 men there but did not stop to fight they have retreated to Richmond and we are going after them lively. Every time we have a fight they fly in dismay. There are 400 fortifications that they have quit and they bragged that we could never take them. Where McClellan made a move they did not stop and fight. The enemy is on the opposite side of the Rappahannock so we will have to wait until something is done by way of the James River where 2000 troops have gone to attack them from the other side...Direct letters to Washington, DC in General Banks' Division...more, The First Battle of Kernstown was fought on March 23, 1862, in Frederick County and Winchester, Virginia, the opening battle of Confederate Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's campaign through the Shenandoah Valley during the American Civil War. Attempting to tie down the Union forces in the Valley, under the overall command of Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks, Jackson received incorrect intelligence that a small detachment under Col. Nathan Kimball was vulnerable, but it was in fact a full infantry division more than twice the size of Jackson's force. His initial cavalry attack was forced back and he immediately reinforced it with a small infantry brigade. With his other two brigades, Jackson sought to envelop the Union right by way of Sandy Ridge. But Col. Erastus B. Tyler's brigade countered this movement, and when Kimball's brigade moved to his assistance, the Confederates were driven from the field. There was no effective Union pursuit. Although the battle was a Confederate tactical defeat, and in fact Jackson's only defeat in the war, it represented a strategic victory for the South by preventing the Union from transferring forces from the Shenandoah Valley to reinforce the Peninsula Campaign against the Confederate capital, Richmond. The Battle of Kernstown started Jackson on the road to being one of the most celebrated Confederate generals. Stone was killed at 2nd Bulls Run, August 30th, 1862. Well written......................................................$250.00

3112 - WE ARE 12 MILES FROM RICHMOND TAKING PRISONERS, A FRIEND IS BURIED ASIDE THE ROAD, THE BATTLE OF THE WILDERNESS BEGINS, May 30th, 1864, 3 large pages by Lt. Augustus Tuttle of the 36th Mass. Infantry written to his wife. He relates in part...We continue to march and fight by day and night but the boys keep courage as we are bound for Richmond, we hope to be in Richmond by the 4th as Vicksburg fell last year on the 4th. We have seen such fighting as we have never seen before, it commenced on the 5th and has continued all the time since...the Rebel prisoners complain that we give them no rest, they begin to think that Grant and Burnside are after them in earnest, he mentions a soldier who died and was buried on the Spotsylvania Road near a house that was being used as a hospital, I think I should know the grave if the headstone is gone. I have his gold watch and other things to send home to his family and have written them with all the particulars, mentions that their Major had a piece of bone come out of his neck and it will quite while until he can sit up, their Chaplain is inept and just joined for the money, more detrimental information about the Chaplain. Tuttle letter describes the beginning of the Battle of the Wilderness which began on May 5th, 1864. Well written....................$195.00

3082 - THERE WERE PRETTY GIRLS THERE AND I HAD A GOOD TIME THERE HAD ALL THE SKINER I WANTED, Scottsboro, Alabama, 1st Ohio Infantry, January 15th, 1864. Charles Cummer writes to a friend...Want some postage stamps sent as he had sent the friend $20 in the mail...I wish you would send as I am pretty well out...I sent you by Lt. Price $10 when he went on furlough...heard his Mother was doing poorly...the papers say it has been cold up there but it has been pleasant here, we have good quarters and live like cocks...WAS OUT ON PICKET THE OTHER DAY AND WAS SENT TO A HOUSE TO SAFE GUARD IT AND THERE WERE TWO PRETTY GIRLS THERE AND YOU HAD BETTER BELIEVE I HAD A GOOD TIME THERE...ALL THE SKINER I WANTED...Cummer signs the letter W. C. Cummer but in actuality the writer is Charles Cummer. A unusual sexual term for having sex with two loved starved Southern girls. Very rare content in a Civil War letter........................................................$165.00

3083 - SOLDIER DOES NOT WANT TO PAY FOR THE BURIAL OF HIS SISTER AT HOME, Scottsboro, Alabama, March 6th, 1864, Charles Cummer, 1st Ohio Infantry. He writes home...have been some engagements but none of us were hurt, have not drawn pay for three months, advises his friend Monroe to join the artillery if he ever joins the army, you have no load to carry, ride most of the time, and you stand off away from the fight. Got a letter from Frank Ceeters the other day and he wanted me to pay for the burial expenses of my sister and I don't think I can afford to pay for it...I think he ought to pay for it himself [his brother -in-law]...worries about his Father's health, will he live long? If he needs money he will help...he signs the letter W. C. Cummer but he is actually Charles Cummer..................SOLD

3084 - CAMP FORSYTH, MO, LOOKED FOR REBELS IN ARKANSAS, SEARCHED A CAVE FOR A REBEL WITH A CANDLE, April 11th, 1863. 4 page letter in ink by D. C. Leming. He writes in part...We went on a foraging trip that lasted three days. We went into Arkansas and got plenty of corn but no Rebels...where we got our loads [corn] we questioned a little boy about his Dad...he said he could not find his Pap...laid out in a turnip patch all night. The boy said his Pap went into a cave and if we went in he would shoot us...I went into the house and asked the woman for a candle and with a board made a torch and got some of the boys and made for the cave. I put a fresh cap on my gun, lit his candle, and started for the cave. I went in to the end of it and could not find anyone's Pap. All I saw was lizards, snakes, and got my britches wet. We have more troops here now, the 3rd Wisconsin Cavalry, 9th Wisconsin Infantry, and the 96th Ohio Battery. There is a rumor here we are going to Rolla. If we do we will be closer to home. Tent caved in due to the rain, catching a lot of fish with the hooks sent. Much more on the situation in camp. This soldier is obviously from Missouri as he states Rolla will be near home. Army records do not list a D. C. Leming but list several other Lemings in the 4th Missouri SM Cavalry. Either records show him by another name or his name was omitted from the records on file. Nevertheless worth further investigation and definitely a Missouri Union soldier............................................SOLD

3085 - WE ARE MOVING ONE OF THE HUGE REB GUNS NAMED THE LITTLE FELLOW, FORT DARLING, VA, June 6th, 1865. 3 page letter from Martin C. Bennett, 1st New York Engineers. He relates in part...I was on police guard around the camp when Company H with 16 horses went after what we call the "Little Fellow" which is one of the Rebels big guns. It weighs 21,745 pounds and they got stuck with it and could not get along so they are going after it again today...have plenty of ice, cherries, and mulberries the later at 25 cents per quart. An interesting letter detailing the removal the Confederate battery at Fort Darling by the Union forces. The only obstacle that protected Richmond from a river approach was Fort Darling on Drewry's Bluff, overlooking a sharp bend on the river 7 mi (11 km) down river from the city. The Confederate defenders, including marines, sailors, and soldiers, were supervised by Navy Cmdr. Ebenezer Farrand and by Army Capt. Augustus H. Drewry (the owner of the property that bore his name) of the Southside Heavy Artillery. [2] The eight cannons in the fort, including field artillery pieces and five naval guns, some salvaged from the Virginia, commanded the river for miles in both directions. Guns from CSS Patrick Henry, including an 8 in. (200 mm) smoothbore, were just upriver and sharpshooters gathered on the riverbanks. An underwater obstruction of sunken steamers, pilings, debris, and other vessels connected by chains was placed just below the bluff, making it difficult for vessels to maneuver in the narrow river........................................................SOLD

3086 - 77TH NEW YORK, THE MUD MARCH NEAR FREDERICKSBURG, JANUARY 1863, Two large pages in ink by Albert S. Green, Company K, 77th NY, Camp near Fredericksburg, VA, January 25th, 1863. He writes in part...We received orders to march on the morning of the 20th and we started out with baggage and marched about 14 miles that brought us about 10 miles above Fredericksburg. That night it commenced to rain. We were then about 1 1/2 miles from the river, they started the pontoons and the artillery the next morning but they soon got stuck in the mud. We worked with men, mules, and horses for two days, we got up with the artillery but abandoned the pontoons, and we reached our own camp again on the 23rd. That is the main body, some of them did not get in until last night...Some died on the road...It is such a hard sight to see men, mules, and horses dragged out by the side of the road dead and dying. There is no mercy here for men or beast. What the next move will be, I do not know. I am tired of this, are there any signs of this infernal war being settled? They know [Confederates] every move we make in time to get fortified before we can get to them, Albert S. Green. "The auspicious moment seems to have arrived to strike a great and mortal blow to the rebellion, and to gain that decisive victory which is due to the country." So announced Gen. Ambrose Burnside to his Union Army of the Potomac on the morning of January 20, 1863, as he started out on another great drive to beat Gen. Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and capture the Rebel capitol of Richmond, VA. Burnside's battered soldiers had, but five weeks to recover from their disastrous defeat at the Battle of Fredericksburg, but the government demanded action. The Union and Confederate armies still faced each other across the Rappahannock River at Fredricksburg, and Burnside's plan was to quickly cross the river above Lee's left and assail that flank of the Confederate position. The Union soldiers and their great wagon trains of pontoon boats, artillery, and supplies made a good start clearing their camp and moving up the river. Then the sky started clouding, and by mid-afternoon a slow drizzle had began. By nightfall a steady, relentless rain was falling, not to stop for days. The next morning the great mule-drawn wagons carrying the pontoons churned the road into a quagmire. The wagons sank to their hubs; the artillery sank until only the muzzles were out of the mud. The exhausted horses floundered, as did the men, as each slippery step through the ooze sucked at their shoes and weighed them down. "The whole country was a river of mud," wrote one soldier. "The roads were rivers of deep mire, and the heavy rain had made the ground a vast mortar bed." Whole regiments and triple teams of mules hitched to the wagons and guns failed to move them. Still the rain came down in torrents. By noon, the next day, Burnside's plans to maneuver past Lee's Rebel army were hopelessly stalled, and his own army was exhausted, wet, and cold. Burnside had no choice but to abandon the movement and order his soldiers back to their camps across from Fredericksburg....................................$195.00

3087 - CHASING BRAGG IN TENNESSEE, SALUTE OF THE GUNS FOR GETTYSBURG AND VICKSBURG, DEAD SOLDIERS HAND STICK OUT OF THE GROUND, 4 pages in ink by Benjamin Hurd, Company G, 1st Ohio Light Artillery, Negley's Division, Decherd, Tennessee, July 9th, 1863. He relates to his brother...We have been chasing Bragg ever since we left Murfreesboro and it has been a fighting chase. We have hung to his rear, not his rear, the rear of his army. We are camped in this place it is about 25 miles from Tullahoma...When we left Murfreesboro we thought we were going to have a big fight at Tullahoma, but old Bragg ran as usual. He left siege guns and lots of camp equipment. We are waiting for the supply train to come up and we will start again. Our cavalry and mounted and infantry are on the go now. We have lived off the countryside for about a week got chickens, pigs, etc. Yesterday we fired salutes [our division] we got 18 guns and they kept on firing for two hours for the Army of the Potomac and Vicksburg [recent Gettysburg/ Vicksburg victories]. You will hear stirring times from the Army of the Cumberland in a short time when we get Bragg at Chattanooga...I think if we get more victories that place will follow...the 123[indistinct] did lose a good many but that is nothing in our time...YOU CAN'T GO HALF A MILE WITHOUT SEEING SOME FELLOW HAND STICKING ABOVE THE GROUND...In December Bragg fought an inconclusive battle at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, the Battle of Stone's River, but once again withdrew his army. In 1863, he fought a series of battles against Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans and the Union Army of the Cumberland. In June, he was outmaneuvered in the Tullahoma Campaign and retreated into Chattanooga. In September, he was forced to evacuate Chattanooga, but counterattacked Rosecrans and defeated him at the Battle of Chickamauga, the bloodiest battle in the Western Theater, and the only major Confederate victory. In November, Bragg's army was defeated in turn by Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in the Battles for Chattanooga............................................................................SOLD

3091 - A SOLDIER WRITES HIS WIFE ABOUT SEXUAL ENJOYMENT THAT THEY BOTH MISS, Camp Cloud, VA, February 18th, 1863. 4 large pages in ink by Pvt. Hiram Tweed, Company A, 144th NY. He relates in part to her...My own dear loved one, I love you more and more the longer I am away from you, I yearn for your loving embrace and caress to make us both feel and enjoy our mutual loving desires. Depending where I may go I may consent for you to come to me...If you can I want to see and feel your great sexual enjoyments. You write of such amorous pure loving desires which I think is a credit to a virtuous loving wife than to one who professes or pretends to dislike and takes a disgust of the pleasures of connubial bliss for we are of one flesh and we are to please one another. I desire you and no other one hear [apparently there have been rumors about his faithfulness], is positive of both their marital loyalty while they are away from one another...more on the war, those who are not patriotic, more...Hiram [Tweed]. Quite an unusual letter concerning a situation that was not all uncommon during the War. The loss of sex and the fear of martial indiscretions while spouses are away. Rare content, well written...........................................$195.00

3092 - SOLDIER WIVES CAPTURED BY THE REBELS, Beverly, VA, July 9th, 1863. 3 pages in ink by Pvt. S. C. Morrison to his wife, 17th Connecticut. He relates in part...his wife may visit him, if she arrives in Beverly he may be off at Greenbriar or in some fight, more than likely you will be captured on the way...two of the soldiers wives were captured the other day. They came to see their husbands and were surrounded by the Rebels and could not come in and were taken off. We have had some fighting here for some time. A very unusual letter mentioning soldier's wives being captured by the Confederates.....................................SOLD

3094 - SOLDIER ARRESTED FOR RAPING A 70 YEAR OLD WOMAN, THEY TRIED A BALLOON ASCENSION BUT TOO WINDY, Camp near Falmouth, VA, January 4th, 1863, 12 pages in ink, 10th New Hampshire, J.C. Richardson, comes with stamped cover, to his wife...he chastises his officers for not caring about their soldiers, he is sending his violin. Thomas Sullivan was arrested for two months for the rap of a 70 year old woman. The court martial runs current and he is sent home in disgrace, mentions his times on picket, men are dying in the regiment of illness...mentions that they tried a balloon ascension that morning and an attempt yesterday but it was too windy and proved a failure, much more. J.C. Richardson...Records show that Thomas Sullivan was dishonorably discharged in December 1863 for his rape of the woman mentioned in the letter. A rare letter mentioning soldier rape during the Civil War.....................................................SOLD


3064 - PROSTITUTES AT WORK IN BALTIMORE TAKING CARE OF THE SOLDIERS, Fort Marshall, Baltimore, MD, February 7th, 1886. Four pages in ink on colored patriotic stationary, red/blue stars...written to his friend Michael Hammons from J. M. Boller, 1st Indiana Heavy Artillery. He relates in part...Things are fine here and hopes are well in Indiana...we have spunky times here, I seldom have to drill, the only duty we have is guard duty and that is once in 10 days...we have time to ramble around town and enjoy ourselves...you may guess how a fellow of my turn would enjoy himself when there are plenty of pretty women about. Baltimore is full of "patriotic young ladies" who devote their entire time to gratify the passions of the soldiers...We are permitted to go into the city every few nights when we have the pleasure to pay our patriotic friends a visit. But I leave you to judge our enjoyment...he describes Baltimore and Fort Marshall with 6 guns and three magazines. Tell the girls that I have forgotten them...had a fight with another soldier...a rare accounting of prostitution in Baltimore which like Washington and Nashville was a hot bed for the "Ladies of the night" during the War. Light stains, otherwise fine and boldly written...The word "hooker" predates the Civil War, but became popularized by Union General Joseph Hooker. After the outbreak of war, the number of brothels in nearby Alexandria, Virginia. A newspaper estimated there were 5000 public women in the District and another 2500 in Alexandria and Georgetown, bringing the total to 7500 by the war's third year "However, it was the towns located just outside the camps where prostitution was most prominent. These small towns were overrun by the sex trade when army troops set up nearby camps. One soldier wrote home to his wife, "It is said that one house in every ten is a bawdy house -- it is a perfect Sodom." Extremely rare content.......................................$295.00

3066 - I MADE YOU A RING FROM A FEET BONE OF A SOLDIER, Headquarters 19th Rgt. [Conn.] also 2nd Ct. Heavy Artillery, Alexandria, VA, December 28th, 1862, William H. Thompson, Company H. 4 pages in ink, patriotic stationary of winged victory. He relates to "Beloved friend" in part...He has been on guard for 24 hours, many sick, 400 on the sick list, two of the best men are gone forever...the rumors are that they will join Siegel and they will be relieved by the 2yth Michigan. His Colonel Wessels is still in the hospital, they have been under the command of General Heintzelman [defenses of Washington]...he has made a ring for her that came from a soldier. It was an old feet bone that I split with my axe and made a hole in it with my bayonet and finished it with my pocket knife...by wearing it, it will glow bright...heavy cannonading from the direction of Centerville, a telegraph just came in that the Rebels were fighting Siegel...Bill Thompson...Real unusual content mentioning making a ring out of human bone. Considering the mores of the day it was probably a Confederate unburied soldier that the bone came from as there were several battlefields near Washington by that date. Rare content, some stains at edge, strong black ink manuscript..........................................$169.00

3067 - AN ACCOUNT OF THE WILSON-KAUTZ, RAID NEAR PETERSBURG, JUNE 1864, 1ST MAINE CAVALRY, Camp near Jones Landing, VA, June 28th, 1864. 4 large pages in bold pencil to his Mother by Elbridge M. Hanson, Company L, 1st Maine Cavalry...We have moved our camp about three miles near Negro quarters on a plantation. There are Negroes left but the owner is prison at Fortress Monroe where he was taken a few weeks prior. To avoid the Rebels getting the wheat crop this year I suppose we will have to destroy it as the government cannot cut it. The government destroyed a large corn crop already. I guess you have heard of the account of Kautz's Cavalry on the advance on Petersburg. Our regiment is in his division and with 5000 infantry and two batteries made the first advance. At midnight, they commenced crossing the pontoon bridge across the Appomattox River just below us and after an advance of about two miles met the Rebels who opened up on our regiment as usual being in the advance. They had some pretty severe skirmishing driving the Rebels before them all day, and the next day the infantry drove them into the entrenchments near Petersburg and a severe battle commenced within a short distance of us. I climbed up on a forage wagon and could see all of the shells bursting in our ranks and the men fall and the musketry sounded like whole bunches of snapping crackers on the 4th of July for about two hours. I moved back into the woods and a shell came in snapping off the top of trees...later our brigade started across the Appomattox and have not heard from them since...the rumors is they will be sent to Elizabeth City, NC...still have some companies on hand and the band near Petersburg...describes the beautiful plantation house, women, and children said all others were gone...we saw three Rebels near the house but did not try to capture them, members of Company A captured a gray backs, several of the 11th PA, were captured by guerillas. On June 22, 5000 Union cavalry and 16 artillery pieces were pulled from the siege of Petersburg and sent, under the command of Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson and August V. Kautz, to destroy the lines of supply the Wilson-Kautz Raid was a cavalry operation in south central Virginia in late June 1864. Occurring early in the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign, the raid was conducted by Union cavalry under Brigadier General James Wilson and August Kautz, who were ordered cut railroads between Lynchburg, VA and the vital Confederate rail supply center at Petersburg. While the raid had the intended effect of disrupting Confederate rail communications for several weeks, the raiding force lost much of its artillery, all of its supply train, and almost a third of the original force, mostly to Confederate capture..............................................$325.00

3068 - A DESERTER IS SHOT AND SAYS HE DOES NOT GIVE A DAMN, LINCOLN REVIEWING THE TROOPS, Falmouth, VA, May 23rd, 1862. 4 pages in ink to his brother by E. L. Johnson. He relates in part..."asks his brother to refrain in using profane language in future letters, we were on review as President Lincoln was here, General Shields came down with 18,000 men and we have a very large force here with the Rebels within miles of them, they shot two of our men who were on guard last night. I go within 600 yards of them as I carry dispatches and orders, there has been a court martial here and a man is to be shot...HE SAYS HE DOES NOT CARE A DAMN...He was a deserter...does not fear any Rebel who had trod Virginia, he believes God is with me...Well written....................................................................SOLD

3069 - THE SIEGE OF PETERSBURG, CONFEDERATE DEFENSES DESCRIBED, CANNOT ATTACK AGAINST THE BREASTWORKS, February 12th, 1864, 6th Maine Battery, Henry F. Howard, 6th Maine Light Infantry, plus pages in ink. Howard writes at the beginning of the Petersburg siege...it is very cold, the wind has blown hard, I was on guard duty last night and it was not very pleasant...the boys have gone to the meeting [religious meeting] about a mile away in a log house...we will be on the move very soon and will make the Johnnies get up and go...there are a great number of deserters coming in every dark night...Petersburg can never be taken by assault but we must flank them. All in front of their works is a stockade built of poles that have been driven into the ground and made sharp at one end as they are driven in slanting to about four feet from the ground. They are put in solid and it would be difficult to pull them out under fire...Howard gives a good description of the stockade stakes placed before the breastworks at Petersburg, well written.................$145.00

3070 - AN OFFICER AT VICKSBURG INFORMS A WOMAN THAT HER FRIEND IS ALIVE, ALTHOUGH WOUNDED, AND WAS SENT TO A HOSPITAL IN INDIANA, Vicksburg, MS, June 21st, 1863. One plus large page letter in ink by Captain W. O. Watson, Co. A., 8th Indiana Volunteers to Miss Jennie Hopkins. He relates in part...Your friend Whitman [Alfred] was severely wounded but his wounds will not result in his death. He describes Albert Whitman in glowing terms as being well thought of in his company. The Captain states that Whitman was sent to a Army hospital in Evansville, IN. Watson, who wrote the letter, was later killed in action at Cedar Creek in 1864. Whitman's records show he was wounded at Vicksburg on May 22nd, 1863 and died at the Evansville, IN hospital on July 26th, 1863. At 10:00 AM on May 22, 1863, brigades from three corps of Grant's army assaulted the city. A long bitter struggle took place and although the assault showed some success at first, the Confederates quickly restored their original lines of defense. The Union army suffered 3,199 casualties, while Pemberton's forces lost less than 500 men. Alfred Whitman was severely wounded on this initial attach on May 22nd, 1863.............................................$100.00

3071 - A RARE POW LETTER FROM COLUMBIA, SC, CASTLE SORGHUM, LT. FRANK STEVENS, 190TH PA CAPTURED AT MALVERN HILL, 8" X 10", letter to his Father on crude "Confederate brown lined paper" by Lt. Frank Stevens, datelined at Columbia, SC, October 16th, 1864. He writes in beautiful manuscript...notes he had written his last letter from Charleston on September 28th [en route from Macon to Columbia]...asks his father for a strong box with specific clothing to be sent to him....boots, pants, hat, shirts, a good pocket knife, a tin plate...also wants $10 in gold to be sent to him by express mail...letters must be confined to private matters, his address to and items to be sent to: Lt. Frank Stevens, Prisoner of War, Columbia, SC in care of Maj. General Foster...A very rare POW letter from a Confederate prison in Columbia, SC known as Castle Sorghum. The box address included Foster's name probably as a aid to getting it there safely as Foster was in command of Union forces. Lt. Frank D. Stevens was a POW twice, once at Gaines Mill 6/27/62, he was released and wounded at Fredericksburg, and again a POW at Malvern Hill 6/13/64. He was sent to Macon, GA and then to Columbia, SC. He saw service in the 41st PA as well as the 190th PA Castle Sorghum was a Confederate prisoner-of-war camp established in 1862 in Columbia. The transportation of large numbers of Union officers to Columbia occurred after Gen. William T. Sherman's Army of the West penetrated deeply into adjacent Georgia and numerous military prisons there were hurriedly evacuated, with their inhabitants transferred to Charleston, South Carolina. On 29 September, Maj. Gen. Samuel Jones decided to transfer the accumulated Federal officers, estimated at 1,400 (some estimates range as high as 1,700), from Charleston to Columbia, escorted by the 32nd Georgia Volunteers and 1 or more companies of the 8th Battalion, South Carolina Senior Reserves. The train ride afforded another opportunity to escape, which many did. It consisted of a 5-acre (20,000 m2) tract of open field, without walls, fences, buildings or any other facilities. A "deadline" was established by laying wood planks 10 feet (3.0 m) inside the camp's boundaries. The rations consisted of cornmeal and sorghum molasses as the main staple in the diet, thus the camp became known as "Camp Sorghum". Due to the lack of any security features, escapes were common. Conditions were terrible, with little food, clothing or medicine, and disease claimed a number of lives among both the prisoners and their guards. Due to the scarcity of supplies for prisoners the military in command there obviously were lenient of what was allowed to be sent to the soldiers. Letters from Confederate POW camps are extremely rare especially from the Deep South camps. Near MINT condition.........................................................$395.00

3073 - SCARCE 69TH NEW YORK ENLISTMENT BOUNTY PAYMENT FOR A SOLDIER WHO DESERT AT PETERSBURG, 5" X 7.5" pink imprinted certificate paying $10 to Benjamin Craig as a new recruit in the service of the United States dated April 15th, 1864. Benjamin enlisted April 16th, 1864 in New York City and deserted at Petersburg February 3rd, 1865. In mint condition. Following Gettysburg, the Irish Brigade ceased to exist as a functioning unit and was disbanded in June 1864. The depleted ranks of the 69th Regiment were filled with new volunteers and draftees from New York's Irish ghettoes. At the end of the summer of 1864, the 69th rejoined its Irish comrades as 1st Regiment of the 2nd Irish Brigade. The brigade served until the end of the war and was present at the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox. Out of more than 2,000 regiments that served with the Union Army, the 69th last more men than all but six regiments. Quite a scarce and desirable regiment.....................$79.00

3074 - CIVIL WAR US ARMY BEAUTIFUL ALLOTMENT CHECK, unissued 3.5" X 7.5", vignette of Secretary of War Edwin Stanton and a vignette of Miss Liberty holding a large flag, all on an attractive green background, 186, "Assistant Treasurer of the United States" New York, only have one. MINT condition.........................................$45.00

3041 - ON THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER WRITING FROM THE STEAMBOAT ILLINOIS, M. C. HUTCHINSON 34TH IOWA WRITES ON THE WAY TO ARKANSAS, 4 pages in ink to his sister, November 11th, 1864 by Pvt. M. C. Hutchinson, Company F, 34th Iowa. He relates in part on his steamboat trip...could not write for lack of mail service, left Morganza [above Baton Rouge, LA] and are 50 miles from the mouth of the White River...bad weather, rain, may go to Memphis, the boat is very crowded with three regiments aboard. The boat has landed to repair some of the works on the N. W. THOMAS [steamboat]...we have landed on the Arkansas shore, hopes to be out within a year and get home...excuse the bad writing for I am writing with my paper on my knee and the movement of the boat makes quite a jarring. More details on the typed transcript. Hutchinson was killed on April 9th, 1865 at the battle of Fort Blakely, Alabama during the advance on Mobile. Comes with a postal cover with the stamp removed postmarked Cairo [Ill]. Fall Duty of the 34th Iowa in 1864...Fall & Spring 1864 - 65, Duty of the 34th Iowa. MOVED TO MORGANZA AUGUST 7 - 11. DUTY THERE AND AT MOUTH OF WHITE RIVER, AR, TILL JANUARY 25, 1865. EXPEDITION TO MORGAN'S FERRY DECEMBER 13 - 14, 1864. MOVED TO NEW ORLEANS, LA JANUARY 25, 1865; THENCE TO BARRANCAS, FL, JANUARY 26 - 28, AND TO PENSACOLA, FL, MARCH 11, MARCH TO FORT BLAKELY, AL, MARCH 20 - APRIL 2. OCCUPATION OF CANOE STATION MARCH 27. SIEGE OF FORT BLAKELY APRIL 2 - 9. CAPTURE OF FORT BLAKELY APRIL 9. DUTY AT MOBILE. HUTCHINSON DIED THE LAST DAY OF THE FORT BLAKELY ATTACK THE DAY THE FORT FELL........................................................................SOLD


3032 - SOME OF THE BOYS GOT INTO A FIGHT WITH THE BUTTERNUTS, SERGT. DAILY SHOT ONE THROUGH THE BOWELS A BULLET BOUNCED OFF HIS HEAD, 4 page letter in ink from Captain Lewis Sims, 89th Indiana to his wife Courtney, September 22nd, 1863. He relates in part...We are still in the fort but are awaiting marching orders and may go to Texas or Chattanooga, probably Texas...will send you some magnolia seeds to plant...some of the boys in the regiment got into a fight with the Butternuts and took some Butternut pins off them. There were 200 of the Butternuts pitched for a fight and only seven soldiers. They got Sergt. Daily separated from the others. Got him down and were beating him and were shooting at him when the others came up and commenced shooting and soon scattered them. Daily got up, one fellow drew his revolver to shoot him, and Daily drew his and they both fired and the Butternut fell shot through the bowels. At the same time, a fellow ran up behind Daily and out a pistol to his head and fired but the bullet glanced upward and did little harm but knocked him down, he soon got up and made at them again, but this was the old soldier that got hurt while the others had 20-30 wounded. They cleaned them out completely. I will quit as I have no good wife to sleep with...A great account of a hand to hand encounter in Tennessee. Sims ends the letter "I will quit as I have no good wife to sleep with." We will include a copy of another Sims letter with his signature to go along with his great letter. Also included is a letter to Sims from his wife with a cover addressed to Sims at via New Orleans. Three items....................................................$195.00

3035 - A BULLET WENT THROUGH A TIN CUP HOOKED ON MY HAVERSACK, Fredericksburg, VA from a Washington Hospital Ward, May 25th, 1864. Three pages in ink with stamped cover, John Marsh 99th PA. He writes to his wife, in part...Have just got up and the city clock has struck one, the men are all asleep now...have 18 men in the room, some wounded bad, some slight but all need attention. I thank the Lord that my life has been spared as I have been where the bullets have whistled past my head in great numbers and men fell dead on both sides of me and than there was a bullet that went through my tin cup that was fastened to my haversack...mentioned another soldier who was severely wounded and took no whiskey...men are coming into this place by boat and car. The boats run up to this place and the cars have been running for two days. The worst cases [wounded] are brought up on boats and the others on cars. It may not be safe for you to write me [a small section cut out possibly censored], excellent content with a real nice cover. Marsh was later to die in the assault at Petersburg - the wounded soldiers Marsh mentions were probably wounded at Spotsylvania..............................................................$175.00

3036 - A CONFEDERATE SHARPSHOOTER SHOOTS A SOLDIER ON A MORTAR AT PETERSBURG, Battery #5, November 30th, 1864. 4 pages in ink to his cousin by C. W. Smith near Petersburg, VA. He relates in part...am in my tent tonight writing his letter, there has been considerable moving the Army for the past 3 days and there is favorable opinion that here will be another battle soon if the weather is favorable. I have never heard a night so quiet and that is a sure sign that the armies are preparing for battle. I asked the movements in Georgia and they implied that he and his whole army could go to hell. Just as I finished your letter an Orderly came into my tent and told me a man had been shot. I went up the battery and a man lay who had been working in the battery where the mortar was that I was firing at the Rebels. He had been shot through the body and did not live long. It was probably done as the result of us killing one of their men when we were firing. Yet it was cold-blooded murder as he was standing on the parapet talking with other men when they shot him...I will go out and talk with the Johnnies before I retire...An excellent letter showing the danger along the Petersburg lines as well as the friendly communications between Federals and Confederates at times.........................$175.00

3037 - THE BATTLES AT GARNETTS AND GOLDING FARM AND SAVAGE STATION, VA, THE SHOT AND SHELL TORE UP THE EARTH AND TREES, OUR BATTERIES MOWED THEM DOWN LIKE SCYTHES, 4 pages in bold pencil with a stamped cover with OLD POINT CONFORT CDS, Orville "Tom" Dewey, 49th NYV in camp near City Point, July 4th, 1862. He relates to his Father in part...Last Saturday [June 28th] while we were at Camp Lincoln near New Bridge [VA], the Rebels shelled us for two hours killing one and wounding four in the 49th, we lay in our rifle pits or they would have cut us up terribly. Under the cover of the artillery, they tried to throw a regiment on us, if fact they got possession of a little breastwork in our front that had been set up to protect our artillerymen. We then opened up on them with shells from "Matt's" Battery and the men of the 33rd NY in our Brigade. In about 10 minutes, we killed 50-60 and wounded about a 100 taking about 30 prisoners. Captain Thad Hamilton was taken; he is the son of Dr. Hamilton of Buffalo and a regular fighter. One of the Rebels said he killed four of them with his revolver before he was taken. Early Sunday morning we retreated through Savage Station when we heard firing from our rear. We hurried back and fought a terrific fight going on. We were immediately ordered into it and away we went. We took the left before we could get to the Rebels they skedaddled...then we burned the bridge that covered the swamp and then we laid in wait for the Rebels who soon made their appearance and commenced such shelling that I have never seen before. Matt's Battery attempted to silence the rebel guns but they were too many for them...their shot and shell tore up the earth and trees...while his battery stood dismounted, one of the pieces killed his horses and men but as usual he stood up until he was able to get his guns off. Then we all fell back in the woods about a half mile, there we formed in line and gave the Rebels fits until night. Our batteries mowed them down like scythes. The roads were so soft it was impossible to drag ourselves through the mud with was from 6" - 18" deep...Orville [Dewey]...The Battle of Savage's Station took place on June 29, 1862, in Henrico County, VA as fourth of the Seven Days Battles (Peninsula Campaign) of the American Civil War. The main body of the Union Army of the Potomac began a general withdrawal toward the James River. Confederate Brig. Gen. John B. Magruder pursued along the railroad and the Williamsburg Road and struck Maj. Gen. Edwin Vose Sumner's II Corps (the Union rearguard) with three brigades near Savage's Station, while Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's divisions were stalled north of the Chickahominy River. Union forces continued to withdraw across White Oak Swamp, abandoning supplies and more than 2,500 wounded soldiers in a field hospital. The account Dewey writes puts the engagements he describes to be on the 28th near Garnetts and Golding's Farm and Savage Station on the 29th of June. The swamp he describes probably is White Oak Swamp [Battle occurred there June 30th]. The cover is addressed to Mrs. William McLean at Buffalo who may have been a friend of his Father. A wonderful series of battle accounts of action during the 7 Day Battles near Richmond..........................................$450.00


2140 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. August 6th, 1863, Pottsville, PA two pages ALS letter in ink with a stamped cover addressed to his wife. He relates to his wife to travel to Pottsville by train as he is in comfortable quarters, tells her to bring her riding skirt as he has a splendid black horse. Whipple is on temporary duty there before being assigned to duty with General Thomas in Tennessee. Well written.................................$175.00

2141 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Pottsville, PA October 5th, 1863 one page letter in bold pencil to his wife while on temporary assignment and includes a stamped cover to her...he relates in part, I have received a dispatch ordering me to Rosecrans' Army without delay and I intend on leaving tomorrow and will stay at Norristown but my stay there will be brief as I must hurry to Chattanooga. I hope we will be victorious in the next battle. W. D. Whipple.................$175.00

2142 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Cincinnati, October 28th, 1863, 4 pages in ink with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple, he relates in part...I have received orders to go to General Thomas at the Army of the Cumberland - now all our plans for living together are frustrated...General Rosecrans had a grand reception for him here in Cincinnati. He has many friends throughout the western portion of Ohio. I would have been pleased to be assigned with him had he been given the command. He laments the time he will be away from his family on this new assignment. Letter comes with a stamped cover, as well as the telegram he received confirming his assignment to General Thomas' Staff. 3 pieces well written................$295.00

2143 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Chattanooga, TN, December 25th and December 27th, 1863, 4 pages in ink with stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple...he relates in part...I stayed in my office today until 1 and then mounted my horse and rode to Rossville and had dinner at Watkins House...the men burned powder [shooting off their guns] at the joy of Christmas...Dec. 27th...The southern winter has set in and the river has risen bringing debris on our pontoon boats and the poor mules cannot haul the wagons through the muck. We should consider ourselves stuck for the spring as mud is everywhere. The regiments are re-enlisting and we must put a large army on the field in the spring to finish the rebellion. It is not true about us evacuation Chattanooga. We never intended to evacuate this place. The Rebels are trying to make themselves believe we are going to do so but at the same time we are building fresh works as the bridge over Running Water on the Memphis and Charleston RR which is 111' high..."W". General Whipple writes from Chattanooga as the Union force under Thomas has settled for the winter at Chattanooga in preparation for  the march towards Atlanta in the spring. Well written.........................................$295.00

2144 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Chattanooga, TN, January 22nd, 1864, 2 page letter in ink to his wife Caroline with a stamped envelope addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple, he relates in part...I had to put your letter away at the offices as I did not want to let anyone see the tears in my eyes...he goes on to describe his room as a parlor on an floor and continues listing the furniture he has...he arises at 8 AM, breakfast at 9 AM with General Thomas and his two aides Captain Willard and Captain Kellogg...we have a Steward and a colored cook as well as our servants...have beef steak, potatoes, hot cakes for breakfast, at dinner beef soup, vegetables, I tend to work late in my office at retire. Whipple gives a good account of his day in this letter which starts off quite tender as his wife's last letter obviously makes him homesick to tears...................................................$275.00

2145 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Nashville, TN, October 27th, 1864, 4 pages ALS by Whipple to his wife Caroline, comes with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple, he relates in part...Whipple gives his wife a description of an entrepreneurial woman about 40 with two memorable daughters presenting applications to him to open a hotel in Chattanooga called "Crutchfield House." She was described as being short and stout on the shortly side of 40. She needed special permission to ship freight on the railroad to ship more than the allowed amount on the railroad as she also wanted to open a store in the hotel to sell wine and liquor. She also wants permission to re-open the "Trout House" in Atlanta which was the finest hotel in Atlanta. He fears that she will not succeed. He wishes he would be free of this miserable war and return to civilization..........................................$265.00

2146 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Nashville, TN, November 6th, 1864, 4 pages in ink to his wife with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple, he relates in part to her...Atlanta was to be our headquarters but a change was made due to HOOD'S movements as it made it necessary to move from Atlanta to Chattanooga. What plans are made I cannot write in this letter which may be captured between here and Louisville. Mrs. Thomas left Nashville for Chattanooga. He stays at the St. Cloud Hotel at $4.50 per day and it is miserable, asks for clothing to be sent. "W". After a short stay in Atlanta Thomas' forces are called back to Nashville due to Hood's movements to the Northwest of Atlanta. Well written, letter and stamped cover.....................................................$275.00

2147 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Nashville, TN, November 9th, 1864, 3 pages in ink to his wife Caroline with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple, he relates in part...I would bring you here if there was any certainty of me remaining here for the winter but at any time we may be ordered out within 24 hours. You are better remaining where you are than coming here to this uncomfortable and expensive place. A lady I met was offered three rooms in a third story of a house for $1700 per year. It has been raining for several days flooding streams and washing away many trestle bridges and interrupting railroads communication. Of course HOOD cannot move in the mud and we have the advantage as we can concentrate our forces by railroad and steamboat. If HOOD cannot advance we will probably attach him. Well written, comes with stamped cover................................................$275.00

2148 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Chattanooga, TN, January 15th, 1864, 4 pages ALS by Whipple to his wife Caroline with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. H. D. Whipple, he relates in part...He is now riding a fine white horse...yesterday we were greeted by the sound of the first locomotive that has arrived since the occupation began. The rails are now opened north and starvation does not stare us in the face now. No one but someone in the army know how much our troops are suffering for lack of food and clothing and as far as our animals are concerned hundreds and hundreds are lying dead and the living are walking skeletons. As I was going to my quarters last night I saw an old horse attempting to make a meal out of pine weather boards of a house. He would gnaw off a few splinters and I could hear him crunch them between his teeth. He is probably dead by this time. We came to the conclusion that the Rebs were starving also and we could hold out. "W". An excellent letter by General Whipple on the state of affairs in Chattanooga during the winter of 1864...........................................$265.00

2149 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Camp near Cassville, GA, May 22nd, 1864, one page in ink to wife Caroline with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple...he relates in part...We move at 4 AM in the morning stripped for battle in the words of General Sherman's Order received. I do not know when I will be able to write again. The Rebs, I promise, will attack our communications and may succeed and capture some of our letters. He tells his wife to tell their little daughter that he will come and see her once the battles are over. Whipple writes at the start of the Atlanta Campaign as Chief of Staff to General Thomas. ALS and cover.................................................$275.00

2150 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Camp near Kennesaw Mountain, June 21st, 1864, 2 pages in ink to his wife Caroline, comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife, ALS he relates in part...The fight goes on seemingly day and night and still the rain pours. Wagons, when they move at all, move at a snails pace. Horses and mules are in the mud constantly. The eternal sound of splash of persons walking through the mud and water is getting tiresome. Everything is getting moldy and boots taken off at night refuse to be put on in the morning. We gained an important point last night and the Rebels during the light tried several times to retake it but failed each time. Their losses must have been heavy in these repulses at least I hope so. My health is still good and I hope we finish off Johnston's Army..."W". General Whipple writes this account just before the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain [June 27th, 1864].....................$295.00

2151 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Nashville, October 24th, 1864, 4 pages in ink to his wife, he relates...I will stay here awhile and return to that fine spot Chattanooga and there to remain for the winter. I visited the ex Post Master Brown's house who were probably first rate Rebs until the arrival of the Union Army. The Rebel General Pillow is a brother of Mrs. Brown. They have a portrait of him as a Major General in the USA hanging in the parlor. Their son is in the Rebel Army on the staff of General Bushrod Johnson. They claim to be Union people and are mortified at the thought of the loss of their crops and timberland fearing that they may be seized by the government as some already has [other citizens in the area]. Their desire to save their property has them being very polite to Union officers and their house is a favorite meeting place of many of them. As Chief of Staff, they overdid their attempt to please me...she said I was so young, handsome, and distinguished. So much flattery arouses suspicion. Mrs. Baird [wife of General Absalon Baird] is living next door and has not seen her husband yet. She came down with Mrs. Sherman [wife of General William Sherman]..."W". As General Thomas' Chief of Staff Whipple was a go between many citizens and Thomas during Thomas' stay in Nashville before he joined Sherman on the march through the Carolinas, well written, comes with stamped cover addressed "Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple" in Whipple's hand.................................................$295.00

2152 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Eastport, AL, January 16th, 1865, two page letter in ink to his wife, he relates in part...On a military steamboat, there are just a couple of buildings laying on the bank of the river with a good many steamers lying at the bank discharging their cargos. Our troops are moving and the wagons are arriving and departing. The gunboats are lying on the eastern and northern bank. We will remain here until the army is completely ready to take the field then away we go again. We have not left the steamer as we cannot find room to encamp our headquarters. Yesterday we went 10 miles up the river to the camp of the cavalry headquarters...gives hopes that the children are well. Signed "W". Comes with a stamped cover addressed to Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple. A fine ALS written in preparation of the march towards Savannah by Sherman...................................................$225.00

2154 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. Eastport, AL, January 21st, 1865, 3 pages in ink, comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife "Mrs. Gen. W. D. Whipple", he relates in part...I have received your letter of the 21st as it was directed to Chattanooga and I suppose it was cut off by Hood's Rebel Army. We will never return to Chattanooga again as a headquarters so letters to me should be sent to Nashville. The same mail brought another letter from you giving news of the improving health of the children. We are encamped on a hill overlooking the steamboat landing. This is a pretty place with an excellent view of the river, boats, and surrounding country. The town of Eastport consists of only three dwelling houses but before the war there were probably twelve but the war has destroyed some. It is bleak here and uninviting. Our nearest telegraph station is at Johnsville away down the valley. All the steamboats have to be convoyed up and it is a slow process. We can do nothing with any dispatch. I can't imagine why General Thomas remains here unless he wants to avoid the useless gab of the citizens of Nashville. There is a division I could have General Thomas says if I desire it so I told him I would take it. I have many misgivings about leaving my present position of Chief of Staff especially since General Thomas' command has been increased although General Sherman commands his troops. I fear by taking this command I will miss the opportunity to be stationed at Nashville and he won't be able to be with her but if he fails to take the division it will risk promotional opportunity for him..."W". An excellent ALS by Whipple with his full signature on the envelope...........................................$295.00

2153 - GENERAL WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Departments of Pennsylvania and Virginia, Middle Military Department, VIII Corps, and sundry other posts. On November 12, 1863, he became Assistant Quartermaster General of the Army and Department of the Cumberland and the following month was appointed to be George H. Thomas' Chief of Staff. In the latter capacity, he took part in all of the operations of Chattanooga and in the Atlanta Campaign as well as the movements which arrested John Bell Hood's invasion of Tennessee at Franklin and Nashville. TWO SEPARATE ALS BY WHIPPLE WRITTEN ON FEBRUARY 27TH, 1865 WITH THE STAMPED ENVELOPES THAT CARRIED THEM...addressed to MRS. GEN. W. D. WHIPPLE, Letter 1, on Stationary Dept. of the Cumberland, Nashville, TN, February 27th, 1865, 1 page to wife Caroline...he obtained a wardrobe, six curtains, and a large carpet and a dining table. The plumber is at work fixing the hot and cold hydrants...there is already a cook and a chambermaid already here in the house..."W", 2nd letter dated February 27th, 1865 at Nashville, TN to Caroline...I have seen General Donaldson today and he will send a quartermaster over tomorrow who will make furniture for our house - such as can be made in the quartermaster's shop and it will be very good. I think we can have the children here in a short time. Do you rather bring them with you or wait? I am going to send to Cincinnati for a mattress or two...yours "W". Two separate letters and TWO covers addressed in his hand...................................................$295.00


2212 - A SUPERB SIEGE OF VICKSBURG MAP OWNED BY A MEMBER OF SHERMAN'S STAFF AT VICKSBURG TOGETHER WITH HIS SIGNED CARTE DE VISTE, 2 items, [a] Carte de Viste of Lt. Colonel J. H. Hammond, AAG to General William Sherman, 15th Army Corps. Hammond was AAG to Sherman at Shiloh as a Major and served continually on Sherman's Staff through the Vicksburg Campaign and later. He is pictured in the famous photo of Sherman and his staff. This CDV was signed in May 1863 by Hammond as AAG, 15th Army Corps, by Gurney of New York. It is signed on the front and back by Hammond. Hammond is mentioned in many documents as AAG during the siege of Vicksburg while serving Sherman on his Staff. [b] A beautiful manuscript map in black and red pen 6.5" X 7" that was drawn during the late siege period of May-June 1863. There are notations for cleared lands, the famous "Grant canal", notations for breastworks, railroads, and terrain symbols. The map includes the area from Haines Bluff in the north south to Warrenton, with Vicksburg and the adjacent fortifications in the center. The map accompanied the Hammond CDV and while there is no indication that Hammond drew the map, it certainly belonged to him through his retained papers. The map is in exceptional condition with details sharp and colors bright. It had been drawn on a linen map paper which remains remarkably undamaged by staining as many maps seem to have. A great pair of Vicksburg related items, CDV and manuscript map, 2 items included..............................................$995.00

2164 - WE ARE TRYING TO PEN UP OLD LEE, Camp by the roadside near Hagerstown, MD, July 11th, [1863]. 1 large bold pencil letter on blue paper by Austin Fenn, 10th Vermont, mentions a friend near South Mountain, since we left there we have traveled about 12 miles and passed the old Antietam battle ground at night as we are trying to pen up Old Lee. If we don't do it, it will not be the fault of us or our Generals. We have brings a man his appetite. I can take a chuck of fat pork and gnaw it a cat gnawing a chicken. I have seen Nate as he come up just as had a side of pork broiled on the end of a stick. I was glad to see him as his regiment passed and I think he will be home soon. The 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th passed here - mentions several soldiers he knows in those units. We are laying awaiting orders. Mentions Sylvanus Winshih who was killed, will send this letter in an envelope...mentions that a friend states in regard to Negro troops. "The Niggers will fight like the devil he has seen for himself." You never can image the size of this army, you can only see one quarter of it at one time. Comes with a copy of another letter by Fenn to verify authorship...a letter written during the attempt to pursue Lee after the Gettysburg Campaign....................................................$125.00


1290 - A CONFEDERATE OFFICER TAKES THE OATH AND SERVED AS A CAPTAIN IN BUTLER'S RIVER GUARD, Lt. William E. Gordon enlisted as a 3rd Lt. in Company H, Louisiana Confederate Guards Infantry. He was promoted to 1st Lt., Company C, 3rd Regiment, 1st Brigade, 1st Division Louisiana Militia on October 28th, 1861. He was captured at the surrender of New Orleans in April 1862 and took the Federal Parole and was made a Captain in the "River Guard Police" whose purpose was to stop insurgents in the river and surrounding lake after the Federals under General Benjamin Butler took control of the City. Gordon moved to Baltimore after the War and in 1869 wrote to Benjamin Butler in hopes of Butler aiding him to obtaining a Federal Government position. This archive consists of the following documents [a]. Officer's Commission in the Confederate Service of Louisiana as a 1st Lt. in the Louisiana Confederate Guard Infantry signed by Confederate T.O. Moore, large seal, 16" X 20", [b]. a letter signed by Butler as Major General stating that William E. Gordon was a master of the River Police in New Orleans during our occupation there and was of undoubted loyalty and efficiency...Benj. F. Butler Maj. Genl. [c]. 1866 document 8" X 10" printed and filled in appointing Gordon as a clerk in the appeal court signed by the Mayor of Baltimore John Lee Chapman, [d]. another of the same for the year 1867, two page letter from Gordon to Butler in January 189 requesting Butler's aid in obtaining a job in the Treasury Department referring to his service to Butler in New Orleans during the occupation of the City as Captain of the River Guard giving his qualifications. Butler dockets the verso of the document stating "this man is a good man and true can you not give him a place in the Treasury and obliged...yours truly Benj. Butler". [e]. a letter signed by [f] a franked large envelope signed Benj. F. Butler M.C. mailed to William E. Gordon in Baltimore postmarked Feb. 2 [1869]. The archive contains the rare Confederate officer's commission and three signed items by Benjamin Butler. The commission has some fold restoration on the verso but paper is fresh and clean, other items fine. A rare example of a Confederate officer switching sides and serving for the Federal cause, the grouping [Louisiana Commissions usually sell for $500 alone.]...............................SOLD


1182 - THE WAR IN MISSOURI, A FLOOD HITS THE REGIMENT, A CONFEDERATE CAPTAIN IS SHOT BY A WOUNDED BOY
, Van Buren, MO., January 3rd, 1863. 3 pages in ink by George Wilcox, 37th Illinois, comes with a DUE 3 stamped envelope addressed to his cousin Mary Ann. He relates in part...Our company is guarding a mill [sawmill] we are sawing lumber to make ferries to cross the river as we will take the pontoon bridges up when we leave which will not be soon as we have to dray prisoners. We had camped on the Black River and got nearly drowned by the flood and had to leave the tents at 4 AM in the morning. The water rose 19 feet and we had 8" - 10" of water in our tent and were trapped away from the high land. We tried to make a bridge out of trees but soon sent for the pontoon boats. They ferried us out, some had to climb trees to escape the rising water. The Rebels arrived here and attacked out forage train and took seven teams and wagons with six mule teams. We had 16 men taken and four wounded. We wounded the Rebel Captain and a private, they took off their wounded. The Captain was shot by a wounded boy who was riding by him - picked up his gun and shot him through...the officers care little for their men...most are drunk and carousing about from the Lt. to the General Doctor. A good long Missouri letter with more details, quite scarce............................................
$265.00

1183 - A SHARPSHOOTER WRITES TO HIS SWEETHEART AFTER BEING UNDER FIRE, 151st New York, Volunteers, actually two letters, one a letter written in poem form by Jesse Benson, Company A [Independent Rifles] 151st NY Vol. Both stamped covers, one on an attractive patriotic letter sheet VICTORY. 1st Letter postmarked September 5th, 1863, patriotic letter sheet with the heading SHARPSHOOTERS and is a letter in poem form detailing the history of his regiment and their Captain, 2 plus pages in ink. 2nd letter, dated October 18th, 1863, 4 pages in ink he relates in part...On picket on Bull Run Creek, our army has been retreating on march for four days and one day we marched 25 miles. We started near Culpepper and now we are within 18 miles of Washington. When we camped on a high hill, there was some skirmishing and was under fire for a half hour, the shells came close, some were hurt in the regiment. As I am writing this, I can see the Rebel pickets by looking down in the hollow. During the four days we marched I could hear the cannons and musket fire, sometimes were close enough to stop us and we drew up in the line of battle, he hopes the War will come to an honorable end, more on the destruction he has seen. Benson's Company [Company A Independent Rifles was Sharpshooter Company] and he was severely wounded in his right arm a month later at Mine Run and had his arm amputated [November 27th, 1863]. Actually two letters with stamped covers. Scarce Sharpshooter group.....................................$325.00

1184 - BATTLE NEAR DINWIDDIE COURT HOUSE, I WAS CAPTURED AND ESCAPED THE REBELS, September 15th, 1864. 2 large pages in pen by H. Roscoe Brackett of the 16th Maine Infantry. He relates in part to friends at home...We knew that the Johnnies were assing in our front for a charge...we had breastworks and were ready for them and we did not have to wait long as they came in three lines of battle. We repulsed them on our front but they tried to break through on our right and the first thing we knew we were outflanked and the bullets came at us from our rear and we were ordered to fall back and we did but the first thing I knew we were surrounded by about a dozen Rebs. I had run right into their lines as did other men. They made me throw down my gun and bayonet which I did as there were so many I knew it was useless to do otherwise. They told me to go to the rear and I started to run with six other men and they kept singing out for me to halt and I heeded them not and kept on running amidst a shower of minnies and case shot bursting all around me from our own batteries. I kept running to the right with others all the time they were after me and I was only two rods from them. I turned to my right and ran into an open field and saw two lines of battle marching towards the woods and knew in a moment it was our men and finally felt safe from the Rebels...we have received a report that Atlanta is ours. The 16th Maine was involved with skirmishing around Dinwiddie Court House in early September 1864, Brackett had been wounded at Fredericksburg and was promoted to Corporal in 1864 after his return to duty. A great letter describing a narrow escape from the Rebels after being overrun by the Confederates..........................................$295.00

1185 - IN THE DEFENSE OF NEWBERN, NC, WE CAN HEAR THE REBEL BANDS PLAY DIXIE, THE REBS STRIPPED OUR DEAD AND LEFT THEM UNBURIED, February [11 - 13th] 1864. 4 pages in ink with a stamped cover by William D. Jones, 3rd NY Light Artillery, Company C to a fried. He relates in part from New Bern, NC...He describes a Confederate attack the first of February, the Rebels came down on a rush waking us from a peaceful slumber about 3AM in the morning. When it was known that they were coming a detacment of 100 men from the 17th Connecticut and a section of artillery from our regiment was sent out to see what was up and I guess they did for only 60 men returned. The 17th lost 40 men, eight were officers. Battery H of our regiment lost two guns, 36 men, 1 Lieut., 13 horses, and harnesses. The artillery never had a chance to fire. The morning was quite foggy and the first thing they knew they were prisoners. The 17th Connecticut done some fighting as well as the 132nd NY who was doing picket duty out on Bachelors Creek some eight miles from here. They were surrounded early in the morning but were able to escape with the loss of only 150 men. They came into the city on cars. The Rebels fired into them wounding a number. At night, the Rebs were in sight of the fort. We could see their campfires and hear their band play Dixie and the Bonnie Blue Flag. They were not more than three quarter of a mile away. Our boys wanted to give them a shot but our Major would not allow it. The rebels stripped our men and took their clothes and left them unburied but buried their own. The Rebels came down again on Tuesday night. They came down in small boats and took a gun boat and the whole crew. It is said that they were all drunk. The crew tried to get up steam but it was a no go so they set the boat on fire and jumped overboard and most got away. If they had gotten the boat, New Bern would be in their possession. The officers in command of the boat are confined and should be for life...William D. Jones, Battery C, 3rd NY Artillery, New Bern, NC. An excellent, well written letter on a Confederate attack to retake New Bern..............................................SOLD


9100 - BATTLE AT FOY'S PLANTATION, NORTH CAROLINA, Newbern, NC, May 3rd, 1862. 4 pages in ink written by Henry Lamoreaux, Company F, 103rd NYSV, to his brother. He relates in part, "I will tell you about the fight [April 7th], there was a few of us from 4 or 5 companies, our 1st Lt. and two of the boys went 15 miles past our pickets and they first saw the Rebels in the woods by a large plantation. The put into the house and the niggar huts. They tied their horses behind the house and shot out all the windows, our boys behind the fence and trees. They fired a few rounds and then charged them double quick. The first man that went into the yard got five balls through him. He fell dead. The Colonel was shot below the knee. It will go pretty hard on him. 8 Privates were wounded. 1 or 2 have died since. They took 11 prisoners, lots of arms and sabers but only two horses. Lots of them were shot. The rest ran away and we do not know how man Rebels they killed. Quite a number by the looks of the blood. There was a large swamp nearby where they dragged them in. The fight lasted about 20 minutes and then they ran. The darkies told us there was several hundred but two miles away so our boys put back. They would have anyway due to the Colonel being wounded. He describes the area in detail, plantations, crops as they are camped on a cane plantation. Describes the huts of the Negroes, lots of hound dogs, they may go to Kingston or off to Beaufort to hold Fort Macon. A excellent commentary on a bloody skirmish on a North Carolina plantation. The Foy family settled in southeastern North Carolina prior to the American Revolution, and James Foy, Jr., purchased Poplar Grove Plantation at Scott's Hill in 1795. Poplar Grove was owned originally by Cornelius Harnett and his colonial mill site is still visible on the plantation. The present Foy home was built by Joseph Montford Foy around 1850, comes with a nice DUE 3 stamped cover. Another name for this plantation is Poplar Grove which is today on the National Register of Historic homes. Very fine...........................................SOLD

9106 - THE WAR IN LOUISIANA, BATTLE BAYOU BORBEAU AND CARRIN CROW BAYOU, NOVEMBER 1863, Berwick [LA], November 10th, 1863. Large 4 page letter in BOLD pencil from Lt. John M. Follett, Company H, 33rd Illinois to his wife with stamped transmittal cover postmarked NEW ORLEANS. He relates in part, "We are again camped on the Atchafalaya River and we marched from New Iberia Sunday morning and marched the first day to Franklin a distance of 30 miles. We got up Monday at 5 AM and marched another 30 miles to this place. We of the Pioneers are camped on the river and my squad is in good humor. Mentions by name several men of the 77th [Illinois]...I must tell you about a recent battle...The next morning after I wrote you our brigade was called up about 2 AM and marched about three miles on the west side of Iberia. The rumor was that the Rebs were coming with 16,000 men to attack us. Our brigade formed in a battle line, the 2nd brigade was closed in one half on each flank on our line of battle and the 3rd brigade was concealed in the timber. The plan was a cute one if old General Lawles did plan it but the Rebs did not favor us with a call. Instead of pitching into us the Rebs sailed into the 1st brigade of General Burbridge's division. The battle was fought on Carrion crow [Bayou]. General Burbridge had sent out some of his division out foraging and had not more than 1000 men engaged and the Rebs came down on him with 8000 men. They mowed down eight rows deep in front and closed in mass on each flank. Burbridge could not retreat without loss and he told his men that no part of the 13th Corps had been whipped and he said that he would not live to have it said that the 4th division was the first to run and the men cheered him and said they would back him up and they stood surrounded on three sides by gray backs and fought like demons. The rebs overpowered then and took over 400 prisoners and killed 57 men. General McGinnis came up with two brigades and so intent were the Rebs trying to take prisoners that they did not see the reinforcements till they came right up to them and there was hand to hand fighting with sword and bayonet and the Rebs had to skedaddle. They left 149 dead on the field besides over 300 wounded and our men took over 300 prisoners. All this was done in two hours. He concludes this lengthy letter apologizing to his wife for unkind comments he had made in past letters and expresses his love and devotion for her and expresses his sorrow for having lost his temper as he misses her so much. With his numerical advantage, it was no chore for Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin to push the Confederates before him as he moved toward the upper Teche in Louisiana. After occupying the Opelousas vicinity, the Union leader found local bayous too dangerous to cross, too difficult for his troops to forage and rain-drenched roads too muddy to travel. By October 26, he had given up the offensive, retracing his steps toward New Iberia. Maj. Gen. Richard Taylor's small army pressed him, but Franklin worried so little about his enemy's attentions that he allowed his divisions to march and encamp far from each other. By November 3, they were scattered over a wide area, with part of the XIII Corps holding a rear guard position near Grand Coteau, on Bayou Bourdeau. Here was the opening Taylor had sought. Just before noon, his advance echelon, 2 divisions of cavalry and 3 infantry regiments under Brig. Gen. Thomas Green, attacked the camp of Brig. Gen. Stephen G. Burbridge's division, the most exposed command. Union sentinels were so lax that the Confederates charged out of a ravine into Burbridge's front and flanks before he could deploy. From his position in the rear, Maj. Gen. Cadwallader C. Washburn rode to he scene, only to discover that many of the troops had broken and were scattered over the field, and the utter destruction or capture of the whole force seemed imminent. Burbridge tried to fight his way out. Directing his attention to the single cavalry brigade and the infantry assailing his front and right, he entrusted the defense of his other flank (threatened by the rest of Green's cavalry) to Lt. Col. Theodore Buehler, the commander of his 67th Indiana. Through what Washburn later called "incompetency or cowardice", Buehler failed to take action till too late; eventually surrounded, he surrendered his regiment en masse to he cavalry. Finding his left "totally gone", Burbridge ordered a retreat. Many of his men had started without him, fleeing 3 miles to the safety of Gen. McGinnis' camp. With the assistance of that division, Burbridge re-formed and stood firm. Fighting vigorously but not making further headway, Green finally drew off, having killed 25, wounded 129, and captured 562 men and one 10 lb. cannon. The day after this galling defeat, the Federals resumed their withdrawal, but with more caution and a healthier regard for Confederate strength, savvy, and opportunism. A great Louisiana battle letter, 2 items, letter and cover..........................................$395.00

9107 - A VIVID DESCRIPTION OF A MEMBER OF THE 119 NYV BEING EXECUTED SITTING ON HIS COFFIN, 8 page letter in ink with stamped cover postmarked Washington, DC, dated September 19th, 1863 by Sergeant Bruce Elmore, Company C, 143rd New York to his wife Libbie. He relates in part, "Yesterday we were called out to witness the solemn duty of witnessing the fulfillment of the law-a man being shot by his fellow soldiers for the crime of desertion. The Brigade formed on three sides of a hollow square and the grave of the doomed man occupied the fourth side of the square. The brigade was all in position about half past two and waited for the doomed man for half an hour. Captain Bennett, with a detail of our own and one other regiment of this brigade commanded by Captain B. escorted the prisoner to the place of execution. He [the prisoner] was brought to the place in a transport or common army wagon drawn by four mules. HE RODE ON HIS COFFIN WITH A CHAPLIN BY HIS SIDE. FROM THE DISTANCE I STOOD FORM THE PLACE OF EXECUTION I CANNOT TELL EXACTLY HIS APPEARANCE, BUT HE SHOWED NO EMOTION THAN ONE WOULD EXPECT AT SUCH A TIME. HE WALKED WITH THE MINISTER AND THEN THEY KNELT ON THE COFFIN [WHICH WAS BY THE SIDE OF THE GRAVE] AND THE MINISTER OFFERED UP A PRAYER. WHILE KNEELING AN OFFICER FIXED THE BANDAGE ON HIS EYES, AND THE LIGHT WAS SHUT FROM THEM FOREVER. HE WAS THEN SET ON HIS COFFIN AND THE MINISTER TURNED AWAY BUT HAD PROCEEDED BUT A FEW STEPS WHEN THE SHARP REPORT OF A DOZEN MUSKETS STRUCK THE EAR AND THE DOOMED MAN WAS NO MORE. HE FELL BACK INSTANTLY AND WITHOUT THE SLIGHTEST STRUGGLE. It was a solemn sight but the welfare of the nation requires rigid military law. The other day a train of SUTLER wagons was attacked by rebel bushwackers on the way to Alexandria. 8 to 10 attacked the train that succeeded in escaping with 5 or 6 horses. The attack was made near one of our picket posts. The bushwackers came from the wood dressed in our uniforms so our pickets did not recognize them. The wackers fired shots from their revolvers but none hit any of our men. He relates more of the story of the attack n the Sutler wagons. He adds that the man executed belonged to the 119th New York. [Research shows that the man executed was Jacob Aierdain who was executed for desertion]. One of the best execution letters we have seen or handled.................................................................SOLD


56th New York Infantry-Official Company 1 Return Listing a Nurse and a Hospital Steward

Fifty-sixth Infantry -- Cols. Charles H. Van Wyck, Rockwell Tyler, Lieut.-Cols., James Jordan, Frederic Decker, John J. Wheeler, Rockwell Tyler, Eliphas Smith, James Dubois. The 56th Regiment was organized at Newburgh and was composed of eleven companies, two light batteries and two Cavalry troops. The batteries later became the 7th and 8th independent batteries and the cavalry part of the 1st mounted rifles. Co. L was the 5th company of N.Y. sharpshooters. The men were mainly from Orange, Sullivan and Ulster counties and were mustered into the U.S. service at Newburgh, Oct. 28, 1861, for three years. The regiment left for Washington on Nov. 7, 1861, was there assigned to the 1st Brigade, Casey's division, and served in the vicinity of Washington until March, 1862. In the opening of the spring campaign, the regiment, as part of the 1st Brigade, 2nd division, 4th Corps, participated in the siege of Yorktown and was present without loss at Williamsburg, Savage Station and Bottom's Bridge. At Fair Oaks, the loss of the command was heavy--66 killed and wounded and 5 missing. In June, the Brigade, in Peck's division of the 4th Corps, was present during "the Seven Days' battles but not closely engaged, and after the battle of Malvern Hill was withdrawn to Yorktown. In December, the brigade under Naglee was assigned to the 18th Corps and reached South Carolina early in Jan. 1862. The regiment served about Charleston, was active in the siege of Fort Wagner in July, 1863, and the subsequent operations in the vicinity. It was assigned to the 1st Brigade, 3rd division, 18th Corps, in March, 1863, and transferred to the 10th Corps in October. While with the 18th Corps, it was stationed on Folly Island and at Beaufort. In the summer of 1864, the regiment was stationed at James Island; lost 50 men in an engagement at Honeyhill; was active at Coosawhatchie and Boyd's point in December, and shared in the operations at Deveaux Neck, S.C., during the same month with considerable loss. The original members not reenlisted were mustered out at the expiration of the term of enlistment and the regiment remained in the Department of the South, serving in the coast division during the winter of 1864-65 and at Charleston from March, 1865 to Oct. 17, 1865, when it was mustered out. The regiment lost during its term of service 64 by death from wounds and 216 from other causes.

Charles H. Van Wyck: Age, 37 years. Enrolled September 4th, 1861 at New York City. Mustered in as a Colonel, September 4th, 1861 for a three-year tour of duty. Mustered out with regiment October 17th, 1865 at Charleston, S.C.

6131 - COMPANY I, 56 NYV, January 31st, 1863, St. Helena Isle, South Carolina, listed detached men. Absent men in Captain Cox's Company, written and filled in by Lt. Norris Crossman. Lists several men detached as nurses in hospitals and another in a hospital at Yorktown. Printed and filled-in, 10" X 16". Captain Cox was listed as AWOL on the verso of the document. Crossman's diaries have been published. Very fine...................................$65.00

6132 - COMPANY I, 56 NYV, Seabrook Isle, SC, March 31st, 1863 listed detached men and officers present in Captain Cox's Company, written and filled in by Lt. Norris Crossman. Lists one man detached as a nurse in a hospital. Printed and filled-in, 10" X 16", Captain Cox was listed as AWOL on the verso of the document. Crossman's diaries have been published. Very fine..................................................$65.00

6134 - 91ST PENN. VOLUNTEERS, SERVED IN MOST OF THE BATTLES OF THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC FROM 1861-65 INCLUDING GETTYSBURG, 8" X 10" manuscript order dated January 15th, 1865 by order of Colonel Seller giving sentinels orders how to greet officers when they approach their posts and how to carry their "pieces". Dated from the headquarters of the 91st PA just before they were engaged in the battles of Dabney Mills and Hatchers Run (February 5-7th, 1865). The 91st fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, the "Mud March", Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the "Bristoe Campaign", Mine Run, Cold Harbor, Wilderness, Petersburg, Dabney Mills, Hatcher's Run, Appomattox Campaign..............$45.00

6135 - 91ST PENN, VOLUNTEERS, SERVED IN MOST OF THE BATTLES OF THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC FROM 1861-65 INCLUDING GETTYSBURG, Dated in the field, April 29th, 1865, 8" X 10" pre-printed and filled in descriptive listing for the pay and clothing account of Sergt. John Evans of Company G of the 91st PA giving the details of his pay after enlistment and clothing allowance not used, signed by Captain William Spangler of Company G, 91st PA. The 91st fought at Antietam, Fredericksburg, the "Mud March", Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the "Bristoe Campaign", Mine Run, Cold Harbor, Wilderness, Petersburg, Dabney Mills, Hatcher's Run, Appomattox Campaign. This document was written 20 days after Lee's surrender at Appomattox when the 91st was still in the field near there. Very fine..............................................$45.00

6136 - OFFICIAL FORM FOR HANDLING A COURT MARTIAL, 4 pages in manuscript 8" X 13" detailing the procedures in conducting a court martial trial in the army, dated 186, statement accounts, witness accounts specifications of charges. Obviously done in the field by an officer. This form is very detailed and came with some other documents pertaining to the 91st PA. First one that we have seen like this. Very fine........................................$35.00

6137 - MISSOURI IN THE CIVIL WAR, Headquarters Dept. of the Missouri, St. Louis, February 14th, 1865, General Order #30, three pages printed, the charges and trial of three named Missouri citizens for robbery and larceny, another against a Henry Smith for trying to bribe a Federal officer to free a prisoner...he was sentenced to the Missouri State prison at Jefferson City. The three charged with robbery and larceny were sentenced to 10 years at hard labor by order of J.W. Barnes, Asst. Adj. General. Choice condition......................$45.00

6139 - A BEAUTIFUL COLLECTION OF CHARLES MAGNUS PATRIOTIC COVERS WITH SEVEN DIFFERENT VIEWS OF ALEXANDRIA, VA AND ONE OF THE SMITHSONIAN IN WASHINGTON, 7 different "Bird's Eye Views of Alexandria." Two hand colored, five in light gilt print, views from the Potomac, views of the town showing military camps and one of the Smithsonian Institute in Washington. All with the desirable Charles Magnus imprint. VF-EF, a choice collection, all war period imprints. The group of seven different................................................$275.00


Bird's Eye View of Alexandria


Bird's Eye View of Alexandria


Covers

6140 - UNITED STATES ARMIES OPERATING AGAINST RICHMOND, 2 2 patriotic covers by Charles Magnus dated 1865, both covers are deep lavender in color with a gilded imprint, one in silver, one in gold, large eagle with the caption "US Armies Operating against Richmond, VA" with spots to enter the Company, Regiment, Brigade, Division, and Army Corps. The silver printed cover is quite attractive, the gold printed cover has oxidized (print somewhat). These are the first two of this type we have seen, unused and a desirable set of Magnus covers, the pair................................................$85.00


6524 - COMMISSION SIGNED BY WILLIAM DENNISON GOVERNOR OF OHIO FOR AN OFFICER IN THE 16TH OHIO, 8" X 11", pre-printed commission for 1st Lt. Cushman Cunningham of the 16th Ohio Infantry dated May 4th, 1861 when the 16th Ohio was still a Militia unit, nice black seal, fine, some ink bleed from endorsements on the verso. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio as an officer (Captain) and Adjutant into late 1863. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio through the war as an officer and adjutant. The 16th Ohio served in the west from late 1861 to September 1864. Cumberland Gap, Tazewell, The Vicksburg Campaign, and the Red River Campaign. Dennison was instrumental in getting Ohio's troops organized and sent troops into Western Virginia in 1861 as well as becoming Postmaster General under Lincoln..................................................$150.00

6525 - COMMISSION SIGNED BY WILLIAM DENNISON GOVERNOR OF OHIO FOR AN OFFICER IN THE 16TH OHIO, 8" X 11", pre-printed commission for 1st Lt. Cushman Cunningham, December 16th, 1861, nice blue seal, fine. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio as an officer (Captain) and Adjutant into late 1863. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio through the war as an officer and adjutant. The 16th Ohio served in the west from late 1861 to September 1864. Cumberland Gap, Tazewell, The Vicksburg Campaign, and the Red River Campaign. Dennison was instrumental in getting Ohio's troops organized and sent troops into Western Virginia in 1861 as well as becoming Postmaster General under Lincoln..........$150.00

6526 - COMMISSION SIGNED BY GOVERNOR DAVID TOD OF OHIO FOR AN OFFICER IN THE 16TH OHIO, 8" X 11", pre-printed commission for Captain Cushman Cunningham, November 18th, 1862. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio as an officer (Captain) and Adjutant into late 1863. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio through the war as and officer and adjutant. The 16th Ohio served in the west from the late 1861 to September 1864. Cumberland Gap, Tazewell, The Vicksburg Campaign, and the Red River Campaign. A most attractive commission with large eagle and flags. Signed by Tod as Governor...............$150.00

6528 - NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT AS A 1ST LT. IN THE 16TH OHIO REGIMENT SIGNED BY UNION GENERAL C.P. BUCKINGHAM, Pre-printed and filled-in 8" X 10", HEADQUARTERS OF OHIO MILITIA stationary advising Cushman Cunningham that he has been appointed a Lt.  in the 16th Ohio, dated November 25th, 1861. Signed by Buckingham as Adj. General of the State of Ohio. Cushman later became a Captain and severed with the 16th Ohio until 1864. Very fine...............................................$85.00

6530 - MUSTER OUT ROLL FOR ADJ. CUSHMAN CUNNINGHAM OF THE 16TH OHIO NEAR VICKSBURG, MS, 12" X 24" printed and filled in muster out roll dated near Vicksburg, MS for Adj. Cushman Cunningham dated June 5th, 1863 while the 16th Ohio was engaged in the Vicksburg Campaign. The reason for the form was his appointment as Captain of the Regiment. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio as an officer (Captain) throughout the war and Adjutant. The 16th Ohio served in the west from late 1861 to September 1864. Cumberland Gap, Tazewell, The Vicksburg Campaign, and the Red River Campaign. Some archival repairs, otherwise paper is fresh and bold manuscript...................................$75.00

6531 - MUSTER IN ROLL FOR CAPTAIN CUSHMAN CUNNINGHAM OF THE 16TH OHIO NEAR VICKSBURG, 12" X 16" printed and filled in mustering in Captain Cushman Cunningham as a Captain in the 16th Ohio. Dated June 5th, 1863 near Vicksburg where the 16th Ohio was involved in the Vicksburg Campaign. Cunningham served with the 16th Ohio as an officer (Captain) throughout the war and Adjutant. The 16th Ohio served in the west from late 1861 to September 1864. Cumberland Gap, Tazewell, The Vicksburg Campaign, and the Red River Campaign. Very good, bold manuscript........................................$75.00

6533 - WOUNDED AND CAPTURED AT GETTYSBURG, COLONEL JOHN F. IRWIN 149TH PENNSYLVANIA, 8" X 10" large pre-printed and filled-in ordnance receipt signed by Irwin as Lt. Colonel of the 149th PA noted "in the field", September 25th, 1864. It appears to be all the accruements and Enfield rife of one soldier. It lists the rifle, bayonet scabbard, cap pouch, cartridge box, plate and belt, gun sling, waist belt, and belt plate. These were turned over to the Colonel by Captain John Batdorff. Quite possibly these were once the property of a dead soldier to be recycled. Irwin was adjutant of the regiment and while acting as major was wounded by a concussion of a shell at Gettysburg on July 1st, 1863. He has a factitious name as Frank Israel when he signed his parole and returned to his regiment. He commanded the 149th in the pursuit of the 149th south. He was officially promoted to Major, then Lt. Colonel. On April 2nd, 1864, he took command of the regiment. Then he was promoted to Colonel on February 2nd, 1864. Very fine............................................$95.00


The Correspondence of Engineer George P. Hunt, US Navy
In the Year 1864
"U.S.S. Metacomet"

Engineer George P. Hunt served in the US Navy from 1861-1887 on numerous ships. His tour on the "Metacomet" in 1864-1865 was highlighted by the action at Mobile Bay but between stations at Mobile his ship went on numerous cruises in search of blockade runners in the Gulf of Mexico. His letters are well written and extremely descriptive. Each letter comes with a copy photo of Hunt.


5270 - CHASING A BLOCKADE RUNNER OFF THE TEXAS COAST
, USS Metacomet, January 1st, 1864. 4 pages in ink by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part, have sent views from New Orleans and Key West, view of the fort and others...have left New Orleans to carry the monitor "Milwaukee" to Mobile, then we sailed down the coast (west) and hit a gale en route like a "north westerner" with bitter cold, vessel pitching and rolling with 2-3 feet of water on the deck, all hatches secured, impossible to stand on the deck without lashing yourself to something. During the gale, we spotted a schooner that might be a blockade runner but due to the heavy seas we did not dare to turn around and chase her, we were disappointed we let a prize go through our fingers however about 3 PM the winds and seas moderated and we turned to chase him and caught him. It was laden with sugar and coffee from Vera Cruz to New Orleans. But since it was 200 miles off course, the papers funny, the Captain condemned her (as a blockade runner), the prize would mean 1/3 of a years pay for Hunt. The capture happened about 85 miles from Galveston, TX. Describes having turkey aboard the past holidays, but some were so seasick they had to dine on "salt horse". A well written letter describing a blockade runner being captured................
$250.00

5275 - REBEL STEAMERS RUN THE BLOCKADE AT MOBILE, ONE GETS AGROUND, BUT WE CANNOT ATTACK IT, IF FARRAGUT WERE HERE IT WOULD BE DIFFERENT, Metacomet off Mobile, April 12th, 1864. 8 pages in ink, with stamped postal cover postmarked New Orleans, written by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part..."Your letter received has gotten me out of the blues. Yesterday two large steamers came on in right under our noses and both escaped. One Clyde built steamer, the other American made. The first a side-wheel steamer, double smokestacks and a little larger than the "Cumberland". They ran along the shore about 3/4 miles from the fort and became aground. We ran up to the flagship "Oneida" and asked permission to go up and shell her before the Confederates could get her off but we were told to go back to our station by the Senior Officer. We had to watch the Rebs bring up steamers and barges to lighten her and she got off by noon. There are 11 vessels now blockading here. The "Itasca", Pinola", "Oneida", "Ossippee", and another lying out to sea. The "Penguin", "Albatros", "Genesee" lay nearer the shore. The "Conemaugh" is in the Secesh Channel. He feels they are stationed in the main ship channel where nothing happens because they are on a black list. The "Pembina" and the "Seminole" lay below us. He remarks about better lookouts on several ships would have prevented the escape and forced them back out to sea. "We could have had a jolly good chase." At daylight, we saw a splendid American made steamer with double smokestacks, side wheels, about 1800-2000 tons, the "Austin" of Havana in the same Secesh channel about 1 1/2 miles from the fort aground. The flag officer would not let me do anything to prevent them from coming with their steamers to tow her off. She got off safe in the afternoon. There are about 40 steamers laying in Nassau waiting to run the blockade. It is provocative to say that if Farragut was here something would have been done. Little is being done to prevent them from running in her. The Rebs may want a few more English rifles and cannon, a few more Whitworth rifles or Brook's cannon which may be mounted in Fort Morgan to greet our ironclads. Says Farragut is in New Orleans. Expects a few more steamers to try to run the blockade when the moon goes down around 1 AM. A great letter regarding blockade running into Mobile just as the fleet was gathering for an attack on the forts.....................................................$350.00

5277 - BLOCKADE RUNNERS GET IN AGAIN, SENT OUT BOATS TO SCOUT THE REBEL FLEET, THE TENNESSEE AND BALTIC LAY AWAITING OUR FLEET BUT THEY MAY ATTACK FIRST, May 21st, 1864, Saturday night [off Mobile], 12 pages in ink by Engineer George P. Hunt on board the USS Metacomet. He relates in part, He has lost a trusted friend McMurray in the "Chenango Affair" who was a 2nd Engineer. He feels that they are being "Blacklisted" doing too much or too little, then overlooked by the authorities. In our case were posted in a very dangerous place and as a gale approached our Captain concluded to enter the sound as the barometer fell rapidly. Captain Jenkins of the "Richmond" sent a boat in after us and gave us the most disagreeable station for 21 days. Close attention needs to be paid to our boilers. News of Grant near Richmond. Last Saturday, a steamer ran out successfully but discovered by our picket boat. But we had problems with signals and she escaped. The "Itasca" lay close to the shore and it was to intercept her and drive her back out in the channel as they always run in close to shore. The "Itasca" got her cable caught on her propeller and signaled "Assistance I need". But at the same time one boat signaled red & white instead of white and red. The confusion allowed the steamer to escape safe while we all attached her running out. The Admiral [Farragut] just arrived on the "Hartford". We go to Pensacola for a few days for coaling. Everyone is scared here about the rebel rams. A deserter came in and reported that they were going to attack our fleet with two gunboats and two rams. Sunday, describes fishing trip nearby where they caught over 600 fish snapper and catfish, most 12-13 pounds fish but some up to 60 pounds with our lines. We also caught a 1000 pound shark and when opened it had several cats and dogs inside! The shark struck one man on deck with his tail and he went head over heels. We are laying now facing Fort Morgan and we can see Fort Gaines and Powell. I believe they are evacuating Fort Powell and laying obstruction in the channel. Reports say there are about 6 miles of batteries after passing Fort Morgan and 50 torpedoes; there was a great storm the other night as we almost lost the picket boats as the rolling seas made it difficult to come along side of us. To remain out would have resulted in being driven to shore and captured as the shore is lined with cavalry scouts watching for blockage runners. We succeeded in picking them up but one man suffered a broken leg getting out of a boat. We sent a boat to Dauphin Isle to watch the Bay for rams and ironclads. They saw two, the "Tennessee" and the "Baltic" ironclad rams and the "Selma" and the "Gaines: gunboats." Captain Leroy has made over $100,000 on a prize the "Desoto" captured. I suppose he does not care much for attacking them now. An excellent letter on the affairs in Mobile Bay in late May where blockade runners still came into Mobile quite easily much to the chagrin of Hunt and his ship seeming being out of the action for one reason or another on a "blacklist"...............................................$395.00

5279 - THE METACOMET CAPTURES THE CONFEDERATE BLOCKADE RUNNER DONEGEL, Metacomet, off Mobile, June 26th, 1864. 4 pages in ink to Miss Earnes by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...He has just returned from Pensacola [coaling] and he thanks her for the copy of the Proclamation [Emancipation Proclamation]. By now you will have learned of the capture of the "Donegal" [blockade runner by the Metacomet], hopefully we will be successful in getting some more out of the sea. The "Denbigh" ran out after the capture of the "Donegal", some said the "Metacomet" was on a wild goose chase but the "D" was the fastest blockade runner which we caught now they feel that they must watch for us. The next night we discovered the "Denbigh" running in close to shore and we drove her out to sea but it ran through our mist and escaped. The captain of the "Donegal" had ran the "Oreto" [old name for the "Florida"] in and out of Mobile and also headed the party who captured the "Fly Boston" and ran her into Mobile a short time ago. He is now in Fort Pickens and he has tried to bribe them into letting him escape. He said that there was a large amount of gold and silver on the "Donegal" and that was the richest prize yet captured. Two of our officers went to see him to try and find out something. I sent a box of cigars back on the "Union", the only thing I got off that ship. Describes the horrible hospital in Pensacola, common sea rations, no ice, no fruit, no attendants except one nigger boy, about 15 officers there suffering from diarrhea and dysentery, chills and fever. They are tormented to death by and fleas and mosquitoes at night. Some have been there for two years. I visited the hospital and decided I would rather stay on board my ship. [Page 5 is small 3" X 4" blue paper written on both sides where he adds], Tuesday night. A lively time, we stood for the Flagship "Hartford" after maneuvering the fleet again and firing at targets. The Admiral and his staff came aboard as he wanted a good at the Rebel fleet started underway so we ran closed and rounded the fort. There most formidable craft is kind half like the "Atlanta" and half "Merrimac" built as ram. Three guns on either side, the one aft is heavy English gun. The Rebs are at a loss to make of our affair. An excellent letter describing the capture of a blockade runner and after a closer look at the "Tennessee" gives a vivid description of the Confederate ram................................................$395.00

5289 - THEY ARE WAITING FOR THE BLOCKADE RUNNER, DENBIGH, Key West [Florida], November 29th [1864]. Two pages letter in ink from Engineer George P. Hunt of the USS Metacomet. He relates in part, We just arrived after a stormy night and leave in the morning for Havana in wait for the "Denbigh" [blockade runner] that is expected from Galveston, will not know when he will be able to write again as he does not know if he will go with the next prize steamer [he hopes to be sent north with the next captured blockade runner they catch]. If you see anything about the old "Metacomet" boys save it for me, asks that Miss Eames send some candy for him to friends as he has not time to go ashore. Hunt's ship was laying in wait for the blockade runner Denbigh that was known to be heading for Havana from Galveston. The Denbigh that was known to be heading for Havana from Galveston. The Denbigh was run aground on Bird Key, Galveston Bay on May 25th, 1865 and burned by Union blockaders the next morning. Comes with a stamped envelope addressed to Miss C [Cornelia] Eames in Brooklyn, NY. A well written letter by Hunt...................................................$195.00

5290 - A BLOCKADE RUNNER SLIPS AWAY IN THE NIGHT, Metacomet, New Orleans, December 12th, 1864. Six page letter in ink to Miss Eames from Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...We expect to be leaving on another cruise either for Mobile or Galveston. I wrote you from Key West about the capture [capture of the blockade runner Susana] and they counted the bales being 130 not as many as I had expected [counted the bales of cotton left on board as the crew had thrown many off when being chased]. We made a mistake in going to Key West with her as we lost five valuable nights, just perfect for blockade running being a full moon and the nights were almost as light as day. We cruised off the Campechy banks to a desolate island off the coast where the Mexican governments sends their exiles and convicts to and it has excellent fishing and coral reefs all around the island. We anchored in 46' of water and could see the bottom. We spotted a steamer burning soft coal heading for Havana. We have chase until the moon set and it became dark and gloomy and lost him. The steamer must have been pretty fast as we were going 13 to 13 3/4 knots for nearly four hours. If we had only one more hour of daylight we could have has passed away and then return. We entered the Mississippi and went ashore to shoot a few ducks then headed upriver and anchored off the city at 6:10. I hope we will have the pleasure of chasing the "Frances" [blockade runner]. The "Tennessee" now [renamed] the "Mobile" had chased the "Susana" and could not catch her. When they were leaving the bay [Mobile] they told us it was no use to try and catch the "Susana" as you might as well save our coal. Others told us also we would not catch her but we did. He is going to the St. Charles Theater that night to see "Hamlet", sending items home to her. I wish we could get in a chase with a [blockade runner of 1000 bales [cotton] and chase her into New York Harbor. Quite a newsy letter from Hunt on blockade duty in the middle Gulf and towards Mexico in late 1864, accompanied by the stamped cover home postmarked NEW YORK. Well written..................................................................$275.00

5291 - REBELS IN NEW ORLEANS HARASS THE WIVES OF UNION OFFICERS AT A CHARITY FAIR, THE CAPTAIN OF THE METACOMET STEPS IN, AFFAIRS IN THE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS, "Metacomet", New Orleans, LA, December 20th, 1864. 7 pages in ink to Miss Eames by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...he is sending home some photographs of the "Hartford", one of the Admiral, one of the passage into Mobile. Mentions he went to the theater in New Orleans and was disappointed by the acting, could have seen better in the Bowery or at Barnum's in New York. There were only about 300 people there and half of them were eating apples and oranges and cracking nuts! Describes an incident at the St. Vincent's Fair where two wives of Union officers were insulted by Secesh men when one took off a United States flag off a sugar coated house. The Captain of the "Metacomet" sent out for another house with another flag and dared the Secesh men to remove it. The matter had been referred to the Provost Marshal. The Captain had several flags from the ship hung at the Fair in defiance of the Rebels in attendance. Mentions that the guns of the Rebel captured "Tennessee" in dock in New Orleans have been "double shotted" ever since her arrival in New Orleans. Mentions another western ironclad there the "Milwaukee" and will be ready to go about the 26th and then we will tow her to Mobile. They are concerned about the mail steamer that is days late coming to New Orleans. Several cotton schooners being prizes arrived in New Orleans from off Galveston. Mentions that his Captain is anxious to get away as he has "cotton on the brain" [he is anxious to get back into the Gulf to try and capture a cotton laded blockade runner]. A very newsy letter about the incident in New Orleans by the Secesh men harassing the wives of Union officers, much more details on the incident, comes with a stamped envelope postmarked NEW ORLEANS. Very fine..................................................$200.00

5292 - ANCHORED OFF THE TEXAS COAST, LOW ON COAL, BLOCKADE RUNNERS LEAVING GALVESTON, Sabine Pass, TX, January 31st, 1865 [aboard the Metacomet]. 4 pages in ink to Miss Eames from Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...The Admiral passes here on his return from the Rio Grande. The mail boat has just brought papers with the news of the capture of Fort Fisher, good for Porter but Butler has gotten himself in dispute. Wishes he could have been at that spot and seen the grand fleet [the one that captured Fort Fisher]. It seems that our luck has played out. We went to Galveston for coal but due to high seas we could not get any and do not have enough to get to New Orleans. When we left Galveston looking for coal there were a number of steamers there ready to run out, one a large cotton steamer laying by the city. He wants to be examined for the upgrade rank of first engineer but fears he may have to wait until he goes north. Word is that the "double enders" may return north. He does not want to leave the "Metacomet" now as everything is working to his satisfaction [engines]. He states that he did not see any ladies in New Orleans well enough to give them his card. I hope to write you some good news from the Campechy Banks, noted on February they are still in anchor at Sabine Pass. The "Metacomet" is awaiting coal in Sabine Pass while the blockade runners apparently are moving out of Galveston with cotton. He hopes to be off the Texas-Mexican coast soon ready to intercept one bound for Havana...Letter comes with a stamped cover postmarked NEW ORLEANS Feb. 6th, '65.....................................................$195.00

5293 - THE METACOMET CAPTURES TWO BLOCKADE RUNNERS, OTHERS ESCAPE FROM GALVESTON, THE REBELS AT MOBILE SEND OUT TORPEDO BOATS, BUILDING UP THE FORTIFICATIONS FOR THE EXPECTED ATTACK, Steamer "Metacomet", Mobile Bay, February 26th, 1865. 10 1/2 pages in ink to Miss Eames by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...We are back anchored near the city [Mobile] and the prospects of a fight or an evacuation as good as months ago. Mentions a fellow friend and sailor who were in a naval fight in an ironclad that burst a gun. I must tell you of our late capture of the "Lily" [not Lily of the Valley] and the "Sea Witch". We captured the "Lily" lying off Galveston waiting for night. She had "gunny bags" and salt and we took her to Sabine Pass. We have sent the "Sea Witch" to New Orleans. Steamers are running in and out of Galveston when they choose. Two nights before we arrived at Galveston two ran out, one got aground but got off. When we got to Galveston, we received orders to return to New Orleans. We traveled with the "Bienville" who was also returning for repair to New Orleans. The officers of the "Bienville" did not think we could keep up with them. We left for New Orleans and soon were 3 1/2 miles ahead of the "B" when we saw two schooners 10 miles distant and on out course. We chased them and "spake" both [hailed both] while the "Bienville" kept on her way. But by the next day we caught up with her as we crossed the bar and beat the "Bienville" to the city of New Orleans. The "Sciota" has just arrived with news that several Mississippi steamers have brought troops from New Orleans [to Mobile] but I do not think an attack is probable. Queried the Chief Engineer about his pending examination and was told to ask for a weeks leave to take it, news from Charleston that the Rebels have evacuated the city. Everybody here has torpedoes on the brain.  The Rebs have two torpedo boats ready to come out and blow somebody up. They rammed the "Octorara" the other night but the torpedo did not explode. Small pox was very prevalent in New Orleans and now has shown up among out troops in Fort Morgan. We have a great many troops there preparing for an attack. General Granger has gone to New Orleans and Rear Admiral Thatcher is in command of the squadron. General Thomas is approaching Montgomery in route for Mobile. I suspect when he gets closer we will have an attack. Sherman has done well and the loss of Charleston is a severe blow to the Confederacy. He does not understand why it is taking so long to attack Mobile or Galveston. He feels that it could be taken with less a force than needed to blockade the cities. Gives details on the sale of the cotton and the blockade runner "Susana" and feels both sold too cheap. Confederate prisoners have been put to work on the fortifications and General Granger has returned. The Confederates had put our men [prisoners] at work on their fortifications so we did the same. A steamer blew up after leaving New Orleans but no appearance of a Rebel attack. The Rebs are receiving reinforcements and building batteries in range of where we lay now. A well detailed letter mentioning the capture of two blockade runners off Galveston, new of the Rebels at Mobile still being aggressive with their torpedo boats, fortifying their position at Mobile for the impending Union attack, comes with a stamped cover postmarked NEW ORLEANS. A well written letter by Hunt.................................................$395.00

5297 - THE ASSASSINATION OF LINCOLN NEWS REACHED MOBILE, RARE COMMENTS ABOUT REPRISALS AGAINST COPPERHEADS AND SECESSIONISTS WHO CHEER LINCOLN'S DEATH, THE DESTRUCTION OF THE CSS WEBB BELOW NEW ORLEANS, USS "Metacomet", May 1st, 1865, Mobile Bay. 12 page letter in ink to Miss Eames from Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...He writes about the surrender of Mobile and thanks her for the papers that she sent on the Capture of Richmond. We fired a salute of 100 guns on the glorious news. He mentioned the Admiral returning from Pensacola with the dreadful news for Washington [Assassination of Lincoln]. On the ship only one man rejoiced at the nation's calamity and if it was not for the Provost Marshal he would have been tied to a lamp post [hung]. General Banks came down on a steamer from Cairo to New Orleans and he made a speech at Baton Rouge and an Illinois Copperhead shouted at him that it was good news [Lincoln's death] he fell dead pierced by 15 bullets. In New Orleans, the same thing occurred when five secessionists or copperheads shouted it was good that the "rail splitter" was dead and the Colored troops would have to return to their masters and the Colored troops shot them. I did not believe the first reports but at last came the confirmation of the assassination of the President but also the brutal murder of Secretary Seward. Who shall be found to take their places? One account says he is still alive. He lauds the diplomatic skills of Seward during the war. Nothing is said who are the assassins but he believes they will be found and this will unite the north. I don't know much about the abilities of Johnson as President but Lincoln seemed to have every confidence in him. If the copperheads had anything to do with this no mercy should be shown to them. President Lincoln has won for himself a name that will exist forever whether a Republican or Liberal Government shall endure. He was simple, warm hearted, honest, and generous to a fault. This Republican President has been cut down in the midst of his glory where can we find a fit successor? The Union will live but oh had he lived enough to have realized the success of his great mission. What the policy of President Johnson towards the rebellious states the leaders will find top their cost that the tenderness of Abraham Lincoln forms no part of Andrew Johnson's character. May 5th [1865], He thanks her for all the papers received. The news has arrived of the arrest of some of the conspirators and the shooting of Booth. He should have been taken alive as his punishment was too light. There is news of the surrender of Dick Taylor; we leave here in a few days on the flagship of Admiral Thatcher for Galveston. Discusses going ashore in Mobile and Pensacola. Wants to take his exam on advancement. News has arrived of the capture of Jefferson Davis at Raleigh. News or rumors persist that General Canby will head for Mexico with 50,000 troops. He describes the destruction of the Rebel ram "Webb" below New Orleans. The "Webb" was bottled up on the Red River and escaped two steamers, the monitor "Manhattan" and "Tennessee" and headed down the Mississippi with over 300 bales of cotton aboard commanded by Lt. Reed of some notoriety [Tacony & Chesapeake fame]. They were trying to run the blockade. The telegraph wires were cut from the Red River and no one in New Orleans knew she was coming but 15 minutes before she passed the gunboats. They fired but she did not return fire. Our shots struck in the city and in Algiers across the river. The tugboat "Hollybock" started after her firing at her, the telegraph wires were cut also below the city. She would have made it to sea but fortunately the "Richmond" had left here the day before and was steaming up the river, and seeing the chase, stopped and rolled out her 11 nine inch guns and waited until she could deliver a broadside that would have sunk her but they instead ran her ashore. Some ran off in the swamp, others set her afire but they caught most of them. The vessel was burnt up. So much for the ram "Webb". A wonderful descriptive letter of the after effects of the Assassination of Lincoln in the South and the feelings Hunt had for the slain President. Much more on Hunt's activities as an engineer on the "Metacomet", and a nice account of one of the last naval encounters on the Mississippi River being the destruction of the "Webb" by the "Richmond"...........................................$595.00

6000 - NAVAL POLITICS IN MOBILE, HIS CAPTAIN WAS CLEARED OF CHARGES IN A COURT MARTIAL BUT IS ON THE BLACK LIST, "Metacomet" Mobile, AL, June 24th, 1865. Four page letter in ink to Miss Eames by Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates in part...Boats are going north but not the "Metacomet". His Captain seems to be afraid to come north afraid to face what his next assignment will be as he faced charges at a court martial which were not sustained and he will be on the "black list". Mentions an incident where he almost caused a tip over of a boat that carried the Admiral [Thatcher]. The Captain pleaded sickness as the cause of my actions. I hope I do not see the Gulf for 7-8 years as the heat is terrible as well as the mosquitoes. The 4th of July will soon be here and I shall be in Mobile. We shall fire a salute for the Admiral and Jeff Davis is down. He encloses a Confederate bill for Johnny. Hunt is about to conclude his tour of duty at the Mobile station and gives more insight his Captain is unpopular with the local naval authorities have made it through a court martial. Comes with a nice MOBILE postmarked stamped cover................................................$165.00

6001 - ENGINEER HUNT IS TRANSFERRED TO THE OCTORARO AND WILL BE GOING HOME, "OCTORARO", Mobile, AL, June 28th, 1865. One page letter in ink to Miss Eames from Engineer George P. Hunt. He relates...Not to write to him again until she hears from him as he has joined the "Octoraro" today and she is expected to go north soon. I applied to go north on a ship and yesterday I received the unexpected news of this new assignment. He is hearing rumors about going home and he hopes to arrive home safe and if he does so he will consider himself very lucky. Comes with a nice MOBILE postmarked stamped cover. The "Octoraro" was another ship that had been in Mobile in Farragut's Fleet..................$100.00


5130 - THE ARMY PREPARES FOR BATTLE IN KENTUCKY, September 24th, 1862. 2+ pages in ink by Private George B. Dowsman of the 75th Indiana Infantry, Co H, Louisville, KY. He relates to his family, "We are now at Louisville and have come here from Shepherdsville on the 23rd. There is an immense army at this place designed to defend the City against the advancing hordes of the Rebel General Bragg that is now stationed at the several places that we have evacuated and judging by the movements that are being made he is about to advance upon the city. Yesterday the women and the children were leaving the city as fast as conveyance at hand could take them. The business places are closed and the (businesses) entirely suspended. E(verybody) has to have his name enrolled at 2 o'clock today or be arrested and his case investigated. There is one hundred and six thousand troops here besides the home guards, citizens will be enrolled on the other side of the river at Jeffersonville. The long roll was beat last night about 2 o'clock. In an instant, every man was under arms and ready to meet the enemy. We were formed into line and remained in until daylight. There is a great diversity of opinion as to what was the object of the rebels. Some think we will be attacked before tomorrow morning and others laugh and say we will not be attacked at all...I think that if Gen. Buell is as near as Bragg's army as he is reported to be we will not be attacked at all but I am not concerned as I think we can handle them pretty easy. It is a wonder to me that we have not been captured. We have skedaddled over Kentucky considerable in a small body so small that it would not have taken much of a force to capture us. We have been drove around so much that the boys call us the flying infantry and say that we can neither be catched or whipped for lighting could not catch us when the rebels make their appearance..." While Bragg rested his troops and planned his next move in Kentucky, Buell marched north from Bowling Green and arrived in Louisville on September 25th. Seeing his primary objective fallen into Union hands, Bragg turned to Bardstown, where he had expected to meet Smith. Smith was actually operating independently near Frankfort, and Bragg, now panifully aware that the lack of cooperation with Smith might prove the Confederates' undoing in Kentucky, began to disperse his troops into defensive postures at Bardstown, Shelbyville, and Danville. Written on a piece of irregular necessity paper, fissure in paper has been restored. Interesting letter on the Union defense of Kentucky forcing Bragg to reconsider his advance.............................................$225.00

5131 - JOHN HUNT MORGAN RAIDS IN TENNESSEE, DESTROYING RAILROADS, CAPTURING UNION SOLDIERS, PURPOSE OF THE WAR TO ABOLISH SLAVERY, February 5th, 1863, near Murfreesboro, TN. 4 page letter in ink by Pvt. George B. Dowsman, Co. H, 75 Indiana Volunteers to friends. He relates, "I have not been well about three weeks...my complaint is chronic diarrhea and having it so long it begins to take me down and I have no strength at all in my arms and legs. About a week ago, I had fear that I would loose the use of my limbs entirely. My right arm was perfectly paralyzed but has got so I can use it again...THERE IS A WILY MAN AROUND THESE DIGGINS CALLED JOHN MORGAN, THE SOLDIERS CALL HIM UNCLE JOHN WHO CUTS SOME MIGHTLY BIG PRANKS AND CAPERS BY THE WAY OF BURNING BRIDGES, TEARING UP RAILROADS AND NOT UNFREQUENTLY HAPPENED THAT IN THE LATTER PART OF THE MONTH OF DECEMBER LAST UNCLE JOHN TO IT INTO HIS HEADS TO TEAR UP THE LOUISVILLE AND NASHVILLE RR SO AT IT HE WENT AND DESTROYED CONSIDERABLE OF THE ROAD...YOU ASKED ME WHAT THEY WERE FIGHTING FOR IF IT WAS TO FREE THE NEGROES. LET ME ASK YOU...THIS WAR IS CARRIED ON FOR NO OTHER PURPOSE...I FEEL CONVINCED THAT THE END CLAIMED AT BY THE AUTHORITIES AT WASHINGTON IS THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY. Morgan was promoted to Brigadier General (his highest rank) on December 11, 1862. He received the thanks of the Confederate Congress on May 1, 1863 for his raids on the supply lines of Union Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans in December and January, most notably his victory at the Battle of Hartsville on December 7th. Dowsman dies of disease 23 days later at Murfreesboro......................................$265.00

5133 - WILSON READIES HIS TROOPS IN ALABAMA TO CATCH FORREST, Camp at Gravelly Springs, Alabama, March 20th, 1865. One large page in ink written by Lt. William Bayard of the 4th US Cavalry to fellow officer Captain Clarence Mauck. He relates..."We have been lying in camp since January 12th, poor Fitz, is dead, he died from the effects of a shell wound in the leg in the late charge near Franklin (TN). Davis is adjutant of the regiments, mentions others at camp by name. Several plan to go into RECRUITING service soon. WE ARE NOW AT WILSON'S HEADQUARTERS; I PASS MY TIME VERY PLEASANTLY AND LIKE WILSON PRETTY WELL. WE EXPECT TO MOVE IN A VERY FEW DAYS, WILSON HAS 12,000 CAVALRY HERE. Major General James H. Wilson, commanding three divisions of Union cavalry, about 13,500 men, led his men south from Gravelly Springs, AL on March 22, 1865. Opposed by Confederate Lieutenant General Nathan B. Forrest, Wilson skillfully continued his march and eventually defeated him in a running battle at Ebenezer Church, on April 1st. Continuing towards Selma, Wilson split his command into three columns. Although Selma was well-defended, the Union columns broke through the defenses at separate points forcing the Confederates to surrender the city, although many of the officers and men, including Forrest and Lieutenant General Richard Taylor, escaped. Bayard was brevetted for gallantry three times during the War. Well written (PB)...............................................$165.00

5134 - SHERIDAN RAIDS IN THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY 1865, BATTLE OF WAYNESBORO, March 6th, 1865, Winchester, VA. Written to his Mother and Sister by Jacob Domer, Co. E, 1st US Cavalry. 4 pages in ink. He relates, "Excuse me for not writing but I have been ill for several days, Sheridan has gone up the Valley with near all the forces that were lying around Winchester, so that there is just a guard remaining at this place. There is no knowing where he is or when he will return at this place, some say he is going on a raid to join Sherman or Grant, talks about affairs at home, a poor farm, tells his sister not to send a box as they are about to move any day. It is reported that Sheridan captured old Early the Lt. General in the Rebel army and 1800 men, besides we expect them to come in every minute with the prisoners and the spoils of another great victory in the Shenandoah Valley [The Battle of Waynesboro March 2nd, 1865]. There will be no more furloughs given out this winter. What are the people at home say of the fall of Charleston and how long the War is going to last as it was great news for this place and excitement is no language to describe the feeling it caused among the soldiers and Union people of Winchester. One hundred guns were fired as a salute for the victory and fall of Charleston." Desiring to eliminate Early's small force as a threat to his rear (and perhaps wanting to remain in Virginia to help finish off Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia near Richmond and Petersburg, Sheridan turned east instead of proceeding to Sherman. Custer's Union division slogged through muddy roads in cold downpour, and on March 2nd encountered the last remnant of Early's Army of the Valley at Waynesboro. Aligned in a defensive positoin along a ridge in front of the South Fork of the Shenandoah River, Early placed his artillery (11 to 14 guns) in a good position to contest any Federal advance. However, he left his left flank exposed, supposing (incorrectly) those dense woods would impede any Union thrust in that direction. After a brief stand-off, a determined Federal attack rolled up Early's left flank and scattered his small force.....................................................$175.00

5135 - AN OFFICER'S WIFE IS DETERMINED TO FREE HER HUSBAND FROM PRISON AFTER THE BATTLE OF BULLS RUN, 4 page letter to Captain McMahon on General George McClellan's staff written by Richard Olgamon concerning the wounding and capture of Lt. John W. Dempsey, Company H, 82nd NY Infantry who was wounded in the head July 21st, 1861 at Bulls Run and became a POW until 1863. Later he entered the VRC in July 1863 after his liberation from a Federal Prison. The writer relates..."Let me introduce you to Mrs. Dempsey wife of Lt. Dempsey of the 2nd NY State Militia who was wounded at Bulls Run and has been a prisoner among the Rebels. Mrs. Dempsey's efforts to accomplish her husband's release exhibit a degree of resolution and persistence which I wish to God all of us men could lay claim to. You know how I feel about the question of the exchange of prisoners and you will pardon me if I ask you to add to your many duties this new duty of helping this poor lady as far as you can. She will tell you what she wants." Obviously the writer was someone of influence probably from his home state of New York. Nevertheless it was almost two years for Dempsey to be released by the Confederates. POW 7/21/1861 Bull Run, VA (Paroled in 1863)* Wounded 7/21/1861 Bull Run, VA (Wounded in head)* Confined 7/23/1861 Richmond, VA (estimated day; sent to Charleston, SC)* Furloughed 7/13/1863 Washington, DC. An unusual letter from a POW from the first major battle of the Civil War. Very fine..........................SOLD

5138 - HOSPITAL STEWARD CAREY E. MCCANN WRITES ON THE MARCH FROM ALABAMA INTO GEORGIA, Decatur, AL, May 27th, 1864, Co. I, 68th Ohio Infantry. 3 pages (large) in ink to his Mother. In part he relates..."He had come to this post to get medical supplies for the regiment, his health and the regiment's is very good, the recruits complain of sore feet and diarrhea. This place is located on the Tennessee River and is a miserable place but we leave in a few minutes for Rome, Ga. Our communications will not be kept up in our rear but by just our scouts probably. We have heard that General Grant has defeated General Grant and that the letter came out of his fortifications and moved against Grant's position. I have hopes it is not just a rumor and will not believe until I see something official. We will get to Rome or Kingston in about 10-12 days with a little fighting thrown in but the Sesesh do not like to mix it up with the "Samuel Blue Coats". It is thought that the Southern Con-fed-e-racy is just about Belly up...he is on his belly that morning in the sun writing this letter sitting on his knapsack and using a box for his desk. He plans to march until he is tired and then ride a while in a wagon. He is referring to the late Battle of the Wilderness in Virginia fought a few weeks earlier where the battle was basically a draw but a strategic victory for Grant. An excellent letter on the 68th Ohio moving in the Atlanta Campaign into north western Georgia in late May 1864.........................................$145.00

5139 - THE SHARPSHOOTERS AT WORK ON BOTH SIDES NEAR SUFFOLK, VA, April 30th, 1863. 4 large pages in ink, Captain Mathew McCann, Company F, 152nd NYV writes to his "Chosen ones of my heart". In part...We have relocated outside the village of Suffolk in our shelter tents, we are surrounded by different regiments and the boom of heavy guns from our different batteries that are shelling the Rebels and the CRACK of rifles in the hands of the SHARPSHOOTERS as they exchange shots with the Rebels who are just across the Nanosecond River not one quarter mile from us. It is very dangerous for those who ramble as those who ramble becomes a prominent mark for the REBEL SHARPSHOOTERS who lay concealed behind their rifle pits on the other side. I do not ramble near and expose myself unless in the discharge of my duty as a soldier. He describes the look of excitement in the camp at the arrival of the mail and is disappointed he did not get a furlough but few are given when before the enemy, things are good in camp, he is stouter and will send a photograph." An excellent letter describing the dangers of the sharpshooters who strike from nowhere to shoot soldiers wandering along the lines not paying attention to the dangers. On April 19th, a Union Infantry force landed on Hill's Point at the confluence of the forks of the Nanosecond River. This amphibious force assaulted Fort Huger from the rear, quickly capturing its garrison, thus reopening the river to Union shipping. On April 24th, Brig. Gen. Michael Corcoran's Union division mounted a reconnaissance-in-force from Fort Dix against Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett's extreme right flank. The Federals approached cautiously and were easily repulsed. On April 29th, Gen. Robert E. Lee direct Longstreet to disengage from Suffolk and rejoin the Army of Northern Virginia at Fredericksburg. By May 4th, the last of Longstreet's command had crossed the Blackwater River en route to Richmond.................................................$165.00

51310 - BATTLE OF CARRSVILLE, VA, Suffolk, VA, May 24th, 1863. 3 page letter in ink by Lt. Selwyn E. Bickford, Company G, 6th Mass. Infantry. He relates in part to his friend Anderson..."On the 13th, we were ordered on a scout and just returned yesterday and we will probably leave Suffolk and we will probably leave for Lowell next Wednesday or Thursday, letters reached me at Carrsville where we were stationed for four days. I presume the papers have given you an account of our fight at Carrsville as we had a lively one and the regiment did itself much credit. We went in a little after a half past two in the afternoon and came out near six that night. The New York papers give all the credit to the New York troops but we were in the advance nearly all of the time. We had six times the losses of any other regiment tell the story. We had no fighting after the 15th but were traveling about most of the time. When we left camp we were supposed to be back in three days and took clothes accordingly. We stayed out 11 days so you can judge our condition. He requests a room be gotten for him upon his return home at a hotel and thinks he will leave the area before any letter can reach him." An extremely well written letter regarding one of the battles for the defense of Suffolk, VA. At Carrsville, VA, May 14-16, 1863, the regiment was engaged with loss. The siege of Suffolk being ended, on the 26th of May the regiment left for Boston, where it arrived on the 29th. Proceeding to Lowell, on June 3rd it was mustered out of the service..........................................$150.00

51311 - THE LIEUTENANT IS A LADIES MAN, DOES NOT RECOMMEND DUTY AS A OFFICER IN THE US CT AS THERE IS A HUGE CULTURE DIFFERENCE, Fortress Monroe, VA, Sunday August 16th, 1863, addressed to his friend Anderson by Lt. Selwyn Bickford, 6th Mass. Infantry. Six large pages in ink. He relates in part...He discusses his recent stay at home and his visit with his wife which he claims was purely business and his thoughts that there will be a "constriction of the Union". No arrangements had been made between her and me and nothing has changed my decision since we separated. Heard a lot abut his domestic affairs the four weeks he was in Lowell...a friend had remarked that he was smart enough to succeed BUT WOMEN WERE KILLING ME...mentions that the old clerk has a sundry business of cutting lumber with a gang of Negroes. It is the policy of the Government to get all they can out of the abandoned farms and plantations with Captain Wilder in charge to doing it. He describes the life at Fortress Monroe, no society and the comforts of New England, he has had words already with the old Captain as he dislikes the sharp tone in the Captain's voice, many of the troops have departed for Charleston, every day more move South, THREE REGIMENTS OF COLORED TROOPS HAVE BEEN HERE WITHIN THE PAST TEN DAYS. IF YOU WANT A COMMISSION IN ONE OF THOSE I THINK I CAN HELP YOU. BUT FROM WHAT I HAVE SEEN I JUDGE THE STANDARDS LESSER AMONG THESE TROOPS THAN THE WHITE VOLUNTEERS. If I should leave here I think I shall go to Washington and prospect a week or two. Please keep rather still about my movements. A very interesting letter from a "Ladies Man" who was obviously estranged from his wife who obviously desired to better himself more than serving in the Army. Bickford has rejoined the Army after he was discharged back in June. Extremely well written on large pages..........................................................$125.00

51313 - THE RAID TOWARDS RICHMOND THAT PROCEEDED THE DAHLGREN-KILPATRICK RAID THAT FAILED, GENERAL BUTLER'S FRIENDS ARRIVE FROM LOWELL, MA, FORMING BLACK REGIMENTS, Fortress Monroe, February 9th, 1864. 6 long pages in ink written by Lt. Selwyn E. Bickford, Chief Clerk at Fortress Monroe, VA. He relates in part to his friend [Anderson]...He suggests that he present his documents to General Butler and he will take care of him and put him in position to make some money. Lowell people come there for business [Lowell was the home of Butler and he was a patron for local townspeople in Virginia]. People from Lowell hope the halo around Butler will shed some radiance upon them. Mentions ladies that have come there which please him. Discusses the reconnaissance successes toward Richmond by our troops at Yorktown as a force as large as 12,000 has pushed as far as they can. The operation has been managed quite quietly as I presume Northern people would not have dreamed of it...The object was to dash into Richmond, liberate the prisoners, and do as much damage as possible. They have not been successful as the Rebels were aware of the affair and were prepared. That game cannot be tried again at present. Recruiting among the Negroes is brisk but officers are not plentiful. The 2nd Cavalry at Camp Hamilton is short 10-12 officers; those who join have a chance for glory. General Butler had reviewed the 1st and 2nd Regiments last Sunday [BOTH COLORED CAVALRY UNITS]. To distract attention from a planned cavlary-infantry raid up the Peninsula on Richmond, the Federal Army forced several crossings of the Rapidan River on February 6. All Corps division crossed at Morton's Ford, the 1st Corps at Raccoon Ford. Union Cavalry crossed at Robertson's Ford. Ewell's Corps resisted the crossings. Fighting was sporadic but most severe at Morton's Ford. By February 7, the attacks had stalled, and the Federals withdrew during the night. Several weeks later Kilpatrick and Dahlgren made another effort to attack Richmond that failed. An excellent letter extremely well written.........................................$195.00

51314 - A GREAT DESCRIPTION OF GRANT AT FORTRESS MONROE, THE PEACE COMMISSIONERS, BUTLER AS A POSSIBLE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE, 8 pages in ink by Lt. Selwyn E. Bickford, Chief Clerk at Fortress Monroe, VA, April 20th, 1864. He relates in part to his friend Anderson...He is assisted by three clerks in the office as the paperwork is so tedious, does not know what part of VA the fight will come from whether it be Eastern VA or on the Rapidan, a large force will be there by May, General Butler is very popular and is a candidate for the Presidency. If Butler was elected all of Lowell would move to Washington. It was rumored that President Lincoln and his wife would be there that day but he went back to Washington, GENERAL GRANT AND HIS STAFF WERE THERE FOR THREE DAYS AND I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SEE THE GENERAL TWICE. hE IS VERY UNPRETENDING IN DRESS AND MANNERS AND IS NOT SO MUCH OF A "BOND BOX GENERAL" AS I WOULD LIKE HIM TO BE. HE WORE HIS BEARD CUT CLOSE AND HAD A CIGAR IN HIS MOUTH. HIS DOUBLE BREASTED COAT WAS UN BUTTONED FROM TOP TO BOTTOM AND IT SWAYED GENTLY IN THE WIND AS HE RODE, PEACE COMMISSIONERS WERE THERE, GENERAL OULD AND CAPTAIN HATCH OF THE CONFEDERATE ARMY. OULD IS A GRIZZLET FELLOW AND LOOKED LIKE THE DEVIL, HATCH WAS AS TRIM AS ANY OF OUR OFFICERS. I SEE Secesh passing by me all the day as they marched to prison at Camp Hamilton where 3000 colored troops are and ARE THE SPECIAL PETS OF THE GENERAL [BUTLER]. The General takes all visitors to see them, mentions a white unit formed from Confederate prisoners. A great letter describing Grant at Fortress Monroe just before the great offensive towards Richmond. Very fine...................................................$200.00

51316 - HE VISITS THE CSS FLORIDA AT HARBOR, OLD ABE IS REELECTED, LOSSES IN THE TOBACCO-WHISKEY MARKET, A RARE UNITED STATES COLORED TROOP LETTER SHEET, Fortress Monroe, VA, November 20th, 1864 on OFFICE ASST QTM. & SUPERVISOR NEGRO AFFAIRS FIRST DISTRICT DEPARTMENT VA AND NORTH CAROLINA. 6 page letter in ink by Lt. Selwyn E. Bickford, Chief Clerk at Fortress Monroe, VA. Bickford who has been speculating in whiskey and tobacco while at the Fort discusses with his friend Anderson the recent fall in prices of these items on the market. He has been quite ill and thinks the use of quinine has driven him mad. He has sold tobacco and whiskey at a loss, mentions that they will have "Old Abe" for four more years. There was no election in eastern Virginia and the guns in the harbor fired a salute at the results as they all opened up at once and the cannonading was brisk for awhile. The squadron has been in the Roads for awhile and he has had the opportunity to see some of the finest ships in the fleet. The WACHUSETT and the FLORIDA are both there but no one is allowed on the FLORIDA. I went as close as I could look upon her deck. She is not neat, attractive, nor trim and quite small, mentions a sighting of Commodore Porter. Quite a long and newsy letter describing the ex Rebel raider FLORIDA late under the command of Captain James Maffitt. After a period of speculation, Bickford's fortunes apparently have changed for the worse....................................................$155.00


4244 - DR. DAVID KINDLEBERGER APPLIES FOR THE POSITION OF SURGEON IN THE US NAVY, 10 pages of manuscript, June 3rd, 1862 by Dr. (Asst. Surgeon Kindleberger) letter detailing his service as an Asst. Surgeon on the USS San Jacinto off the African coast (1859-60) where as Asst. Surgeon there were no deaths from Remittent Fever (Malaria). (They were on anti-slave duty off the mouth of the Congo River). One death they had was a free Negro from Plevritis. He continues to give a medical report on the African voyage listing illnesses such as gonorrhea, syphilis, and remittent fever. He describes his time after the African voyage being part of Porter's mortar fleet at Ship Island in March 1862 and took part during the bombardment of Fort Jackson and St. Philip aboard the Miami delivering shot and shell to the fleet. Then he was ordered back north. He describes the illness on the ship during that expedition as mainly diarrhea caused by drinking river water. Kindleberger writes an essay on the symptoms and treatment of remittent fever as seen during his voyage to the West coast of Africa. He continues the application with answering nine questions regarding medical issues including diseases of the bones and the setting of bone fractures, questions regarding the bladder, etc. Kindleberger served on the San Jacinto, Portsmouth, Miami, Monongahela, and Itasca. He was present when the TRENT was captured and at Port Hudson and Galveston. See Porter pg. 280, 597, 789 for comments about Kindleberger. 10 pages near mint condition.............................................SOLD

4245 - A HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL GRADUATE APPLIES FOR THE POSITION OF ASST. SURGEON IN THE US NAVY, 7 pages of manuscript, Dr. Samuel Gilbert Webber. His letter attesting to his physical ability to serve in the Navy. A letter dated March 22nd, 1862 from the Naval Asylum in Philadelphia listing his qualifications and education detailing his education at Harvard and his training at the Mass. General Hospital since his graduation. The application includes 9 questions that Webber answers including a discussion of scarlet fever and typhoid, a discussion of the chemical properties of potassium. Webber attained the position of Asst. Surgeon and was assigned to the USS Nahant on May 22nd, 1862. 7 pages of beautiful manuscript..............................SOLD


4232 - ACTION BEFORE CHATTANOOGA BEFORE THE BATTLE OF LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN, November 15th, 1863, Camp at Chattanooga. Letter to his Father from Pvt. Thomas Walker, 15th Ohio Infantry. Four pages in bold pencil. He relates, "expresses surprise at getting a letter from his Father, mentions at present little actual fighting now and then, we get to shell the Rebels and the Rebels get to shell our camp off Lookout Mountain which is a huge mountain two miles from our camp, tells his Father no not be afraid of him re-enlisted as three years is enough for him. There was heavy cannonading up the river this morning, our men were trying to throw up a pontoon bridge about five miles up and the Rebels open up with five pieces of artillery but our men fetched the same amount of cannon and drove them away, that shows they won't stand fire. We have whipped them every place we have met and only here they gave us a smart flogging but we held on to Chattanooga and now we are heavily fortified with heavy guns. The Rebel camp is in sight of our men and we shell them without much damage and they shell us without any damage as they retaliate back on Lookout Mountain, mentions his box being in a wagon after Murfreesboro." Written just before the Union advance at the Battle of Lookout Mountain...............................$250.00

2100 - 10TH MISSOURI AT VICKSBURG AFTER THE CAPTURE, July 22nd, 1863. 8" X 10" manuscript order for Captain Joel Strong (10th Missouri) order to assemble a guard as his orders as Brigade Office of the Day. Just several weeks after the surrender of the City. Strong had been previously wounded at Champion Hill. Mint condition...........................SOLD

2102 - SOLDIER'S COVER FROM MASSACHUSETTS TO SHIP ISLAND TO A COLORED TROOP OFFICER, Postal cover from Attleboro, MA sent to Captain Levi I. Hawes, 74th Mass at Ship Island off the Mississippi coast in July [1864]. 3 cent stamp grid cancelled................................$45.00


2020 -THE DEATH OF ELLSWORTH, May 27th, 1861, Fortress Monroe, VA. Headquarters. Letter in ink, 2 large pages to his sister in Quincy, MA, by Samuel Nightingale, 39th Mass, Vol., hand carried cover. He relates..."The 4th regiment has orders to leave today some place I did not know where. It is thought they will go up the James River about 12 miles towards Norfolk for the purpose of erecting a land battery. All did not go as not all had new muskets. We will go in a few days when we have new muskets. The 4th Regiment has gone and detachment of artillery and a New York regiment. Probably you have heard of the death of Ellsworth of the Ellsworth Zouaves shot in Alexandria while he was pulling down a secession flag. We heard the news from a man in Washington. His company, upon seeing Ellsworth shot, shot the man and ran him through with their bayonets and he was dead before Ellsworth was. The gentleman from Washington said that they had set the city afire in 15 places." Much more on the camp, the person who is carrying th eletter home has been discharged due to illness. Letter comes with a hand-carried cover and Carte de Viste of Samuel Nightingale (39th Mass), G.H. Loomis bm, ink ided on verso, three items.............................................$395.00

2021 - A SOLDIER SHOT WHILE SITTING ON HIS COFFIN, October 5th, 1863, Camp near the Rapidan, VA. Four pages in ink to his sister in Quincy, MA, by a soldier who signs as "Samuel". (Cpl. Samuel Nightingale, 39th Mass.) He relates...We are now near the Rapidan River just on the other side are the Rebels. Our pickets and theirs talk with one another, we have gone as far as we can go unless we cross and I do not think it is the intention to cross at present. The Rebs are pretty strongly fortified and command a good position. Last Friday, I witnessed an execution of a deserter belonging to the 90th PA, Rgt. That day it rained or rather poured down in torrents. We got drenched through and through. Our division was formed into a square and the prisoner was conveyed in an ambulance, the band playing a dead march. He was taken out of the ambulance with his coffin. The priest said a few words to him which I could not hear. He was placed on his coffin blindfolded and when the word FIRE was given 12 muskets was discharged at him and his soul was launched into eternity. It was the first thing of this kind I have ever witnessed and I hope it will be the last. More on his needs for warm clothing for the upcoming winter. A rare account of the death of a deserter by firing...............................SOLD

2023 - THE BATTLE OF NEWBERN, NORTH CAROLINA, May 4th, 1862, One letter from Cpl. Alonzo Nightingale, 24th Mass. Company G, to his cousin Samuel Nightingale, Newbern, NC. Three large pages in bold pencil, he relates..."I tell you Sam the 24th is the crack regiment as nothing goes ahead of it. General Foster, formally in command of the Brigade said their was not a whole division so well drilled and disciplined as ours and you will see by his officer's report that he gives the 24th Regt. great praise for bravery and coolness in the Battle at Newbern. General Burnside in his official report said every regiment was worthy of praise but those who were under such heavy fire as the 24th Mass, Vol., 19th Connecticut, 51st NYV, 9th NY deserve credit for their bravery and coolness under trrific fire of musketry and artillery and the 24th for the coolness in which they advanced inch by inch under raking fire of heavy artillery and a deadly fire of musketry until the final charge was made and then the Rebels left terrible quick. Since the battle our Colonel has been promoted to Brigadier General and commands the 2nd Brigade of the 1st Division, the 19th, 27th and 24th MV form the Brigade. I expect on the next advance we will be led off by our brigade. We are expecting an attack any day now, our regiment has advanced six miles and we camp in the woods. We staid there about three weeks and were ordered back to the City again. We have 40 rounds of cartridges and they are to give us 20 rounds more and then we are ready to meet the Rebels again...more on the strength of the unit, news of the capture of New Orleans, the boys are cheering and the band is playing. We are waiting news from Yorktown that it is taken and the Rebels are driven from Corinth...you may soon hear that the war will be at a close...". A well written letter describing the heroic actions of the 24th Mass. at the Battle of Newbern. Comes with a DUE 3 cover, with SOLDIER'S LETTER 24th Mass stamp which is scarce in itself, 2 items..................................SOLD

2025 - NAVAL LETTER AND SAILOR'S WALLET, Letter written by William H. Allen from the U.S.S. Tritonia at Mobile on October 26th, 1865. Four pages in ink from Allen who was 3rd Asst. Engineer (1864) to his mother discussing two model boats he had completed but had broke the model of the gunboat...he describes the "Bark" he completed and was sending it home with a Navy revolver. He instructs his Mother how to finish off the rigging with a sharp scissors and to inquire as to having carriage painter paint the boat. He gives specific instructions as to the painted required as well as emblems to be added. The Tritonia had been in the West Gulf Blocking fleet and was guarding the rivers and outlets for marauders who were along the coast just after the war ended. The letter comes with Allen's large fold over leather wallet with an old note "This wallet belonged to William H. Allen at the time he was in the Civil War on Farragut's Flagship." Allen had served on the Hartford during the Mobile campaign. Interesting letter and accompanying wallet. 2 items.............................$295.00

2026 - PRIVATE LEWIS PRALL, 30TH PA VOL., FOUGHT AT ANTIETAM AND GETTYSBURG, Three letters included are (1) Camp Near Sharpsburg, October 23rd, 1862. 4 pages in pencil, with stamped cover CDS Hagerstown, MD. to his mother. He relates...send letters to Hagerstown, he has drawn new clothing and is trying for a furlough which is hard to now get, has applied for one to go to Georgetown for three days, all requests have to go to the War Dept. in Washington, awaiting a reply but they may refuse to sign it. A Camp letter written just after he fought at Antietam, (2) Camp Near Union Mills, VA, March 16th, 1863. 4 pages in ink to his sister by Lewis Prall. He relates...it is difficult to seep in the sold nights, has a large fireplace, must sleep with six warm blankets, they get plenty to eat, sugar, beef, fresh bread baked twice a week. The general has called us up expecting General Stuart to make a cavalry raid around here, we are used to hearing about General Stuart and if he comes we will show him how the brave boys from old PA fight...here are two rings made of laurel wood, one for you and one for mother. Stamped postal cover Alexandria, VA, 2 items. (3) Camp at Fairfax Station, VA, April 1st, 1864. 4 pages in pencil to his mother. He relates...went to Alexandria to the Express Office and brought back 21 boxes one being mine, my box was not spilled, everything fine, but 2-3 pies were a little bit moldy, will  never forget the thoughtfulness of home. Thank Mr. Greest for the tobacco and segars, gave a Captain and an orderly some of the goodies, there are four in our tent, left Union Mills on the 14th of last month and went to Centerville, stayed there about to days and came back to Fairfax Court House and found our brigade the next day, we were ordered to pack and marched in the rain to Fairfax Station...may go to Alexandria, do not expect any trouble from the Rebels as there are none near here, mentions Ben Palmer of the 166th who went in as a substitute for $400, stamped cover with Alexandria, VA PM, the three letters and three covers....................$295.00


1305 - MISSOURI OATH OF ALLEGIANCE, 8" X 10", Nodaway County, Missouri. Pre-printed and filled-in Oath of Allegiance dated December 9th, 1865 for Valentin Karll attesting to his allegiance to the State of Missouri and the United States for a basis of acceptance as a 2nd Lt. in the Missouri Militia. Three revenue stamps applied to this oath, an officer in the Missouri Militia. The Missouri Militia was active from 1862 through the end of the war fighting Confederates and served also after the war in a police capacity. Very fine..............................$145.00

1308 - RARE UNION "BROWN WATER" NAVAL ENLISTMENT, 8" X 10", August 30th, 1864. Pre-printed and filled-in enlistment for John H. Rose on the US Steamer BURNSIDE at Bridgeport, AL who had presented John M. Sherfrey as his substitute who had originate from Iowa. The descriptive list for Rose states he was a native of Alabama, dated at Nashville, TN on the verso of the document. Signed by Lt. Comm. H.A. Glassey, Naval forces in Upper Tennessee River. Very fine Naval document from the interior waters. Navy are rare and seldom seen.............................$145.00


708 - 1ST NEW YORK ARTILLERY AT CAMP CALIFORNIA, Camp California, March 6th, 1862. Letter by Sgt. James A. Skinner, Battery B, 1st NY Artillery, 4 pages in ink. We are ordered last Thursday to pack up to be ready to march as the enemy had appeared in force at Accotink Creek where our forces are re-building a railroad bridge which the Rebels had destroyed with another battery and about six regiments of Infantry were to drive them back...we awaited with knapsacks on and horses harnessed and had to force many against their wills to guard the camp, but the Rebels had slid away, it was hard for the boys to return to camp without a fight. Well written....................................$125.00

709 - SCARCE 50TH NEW YORK ENGINEERS LETTER - MOVING THE TROOPS OVER THE POTOMAC RIVER, Berlin, MD, November 2nd, 1862. 10 pages in ink by Charles E. Snyder, 50th NY Engineers to Hannah...we hear the sound of booming cannon in the distance speaking of what our fellow men are involved with, probability of another great battle, a week ago we laid a pontoon bridge at this place and thousands of men and trains have passed since, the whole left wing of the Army of the Potomac has passed here, troops have been passing by the thousands, last Monday we moved our camp from Harper's Ferry to down here, mentions the 97th NY camped nearby with severely reduced forces. A long letter continues with all aspects of life in their camp and philosophy about the War in general. A very newsy and well written Engineer letter........................................$145.00

710 - BEGINNING OF THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN, Camp near Buzzard's Peek, GA, May 4th, 1864. Three page letter in ink by Pvt. James L. Bryant, 33rd Mass Vol. beginning of Sherman's March towards Atlanta, written to his Father and Mother...we have left the pleasant valley of the Lookout and have camped here, has marched and camped at Gordon's Mill, GA, they are copper in color from marching in the sun and will be soon black before the Fall...we are now what we call "in front", our picket has gone up to what they call Smokey Ridge, they are near Ringgold, GA., and will proceed to march until the Gulf of Mexico...Sherman's march begins towards Atlanta......................................SOLD

Letters from Edward Potter - US Navy attack on New Orleans and Vicksburg

712 - WE ARE OFF PETIT'S BAR NEAR MOBILE, USS WISSAHICKON, February 8th, 1862. Four page letter by Edward Potter to his sister, "Went on shore and got some oysters, we see the vessels off Mobile, 12 - 15 miles distance, we are needing coal and will go to Ship Island, describes the discipline of the Captain, newsy letter, missing last page...........................$55.00

714 - CAME FROM SHIP ISLAND, LANDED AT NEW ORLEANS, WENT UPRIVER TO FIND REBELS, Algiers, LA (across the river from New Orleans), June 10th, 1862. Four page letter to Mira from Robert Fl. We have been ordered to march any hour, given 40 cartridges and started on the Steamer Diana upriver. When we were about 12 miles upriver, we were told we were going upriver after about 200 - 300 Rebel Cavalry...the boys felt they were going to have a fight, about 3am, we landed and let some men from the company off to see if there were any Rebels, the remainder went upriver on the steamer and was to meet them at the the Convent Landing which was about 12 miles further up...we marched about five miles and at daybreak took a Rebel Captain prisoner...we were very tired since we had left Ship Island, we had done nothing but guard duty. We had arrived at New Orleans, May 6th and arrived here May 30th. News tells us that Richmond is ours after 3 days of hard fighting...we find a great many Rebels here, but they say little, but that Beauregard will whip us...captured a Colonel and Lt. Colonel, but released them on a Parole of Honor, mentions those ill in the company. A newsy letter on one of the first movements upriver by the newly arrived Butler troops........................$145.00

715 - BRASHEAR CITY, LA - CAMP OF THE 16TH OHIO BATTERY, November 25th, 1863. Six page letter in ink from Captain T.P. Turst of the 16th Ohio to his wife, comes with a nice stamped envelope CDS New Orleans with a DUE 6 stamp. He speaks at length of his wife coming to join him, troops are to leave for Texas, but the heavy draft boats could not come over the bar there, troops had to be sent back to New Orleans for transport to Texas, he raves about and describes the countryside and tells his wife he would like to move there (New Orleans) after the War, vivid descriptions of the crops, vegetables, oranges, the splendid weather, he remarks about the absence of Yellow Fever in New Orleans the past two seasons (a result of the cleaning up of the City by Butler removing stagnant standing water and cleaning the streets where mosquitoes flourished in the past), much more on the area, interesting and well-written with cover.................................................SOLD

Three Newsy Letters from Brig. General Nathanial Collis McLean written from Lexington, KY

717 - SPEAKS OF OUSTING OF GENERAL BURBRIDGE IN KENTUCKYLexington, KY, Headquarters, 1st Div. Military District of Kentucky, December 9th, 1864. A four page letter by General Nathanial McLean to his wife. He won't be home for Christmas, doesn't know when General Burbridge will return and fears that he will order me to take his place in the field, he fears also that Burbridge does not have enough troops in the field...he mentions that great efforts are being made to get Burbridge relieved and as much as he apparently dislikes Burbridge, he does not want to be thrown back to General Schofield and doubts he could survive under him...he mentions he does not want to leave again until the prejudices against him are removed. Comes with a stamp removed cover addressed to his wife which in essence is another autograph...Burbridge was despised in Kentucky by civilians and subordinates. McLean has been relegated to Kentucky due to his perceived ineffectualness of his actions at Chancellorsville. Later, he served under Schofield in the Atlanta Campaign...interesting commentary from one General about his commander. Mint condition.....................................................$225.00

719 - BURBRIDGE IS ADVANCING NEAR ROGERSVILLE, STONEMAN WITH HIM, Lexington, KY, Headquarters, 1st Division, Military District of Kentucky, December 14th, 1864. 4 page letter in ink to his wife by General Nathanial McLean. He relates...he wishes a good night kiss from her and he won't be able to leave for Christmas as he cannot leave, but looks forward to going to Louisville to prepare for her to come...General Burbridge is advancing near Rogersville, TN. As he has met General Stoneman - he is not certain what the object is at present, he has not heard anything about the changes in command, but he expects to hear something any day, Burbridge's friends in the military may consent to a change if they can get a man they like in his place. Burbridge and Stoneman were on their way to destroy supplies and facilities in Southwest Virginia and soon met Breckenridge at Marion, VA, which slowed down his efforts to destroy civilian property as he was stalled by the small group of Confederates under Breckenridge. Burbridge was soon ousted from command as he had alienated everyone in Kentucky. Well written by McLean and comes with a envelope minus the stamp addressed to his wife by him which is another signature................................$225.00


2146 - FORREST ATTACKS AND DESTROYS THE RAILROADS, ATTACKS COLUMBIA, TENNESSEE, ROUSSEAU IN A CHASE, LINCOLN WINS BY A LANDSLIDE IN THE REGIMENT, Headquarters 21st Indiana Battery, October 6th, 1864, 3 pages in pen with stamped cover by A. P. Andrews to his Father. He relates in part, "our communications are interrupted for ten weeks we have had no mail thanks to General Forrest, the road is cut between here and Nashville, three bridges are destroyed all due to cowardice or treachery of a Lt. who surrendered all the three block houses protecting the bridges without firing a shot. On Sunday General Forrest appeared before Columbia and attacked the pickets and on two roads drove them into town. Skirmishing was quite brisk for a time as they continued to press our men. It caused a few shells to be thrown among them and they withdrew and camped some four miles from town. The next day, they left fearing General Rousseau's approach. It will take some times to repair the road. Below Pulaski the road is also very much injured. The other road is considered not much injured so I suppose General Forrest's raid was a failure. I think Sherman is secure in Atlanta; the Rebels have not broke communication. A vote was taken in the company a few days ago and the results were Lincoln 106, for McClellan 8, 18 men at Franklin did not vote." An outstanding letter describing Forrest's probing efforts into the federal lines near Columbia prior to Hood moving his army north across the Tennessee River. Well written, very fine..........................................................SOLD

THE ATTACKS ON THE MISSISSIPPI COAST FROM SHIP ISLAND, THE IMPENDING ATTACK ON NEW ORLEANS, THE ATTACKS ON BILOXI AND PASS CHRISTIAN, MISSISSIPPI INCLUDING SOLDIER'S ART

11080 - NEW ENGLAND DIVISION, SHIP ISLAND MISSISSIPPI, GENERAL BUTLER'S EXPEDITION, APRIL 5TH, 1862, 12 pages in ink, B. C. Johnson, 6th Michigan Infantry. 7" X 8" pages. The CONSTITUTION is due here today with six wagon loads of mail for the 6th Michigan. We had orders to pack four days ration of meat and hard bread, describes the clothing they were allowed to pack. There were three regiments before us to board which took three days then the orders were countermanded. We will probably go up the Mississippi. Gunboats and transports went to the mainland and marched into a village and took one piece of artillery. They marched three miles and lined up in a line of battle and fired three or four shots at them and they fired one volley at us and turned and ran. The boys then went into the village and took everything, filled their knapsacks. We then marched up to the Rebel encampment and formed a line of battle. They fired one volley over our heads; we returned fire and charged with bayonets. Cowards they are they ran. We captured two field pieces but the rest they dragged away but we captured all their camp equipment. We took what we could and burned the rest. We captured a fine steam vessel and a sailing ship. Our harbor is filled with prizes. The battle was clearly seen from the Island as we could see the shells bursting. The Rebels will never meet us in the field again as they lay skulking behind trees in the swamps. We will hunt them as a dog hunts a rabbit. Our cold steel is too much for them. There are reports that Norfolk is captured but we don't believe it. The papers of the 10th say that the Potomac is clear of Rebels. We expect General Burnside to make an attack on Norfolk. I assume by this time it is possession of our troops. The boys are cleaning up and making ready for the expedition. 

Sunday, April 6th, 1862, just put on inspection, it is very warm today and the boys look for shade, there are thousands of rumors going through the camp, April 13th, we have gotten new Austrian rifles and new hats that are called Butler Hats. They are designed for this climate. They are blue with a fore piece on them like a cap and coat $1.30 each. There is a large steam ship laying off the island six miles as we are looking for the CONSTITUTION. We live on hard bread and coffee and sleep on our overcoats. On the way down the CONSTITUTION had a case of smallpox. When the ship landed the soldier was out in a wagon away from camp under a tent away from the others. Six soldiers have died from smallpox. Monday, April 7th, the 9th Connecticut was selected to use the scaling ladders in charging the Rebel forts, we will have a sham fight with blank cartridges. Three regiments will make a charge on a battery. We received news that Manassas is evacuated and Burnside has captured Newbern. Six vessels loaded with troops came in yesterday. Connecticut boys drowned while going over the sandbar. We will call them the "Mississippi Tigers" and they carry a pirate flag of red and black. There are 16 regiments here now numbering 18,000 men. He concludes the letter with a colored pencil drawing of the camp of the 6th Michigan at Newport News, VA, dated February 6th, 1862 before the unit's departure for Ship Island. Johnson describes the attacks on the Mississippi Coast at Biloxi on April 3rd, 1862 and at Pass Christian on April 4th, 1862 where the 9th Connecticut took Confederate colors. Well written in bold ink....................................SOLD

80024 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, A CAVALRY CHARGE ON THE ORANGE AND ALEXANDRIA RAILROAD, November 20th [1862], Halls Farm [VA]. 4 pages in bold pencil, with postal cover, by Pvt. John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry to his brother [Davy], "I must tell you about a cavalry charge our regiment made last week. There were 150 of us led by a scout and we rode around their pickets to avoid any alarm the pickets might give, we forded the river and drew up in line. It was Sunday and they were preparing to go to meeting. A citizen saw us and rang the alarm the pickets might give, we forded the river and drew up in line. It was Sunday and they were preparing to go to meeting. A citizen saw us and rang the alarm bell. The first thing our boys heard was the tolling of the bells and they were ready for us. We were ordered to charge and we went in and hollowed and they did the same, we met them in town and rode though the center of them - 250 of them without losing a man. We wheeled around and charged a second time and killed about three of them. One of our men was struck three times on the head with a saber but it did not hurt him much. We captured about 300 yards of gray cloth and took about 70 prisoners. On the way back, we took every picket on the road and broke open 30 barrels of apple jack and every man filled their canteens. Our regiment is 35 miles from this place now as we all have lame horses and will get new ones to rejoin the regiment. Send me some money for penny stamps and I will send you a Washington paper. John Kay."  Great letter........................................SOLD

80027 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, A REBEL RODE OFF AFTER A FIGHT WITH A SABER STUCK IN HIS BACK, GREAT ACCOUNT OF A CAVALRY ATTACK, Potomac Creek [VA], March 19th, 1863. Four pages in ink to his brother Davy with a stamped cover by Private John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry. He relates in part, "Did you hear about the cavalry charge that took place here the day before yesterday? It was the hardest cavalry fight that has ever been fought in our regiment and brigade. Our division went down to the river with intentions to cross. The general ordered the 4th New York to cross but the Rebels had cut down trees across the ford. They had to be moved away before we could cross. We then were ordered to cross but the Rebels had rifle pits and poured it on our men right smart but our men got them out of the way but we had to cross single file and just as our men reached the other side of the river about half a dozen of our men were shot dead on the bank, but our men kept going and you ought to see the Rebel pickets going away. We got 20 prisoners out of the rifle pits. We went a little further and 3000 Rebels were waiting for our men. Our men got up to the lines as quick as they could with little time to spare as the Rebels came with a great yell. Our boys stood still until they came within 4 rods when our boys heard the order to move forward and sent up a yell that scared the Rebels. Our boys did use their sabers and it took considerable laming to fetch a man from his saddle. ONE OF OUR BOYS FROM COMPANY G TOOK OFF AFTER A REBEL AND STRUCK HIM THREE TIMES WITH HIS SABER TO NO EFFECT. THEN A NEW IDEA CAME IN HIS HEAD TO FRONT POINT HIM AND HE STABBED THE FELLOW WITH HIS SABER IN THE BACK OF HIS NECK. JUST AS HE DID THAT HIS HORSE SHOT UP AND HE FELLOW RODE OFF WITH THE SABER IN HIS BACK. I could tell you a dozen more incidents but do not have the time. They fought all day one charge after another. There will be more hard charges this summer. John Kay."................................................. SOLD

80028 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, LINCOLN, HIS WIFE, AND HOOKER PASS THE TROOPS - MRS. LINCOLN LOOKS LIKE ABE'S GRANDMOTHER, Potomac Creek, [VA], April 11th, 1863. 4 page letter in ink to his sister by John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry. He relates in part, "Abraham Lincoln and his wife passed through here yesterday, he passed through a column of infantry a mile long and every regiment gave nine cheers, three for Abe, three for his wife and three for General Hooker and down he passed. A Dutch boy in our company said that Mrs. Lincoln looked like his grandmother because her face was wrinkled. Thank you for the postage stamps you sent as it is almost impossible to get them here. We were supposed to cross the river, but I guess they got enough of it the last time we crossed...Captain Richards came back to the regiment yesterday but the boys don't think much of him now, I suspect we will be on the move soon as the teamsters have been given orders to grease the wagons and harnesses and wait for orders to move. I suspect tomorrow. He draws a character of a soldier riding a chicken entitled "Eddie riding his pony." Abe and Mary Lincoln on April 8th, 1863 reviewed Hooker's troops. A member of the 6th Corps wrote a description of the event, "the reviewing ground was a plateau, slightly rolling but sufficiently level to admit of good marching. The reviewing stand, a knoll somewhat elevated, could be seen by the Confederates...After the President and General Hooker and staff had ridden down the front of the line and returned by the rear, they took position on the rise selected for the reviewing stand, which was about the center of the line. The ladies who accompanied Mrs. Lincoln were grouped about her in carriages to the left of the stand. When all were satisfactorily placed, the march past began. When the signal was given the brigade on the extreme right marched by platoon to the front, and wheeling to the left, marched down past the President. As each brigade marched to the front its place was immediately filled by the next in line, so that one line was moving to the right while the other was moving to the left past the reviewing stand." A rare commentary on the appearance of Mary Lincoln................SOLD

80030 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, STONEMAN'S RAID 1863, Potomac, May 8th, 1863. 4 pages in bold pencil to his sister by John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry. He relates in part, "I have had a hard time of it since the 13th of last month, we started for the River Rapahanie at Kelly's Ford we camped about two miles from the river, we stayed they until we drew the Rebels to the ford and then left for Belington Station, drawed five days rations and started up the river as as Sulphur Springs and then came back through Warrenton and camped five miles this side of that place. We lay here three days and then drew 6 days rations, 3 on the horses, three on the mules. We left Warrenton on the 28th and nice pm and traveled all night and again the next day until 9 at night and then went in camp by the river. On the 29th, we crossed the river, describes taking items from homes. Took corn, lard, bacon, flour...only 150 niggers left here, there is fighting ahead and our men are driving them back. On the 30th, we started at light from Kelly's Ford, went though Culpepper and Slatter Mountain and camped 5 miles on the other side towards the Rapdan. 1st of May got up and packed our mules in a field and waiting for marching orders. They are fighting down at the Rive River, we stayed overnight and burned a bridge and then came down to reinforce them. There is fighting at Falmouth, Fredericksburg lies opposite Falmouth, heavy fighting at United States Ford. When I came on the road from Falmouth to the battlefield there were wounded soldiers long the road for 10 miles some with their arms and fingers off and all shot up all over...John Kay." Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker, in his plans for the Chancellorsville Campaign, April-May, ordered some 10,000 Union troopers on a mounted raid against the communications and supply lines of Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. This raid was to take place before the main body of the army attempted a turning movement on the Confederate flank, and comprised nearly all of the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac. Leading the newly established Cavalry Corps was Maj. Gen. George Stoneman. Stoneman was originally scheduled to start from Falmouth, Virginia on the 13th, and cross the Rappahannock River the next day, but a heavy storm flooded the river and made a crossing impossible for 2 weeks. As a result of this delay, on the 29th, the cavalry crossed the river with the rest of the army. The command was split into 2 columns, 1 commanded by Brig. Gen. William A. Averell and the other by Brig. Gen. John Buford. Stoneman rode with Buford's command, which was the main force of the cavalry. Averell was intended to ride toward Gordonsville and the Orange & Alexandria Railroad and to mask the movements of the larger column, which was to strike the Richmond, Fredericksburg, & Potomac railroad. The raid was an unrelieved failure. Averell spent most of his time at Rapidan Station worrying about phantom Confederate cavalrymen and was recalled by Hooker on May 2nd. He was also subsequently relieved and replaced by Brig. Gen. Alfred Pleasonton. Stoneman, with Buford and Brig. Gen. David M. Gregg, destroyed some railroad track and other property around the Virginia countryside, but their efforts had no lasting effects. Stoneman's raid was one of Hooker's worst mistakes in the campaign...........................................SOLD

80031 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, TRUMAN REEDER HAD HIS ARM SHATTERED AND IT HAD TO BE AMPUTATED, OUR MAJOR KILLED, Cold Harbor, VA, May [June]5th, [1864]. 3+ pages in ink to his sister by Private John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry. He relates in part, "I am still driving a team and in good health, this Cold Harbor is a village of one house! We are in camp two miles from the Chickasaw River and 15 miles from Richmond and 10 miles from White House Landing. We are near the vicinity where McClellan lost so many men [Peninsular Campaign 1862]. Our regiment has been in another fight since I last wrote. Our regiment lost about 30 men killed and wounded. William Borts was killed in our company. Joe Miller was wounded in the left thigh, Truman Reeder was shot in the left arm and it shattered the bone and it had to be amputated. The Major was killed and he just got his commission he day before. Seems like the Rebels just won't let us have a Major. There is fighting every day more or less with some heavy cannonading. The Rebels tried to get our train [supply] when we went out with the cavalry. The Rebels charged the train but no damage was done as the 1st PA Cavalry was on hand and drove them back. Some of the drivers ran off into the woods. Will send you a picture first chance I get. John Kay." Kay has obviously misdated this as William Borts was killed at Hawes Shop, VA on May 28th, 1864 thus conjecture dates this letter probably June 5th, 1864.............................SOLD

80033 - 6TH OHIO CAVALRY, THE DIGGING OF THE PETERSBURG TUNNEL, A DRAWING OF THE PLANS TO BLOW UP THE REBEL FORTS, Light House Point, VA, July 19th, 1864. Three pages in pen to his mother and father by John Kay, 6th Ohio Cavalry. He relates in part, "I am well and enjoying a soldier's life of hard tack and coffee. Our company has been in another skirmish as we were ordered to cut the railroad. That is the one that runs into Petersburg. We then got there was a considerable amount of Rebel Infantry so they went back to camp. We are now waiting for the coming of the pay master; all the boys are in good health. I had a conversation with a young man who had just come from the front says that Grant has four regiments of Miners [PA Coal miners in the army] that do nothing but undermine the Rebel forts which you will see from the sketch below. I have been looking for a letter but have made up my mind that it probably was captured with General Franklin. John Kay." Kay draws the lay of the land showing the under mining of the Rebel works near Petersburg. The men of the 48th Pennsylvania sought to break the stalemate with an ambitious project. The brainchild of Lieutenant Colonel Henry Pleasants, the plan called for the men of his regiment--mostly miners from Pennsylvania's anthracite coal region--to construct a tunnel to the Confederate line, fill it with powder, and blow a gap in the fortifications. On June 24, the plan received the approval of the regiment's corps commander, Ambrose Burnside, and the digging commenced the following day. Burnside's superiors, Generals Grant and George Meade, expressed little enthusiasm for the project but allowed it to proceed. For five weeks the miners dug the 500-foot long shaft, completing about 40 feet per day. On July 30, a huge cache of gunpowder was ignited. The plan worked, and a huge gap was blown in the Rebel line. But poor planning by Union officers squandered the opportunity, and the Confederates closed the gap before the Federals could exploit the opening. The Battle of the Crater, as it became know, was an unusual event in an otherwise uneventful summer along the Petersburg line.............................................SOLD

8016 - 2ND IOWA INFANTRY, FORT DONELSON, THE REGIMENTAL FLAG HAS A GREAT MANY MARKS OF THE BATTLE, MANY LOST, William C. Holden, 2nd Iowa Infantry. 4 page letter to his Father, March 8th, 1862, on board the steamboat KEYSTONE on the Cumberland River. He relates in part, "I have been ill since the 19th of February and have had a pretty bad time of it. I had a type of "Camp diarrhea" which is very common among the troops and it reduced me in a few days into a skeleton. I am getting a great deal better now. My regiment left for Ft. Donelson the day before yesterday for some point above Fort Henry and I was not able to march and was left behind with the baggage which is going around by water. Most of the troops have left Ft. Donelson. I think a column will move from above Fort Henry [as a large force is concentrating there for some point in Alabama or across to Memphis. I think I shall be able to keep up when I get to the regiment. I have written two letters to St. Louis since the battle and have not have had a reply. the weather has been very disagreeable at Ft. Donelson since we landed there. It has either been snowing or raining all of the time. I was never so glad to away from a place in my life. We have left a great many brave soldier behind us who gave their lives to their country. Governor Kirkwood of Iowa paid us a visit shortly after the battle and took our regimental colors back to the capital of Iowa. He said they would be hung over the speakers chair during the session of the legislature. They bear a good many marks of the battle as they were the first stand of colors inside the breastworks. Direct your letters to Ft. Henry, Tennessee." The soldiers of the 2nd Iowa Infantry Regiment enlisted for three-year terms, with many soldiers fighting until the end of the war. Samuel Curtis was a leader in this unit. Highlights of the service of this regiment include distinguished actions at the Battle of Fort Donelson and at the Battle of Shiloh, where about 80 members of the regiment were casualties, either dead or wounded. The regiment fought in the subsequent Battle of Corinth and later in the Atlanta Campaign, including at the Battle of Atlanta, continuing on to South Carolina and to Goldsboro, North Carolina, in the Carolinas Campaign. With the surrender of the Confederate States Army under Joseph E. Johnston, the 2nd Iowa traveled to Washington, D.C., for the Grand Review of the Armies of the Union on May 23 - 234, 1865. The regiment was mustered out on July 12, 1865 and discharged at Davenport, Iowa on July 20, 1865. The letter is well written in bold ink, several archival repairs at folds, small paper loss at spine, comes with a stamped postal cover with a patriotic vignette of a soldier standing near an American flag. Two items, excellent content about the 2nd Iowa's battle flags being damaged in the assault and the first inside the breastworks.........................................................SOLD

7143A - 7TH RHODE ISLAND INFANTRY, Private Herbert Daniels, Company C, 7th Rhode Island Infantry. A grouping of 64 letters, 35 are war dated to the end of his service, 29 are post war. 99% have nice stamped postal covers. The War date letters are datelined from various posts such as Kentucky and Virginia. Some are from him while in transit from and to Massachusetts during the war, I or two from Salina to him. 99% of the letters are from him to his lover Mrs. Salina Waterson of Worcester, Mass. some of the letters are in pencil, some light. Herbert carried on a torrid love relationship during the war and his post war letters also contain some of the same element. These are camp letters with a lot of personal information about the pair, his longing for her during and after the war. These letters were quickly scanned for content and put back into the original envelopes. The group comes with a copy picture of Daniels as he is seen in the regimental. 64 letters, 62 stamped covers. The lot.............................................................SOLD [this is figuring the post-war letters at 0 and the stamped covers are worth $100 alone]

FORREST'S MEN TAKEN AS PRISONERS KILLED BY NEGRO GUARDS THE BATTLE OF TUPELO, MISSISSIPPI

71200 - NEGRO TROOPS KILL CONFEDERATE PRISONERS AFTER THE BATTLE OF TUPELO, MS, Memphis, TN, July 27th, 1864, 4 large pages in ink, by Andrew Fern, Co. E, 95th Illinois to his brothers James and George. He relates in part, He writes about the President's draft call for 500,000 more men and suspects that a draft will be required. General Grant is certain that General Sherman can take Atlanta and told President Lincoln that if he had 100,000 more men he would be able to take Richmond in 100 days. He feels all things possible should be done to put down the Rebellion as it is now ruining the country and putting the country deep in debt. He comments on the Peace Commissioners from Jefferson Davis and their highly unacceptable proposals. Now that the expedition that had been sent out under General Smith has returned they accomplished all they had intended to do. THEY HAD A FIGHT WITH GENERAL FORREST UNDER GENERAL LEE AND WHIPPED THEM AT TUPELO. THEY ACTUALLY HAD THREE FIGHTS WITH HIM AND WHIPPED HIM EACH TIME. THEY TOOK ONLY ABOUT 60 PRISONERS THAT THEY BROUGHT IN WITH THEM, THE REST OF THE PRISONERS WERE TAKEN UNDER NEGRO GUARD TO THE REAR. THE NEGRO SOLDIERS CAME OUT ALL RIGHT [IN THE FIGHT] BUT THEY WOULD NOT HEAR ANYTHING OF THE PRISONERS. THE NEGROES WOULD TAKE THEM A LITTLE WAY FROM THE TRAIN AND STAB THEM RIGHT THROUGH WITH THE BAYONET. THIS WAS AN EFFECT OF THE FORT PILLOW SCRAPE WHEN THEY ]THE CONFEDERATES] COMMENCED FIGHTING THEY SHOWED NO QUARTERS [ON NEGRO PRISONERS]. OUR MEN [NEGRO TROOPS] THROUGH THEY SHOULD SHOW NO QUARTERS FOR THEM [FORREST'S CAPTURED TROOPS]. AT TUPELO WE KILLED AND CAPTURED ABOUT 4000 OF THEM, OUR LOST WAS ABOUT 150 KILLED AND WOUNDED. WE NOW HAVE ABOUT 300 MEN IN THE REGIMENT AND ARE AS TOUGH AS NUTS. ANOTHER EXPEDITION UNDER SMITH WILL SOON GO DOWN RIVER BUT IT IS NOT KNOW IF THEY WILL GO TO WHITE RIVER OR MOBILE. This excellent letter comes with a fine stamped cover postmarked Memphis, TN, extremely rare content. Only the second letter we have ever handled describing Negro USCT troops killing Confederate prisoners.  After the Confederate victory at the battle of Brice's Crossroads, the supply lines for Sherman's armies in Georgia became increasingly vulnerable. District commander, Cadwallader C. Washburn dispatched a force under General Andrew J. Smith to deal with Confederate cavalier, Nathan Bedford Forrest. Smith arrived in northern Mississippi on July 11, 1864. Forrest was nearby with 6,000 troops but under orders from his superior Stephen D. Lee not to attack until reinforcements arrived. The next day Lee arrived with 2,000 reinforcements. Smith withdrew from his current position towards Tupelo. Forrest considered Smith's movements a retreat while Smith was intending to destroy the railroads at Tupelo. On the night of the 13th, Smith constructed breastworks near Harrisburg, an abandoned town a mile west of Tupelo. Early on July 14, Lee ordered an assault on the Union lines. Lee attacked the Union right under General Joseph A. Mower while Forrest assaulted the Union left held by Colonel Davis Moore and a General Benjamin Grierson. Throughout the morning, Lee and Forrest led a series of uncoordinated attacks against defended positions which Forrest later claimed were impregnable. During the night Smith burned the remains of Harrisburg but the flames illuminated his lines. Forrest led a daring night assault against the Union left defended by a brigade of USCT which held strong and repulsed Forrest. On July 15, Smith began to move north. Forrest attacked Smith's rearguard and was again repulsed and wounded in the foot. A few days later Smith returned to La Grange, Tennessee from where he had originally departed. The Battle of Fort Pillow, also known as the Fort Pillow Massacre, was fought on April 12, 1864, at Fort Pillow on the Mississippi River in Henning, Tennessee, during the American Civil War. The battle ended with a massacre of surrendered Federal black troops by soldiers under the command of Confederate Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest. THIS DRAMATIC ACCOUNT DESCRIBES THE RETRIBUTION THE NEGRO TROOPS SHOWED AFTER THE BATTLE OF TUPELO AGAINST FORREST'S CAPTURED MEN. The Negro troops involved in this account were members of the 1st Brigade USCT serving under Colonel Edward Bouton. This was the last battle that Forrest faced Federal Infantry and he was wounded in the foot at this battle. 2 items, letter and postal cover................................................SOLD

51603 - THE CONFUSION AFTER THE BATTLE OF BULLS RUN, INCORRECT REPORTS ON THE ACTIONS OF THEIR OFFICERS, Va, July 30th, 1861, 4 pages in ink, large 8" X 10" pages, from Captain Clark Edwards, 5th Maine [later Colonel of the regiment], to his wife. He relates in part, "We are now at Claremont about 4 miles from Alexandria and about 13 miles from Washington. He sees from the Portland papers do not give a true account of the Bulls Run fight. Papers say that there were just two or three officers on the field at the fight, all of the officers were on the field from one to two hours, mentions several men missing, don't know if they were killed, our regiment is in bad shape, few tents, describes leaving supplies on the battle field at Bulls Run, troops setting up camp again after the battle, mentions ill soldiers, another soldier shot off one of his fingers with his pistol, it is a common thing in order to get out of the line of battle, much more on the confusion after the Battle of Bulls Run................................................SOLD

51604 - NONE OF MY MEN SHOWED ANY COWARDICE AT THE BATTLE OF BULLS RUN, Claremont, VA, August 2nd, 1861, 3 large pages in ink by Captain Clark Edwards [later Colonel of the 5th Maine], to his wife. He relates in part, "We were out of picket all of the company we could muster and stayed out in the rain, we are now quartered on land owned by a man in the Rebel army who ifs fighting against us, the politicians say our army are cowards, it is a hard thing to say about our Army that fought against double their number at Bulls Run and they [Rebels] lost twice as many men as we did, when our artillery gave out it was useless to fight with just  Springfield muskets. Some of my men who fell on the march came up home." And overtook us on the field of battle. I do not think any of my men showed any cowardice. Some of the ill men will soon be sent home. Edwards reviles at the thought of his men being classified as cowards by people back home, much more content........................................SOLD

51612 - THINKS THE NEWS OF JEFFERSON DAVIS' DEATH IS A HOAX, FRECH NURSES IN THE HOSPITAL, Camp Vernon, September 8th, 1861, sunday afternoon, 4 page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine Infantry. He relates i part, he has visited his friend in the hospital, everything that can be done has been done to make him comfortable, he is in one of the best hospitals with the best French nurses, was on fatigue duty yesterday with 150 men, may be a fight within a day or two, THINKS THE REPORTS OF THE DEATH OF DAVIS [JEFFERSON] IS A HOAX, much more on the health of the member of their company, have lost one man to illness, much more camp news." A good letter referring to the French nurses that came to the Washington hospitals after the Crimean War. Comes with a stamped cover addressed by Edwards to his wife, two items........................................................SOLD

51625 - MCCLELLAN AND FRANKLIN THINKS THE 5TH MAINE IS THE BEST IN THE BRIGADE, Camp Franklin, November 16th, 1861, 8 pages in ik to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards of the 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, has been very cold, just a scold as Maine, found ice in my bowl in my tent, describes the recent review where he says the 5th Maine stood out, it was a splendid sight, 20,000 troops, McClellan and Franklin said we were the best looking regiment, my company all wore white gloves and had their clothes and shoes brushed, mentions that a soldier long away from the company is not wanted in the 5th Maine anymore, General Slocum told him he could go home when they went into winter quarters, he will go home to recruit for two or three weeks, Jimmy, his servant, has just made up his bed on the floor. The letter comes with a stamped cover postmarked Washington addressed by Edwards to his wife............................................SOLD

51634 - REBEL ARTILLERY IS FIRING ON OUR VESSELS ON THE RIVER TRYING TO RUN THE BLOCKADE, Camp Franklin [VA], January 28th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards. He relates in part, it has been raining like the devil in torrents, am Field Officer of the day, many are sick, some in the hospital Jim [Jimmy his servant] is ill in the hospital, another man is so ill I do not think he will make it, some of the boys are playing cards, mentions his servants Jimmy and Sidney, mentions that the Sutler is still in camp but thinks they will go to a Penna. Regiment. I can hear the roar of the Rebel cannons on our boats that are running the blockade down the river, it sounded like thunder. Since I have returned I can hear the sound of the artillery, I am afraid some of our vessels will go to the bottom as I have never heard so much firing as I have tonight. All confusion in camp as the tattoo is beating. A good letter regarding the Rebel batteries on the Potomac near Leesburg firing on Union ships trying to run the blockade. Also a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp impaired, 2 items.........................SOLD

51636 - A LONELY SOLDIER DETAILS HIS NEED FOR HIS WIFE'S SEXUAL AFFECTION, HIS TENT MATE VISITS THE LADIES IN TOWN TO GRATIFY HIS NEEDS, March 24th, 1862, [Near Manassas & Centerville, VA], Monday Evening, 4 page letter in ink from Captain Clark S. Edwards to his wife. He relates in part, We will move soon probably down this river, he discusses camp news and states that the war news iS good. One officer has resigned and will be heading home to Maine. There is no sign of leaving there. I HOPE YOU WILL RECOLLECT THAT WEDNESDAY IS MY BIRTHDAY AND SEND ME A PRESENT, I KNOW WHAT I HOPE IT WILL BE BUT YOU CANNOT SEND IT VERY WELL UNLESS YOU COME YOURSELF YOU KNOW WHAT I MEAN. I THINK I COULD DO YOU A LITTLE TONIGHT AS I HAVE BEEN THINKING OF SOME OF OUR PAST TIMES. I HAVE A HARD ON ONE IN AWHILE WHEN I THINK OF YOU. JOHN WENT TO TOWN TO GET HIS HE WAS THERE LAST NIGHT JUST BACK AT DAYLIGHT THIS MORNING. A quite sexual explicit letter from Edwards telling his wife his need for her sexual attentions. Rare content, comes with a stamped postal cover addressed by Edwards to his wife postmarked Washington, 2 items....................SOLD

51644 - LIFE FOR A SOLDIER ON A STEAMER NEAR YORKTOWN, On board the Steamer John Brooks near Yorktown, VA, April 21st, 1862, 4 large pages to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, Went to see Bartlett our old Sutler to get some provisions but he had sold out. Went aboard a fine boat when the officers were eating breakfast and found the officers of the 27th NYV, saw General Slocum and his staff in a finely furnished room with carpets, sofas, etc. He describes his boat as a day steamer with no fine saloon. Went ashore to the Quartermaster and bought some grub for our mess. A cook that came aboard says that a Maine unit got cut up badly in a fight Saturday. A steamer is going up to Fortress Monroe with the wounded. We are five miles from Yorktown and two miles fro our picket. The fireman in the engine room made the boys pay 10 cents a quart to boil their coffee. I paid to cook in the mouth of a furnace. Will be in a battle soon but I will all right, much more. A very long and detailed letter about his time on the steamer at anchor near Yorktown, costs of food at the government quartermaster's office, the cost of cooking on the ship paying the engineer to use the heat from the furnaces............................................................. SOLD

51645 - WE ARE CAMPED ON THE LOWER DECK OF THE SHIP, MUCH ILLNESS BREEDING BELOW, On board the Steamer John Brooks, Sunday afternoon, April 27th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are still on this abominable boat with a thousand men and my company is in the lower deck, also horses, the band...some are getting sick, some carried ashore with illness, there are many cases of fever on the boat, we may attack Norfolk while Burnside attacks in the rear, some think we will cross over and attack Yorktown in the rear while our gunboats fire on the front. Mentions that his servant "Jimmy" is with him, very mad about the lack of mail, many more details about the ship and the terrible conditions that are breeding disease. Letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards missing the stamp...........................................SOLD

51646 - ORDNANCE IS PASSING DAILY ON TO YORKTOWN, On board the Steamer John Brooks, Near Yorktown, May 2nd, 1862, 7 large pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, He mentions about seeing the many pieces of ordnance that has passed there heading towards Yorktown, mentions that the hospital ship Webster has come from new York, hundreds of boats all around me, I can see smoke coming from Yorktown as one battery has been giving it to them today. The band is now playing on the other end of the deck. We will leave this ship in the morning for cam ashore, more on the band playing, his memories of sitting with her in Maine watching the lighting in the sky as he is doing now, much more. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards minus the stamp...................................... SOLD

51649 - WE ARE WITHIN 10 MILES OF RICHMOND, THE REBELS ARE AT THE BRIDGE, Camp of the 5th Maine, 4 miles west of White House, New Kent County, VA, May 10th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, We are again on the move, marched yesterday to this place from White House, had two days rations in our haversacks, we are within 10 miles of Richmond, marched seven miles yesterday over a bad road, we are less than 250 in the regiment many falling out along the road due to the heat, it is heart rendering to see that happen, They carry 50 pounds with overcoats, blankets, muskets, 40 rounds of ammunition, haversacks. I should not be surprised if we fight this afternoon for the Rebels are at the bridge near here. Have orders to move out with one day's rations and full canteens. The New York regiment is still out. I noticed that they took their stretches and ambulances to fetch in the dead and wounded. I shall write you gain when we get to Richmond. The letter comes with a stamped envelope addressed to his wife by Edwards. The Army of the Potomac pushed slowly up the Pamunkey, establishing supply bases at Eltham's Landing, Cumberland Landing, and White House Landing. White House, the plantation of W. H. F. "Rooney" Lee, son of General Robert E. Lee, became McClellan's base of operations. Using the Richmond and York River Railroad, McClellan could bring his heavy siege artillery to the outskirts of Richmond. He moved slowly and deliberately reacting to faulty intelligence that led him to believe the Confederates outnumbered him significantly. By the end of May, the army had built bridges across the Chickahominy and was facing Richmond, straddling the river, with one third of the Army south of the river, two thirds north. (This disposition, which made it difficult for one part of the army to reinforce the other quickly, would prove to be a significant problem in the upcoming Battle of Seven Pines). On May 18, McClellan reorganized the Army of the Potomac in the field and promoted two major generels to corps command: Fitz John Porter to the new V Corps and William B. Franklin to the VI Corps. The army had 105,000 men in position northeast of the city, outnumbering Johnston's 60,000, but faulty intelligence from the detective Allan Pinkerton on McClellan's staff caused the general to believe that he was outnumbered two to one. Numerous skirmishes between the lines of the armies occurred from May 23 to May 26. Tensions were high in the city, particularly following the earlier sounds of the naval gun battle at Drewry's Bluff....................................SOLD

51650 - MCCLELLAN HALTS HIS ADVANCE, REGROUPS HIS ARMY, Mechanicville, VA, Hanover County, June 5th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, Just got in from picket, the boys got drenched in the rain, the enemy is still occupying the hills on the other side of the Chickahominy River all in plain sight. Our pickets will often come close enough to converse with one another. He mentions his servant "Jimmy" having dinner ready upon their return - strawberries, hash beef steak, the water is so high we cannot move to fight, will have to wait until it lowers, a Sergeant has died in the hospital of typhoid fever and several other cases may prove fatal. I suspect when the boys get paid they will lose it gambling. I hear the booming cannons on our right at the present time but I do not think there will be a general engagement for two or three days as we are not ready to fight yet. I have heard that H. G. Thomas is to be appointed Colonel of the 16th Maine but I do not feel the Governor is fool enough to put him in that position. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed. Lee used the month-long pause in McClellan's advance to fortify the defenses of Richmond and extend them south to the James River at Chaffin's Bluff. On the south side of the James River, defensive lines were built south to a point below Petersburg. The total length of the new defensive line was about 30 miles (48 km). To buy time to complete the new defensive line and prepare for an offensive, Lee repeated the tactic of making a small number of troops seem larger than they really were. McClellan was also unnerved by Jeb Stuart's audacious (but otherwise militarily pointless) cavalry ride completely around the Union army (June 13-15). a great deal more of content, nice letter, 2 items............................SOLD

51651 - REPORTS ON THE LOSSES AT FAIR OAKS, In the woods near the Chickahominy, Hanover County, June 12th, 1862, six large pages by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine.  He relates in part, I have taken my camp stool and come out of the scorching sun, still waiting for a fight. Little Mac is getting ready; I see by the papers that our estimate of killed and wounded was correct and their loss was less than 10,000 killed and wounded. I think the Battle of Fair Oaks or Seven Pines was one of the hardest battles fought except at Corinth. I have $150 that I will send you. The Rebels are still firing away at us and our army annoys them little. The great blow will be struck soon. Much more on home news, other officers, a new regiment coming through Annapolis. Lee used the month-long pause in McClellan's advance to fortify the defenses of Richmond and extend them south to the James River at Chaffin's Bluff. On the south side of the James River, defensive lines were built south to a point below Petersburg. The total length of the new defensive line was about 30 miles (48 km). to buy time to complete the new defensive line and prepare for an offensive, Lee repeated the tactic of making a small number of troops seem larger than they really wee McClellan was also unnerved by Jeb Stuart's audacious (but otherwise militarily pointless) cavalry ride completely around the Union army (June 13-15). The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed. The long letter is somewhat light but quite readable................................................SOLD

51652 - THE CONFEDERATES HOLD MCCLELLAN AT BAY, On Picket, Nedow farm, near Mechanicsville, VA. Front of Richmond, June 17th, 1862, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards,5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, I am in command of the regiment today as the Colonel and Major are gone, have been busy today policing the pickets. Mentions the mansion of a Mr. Sidney, he is the strongest Sesesh I have seen since I left Alexandria, he is a man of about 60 years and has 13 children and from what I hear from the slaves he has five or six in the Rebel Army. His wife is the first white woman I have spoken to since I left Alexandria. He describes the fields surrounding the house, a field of wheat is uncut as the slaves have left him, and he supposes the cavalry horses will eat it. Wednesday morning, Jimmy, his servant, has brought him his breakfast. I suspect that the great fight will come today or tomorrow. The report came in that Fort Darling was taken, June 19th, was relieved, moved to this place, the bridge we crossed was built in five days, when we arrived here last night the cannons were roaring and the sound of small arms on our front. We saw that our trioops had driven back the Rebels and the field was clear. Thinks that a fight will come soon, the report that Fort Darling was taken was false. Despite claiming victory at Seven Pines, McClellan was shaken by the experience. He redeployed all of his army except for the V Corps south of the river, and although he continued to plan for a siege and the capture of Richmond, he lost the strategic initiative ad never regained it. Lee used the month-long pause in McClellan's advance to fortify the defenses of Richmond and extend them south to the James River at Chaffin's Bluff. On the south side of the James River, defensive lines were built south to a point below Petersburg. The total length of the new defensive line and prepare for an offensive, Lee repeated the tactic of making a small number of troops seem larger than they really were. McClellan was also unnerved by Jeb Stuart's audacious (but otherwise militarily pointless) cavalry ride completely around the Union army (June 13-15). The letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, much more content, 2 items...........................................SOLD

51653 - THE COLONEL IS WOUNDED AT THE BATTLE OF GAINES MILL, Sunday Morning, July 13th, 1862, in the field near Harrison's Landing, VA, 6 page letter in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, The Colonel is wounded slightly above the elbow by a piece of artillery shell, notes that a Lt. Sanborn was not wounded in the late fight, I expect soon for Jimmy to call me for dinner [his servant], mentions he wrote the Governor with a full report on the regiment. I told him I would not like to be promoted to serve under Jackson [Colonel] but would prefer being in a new regiment. If I should be promoted I should have to buy new clothes which may coat $300. I hope to see the stars and stripes fly over this country and hope this war will soon close soon, thousands of our best men will lay their bones in this state. On June 1, the Confederates under Smith renewed their assaults against the Federals, who had brought up more reinforcements and fought from strong positions, but made little headway. The fighting ended about 11:30 a.m. when the Confederates withdrew. McClellan arrived on the battlefield from his sick bed at about this time, but the Union Army did not counterattack both sides claimed victory with roughly equal casualties--Union casualties were 5,031 (790 killed, 3,594 wounded, 647 captured or missing), Confederate 6,134 (980 killed, 4,749 wounded, 405 captured or missing). McClellan's advance on Richmond was halted and the Army of Northern Virginia fell back into the Richmond defensive works. The battle was frequently remembered by the Union soldiers as the Battle of Fair Oaks Station because that is where they did their best fighting, whereas the Confederates, for the same reason, called it Seven Pines. Colonel Nathanial Jackson was the wounded Colonel mentioned in this letter wounded at Gaines Mill, June 27th, 1862. The letter comes with an envelope addressed to his wife by Edwards, stamp removed, 2 items.........................................SOLD

51654 - THE 7TH DAYS BATTLES, EDWARDS REFUTES THE REPORTS THAT THEY RETREATED FROM THE REBELS, CALLS THEIR COLONEL A COWARD, 5th Maine Camp in the field, near Harrison's Landing, VA, July 29th, 1862, four huge 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife by Captain Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, I am sitting on a Court Martial, there are 11 of us in all, the President is Lt. Cal Brown of NY City. He is a professional lawyer. The Advocate is Lt. Weed of General Slocum's Staff. He discusses reports from home that they had retreated again. We drove the enemy from every field in the six days fighting and at night fell back and took a new position and when the Rebels came on we drove them back in every fight. He mentions getting a promotion in another regiment; officers who resigned are getting their applications refused. I will not take a Major's commission under Jackson [Colonel] and I will not have anyone promoted over me. The Governor wrote me about a promotion in the 5th Maine but I wrote him back that I would not take one under him [Jackson]. I would like to write you a few lines about the Coward [Jackson]. Mentions a horse he is sending home. I will buy a saddle and if I get a position in one of the new regiments. He mentions his servant Jimmy who wants to go home with him. The band has been playing almost for the last time tonight. The second phase of the Peninsula Campaign took a negative turn for the Union when Lee launched fierce counterattacks just east of Richmond in the Seven Days Battles (June 25 - July 1, 1862). Although none of these battles were significant Confederate tactical victories (and the Battle of Malvern Hill on the last day was a significant Confederate defeat), the tenacity of Lee's attacks and the sudden appearance of Stonewall Jackson's "foot cavalry" on his western flank unnerved McClellan, who pulled his forces back to a base on the James River. Lincoln later ordered the army to return to the Washington, D.C., area to support Maj. Gen. John Pope's army in the Northern Virginia Campaign and the Second Battle of Bull Run. The Virginia Peninsula was relatively quiet until May 1864, when Maj. Gen. Benjamin Butler again invaded as part of the Bermuda Hundred Campaigns. Includes a postal cover addressed to his wife by Edwards with the stamp removed, 2 items...................... SOLD

51697 - I CANNOT DESCRIBE THE MUD AFTER THE SNOW AND RAIN, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., February 2nd, 1863, near White Oak Church, VA, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, Everything is uncertain about our move, we had a deep snow several days ago and now it rains very hard, Mud, there is nothing I can do to describe it, the boys however are in good spirits and I hope the regiment to be full again recruiting. He will send her $800-$1000, he tells his wife to tell Chas [their new sutler] not to come now as the roads from the landing to their camp are bad, much more on the affairs of the men in the regiment. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards with a DUE 6 marking. A very long letter with cover, two items..............................................SOLD

51706 - LT. COLONEL WILLETT IS UNDER ARREST BUT IT WILL AMOUNT TO NOTHING, Headquarters of the 5th Maine, Camp near White Oak Church, VA, March 27th, 1863, four large pages to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, He relates that everything was fine with the regiment when he returned from leave aside from some drinking, both horses are fine, one called HOOKER and one MAC [after McClellan]. His Colonel's commission has arrived and he is sending it home and wants it framed. He mentions that appointment of a new Surgeon, has not done anything about replacing the Major as General Bartlett has been away on leave. Lt. Colonel Willett is now under arrest for allowing his men to distribute old hay on the picket line but it will amount to nothing. His servant Jimmy is getting dinner and all is well in the camp................ SOLD

51709 - A FEMALE SOLDIER HAS A BABY WHILE ON PICKET AND HAD BEEN IN THE ARMY FOR OVER A YEAR, Sunday Afternoon in camp near White Oak Church, VA, April 12th, 1863, four very large 8" X 13" pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, He had tried to get the 5th Maine moved out of their present assignment but is finding it difficult as his source in Washington once tried for Colonel Beal of the 10th Maine to have that regiment moved and it did not happen. His source for help in Washington was Senator William Fessenden of Maine. He notes, somewhat out of character, about a certain lady named Mrs. Lindsey "thinks she is too young for her man". "I presume she does not get screwing enough, she is to be pitied."  THERE WAS A GIRL WHO WAS IN A REGIMENT NEARBY HAD A BABY WHILE ON PICKET. SHE HAD BEEN IN THE ARMY FOR OVER A YEAR AND WAS IN BOTH THE PENINSULAR AND MARYLAND CAMPAIGNS - BULLY FOR HER! He asks his wife if there is any more "screwing around in Bethel than usual." An extremely interesting letter by Colonel Edwards commenting about a Female soldier having a baby on picket duty. This commentary is extremely rare and we have never seen anything like it in letters over the years. The long letter does include some sexual comments. Letter comes with a stamped cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, two items..............................................................................SOLD

51718 - AS I WRITE I HEAR THE CANNONS BOOMING AT CULPEPPER, Headquarters of the 5th Maine Vol., Camp near New Baltimore, VA, September 13th, 1863, 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine. He relates in part, he mentions his wife's letter of the 6th describing the changing of the colors of the leaves in Maine, new recruits are coming in to fill the ranks, mentions a Captain Diering's discharge after being wounded at Salem Church, our regiment is growing less each day, lots of home news. He sent money home with the Chaplain. He is writing in his tent and can hear the cannons booming at Culpepper, we have received notice to move out at once if needed, I do not think there will be much of a fight as our army is not yet ready. He has sent two pictures home, one of him and another of General Bartlett's staff. The letter comes with a stamped envelope addressed to his wife from Edwards, two items..........................................SOLD

51750 - THE GOVERNOR WANTS OUR REGIMENT TO GO TO THE FRONT, Saturday, April 2nd, 1864, [camp at Welford Ford, VA], 4 large pages in ink to his wife by Colonel Clark S. Edwards, 5th Maine Vol. He relates in part, He is on court martial duty but no cases that day, we cannot break camp due to the very bad weather but when we do we will probably get into one or two fights before June. I received a letter from the Governor today and by the tone of his letter he wants the regiment to be kept up and at the front. He would like to command a brigade. He mentions a captured sword he had sent home that he wants mounted. This letter obviously was not well received in the regiment as the regiment's enlistment was up in June. The letter comes with a cover addressed to his wife by Edwards, 2 items.......................................SOLD

31710 - HOSPITAL CHAPLAIN'S PAY VOUCHER, CAMBERLAIN [COLUMBIAN] USA HOSPITAL, WASHINGTON, July 1864, 10" X 15" pre-printed and filled-in pay voucher for Chaplain Herman Eggers, for $115.17 for his pay as Chaplain at the US Army hospital in Washington [Columbian Hospital, on Meridian Hill west of 14th St.], fine......................SOLD

31712 - PAY VOUCHER, VOLUNTEER RESERVE CORPS, 23RD VRC, CAPTAIN ALLEN SHORTLEDGE, 15" X 10", pre-printed and filled-in, May 10th, 1864, voucher paying him and for his white servant for service in August, 1863, $117.90 was allotted to him. Shortledge has been in the First Delaware Infantry and entered the VRC in July 1863. Very good.........SOLD

1307 - ROMNEY [WEST VIRGINIA], REPAIRED A BRIDGE BURNED EARLIER BY THE REBELS, PASSED MANY PLANTATIONS FEW SLAVE MEN, JUST LITTLE ONES AND WENCHES, April 7th, 1862, 5 pages in ink on blue/red trimmed patriotic stationary with embossed Washington vignette, plus a Patriotic UNION with eagle patriotic cover [stamp removed], to his brother from Pvt. William Tittle 55 OVI. He relates in part..."We left Camp Schenck and marched to Springfield, we took only what we could carry and a great many things were thrown away. The citizens carried away everything we threw away. There are a good many slaves down here but few to what once was. We passed some very fine Nigger Plantations but we would see very few men, but plenty of little ones and wenches. Most of the fences were destroyed. Romney is located in a nice place and I suppose it looked well once but looks very bad now with few folks living here now. No stores or groceries or a tavern. The women talk Secesh generally and many dressed in black as a many died of typhoid fever. Went to a graveyard and saw new graves, two being of Georgia Volunteers. We are quartered in the court house and we have to stay to rebuild a bridge that was burned the first time we were at New Creek." An excellent letter describing Romney after Jackson's troops had evacuated that area and destroyed bridges and dwellings. Well written............................................SOLD

1308 - THE CAVALRY FETCHED IN 25 BUSHWACKERS, April 20th, 1862, 4 pages in ink on patriotic embossed stationary with red/blue trim from Camp Lee, VA by Pvt. William Tittle to his sister, with stamped envelope. He relates in part, "We had a very good time while we were at Romney, describes the courthouse as being ransacked, books torn up, goes into great detail about the rations they have gotten since they entered Virginia, traded green coffee for syrup, we have been detailed to build a ferry boat to cross the river, it was 50' long and 12' wide. We then left Romney and went to Moorfield. He describes several men swimming across the river; one with his boots on, George Nims got carried away and drowned. The cavalry fetched on about 25 bushwhackers Saturday afternoon. 19 had no uniform, and 22 of them had guns but they were squirrel rifles. They were however a hard looking set of men and I do not know what we will do with them."......................................SOLD

1309 - THE BATTLE OF MCDOWELL, VIRGINIA, Two actual letters written on May 13th, 1862 at Franklin, VA. 13 total pages, red/blue patriotic trimmed stationary with embossed vignette of Washington by Pvt. William Tuttle, 55th Ohio OVI to his sister with a stamped postmarked NEW CREEK STATION, VA. He writes in part..."we left Petersburg on May 2nd and crossed the river, quite difficult to cross, the 5th VA crossed in the morning, the 55th crossed in canoes and flatboats, the 82nd crossed the next day. Describes the horses drawing cannon floundering when crossing the river, finally arrived at Franklin after a 20 mile march from Petersburg. Reports came in of wagons being captured by bushwhackers about 8 miles distance and 300 men were sent out in a chase, one wagon guard was wounded in the arm. We proceeded to march about 11 miles when Schenck got a dispatch from Milroy that the Rebels were coming on him and he wanted help. We marched until half past ten and camped. We came 19 miles from Franklin and guarded the teams and knapsacks. Marched to McDowell that was 10 miles from Monterey. At 3 in the morning, we received word that the entire force was retreating back about daybreak. We began to move back and while stopping for dinner put pickets out. A short time later a lot of Rebel cavalry came upon them and killed some. It is supposed that the 55th lost 11 boys, one of the Company H pickets that got away did not know anything about the rest of the boys. The Rebel force was strong at MCDOWELL, JACKSON AND JOHNSTON ARE TOGETHER and some say their troops will number 20,000. The 55th was not in the fight at McDowell. The 2nd and 3rd VA, and the 25th, 32nd, 95th, and 20th....these seven is all and the 5th VA was into it also. The Rebels had been shooting our pickets but all is quiet now on the Potomac. We had loaded up everything and were on the way to Franklin but the enemy was coming on and they marched us back a short distance until the Rebels came into sight. We retreated back into town, and planted cannons all around with the intention of drawing the Rebels on but they did not stand and fight Rebels spies all over town. Whenever the Rebels would try and plant a battery our men would knock it to pieces, more on the Rebels near the town firing at Union positions and return fire by the Union artillery. Finally the Rebels retreated. General Fremont and Staff came into Franklin with him riding a white horse, much more by Tittle." Some historians consider the battle of McDowell the beginning of Jackson's 1862 Valley Campaign, while others prefer to include the First Battle of Kernstown, Stonewall's only defeat. The battle of McDowell is studied today by military historians for several reasons. At the tactical level, it can be argued that the Union forces achieved a draw. Milroy's "spoiling attack" surprised Jackson, seized the initiative and inflicted heavier casualties, but did not drive the Confederates from their position. At the strategic level, the battle of McDowell and the resultant withdrawal of the Union army was an important victory for the South. The battle demonstrated Jackson's strategy of concentrating his forces against a numerically inferior foe, while denying his enemies the chance to concentrate against him. Jackson rode the momentum of his strategic win at McDowell to victory at Front Royal (May 23) and First Winchester (May 24). Well written actually 2 letters...............................SOLD

1310 - THE MARCH AFTER JACKSON ENDING WITH THE BATTLE OF PORT REPUBLIC, June 15th, 1862, Mount Jackson, 4 page letter in bold pencil [RED/BLUE TRIMMED PATRIOTIC STATIONARY] with stamped postal cover to his brother by Pvt. William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part..."We left Franklin on May 25th and marched to Petersburg the 1st day, then we started for Moorsfield after wading a river, marched through rain. We left tents and knapsacks at Petersburg and have laid out every night since. Then we left for Winchester and marched through Wardensville. Sunday we camped on the Strasburg Road. We started towards Strasburg and marched a short distance when we heard the cannons roar ahead and the word was onward. Jackson had retreated in the night and we were six miles from Strasburg. We marched to Woodstock and camped there 8 miles from Winchester. Then we marched through Edenburg and Mt. Jackson and had to cross the river after Jackson had burned the bridge Wednesday the 4th [May]. I was detailed to help put up a pontoon bridge and we and the cavalry crossed. Much rain moved the river p and had to add planks to the pontoon bridge. We crossed at 3 o'clock 2 miles and camped at New Market which is 7 miles from Mt. Jackson. Friday we marched within a mile of Harrisonburg and camped. We had quite a fight on the 9th of May but I do not know the losses on both sides but a good many." The Battle of Port Republic was fought on June 9, 1862, in Rockingham County, Virginia, as part of Confederate Army Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's campaign through the Shenandoah Valley during the American Civil War. Port Republic was a fierce contest between two equally determined foes and was the most costly battle fought by Jackson's Army of the Valley during its campaign. Together, the battles of Cross Keys (fought the previous day) and Port Republic were the decisive victories in Jackson's Valley Campaign, forcing the Union armies to retreat and leaving Jackson free to reinforce Gen. Robert E. Lee for the Seven Days Battles outside Richmond, Virginia.............................................SOLD

1311 - JACKSON'S LATE VALLEY CAMPAIGN, THE DEATH OF TURNER ASHBY, ACTION NEAR HARRISONBURG, VA, BATTLE OF PORT REPUBLIC, Strasburg, VA, June 22nd, 1862, 4-8"X 13" pages in pencil with a stamped NEW YORK state patriotic cover, addressed to his brother by Pvt. William Tittle, 55th OVI. He writes in part..."describes the march to Harrisonburg, some of our cavalry went pot towards Port Republic and found out that JACKSON had left the pike. He went out 2 ½ miles down the road from Harrisonburg when they saw Rebel cavalry in the woods and our cavalry made a charge. When they got close enough two regiments of infantry concealed behind an elevation of the ground fired on our cavalry and killed some and took some prisoners and took the Colonel of the cavalry. I do not know how many the Rebels lost BUT THEY DID LOSE ASHBY HE WAS WOUNDED AN DIED THE SAME NIGHT, HE WAS COLONEL OF CAVALRY BUT A SHORT TIME AGO HE WAS PROMOTED TO BRIGADIER GENERAL AND IS THOUGHT TO HAVE BEEN SMARTER THAN JACKSON...but Jackson is sharper or he could not get around as he does...Milroy's brigade was sent out was sent out on the same road to see what could be found of the 55th...There were several wounded picked up, the scout was to take us only where the fight had been but he took us out 6 miles where the Rebels were in camp, we returned back to camp. Sunday morning the 8th and had a  brisk fight...the whole force went out and the fight lasted til 4 o'clock. Cannons and musket firing, the 55th had to support a battery. Several hurt and killed. The rebels had the advantage being in the woods. We drove them back and the loss on both sides was middling heavy. We marched back and then a Rebel battery opened up on us, two of our cannons silenced them. June 9th, Schenck's brigade was to take the front and center of the fight but when we moved forward we found that the Rebels had retreated to the river where Shields had a fight with them and killed a great many of them while they crossed the river but JACKSON was too much for him and burned the bridge. We went back to Harrisonburg and Shields went down the river and a report started JACKSON had gone after him. Thursday the 12th, we marched to Mt. Jackson. We were marching on the battlefield when we found 11 wounded in a wheat field that had been out all night and several dead, I saw two lying side by side along the road. Later we saw a dead Rebel lying in the wheat field; it was a hard sight, many dead horses laying around. The first day we were after JACKSON we marched through Strasburg, could not look at the side of the road when marching. The 55th had most of its men at Keys Crossing, 530 men. Took many prisoners on the way from Strasburg to Harrisonburg, most of them had given out for JACKSON left this valley a little sooner than he came into it. Jackson destroyed many bridges that will take time to repair. I came in from picket; there is lot of Rebels around here still but mostly cavalry. It is reported that Jackson is largely reinforced and will lie a fight soon." The Battle of Port Republic was fought on June 9, 1862, in Rockingham County, Virginia, as part of Confederate Army Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's campaign through the Shenandoah Valley during the American Civil War. Port Republic was a fierce contest between two equally determined foes and was the most costly battle fought by Jackson's Army of the Valley during its campaign. Together, the battles of Cross Keys (fought the previous day) and Port Republic were the decisive victories in Jackson's Valley Campaign, forcing the Union armies to retreat and leaving Jackson free to reinforce Gen. Robert E. Lee for the Seven Days Battles outside Richmond, Virginia. An exceptional letter............................................................SOLD

1312 - WE HAVE HEARD THAT JACKSON IS COMING TOWARDS US WITH A STRONG FORCE, VALLEY CAMPAIGN 1862, Camp on Cedar Creek, June 30th, 1862, 4 pages in ink with patriotic letter sheet UNION with a 55th OHV embossed stamped cover PM WINCHESTER, by Pvt. William Tittle, 55th Ohio Vol, to his brother. He relates in part..."I wrote from Strasburg with an account of our march and fight, mentions the men still standing after the fight, we see in most every part that JACKSON is coming on to us with a very large force but we are not scared much. Describes the fall of cannon balls among the men, "makes dirt fly in every direction," mentions a soldier who was captured at the Battle of Franklin and we have not see him since, mention officers of the 55th who have taken sick." A beautiful patriotic letter with a scarce regimental cover. Very fine.......................................................SOLD

1313 - FREMONT WAS WRONGED AT PORT REPUBLIC, OTHER GENERALS ALLOWED JACKSON TO ESCAPE, DESCRIBES THE DIVISION CHANNEL OF COMMAND BY GENERAL, Sperryville, VA, July 17th, 1862, 8 pages in ink with stamped cover to his sister by Pvt. William Tittle, 55th Ohio Infantry. He relates in part, "We have done some more marching when we left camp at Middletown Monday July 7th and marched within one mile of Front Royal which is a distance of 14 mile. It was close to the Shenandoah River where Banks had burned the bridge the time JACKSON WAS AFTER HIM. We marched through Front Royal to Milford. Then we marched 12 ½ miles to Luray which is the county seat of Page County. We then marched across the Blue Ridge to Sperryville. We seemed to be above the clouds and was on a ridge and it was very foggy. Our next move will be to Culpepper Court House which I think is 25 miles away and they say there are some Rebels there. There was some at Luray but they did not stand and fight. I suppose you have heard of the change that has taken place in this department. General Fremont was well thought of but he has enemies and the Port Republic affair showed plainly that something was wrong in this department for if Shields and Carroll had been at their bridge, Jackson could have not gotten away. Shields had only one brigade at the bridge. I have not seen General Pope but I have heard he is a good man and commander of the 25th Ohio which is our brigade. Colonel McClain is acting brigadier General in Schenck's place. Milroy had command of the 1st brigade and McClain the 2nd. Schenck is acting Major General. General Siegel has command of this division. He made a speech, then General Shurz, then Schenck, then Milroy, then McClain, then S.C. Lee. Siegel is a small man. All was quiet in camp except some firing of artillery. We have heard that Clay Hartey wrote home to his mother that he was in the hands of the Rebels after being captured at Franklin, much more mentioning specific men in his mess by name." A very descriptive letter describing his travels to Sperryville. Well written by Tittle. Very fine..................................................................SOLD

1314 - WE SENT OUT A FORAGE TRAIN TO SECURE CORN AND MET AN OLD REBEL WOMAN, Camp near Surryville, VA, July 30th, 1862, 4 pages in ink on patriotic stationary to his brother by Pvt. William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part, "We sent out a forage train about 20-25 wagons with members of the 93rd and 55th Ohio. The officers went out ahead to fins corn and oats. We went to a farm where there was corn. An old man came out and insisted that we leave his corn but he soon gave up. The old lady came out and she talked rebeldon rite a long and said that she had only been there about a year and she was poor. Well I don't know how poor she is as she had 200 acres and several slaves and a mill on the farm. She has a son in the Rebel army at Richmond who is a Lieutenant, and another son had died but he has two left. They left for Richmond ten days before we came according to the slaves. The old man wishes the war was over and he has a nice appearance but he is still a Rebel. We will soon leave this place as forage is scarce. Since Siegel has the command things are a little different. We have not heard much about Fremont since he left."  Tittle abruptly ends his letter. Red/blue patriotic stationary. Very fine..........................SOLD

1315 - THE BATTLE OF CEDAR MOUNTAIN AUGUST 9TH, 1862, Camp near the battlefield in the woods, 12 miles South of Culpepper, August 15th, 1862, 5+ pages in pencil with stamped cover by Pvt. William Tittle, 55th OVI to his brother. He relates in part, "We left Sperryville Friday night the 8th at nine o'clock for Culpepper a distance about 20 miles and marched within a mile of the courthouse. Banks' army passed through Sperryville on the 9th and went through Culpepper and commenced skirmishing with the Rebels near Slaughter Mountain. About noon the cannonading was brisk and last til about 6 when the infantry became general. It was General Ewell's force that Banks attacked then JACKSON came, what his force was I do not know, but Banks drove them back, they marched us through town about 4 miles and stopped. It was half past ten and we started for the fight, the cannonading had been terrible between 10-112 o'clock and the hardest of the fighting was a night. It was a very light night as we marched out and met a great many wounded coming back THEY TOLD US OUR MEN WERE BEING CUT TO PIECES. We moved up and lay in a field a little before daylight when we were awaken by the firing of the pickets close by. When they seen the Rebels forming in the line of battle one of Milroy's batteries opened up on them and threw some shells that made them scatter. We move back and commenced skirmishing the rest of the day. I saw one man shot in the calf of his leg. It was a spent ball and did not do much damage. Saturday night General Hill came with 18,000 men that revived the Rebels and we drew back. Some reports say we had to others that we tried to draw them. There was only half our men in the fight as they could not all get in position. When the fight was over the Rebels had position of the battle ground and held it. A good many dead and wounded lay on the field until Sunday and Monday afternoon. It rained for several days and it was hot which  was very bad for the wounded. Monday Milroy went with a flag of truce to see JACKSON to make arrangements for burying the dead. They agreed to work till half past two and both sides worked there together and they had to lengthen the time to 5 o'clock. It is said that General Ewell told our men half an hour before the time was up that they could work half an hour then leave on double quick or they would be taken prisoners. I think the Rebels lost the most. The men who were out there said they buried 580 men. It was a draw battle as neither side retreated after the battle but the Rebels have gone across the Rapidan River yesterday. Think the Rebels will make a stand near here. Most of the Rebels came from Richmond. Prisoners say they had between 60,000 and 70,000 men. I think we had 100,000. There were three bayonet charges during this battle on batteries, it was a awful sight, dead horses everywhere. King's Division arrived from Fredericksburg on the 11th."  The Battle of Cedar Mountain, also known as Slaughter's Mountain or Cedar Run, took place on August 9, 1862, in Culpepper County, Virginia, as part of the American Civil War. Union forces under Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks attacked Confederate forces under Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson near Cedar Mountain as the Confederates marched on Culpepper Court House to forestall a Union advance into central Virginia. After nearly being driven from the field in the early part of the battle, a Confederate counterattack broke the Union lines resulting in a Confederate victory. The battle was the first combat of the Campaign. JUST AN OUTSTANDING BATTLE LETTER.............................SOLD

1319 - CAMP NEAR CENTERVILLE, VA, OUR CHAPLAIN SPEAKS HIS MIND, October 22nd, 1862, 4 bold pages in ink, with patriotic cover red/blue LIBERTY TREE with flags by William Tittle of the 55th OVI to his sister...is concerned on his Mothers health, he hopes they shall all live to meet again, but if not they may meet together where there is no sin or war. Our Chaplain preaches to us each Sunday but we are not compelled to go but I feel it is best. We have gotten a fine Chaplain after the last one left. We have one who is not afraid to speak his mind as he goes about the boys talking about swearing and playing cards. We are still in our shelter tents yet General Sigel was here a few days ago and He said we would have our Sibley tents, knapsacks, and cooking utensils sent to us but they have not come yet, much on recruiting, officers in the regiment, many more details concerning the company, commands, excellent letter on Chaplains..............................................SOLD

1333 -BURNSIDE HAS BEEN RELIEVED, REPLACED BY HOOKER, Camp at Bell Plain, VA, January 28th, 1863, 2+ pages in ink with a fine patriotic cover THE FLAG OF OUR REGIMENT, written to his brother by William Tittle, Co. H, 55 OVI. He relates in part, "We heard last night that Burnside has been relieved and replaced by Hooker, it is also reported that Franklin and Sumner have resigned. What is going to take place now is unknown but I wait patiently for better news and I hope that the time will soon come for a change that will end this war, just and honorably for the north. We left the camp that we came to first, there was a general move intended when we left Stafford but account of bad roads all the troops were ordered back to their old camps. We left the camp and marched down the river half a mile and camped close to some timber. We went to work building a shanty and I think we will stay here awhile, rain and snow. Colonel Lee went home so there is none of Sigel's men except Lee's Brigade. I do not know whether Lee has his stars yet." [Colonel John C. Lee, Colonel of the 55th OVI later Brevet. Brig. General, distinguished at 2nd Bull Run.] Great Cover..............................................................SOLD

1334 - CAMP NEAR BROKS STATION, VA, 55TH OVI, 4 page letter in ink, February 23rd, 1863, with stamped postal cover. He writes to his Brother, William Tittle, Co. H, 55th OVI. He relates in part, "Am glad to get the Tiffin and Cincinnati papers as there was a great deal of reading in them, Monday the 16th General Hooker reviewed McLean's Brigade, he is a fine looking man. The weather has varied from rain to snow, ground is very soft, 6" of snow fell again and packed hard with the cold, mentions a friend named Joseph who spent several days with him, went on railroad guard yesterday at noon it was stormy and I did not want to go but it was so stormy I did not want to ask anyone to take my place, mentions sending personal effects back home and concerned if they arrived, one case of smallpox in the company, a soldier named Shafford."  Well written letter and stamped cover.............SOLD

1336 - A SOLDIER COMRADE DIES IN CAMP, GENERAL SIGEL RESIGNS, March 5th, 1863, 3 page letter in ink to his brother from Pvt. William Tittle, 55th Ohio OVI, Camp near Brooks Station, VA with stamped postal cover. He relates in part, "Wants his brother to get percipitate, safoclida, and brimstone, also a pair of size 9 boots "middling wide". He wants them double soled with heel held with round beaded nails. Wants them long as they have many streams to wade. Poor Shafford is done laboring as he died Tuesday morning the 3rd and was buried Wednesday morning. We have little War news, I am sorry to hear that Sigel is resigning for he is one of our best generals." Sigel was detested by Halleck and left the Corps but was reassigned to command the Dept. of West VA. where his lack of aggressivenes plagued him again. Well written, letter and cover...........................................SOLD

1337 - SIGEL IS RELIEVED OF HIS COMMAND AND HAS RECEIVED A COMMAND IN THE WEST, March 15th, 1863, Camp near Brooks Station, VA, 3 pages in ink to his sister by William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part, "Mentions Clark Kline is still in the Division hospital with some kind of fever, our Lt. Colonel has resigned and has gone home, it was reported that Sigel has resigned but the word is now he asked to believed of his command and it was granted and now has a command in the West, there has been two cases in the regiment of Smallpox and they both died, I think there is some [smallpox] all through the army, gives details on the boots he need from home." Sigel was detested by Halleck and left the Corps but was reassigned to command the Dept. of West VA where his lack of aggressiveness plagued him again. Well written.............................................SOLD

1338 - GENERAL HOOKER IS NOW OUR MAN, March 16th, 1863, 4 pages in ink by William Tittle, 55th OVI, Camp near Brooks Station, VA. He relates to a friend in part, "This is a terrible war for both the North and South, how long it will last the Lord only knows, it has caused a great many lives to be lost and I hope it serves a warning to the living to mend their ways. The war will ruin many as the enticements to sin in the Army are many. We are surrounded by men of all grades but very few religious men in the 55th, we have seen some good and bad times, but my motto is continue the war till every rebel submits to the laws of the Constitution, the traitors in the North is doing the Union cause a great deal of harm, I am for freedom but I don't approve letting some of our Northern editors publish such pieces that I have read as it causes dissatisfaction among the soldiers. The army of the Potomac is in good condition with plenty to eat, so many changes in commanders do not suit all, and General Hooker is our man now, lists changes within the 55th officers." Good newsy letter about the Copperheads in the North and the change of command with Hooker leading the Army of the Potomac.....................................................SOLD

1339 - A FATHER OF A DEAD SOLIDER COMES TO CAMP TO PAY HIS SON'S DEBTS, CHANGES IN COMMAND OF THE 55TH OVI, Sunday March 22nd, 1863, Camp near Brooks Station, VA, 4 pages in ink from William Tittle 55th OVI to his brother. He relates in part, "He would rather have the war end honorably than go home early, Captain Stevens will be promoted to Major as our Lt. Colonel resigned and went home, the Captain of Company F was wounded at Bull Run and resigned lately, Captain Shipman and Bennett have aslo resigned, Mr. Shafford [whose son had recently died] came to the regiment last Friday and stayed until yesterday. He feels bad and paid all of his son's debts which were $20"......................................................SOLD

1340 - A GENERAL MOVE WILL SOON TO COME, Camp near Brooks Station, VA, March 29th, 1863, 3 pages in ink with a stamped postal cover to his brother by William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part, I was on provost Guard duty at McLean's Headquarters, an officer just resigned and several other discharged, Lt. Ragan [who was discharged] had a bad ankle, he was a good officer. James Tittle is in the 153rd PA and is camped only 3 miles from us and it was them who relieved us at the railroad for guard duty. The roads are terrible, the woods are all gone as the timber has disappeared, when the roads get better I suppose that there will be a general move made and I think that the Rebels will get a good chase."  Letter and stamped cover..................................................SOLD

1341 - CARL SCHURZ HAS TAKEN COMMAND OF SIGEL'S OLD CORPS, Camp near Brooks Station, VA, April 8th, 1863, 3+ pages in ink with a stamped postal cover to his brother by William Tittle 55th OVI. He relates in part, "My boots finally came and I am well pleased with them they are large a plenty. They are better than I could get here for $12. Carl Schurz has command of Sigel's old corps and he past an order that every man must have an extra pair of shoes in his knapsack, it does not make a difference how good a pair of boots we have, I got out of drawing some government shoes as I had a pair of boots I got at Chantilly and I got them half soled and nailed for 85 cents. O. O. Howard was in command of the 11th Corps and he was here last evening, he lost his right arm but is a fine looking man but small.".................................................SOLD

1346 - CHANCELLORSVILLE, THE DEAD AND WOUNDED, JACKSON IS DEAD, HOWARD BLAMES HIS MEN FOR THE DEFEAT, Camp near Brooks Station, VA, May 24th, 1863, 4 pages in ink with a stamped postal cover by William Tittle, 55th OVI to his brother. He related in part, "A good many have died since they were brought to the hospital. George Runner was wounded in the small of his back and he died the morning of the 19th. He is the only one who has died in Company H. Major Stevens is well for what he has suffered and is getting along as well as can be expected. There were two known killed in Company H, Edward Hinckey and Samuel Hoolman were both killed dead. George Ragan, W. W. Gittinger, E. W. Barker, Jacob France were all wounded and got off the field. Corporal Eri Mernard and Corporal C. S. Morse, Isaac Livinbarger, Charles Dudrow, and Corporal Dejeans has lost one leg, these five were taken prisoners and paroled. Others nothing has been heard about. James Linn was taken to Richmond and paroled. The last account was that he was at Annapolis. That is all that I can think of as being wounded. I suppose it is true that STONEWALL JACKSON IS DEAD, HE WAS A VERY SUCCESSFUL MAN FOR THE CONFEDERACY, We have encouraging news from the west that Grant has had good luck and will soon take Vicksburg. A great deal depends upon Grant and Rosecrans. General McLean has left to serve with Rosecrans. Most of the officers in the 25th, 55th, and 75th Ohio regiments signed a petition to get out of the 11th Corps. There are so many Germans regiments in it and the officers are most all the time drunk. General Howard has cleared himself and put the blame on all the men that could not help. I do not think Howard is a man who drinks too much but I know that he was OUT GENERALED and why he did not acknowledge it like a man but to call the 11th Corps cowards. When Sigel had command the 11th Corps was one of the best in the Army of the Potomac. I do not care that Howard makes a few believe we are all cowards but there will be a future day that they who do evil will have to answer for such things and I am satisfied that I have done my duty. Monday morning, General Howard has gotten a dispatch that Grant has taken Vicksburg with 20,000 prisoner." A great letter describing all the blame Union Generals put on othr after the Chancellorsville debacle. Significant contributors to the impending Union disaster were the nature of the Union XI Corps and the incompetent performance of its commander, Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard. Howard failed to make any provision for defending against a surprise attack, even though Hooker had ordered him to do so. The Union right flank was not anchored on any natural obstacle, and the only defenses against a flank attack consisted of two cannons pointing out into the Wilderness. Also, the XI Corps was an organization with poor morale. An excellent post-Chancellorsville letter.......................................SOLD

1347 - THE REBELS ARE TRYING TO DRIVE FIGHTING JOE OUT OF HERE, Camp near Brooks Station, VA, June 1st, 1863, 4 pages in ink to his sister from William Tittle, 55th OVI with stamped postal cover. He relates in part, "We are now in the 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division of the 11th Corps, General Stineware [Von Steinwehr] commands the division and Colonel Smith of the 73rd Ohio commands the brigade. Our brigade is composed of the 11th Rgt., 33rd Mass., 136rd NY, 73rd and 55th Ohio. The 33rd is a large regiment, they lost but a few men in the late fight, this brigade did not lose many men. We have about 250 men ready for duty, it is a small regiment now compared to what it was. It is a serious thing to go into a fight to see men falling on all sides and to not know what moment would be your last or get mortally wounded and to be left to die without anyone to close their eyes. We are in a camp we have built with logs and shelter tents, we go on duty every other day fortifying here very fast as there is a prospect of the Rebels trying to drive Fighting Jo out of this but I think they will have a time before they drive Hooker out of here but they might come between us and Washington and give us some bother. Vicksburg is not ours yet. Went to see Colonel Stevens in the hospital and he has got his Lt. Colonel's commission. I have seen his wounds dressed and look well. The other boys who were wounded are doing middling well. Isaac Livingbarger is the worst now but they think his leg can be saved but I am afraid if he loses his leg he will lose his life.".............................................SOLD

1348 - THERE WAS HEAVY CANNONADING AT FREDERICKSBURG, Camp near Brooks Station, VA, June 9th, 1863, 4 page letter in ink by William Tittle 55th OVI to his brother with the stamped cover. He relates in part, "Colonel Stevens is gaining very slowly and his symptoms is very good [had been wounded by three bullets at Chancellorsville and promoted to Colonel while in the hospital], the rest of the wounded in Company H is doing very well, I believe in taking advantage of the Rebels every way we can and every slave we capture wears them out, I am glad to hear this war is not a fight for the niggers and more as it was 6 months ago, glad some of the church burners back home are being arrested as I think hanging is not any more than they deserve, I hope they will get severely punished for their treasonable work [Copperheads in the North], disabled soldiers are selling newspapers in the camps, last Friday there was heavy cannonading at Fredericksburg it commenced about 6 o'clock and lasted until dark, it was heavy while it lasted and since then we have been under marching orders to go out at the sound of the bugle. It is been reported that some of our men are across the river. They were cannonading Saturday morning and this morning they were cannonading in the same direction but we think they are trying to get up around towards Washington. The siege at Vicksburg is going slow. We have not any of our old Captains left except Captain Powers and he was wounded. It is reported that Jo Brown will be dismissed from the service for cowardice. Have another likeness and will send to Mother but I look black, I look blacker than I did when I left Ohio for sure." Lee had left Fredericksburg for Culpepper Court house leaving Hill at Fredericksburg confusing Hooker as to Lee's intention. Letter and postal cover............................................SOLD

1353 - LEE'S RETREAT FROM GETTYSBURG, OUR CAVALRY HAS BEEN DRIVING THEM ALL DAY, July 27th, 1863, Camp at Warrenton Junction, 5 pages in pen with stamped cover to his brother by William Tittle, 55th Ohio Infantry. He relates in part, We marched drown from the mountain and camped 1 miles south of Boonsboro the 10th at 10 o'clock and marched through Boonsboro. We then marched to Beaverton and the day was very warm and our cavalry had been driving them all day. Sunday the 12th, we marched to Fundstown and formed a line of battle one mile south of Hagerstown with our line running north and south. The Rebels showed a bold front that evening and there was some skirmishing to our left. We had a hard rain that evening and carried rails and threw up rifle pits and we got little sleep that night the 13th. There was some skirmishing in a long line the morning of the 14th. We then marched through Hagerstown and camped within a mile of Williamsport for the night. Williamsport is 9 miles from Hagerstown and is closest to the Rebels. On the 15th we marched back threw Hagerstown and crossed the mountain and marched through Myersville and camped one mile from Middleton. On the 16th we marched through Jefferson and marched to the Harpers ferry Pike. Then we camped near Berlin, I saw Samuel Martin in Hagerstown as the 123rd was there. Poppleton was wounded and taken prisoner at Winchester. David Thomlin has been missing since Sunday the 19th. At 6 p.m. we marched to Berlin and crossed the river into Virginia as they had two pontoons at that place. The first town we came to after crossing into Virginia was Lovettsville. They were all for the Union there. Next was Waterford and they gave three cheers for the brave army of the Potomac and the good old flag. Then we went to Goose Creek, then to Warrenton. We passed through Middleburg then to White Plain, and then to Warrenton Junction, passed through Greenwich then Catletts Station...at present our regiment is don to 300 men." Many more details of the march through Maryland and into Virginia on the pursuit of Lee...........................................SOLD

1358 - OUR AMBULANCE DRIVERS CAPTURED BY THE REBELS, THEY ONLY HAD REVOLVERS TO DEFEND THEMSELVES, CANNONADING HEAVY TODAY TOWARDS THE RAPPAHANNOCH, Camp at Bristol Station, VA, September 13th, 1863, 4 pages in pencil with a stamped postal cover to his brother by Corporal William Tittle, 55th Ohio Vol. He relates in part, "We are here guarding the railroad, I sent out a squad Thursday and had orders to take all the government property that we found and we happened to stop t a large house. There was an old man met us in the yard and invited us into his parlor. He conversed with us and asked us if there were many Presbyterians in Ohio. He had been a preacher for 40 years. He is for the South and thinks them right but was against secession but when the state went out he went along with the state. He thinks is large enough for tow Presidents. He called in his daughters to pay music for us. He has two sons in the Rebel army; his wife is a cousin of General Robert E. Lee. General Ewell lived close to this man but his house is deserted and is wrecked. Wilson Oliver Melray was taken prisoner yesterday. He had been driving an ambulance and yesterday him and 4 others went out to Brentsville and Oliver and two others were taken prisoner. They were on horseback and had nothing but revolvers to defend themselves. Yesterday evening we expected a cavalry raid through here but it did not come. There has been cannonading towards the Rappahannock every day for the past 5 days but it has been the heaviest and the most today." Excellent content, includes stamped cover.......................................................SOLD

1359 - A SOLDIER REDUCED IN RANK FOR HIS COWARDNESS AT GETTYSBURG, Camp at Bristoe Station, VA, September 20th, 1863, 4 pages in ink with a stamped postal cover by Sergt. William Tittle, 55th Ohio Regiment to his sister. He relates in part, "There has been fighting in this department lately, we have possession of Culpepper, and the cars are running to that place now, there has been a good many soldiers went past on the cars to the front since we camped near the western troops that was at New York, a lot of them marched past last week, the 7th and 8th NY passed and several other Ohio Regiments. Joshua Lemerd was with the regiment, he was back sick. He was the Orderly Sergeant but has been reduced to the ranks since the GETTYSBURG FIGHT FOR COWARDNESS. That is what the boys told us and how true it is I don't know. There is one brigade of the 6th Corps passing now. They have been to New York and all say the draft went well. Good news from the front as reports is we have taken Goldensville. I was on railroad guard for three days and got relieved Thursday at noon. Yesterday I was on guard at Brigade headquarters. have just been promoted to Sergeant dated the first of August. The soldiers are anxious about the elections ]at home in Ohio\. They are down on the Copperheads. Never would do to elect such as man as Vallingham in Ohio." Letter and postal cover...............................SOLD

1361 - THE 55TH OHIO IS TRANSFERRED FROM THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, AMMUNITION EXPLOSION KILLED MANY, GREAT ACCOUNT ON 1100 TRAIN TRIP SOUTH TO ALABAMA, September 30th, 1863, Camp at Bridgeport, Alabama, 8 pages in pencil with stamped to his brother from Sergeant William Tittle, 55th Ohio Volunteers. He relates in part, "I suppose you have heard the 11th Corps has left the Army of the Potomac on September 24th. We got orders to march to Manassas Junction, ran through Washington and run all night to Harpers Ferry, then to Martinsburg. We left and passed through Cumberland. We had a good look at the Capital when we passed. Moved to Bell Air on the Ohio River and crossed on pontoons and changed cars for the first time then to Columbus and then to Dayton. Finally Indianapolis, changed cars and headed to Louisville after crossing the Ohio by boat. Finally arrived at Nashville. We camped close to the Tennessee River, the railroad bridge had been burned and now 26 miles form Chattanooga by railroad but it is a 40 mile march. Today a large pile of ammunition exploded when they were loading some shells on a wagon an let a box fall. It exploded about 40 rods from our camp, don' t know how many killed or hurt, the explosions lasted about an hour with several shells exploding at a time. Heard one man was thrown 2 rods but was not hurt much...October 1st, we have had a long train ride 1168 miles from Manassas to Bridgeport, describes the countryside in the Northern and the Southern states seen during the long ride...mentions that the 119th Ohio was cut up pretty bad and Kendel Dunkin was killed along with James Gibons...heard that 9 were killed yesterday in the explosion and 30 to 40 tons of ammunition lost in the pile." This letter goes on and on about the long trip South, many, many more details...........................................SOLD

1365 - HAVE JUST BUILT WINTER CAMP, LOOKOUT VALLEY, January 1st, 1864, Camp in Lookout Valley, TN, 2 pages in ink with a postal stamped cover to his brother by Sergt. William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part, "Am surprised that his brother has received only two letters since his arrival in Alabama. We have had a long and middling march since our arrival here. We got back to camp on the 17th and on the 25th moved camp about a half a mile. We have camped in a good place and have built good winter quarters. Had a lot of rain, some snow and the weather is quite cold. There is a good deal of excitement about enlisting in the Veterans Corps as the old 55th has nearly re-enlisted to serve three years during the war from this time." Letter and postal cover...................................SOLD

1366 - RE-ENLISTED BUT THE SURGEON DID NOT PASS ME, January 8th, 1864, Camp in Lookout Valley, TN, 3 pages in ink with a stamped cover to his brother by Sergt. William Tittle, 55th OVI. He relates in part, "We have lived to see 1864 and the war is not ended but I hope the time will soon come when this terrible war is over, the Veterans business has mad a change but the time is past for the big bounty. The 72nd Ohio started home last Monday and the 55th Ohio is to start at 9 or 10 all that is wanting is transportation. The 5th has nearly all re-enlisted they were mustered in from January 4th for three years. I re-enlisted but the Surgeon did not pass me as they were middling particular. It surprised the boys to hear that he did not think I was fit for duty. I am to be put into the Invalid Corps as a good many are going into it. Clarence Linn is to be discharged due to his eyes. My complaint is that it difficult for me to carry a knapsack on account of my left shoulder." Letter and stamped postal cover......................................................SOLD

1367 - HOOKER IS BACK, WE WERE TRANSFERRED TO THE 136TH NY, WE ARE DISSATISFIED WITH THE MOVE AND WROTE THE GOVERNOR OF OHIO, Camp in Lookout Valley, TN, January 25th, 1864, three page letter in ink with stamped postal cover to his brother by Sergt. William Tittle now of the 136th NYV. He relates in part, 
"We have been transferred to the 136th NY. We have our cabins built. The oys don't like it that we were transferred to a NY regiment and have sent a petition to the Governor of Ohio to have us transferred to an Ohio Regiment and all the boys signed it. We can't get credit for ourselves or our state in a NY regiment. They put us here and read an order that all the new commissioned officers must be reduced to ranks. These New Yorkers must be watched. When I am reduced in rank I want to know what it is for. Several of our Generals went home. Hooker is back I think Howard started last Thursday. Hooker commands the 11th and 12th Corps and General Steinwehr commands the 2nd Division. Colonel O. Smith commands the 2nd Brigade but now General Steinwehr is home sick and Colonel Bushbeck commands the division. Colonel Smith went home with the 73rd Ohio and Colonel Wood of Co. F, 136th NY commands the 2nd Brigade."................................................
SOLD

1369 - THEY MAY GET TO REJOIN THE 55TH OHIO, Camp in Lookout Valley, TN, February 18th, 1864, 3 pages in pen with a stamped cover to his sister by William Tittle of the 136th NYV. He relates in part, "We had sent a petition to the Governor of Ohio to have us all transferred to one of own state regiments, the reply was that the state did not have the power but Washington could and the state requested Washington put the men back in their own regiments, think that the 55th will reassemble in Cleveland. Expect to go out on picket, James Adams was taken prisoner at Gettysburg and we have seen his regiment here and they reported Jim was back sick after being released. Colonel James W. Stevens was dismissed from the service for failing to appear. I suppose he should have appeared at Washington before he went to the regiment." Letter and cover stamped................................... SOLD

 

1370 - THEY HAD A FIGHT AT RINGGOLD LAST WEE, MANY PRISONERS TAKEN, February 29th, 1864, 3 pages in ink with stamped cover, Camp in Lookout Valley, TN, William Tittle of the 136th NY relates to his brother in part, "I got a pass and went on Lookout Mountain, we are camped about 1 ½ miles from the foot of it. I wanted to see the top of the mountain where the Rebels had lots of fun shooting at us poor Yankees. They were in perfect safety at that top. He describes the jutting stone ledge on the side of the mountain. A person can see everything for a long way around. It is a place that travelers will stop and see for years to come. Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge will long be remembered by citizens and soldiers...most of the dead have been taken up and buried in the cemetery. They had a fight at Ringgold last week and they have fetched a good number of prisoners. Most all the troops have left Chattanooga and moved farther towards the front. The 73rd Ohio is due back soon and we expect the 55th won't be long behind them. When the 55th returns I will try and get back into Company H, some of the boys have the mumps, more.".........................................................SOLD

1383 - WE ARE CROSSING THE CHATTAHOOCHEE RIVER, ATLANTA CAMPAIGN, Camp near the Chattahoochee River, July 17th, 1864, 2 pages in ink with a stamped postal cover to his sister, William Tittle, 55th Ohio Vol. He relates in part to her, "he has received the bible his mother had sent, I think the giver of all gifts for sparing my life. I can see a little better at night but am not sure as there is moonlight now. Albian Lee has not been well for a few days he is still in the company but not fir for duty. Please send me a few stamps as I am about out and I can't get any here. We have orders to march at a moment's notice I expect we will cross the river as there are already 2 or 3 Corps over now." Jefferson Davis that day had relieved Johnston of command and pit John B. Hood in command to stem the Union advance on Atlanta. Several days later Tittle and the 55th Ohio were involved in the Battle of Peachtree Creek..................................................SOLD

1389 - ATLANTA IS OURS, JOHN HUNT MORGAN IS DEAD, A GRAPHIC DESCRIPTION OF CAPTURED ATLANTA, Camp at Atlanta, GA, September 12th, 1864, 4 page letter in ink with stamped cover by William Tittle, 55th OVI to his sister, "We have reason to believe that JOHN HUNT MORGAN IS KILLED AT LAST, at last Sherman's last move was a good one for the Rebels had Atlanta and they got badly whipped. The news is that the campaign is ended for awhile and I hope it is for we have had 4 months of a campaign. We left the valley the 2nd of May and got in Atlanta the 2nd of September. It was a detachment sent out of the 3rd Division 20th Corps that was the first in town and on the 11th the rest of the Corps moved up and at the present time we are camped southeast of town between the Augusta and Macon railroad 1 mile from town and behind the Rebel works this side of town. It was not very fortified but the northwest side was and it would have been impossible to take by storm. There have been about 20,000 inhabitant in this place before the war; parts of town are badly damaged by our shells. The Rebels burned four trains of cars and a good deal of ammunition. You will see by the papers how they destroyed things. When we came into town there were a lot of citizens but they have been given orders to move north or south. I think it is a good order. Atlanta had been a nice place to live, lots of shade trees in the streets. My eyesight has improved; it came back all of a sudden. I could not see at night sometimes. Corporal Dennis Spurrier got wounded the 17th of August and died the 3rd of September at Chattanooga. Our company had 41 guns when we left the Valley and we were down to 14 but now they had 3 that came back." He refers to active men in his Company H that were healthy for service at the end of the campaign. Sherman settled into a siege of Atlanta, shelling the city and sending raids west and south of the city to cut off the supply lines from Macon, GA. Both of Sherman's Cavalry raids were defeated by superior southern horsemen. Following the failure to break the Confederates' hold on the city, Sherman began to employ a new strategy. He swung his entire army in a broad flanking maneuver to the west. Finally, on August 31 at Jonesborough, Georgia, Sherman's army captured the railroad track from Macon, pushing the Confederates to Lovejoy's Station. With his supply lines fully served, Hood pulled his troops out of Atlanta the next day, September 1, destroying supply depots as he left to prevent them from falling into Union hands. He also set fire to eighty-one loaded ammunition cars, which led to a conflagration watched by hundreds. On September 2, Major James Calhoun, along with a committee of Union-learning citizens including William Markham, Jonathan Norcross, and Edward Rawson, met a captain on the staff of Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum and surrendered the city, asking for "protection to non-combatants and private property." Sherman, who was in Jonesborough at the time of surrender, [15] sent a telegram to Washington on September 3 reading, "Atlanta is ours, and fairly won." He then established his headquarters there on September 7, where he stayed for over two months before Sherman ordered the evacuation of all citizens. On November 14, Sherman's army burned all but about 400 buildings, including homes and businesses; estimates of the number of buildings destroyed range from 3,200 to 5,000. The next day, the army departed east toward Savannah on what became known as Sherman's March to the Sea................................................................SOLD

 

1390 - UNCLE ABE IS THE MAN THAT EVERY TRUE UNION MAN WILL SUPPORT, Camp at Atlanta, GA, September 22nd, 1864, 3 pages in ink with a stamped postal cover marked Chattanooga, TN to his brother by William Tittle, Company H, 55th Ohio. He relates in part, "We have had a hard summer, we have a very nice camp here. A good many men are coming back to the regiment that were sick and had slight wounds. Albion Lee is still at the division hospital but is up and around. Hal Chamberlain is back to the company doing duty, Corwin Sity who got hurt jumping off the cars [train] is getting better now. GEORGE MCCLELLAN IS THE DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE FOR PRESIDENT AND SOME THINK HE IS THE MAN FOR PEACE BUT I CAN'T SEE IT THAT WAY. WE HAVE A FEW MCCLELLAN MEN IN THE REGIMENT BUT I DO NOT THINK ANYMORE OF THEM THAN I DO THE COPPERHEADS, ONE IS NO BETTER THAN THE OTHER. IN MY OPINION UNCLE ABE IS THE MAN THAT EVERY TRUE UNION MAN WILL SUPPORT AS HE IS THE MAN TO GUIDE THE SHIP OF STATE." The 55th remains in camp near Atlanta and Tittle's thoughts concerning the upcoming Presidential election are reflected in this letter........................................................SOLD

 

1392 - WE HAVE BUT A FEW MCCLELLAN MEN IN THE 55TH, UNCLE ABE MUST BE THE NEXT PRESIDENT OR ALL OUR WORK IS LOST, Atlanta, GA. November 5th, 1864, 3 pages in ink with a stamped cover to his brother by William Tittle Co. H., 55th Ohio camped near Atlanta. He relates in part, "I am glad to say we have but few McClellan men in the 55th. For my part I think men who vote for McClellan are a little blind. I am glad to hear that the Union men carried the day in the state election. In the different states it is time to do the work, Uncle Abe must be the next President or our works is all lost. This war can't end with peace until the Rebels give up. I want peace as bad as anybody else but I want a peace that will last. Mentions that he will draw some boots, feels greenbacks are as good as gold. Most of the sick and wounded have been sent back to the rear. Mentions several soldiers in his company who have been sent back." Good commentary on the close at hand 1864 Presidential election between Lincoln and McClellan..................................SOLD

 

1393 - THE REBELS ATTACK, SEVERAL KILLED AND WOUNDED, LINCOLN WINS BY A LANDSLIDE, REBELS ADVANCE ON THE DECATUR ROAD SHEELING US, Camp near Atlanta, GA, November 11th, 1864, 3 pages in ink with a stamped postal cover to his brother by William Tittle, Company H, 55th Ohio. He relates in part, "On the 5th we left camp and camped and the next morning at daylight the Rebel cavalry drove in the pickets in the 2nd brigade, 2nd Division. They killed 1 of the 23rd Indiana and wounded 1. The Rebels soon left. That evening we marched back to the old camp and got 198 recruit for the 55th. There are a good many of them are substitutes and they are mostly good sized men. THE 8TH WAS ELECTION DAY AND ALL QUIET LINCOLN GOT 402 AND MCCLELLAN GOT 64. THERE WERE ONLY 8 OR 9 OLD THE OLD MEN VOTED FOR MCCLELLAN BUT SOME OF THE NEW MEN IS THE DISPECT KIND OF MCCLELLAN MEN BUT THAT IS ALL THEY KNOW. It is reported the UNCLE ABE has gotten every state which is good news for all Union men. I had no fears that he would gain the day. The morning of the 9th the Rebels advanced on the Decatur road with cavalry and artillery and threw a few shells towards town. Then they moved towards the Macon Road and made an attack and then moved towards the river. I do not think they did much damage. WE ARE TO START ON A LONG CAMPAIGN IN A DAY OR TWO, HAVE CLOTHING TO LAST TWO MONTHS AND WE ARE TO SUNSIST ON THE COUNTRY. WE ARE GOING SOMEWHERE ON THE COAST SOME THINK SAVANNAH WHICH IS ABOUT 500 MILES FROM HERE. It is reported that this is the last mail to go out of here." On November 14, Sherman's army burned all but about 400 buildings, including homes and businesses; estimates of the number of buildings destroyed range from 3,200 to 5,000. The next day, the army departed east toward Savannah on what became known as Sherman's March to the Sea. An excellent letter regarding the last attacks of the Rebels near Atlanta, the election results for President, and the final preparations for the "March to the Sea"...........................SOLD

1300 - I WAS IN FIVE BATTLE WITH LITTLE GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN LAST SUMMER, May 7th, 1863, Fort Richardson, VA. 5+ pages in ink with stamped cover, Sergt. Edgar Bennett, Co. K, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. "We are in so much danger we do not know what minute we will get shot. We have been so hardened we do not think or fear the bullet. I habe had many close to my ears when many of my comrades fell last summer. I was in five battles on the Peninsula with little George B. McClellan but I hope I never be on another for it is a dreadful thing to view - the battlefield. There are so many killed or wounded...SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag..................................SOLD

12269 - 1ST CONNECTICUT HEAVY ARTILLERY, BURYING THE DEAD AFTER HANOVER COURT HOUSE, COMES WITH SILK FRAGMENTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG, 4 page letter written in red ink to his fiancée by Sergt. Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. Fort Richardson, VA, June 14th, 1863 with stamped cover. He relates in part..."There is no respect for the Sabbath here. There has been more killed than we will ever know of what has become of our armies. They have all not been discharged nor in our hospitals, on no are they in the cold ground of Virginia. Mary, I will tell you of what I have seen myself, at the Battle of Hanover Court House. It came out in the papers that there were about 100 killed and wounded but no so. I was detailed to bury the dead. 4 regiments buried 3000 that were killed in that battle...it is awful to think of it. I hope I shall never witness another battle, more..." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of red and blue silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag.............................................SOLD

1301 - FORT LYON BLOWN UP KILLING 26 MEN WOUNDING 14 MORE, MORE NEGROES ARE GETTING TO FIGHT, Fort Richardson, VA, June 19th, 1863. 4 pages in ink with stamped cover. Sergt. Edgar Bennett, Co. K, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. "There is a great battle progressing on the Rappahannock now, yesterday Fort Lyon near Alexandria was blown up killing 26 and wounding 14 but more are thought in the ruins. They are getting the NEGROES to fighting and I am glad of it. They have in service 35,800 NEGROES so the government will not want so many white soldiers from the North. There is no planting here as the soldiers would steal everything...milk is now two thirds water"...SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag..............................................SOLD

1302 - MEN ARE ILL AND DYING FROM SUNSTROKE, TOO HOT FOR THE ARMY TO MOVE, Fort Richardson, VA, August 7th, 1863. 3 pages in ink, Sergt. Edgar Bennett, Co. K, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, "I went to Fort Lyons to see your Uncle, had pictures made, they were no so good as it was so warm. They did not take it in a tent...it is too warm for the Army to move, last Sunday seven men in the regiment were sun struck, one died instantly, also the Doctor cannot get up from his bed due to the sun, there are many sun struck in Washington City," SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag........................................SOLD

1303 - FORT RICHARDSON, VA, DOES NOT LIKE THE DRAFT, August 23rd, 1863. 2 pages in ink to his fiancée Mary, Sergt. Edgar Bennett, Co. K, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. "Mentions that his Uncle has been drafted, I don't like it at all to see men brought out here against their will for there are plenty in the north wanting to come by their talk. I am afraid if my Uncle goes to war it will kill his Father"...SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag................................SOLD

1305 - THEY ARE HAVING CAVALRY SKIRMISHES EVERY DAY, Fort Richardson, VA, October 27th, 1863. 2 pages in ink with a stamped cover CDS Alexandria, VA, by Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates to Mary in part, "They are having cavalry skirmishes every day and the Union side never loses any men killed or wounded, he just received a letter from his brother who is moving from Illinois to Iowa as he likes it better in Iowa," SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag..................................SOLD

1306 -  THE REBELS MADE A CAVALRY RAID AND CAPTURED SUPPLIES AND PRISONERS, OUR CAVALRY WENT OUT AND TOOK 100 PRISONERS, Fort Richardson, October 12th, 1863. Three pages in ink to Mary by Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."There was a cavalry raid about five miles from here the other night. They captured a great deal of stuff and sutler stores. The Rebels captured a number of prisoners. Yesterday they was a brigade of cavalry that went past here to where the Rebels made their raid and this morning they came back with about 100 Rebel prisoners"...SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter, stamped cover and remnants of the flag...............................................SOLD

1309 - BOYS AS YOUNG AS 13-14 ENLISTED BY GETTING THEM DRUNK, January 19th, 1864. 6 pages, stamped cover CDS Alexandria, VA, Fort Richardson, VA, Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, to Mary his fiancée. He relates in part..."Some of the boys wanted me to drink some whiskey but I told them I did not use the stuff, our camp is filled to 150 men, we get to sleep on oak planks but the recruits were told we had feather beds...there are boys here not more than 13-14 years old. They told some hard stories how they got to enlist, some by getting liquor down them, we continue to build barracks"...SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag.........................................................SOLD

1310 - I WENT TO ALEXANDRIA TO BUY A VALENTINE FOR YOU, Fort Richardson, VA, January 27th, 1864. 3 pages in ink to Mary from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, with stamped cover CDS Alexandria, VA. He relates in part..."I expect my bounty check for $300 any day, I shall send it to you to hold as I don't fell confident in keeping it here, I went to Alexandria to look for a Valentine for you but all I saw was 'comic' ones so I did not buy one for you so do not look for one from me," SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag................................SOLD

1314 - WISHES HE COULD BE FREE FROM THE BOUNDS OF SOLDERING, Fort Richardson, VA, March 4th, 1864. 2 pages in ink to Mary from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He philosophizes about his situation to Mary, "I have roved through many a weary round and I have found nothing but naught in vain, while glory sighs for other spheres I think that the home that lone endears is worth the world, could I once more be free from the ties I am now bound of soldering." SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk form the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and remnants of the flag.................................SOLD

1316 - THE BOYS ARE GOING HOME TO VOTE, Fort Richardson, VA, March 16th, 1864. 3 pages in ink to Mary from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."I have been busy all day gettting furloughs ready for the boys going home to vote, when I get paid I will send money home to Father, more camp news." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg than manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, comes with a stamped cover postmarked Alexandria, VA.............................................SOLD

1318 - HE SENDS MARY A CONFEDERATE $20 BILL, Fort Richardson, VA, April 26th, 1864. 4 pages in ink from Sergt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery. He relates in part to Mary, "Alexandria and Washington are full of soldiers. There is nothing to see here but soldiers and wagon trains for miles upon miles, the city ID full of music from the bands and drummer corps. I am now in the 1st Corps and get $17 per month. MINNIE HERE IS SOME CONFEDERATE MONEY..." Bennett has enclosed a 1862 Confederate $20 banknote in fine condition with this letter which is a tad light but quite readable, a nice souvenir for his fiancée. Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and Confederate note........................................SOLD

1322 - BOYS CAME IN AFTER BEING UNDER FIRE FOR EIGHT DAYS, Camp near Petersburg, VA, May 18th, 1864. 3 pages in bold pencil by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery. He relates to Mary in part..."I see the 6th, 7th, 8th, 11th, and 21st Connecticut Regiments. They are all within 2 miles of here. We are among the reserve artillery now. We have very little to eat but crackers and hard pork and hardly enough of that, I have not had a good nights sleep since we left Alexandria and have not taken my clothes off for nine days. I have never witnessed such times. Some boys from Burlington came in from the field after being under the enemy's fire for eight days steady." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, good letter from Bennett just before he was thrust into action.........................................SOLD

1373 - THEY ARE BACK IN THE 55TH OHIO, March 29th, 1864, Camp in the Lookout Valley, TN, 2 plus page letter in ink to his brother. He relates in part, "Describes a large snow fall, it froze on the ground, we were all transferred back to the 55th Ohio, he describes how the orders were carried out, he and his friends dropped from the rolls of the Invalid Corps and will go to the 55th OVI, the Colonel has returned from Ohio with the boys, a good many cases of smallpox and measles have shown up in camp." After several months in the 136th NYV and a scarce of being sent off with the Invalid Corps, Tittle is reunited with his old regiment the 55th Ohio.......................................................SOLD

1374 - GENERALS THOMAS, HOOKER, AND BUTTERFIELD REVIEWED THE TROOPS, Camp in Lookout Valley, TN, April 14th, 1864, 3 page letter in ink to his sister with a stamped postal cover by William Tittle, 55th Ohio Vol. He relates in part, "Mentions the smallpox that is in Ohio killing many, we have not had many new cases of the smallpox lately, thinks the Surgeons have a better understanding how to treat it better than last winter. We have a grand review today with Generals Thomas, Hook, and Butterfield reviewing the 11Corps. General Howard has left to command the 4th Army Corps and the 11th and 12th is consolidated and Hooker is to take command, I think it will be called the 20th Corps. The 49th Ohio got to Chattanooga, they marched from Nashville to Stevenson, Alabama then rode on cars to Chattanooga, then they marched towards Cleveland, TN, I sent Wilson a Chattanooga newspaper they are trifling small papers." The 20th Corps was formed April 4, 1864, by taking the Twelfth Corps, which was composed of the veteran divisions of Williams and Geary, and adding to it Butterfield's newly organized division. At the same time, two divisions of the Eleventh Corps were broken up and distributed to the divisions of Williams, Geary and Butterfield. The badge of the Twelfth Corps was retained, and there was no good reason why its number should not have been retained also; the brigade and division generals of the Twelfth Corps retained their respective commands, and little change was made other than the increase by accessions of transferred material. Each division now contained three brigades, containing in all 52 regiments of infantry, and 6 batteries of light artillery, numbering 21,280 officers and men present for duty. It was all veteran material, the most of the regiments having served with the Army of the Potomac in many of the greatest battles of the war, and, later on, at Wauhatchie and Lookout Mountain. Major-General Joseph Hooker was placed in command........................................................SOLD

 

1376 - FIGHTING BEFORE THE BATTLE OF RESACA, GA AND BATTLE ACTION AT THE BATTLE OF RESACA, TWO SEPARATE LETTERS IN THE SAME ENVELOPE, Camp near Tunnel Hill, GA, May 10th, 1864, 3 pages in ink to his sister by William Tittle 55th OVI. He relates in part, "May 2nd, we left amp in Lookout Valley and marched to Lees & Gordon's Mills on the Chickamauga River, we marched a distance of 16 miles and camped for the night, then we marched with six days rations and 60 rounds of ammunition and camped at Pleasant Grove on the Chickamauga three miles west of Ringgold a distance of 12 miles. We left camp and camped to Lees Farm and camped closest to Nigger Jack Gap. We crossed Taylor's Ridge and then camped for the night six miles from Tunnel Hill. The bugle sounded and we marched towards Tunnel Hill and left our knapsacks in camp. We went out 4 miles and found the 14th Corps on our left and this division went to our right. We drove the Rebels back to the Gap with some skirmishing and cannonading. We marched back to the camp after it was over and had lost 2 killed and 4 wounded in the 55th. Monday the 9th we stared at 7½ o'clock and marched back to the gap and formed a line of battle to support the skirmishers, the rebels fired four shells at out line that came very close and wounded one man. At 11:30 Company H and I went out on the skirmish line and at half past 1 we were relieved by the 14th Corps." Tittle continues a second letter on May 20th, 1864 from Camp near Kingston, GA. One page in bold pencil to his sister. He relates in part, "I am permitted to write you again to let you know I am well. We had a hard fight skirmishing commenced at 1 o'clock in our front and we advanced a short distance which caused a general engagement and out regiment lost heavily, 18 killed including out Colonel, Major, and Captain, in killed and wounded in the regiment we lost 92 men in the Regiment of a little over 300 men that night. The Rebels retreated and we are in pursuit. We had another skirmish with them yesterday and we drove them. There has been no change to send out mail since we left the valley." Both letters describe battle action near Resaca where the 55th lost near 30% of the regiment killed and wounded along with many officers as noted by Tittle. Both letters come with the stamped postal cover both letters were mailed in. Two excellent Atlanta Campaign Letters.......................................SOLD

1331 - THE PAPERS SAY LINCOLN IS RE ELECTED, before Petersburg, VA, November 11th, 1864. Two pages in ink by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part, "One year today I was in Washington receiving greenbacks for three more years, but now what they are trying to do but offering $1800 in greenbacks or $1000 in gold for 5 years in the regular army, those who have served one year will get a 60 day furlough but I don't think so much of it...THE NEWSPAPERS SAY LINCOLN IS REELECTED BUT I HOPE HE IS NOT...we have a new Captain and he is a good one. He is rough but we all know him", Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter and stamped cover postmarked Washington, 2 items................................SOLD

 

1332 - THANKSGIVING IN CAMP 1864, Before Petersburg, VA, November 25th, 1864. Three pages in ink to Mary by Srgt. Edgar Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery. He relates in part..."Today I got for my battery of 16 men, two geese and a turkey, we had a fashionable dinner with potatoes...the pickets were quiet yesterday from shooting, describes the scene when the soldiers got drunk from whiskey...I have never seen so many drunk in camp, it was disgraceful to see," SILK REMNANTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG INCLUDED, Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. Comes with remnants of silk from the regimental flag of the 1st Ct. Heavy Artillery. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter, stamped cover and remnants of the flag.............................................. SOLD


1333 - HARD FIGHTING TO OUR LEFT THIS MORNING, Before Petersburg, December 5th, 1864. 4 pages in ink by Srgt. Edgar Bennett to Mary. He relates in part, "There are great moves being made in the Army and we think that there will be a great battle fought before long, I used to smoke quite a bit but I will now stop. With a friend we both will stop smoking pipes nor any tobacco except segars [?] until we get in garrison duty again, I think it shall be a good thing for us both...since morning there has been some hard fighting to the left of us, they could not send up our bread today due to the fighting on our left," Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in March 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter with stamped cover....................................................SOLD

1338 - OUR WORKS HAVE CAVED IN TO OUR MAGAZINE, Before Petersburg, January 22nd, 1865. 3 pages in ink by Srgt. Edgar B. Bennett, Co. K, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part..."The works have all caved in even to our magazine and we have been rebuilding them night and day...as the tops of the magazine are higher than our breastworks we have to work at night [to avoid being shot by sharpshooters], wonders when some of the men are that went towards Charleston as they have not arrived at Wilmington, we think they will meet Sherman in Charleston." Bennett was later wounded in the hand by a saber cut and taken prisoner near Petersburg in march 1865. A famous unit at Petersburg that manned the famous "Dictator" mortar, letter with stamped cover.......................SOLD

12270 - REPORTS ON THE FIGHTING NEAR GETTYSBURG, THERE WILL BE A GREAT BATTLE FOUGHT TODAY, July 4th, 1863. Four page letter in ink datelined Fort Richardson, VA by Sgt. Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Conn. Heavy Artillery to his fiancée Mary, comes with stamped postal cover along with RED AND BLUE SILK FRAGMENTS FROM THE REGIMENTAL FLAG OF HIS UNIT. He relates in part to her..."The two contending armies have met and are fighting desperately in Maryland, and I think today will be a great battle as it is the 4th of July. If they fight today it will be as large a battle as in on record [Gettysburg]. Describes his past 4th of July's in the army, Hagerstown, Harrison's Landing, more". Bennett was later wounded in front of Petersburg by a saber cut and captured in March of 1863. His regiment manned the famous mortar "Dictator" that fired on Petersburg from a railroad car. Letter, cover, flag fragments....................................................................SOLD

12272 - HE HOPED MCCLELLAN BECOMES PRESIDENT AS HE VOTED FOR HIM, THINKS MAC HAS THE VOTING MAJORITY IN HIS COMPANY, BEFORE PETERSBURG, A BLACK REPUBLICAN ISSUES A THREAT ON HIS VOTE, Before Petersburg, October 21st, 1864. 3 pages letter by Sgt Edgar B. Bennett, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery to Mary. He relates in part to her..."There is fighting going on all the time North of the James River, the cannonading has been heard here distinctly for several days...On the 19th, the appointed men of the Governor came to pick up the votes of the 1st Connecticut Vol. Artillery. They arrived and took the votes. I had but one vote and voted for George McClellan but for no one else. Oh there was some hard talk. One "Back Republican" said when I took my vote and sealed it that a man who would vote that ticket ought to have his throat cut...there was quite a bit of McClellan men near and we delivered the votes to Captain Bruster. It was all done in 15 minutes time. There were about 47 votes in the company and as near as we could learn "Mac":  had the majority by 6 or 7. I hope he will get in as President. It would be worth a great deal to all of us." An excellent letter regarding the election of 1864 between Lincoln and McClellan. Bennett was later wounded in front of Petersburg by a saber cut and captured in March of 1865. His regiment manned the famous mortar "Dictator" that fired on Petersburg from a railroad car......................................................................SOLD

11242 - DURING THE BATTLE OF CHANCELLORSVILLE, A DELAWARE INDIAN SOLDIER STABBED A NEGRO, HOOKER CROSSING THE RAPPAHANNOCK, May the 4th, 1863, two page letter in ink from Cunningham Johnston, 118th PA. He relates to his friend, Mr. Hiram Whitford, Thank you for your letter received. I am not very well as I have a bad cold. There are a lot of fellows went out on a scout today and don't know whether they will fetch anything but they generally do. One of the "Darkey's" asked one of the Delaware for two dollars that he owed him and the Delaware stabbed him [Delaware Indians served the Union during the war many as scouts]. They had him in jail and he got out last Saturday. They found him at Williamsburg and they fetched him back. Our fellows still hold Williamsburg and they calculate they hold it. General Hooker has crossed the river Rappahannock and has killed from three to five hundred and has taken a lot of prisoners besides. I guess Hooker calculates to cut off their supplies and tear up their railroads. Last Friday the rebs came within three of four miles of our picket lines and took off a lot of Darkeys. Our fellows went out last Saturday and seen lot of Rebel cavalry and saw them at night again but they didn't come close to do anything...he tells them to make sure they put up all the oats they can...from Cunningham [Johnston]. After the "Mud March", the 118th returned to camp at Falmouth, which it occupied until April 27, 1863. It was closely engaged at the Battle of Chancellorsville, again suffering considerable casualties. The 118th was in camp at Falmouth until June 10 when the Army of the Potomac commenced its northward movement for the Gettysburg Campaign. The Corn Exchange Regiment acted as support in the cavalry engagements of Aldie, Upperville, and Middleburg. The regiment reached Gettysburg early on July 2, 1863. At four o'clock that afternoon, the 118th went into action in support of Maj. Gen. Daniel Sickles' III Corps and was closely engaged, losing 3 killed, 19 wounded, and 3 missing or captured. On the 3rd, the regiment was moved to Big Round Top, where it remained without engagement. Following the battle, it then joined in the pursuit of the retreating Confederates and encountered the enemy on July 4. This letter was written near Falmouth, VA, before Johnston was engaged in the actual battle where the Federal army had established a base for the battle. Fine, rare content mentioning an Indian killing a black. Johnston was later a POW at Cold Harbor..........................................................SOLD

71147 - 1ST RHODE ISLAND CAVALRY, CAPTAIN CHARLES H. THAYER, Carte de Viste of Captain Charles H. Thayer, Company C, 1st Rhode Island Cavalry by Addis of Washington signed in ink on the front as Lt. accompanying the Carte de Viste are three war dated letters in ink written by Thayer [a] Camp Sprague, Washington DC, June 21st, 1861 to his sister, three + pages in ink, 8" X 10", details his travels to Washington, did not go to Harpers Ferry as it was reported evacuated, had warm receptions, escorted with fife and drum, describes visiting the White House, Capital, Navy Yard, War department, etc. Other regiments have left the city for Virginia. They say Beauregard is advancing towards Washington, if he does he will have a great many soldiers to greet him, wants two gold dollars sent to him. C. H. Thayer, Company D, 1st Rhode Island Militia, [b] Camp of the Rhode Island Cavalry, Potomac Creek, VA, December 29th, 1862, 1 1/2 large pages in ink to his Mother with stamped cover addressed to her, he relates in part...part of the company is out on picket but I did not have to go as another Lt. from Company B, went in my place. I have just received orders to get the men ready with three days rations, I report to the Lt. Colonel of our regiment tomorrow morning at 7 o'clock. He is to have 500 men under his command, and others from another regiment for a "raid". I think our Colonel has another 500 men who will go in another direction. He describes in detail making a fireplace in his tent, digging down, placing flat stones, and making a chimney outside, C. H. Thayer, 1st RI Cavalry, [c] camp 1st Rhode Island Cavalry, Middletown, VA, October 29th, 1864, 4 pages in ink to his friend Rhodes. Who is another soldier, describes what he has been up to as a cavalryman, has been an Inspector General on Colonel Gibbs' Staff, an escort for General Torbert during battle acting ADC on his Staff. General Torbert went to Washington with an escort of 40 men as far as Martinsburg. Mentions a letter he received from a POW in a Charleston Hospital brought by an exchanged prisoner, discusses the trouble Rhodes was having in getting his resignation approved due to political actions by a senior officer who was making it difficult for him, mentions that the 1st NH [Cavalry] is a hell of a regiment but only has 75 men fit for duty, he is trying to get out of the service as many of his officers [he names] are devilish! Thayer was missing at Kelly's Ford and wounded there as well, promoted to Captain January 18th, 1863. Most of the regiment's service in 1862 [1st Rhode Island Cavalry] was in northern Virginia, where it served as scouts to determine enemy movements, as well as foraging for supplies and screening infantry movements. The troopers saw action contesting Stonewall Jackson's cavalry in the Valley Campaign. They fought in the Second Bull Run Campaign, as well as many other battles of note, including service in the cavalry actions surrounding the Battle of Fredericksburg. In 1863, they participated in the Chancellorsville Campaign, and played an important role in the opening battle of the Gettysburg Campaign at Brandy Station. Shortly thereafter, isolated and alone deep in Confederate territory on a scouting mission, they lost nearly 240 of their 280 remaining men at the June 17 skirmish at Middleburg. The regiment was refitted with new recruits and performed scouting and outpost duty along the upper Potomac River until September, when they rejoined the Army of the Potomac, participating in the Bristoe Campaign and Mine Run Campaign. The following year, the 1st Rhode Island served in the defenses of Washington DC before eventually returning to the Shenandoah Valley under the command of Philip H. Sheridan. Due to heavy battle losses, the regiment was consolidated to a battalion of four companies on January 1, 1865. They continued serving in the valley for much of the rest of the war before being mustered out at Baltimore, Maryland on August 3, 1865. 3 nice ink letters, one cover and pen ided CDV of Thayer at Lt. taken at Washington. A very scarce regiment............................................................................SOLD

71148 - 2ND RHODE ISLAND INFANTRY, THREE LETTERS IN ONE, THE MARCH TOWARDS DOWNSVILLE, MD AFTER ANTIETAM, THE US HUSSIARS CAVALRY TAKEN TO BE CONFEDERATES BY THE 23RD PA, A LITTLE GIRL WITH A FLAG AND A PAIL OF WATER IN MARYLAND GREETING THE SOLDIERS' ARRIVAL, September 24th, 1862, Downsville, MD, 4 large pages that include three letters to three different family members, from Henry T. Blanchard, Co. K, 2nd Rhode Island Infantry [Sergeant October 5th, 1862]. The letters are in ink with an PS paragraph in pencil. He relates in part...[a] to his Father and Mother...we have marched hard to reach this town and hope we can settle in camp, the artillery horses in this division are poor as crows and it is as much as they can do to draw the guns and caissons. We need new clothing and hope to draw it soon as we are as ragged a lot soldiers you ever saw. Describes Downsville with having several stores, blacksmith, and a post office, [b] letter to his brother he relates in part....they have had two days rest and feel quite refreshed, since leaving Chain Bridge we have been continually on the march, the 23rd and the 36th NY are here guarding Edwards Ferry, the 23rd got in a skirmish with the Rebels and the Colonel and several men were wounded, Downsville was foot of Sugar Leaf Mountain, march several miles and crossed Monocracy Creek and halted just the other side of the mountain. I have seen a number of the PA Militia, a stout and robust lot wearing a variety of clothing and some riding splendid horses. Mentions that the US Chasseurs while on picket challenged some riders who were PA Militia but the riders did not understand the language and took to flight, some of our men who were outside our lines said that they saw some of the PA Militia running for their life. They took the Chasseurs for Rebels, [c] to his sister he relates in part...When we came through Berkettsville, MD, we saw a pretty little girl standing by her door with a small flag and a pail of water -  she was handing it out to tired and thirsty soldiers. The day before there was a terrible battle in the village and the residents had to keep in their cellars to avoid the shell and cannon balls. Henry L. B [Blanchard]. An excellent letter by Blanchard who was to die at the Wilderness on May 6th, 1864, on his regiments' movements coming into Maryland from the west. Excellent content from a scarce Regiment..........................................SOLD

71101 -  BUCKTAILS SHOOT REBELS, ABRAHAM BLAIR, 30TH PENNSYLVANIA INFANTRY
, Headquarters, Virginia Regt., 1st Camp Pierpoint, Company B, to his friend Lew. He relates in part on attractive Patriotic stationary of the US Capital...I am at present on the sacred soil of Virginia..."The Capital is Safe", we had it pretty easy at Camp Wayne, we are encamped in a fine place. It is beautiful country even though invaded by an army. Last Friday we left this camp on a reconnoitering party up the country about 15 miles taking our knap sacks and driving the sneaky Rebels on before us like dogs. We marched on till about 6 o'clock and turned into a field where we cooked our supper and then we fell back about two miles and then camped for the night and slept on the soft ground as we had not taken our tents along. Colonel Kane's regiment [the Bucktails] went out scouting on Sunday and shot 4 or 5 Rebels and they were coming in the evening and Company E of our regiment was out on picket and a few shots were exchanged between them by mistake but luckily no one was hurt. That caused an alarm in our camp and our company was sent out on picket at 8 o'clock. I tell you the next time I go "peddling" for Uncle Sam I will go on horseback [Cavalry]. I don't believe in carrying a heavy pack for a long march. We have to go on dress parade now with knapsacks. We may move soon and you will hear of a battle soon and if you hear of the 1st Brigade being in it, you may know that the "Union Guard" was in it and take my word for it we will be the last to run...Abraham Blair. Although Bair does not date this well written letter, the 30th PA was at Camp Pierpoint from October 1861 - March 1862. He enlisted in July 1861 and saw action at Mechanicsville. Gaines Mill, Malvern Hill, 2nd Bulls Run and Antietam. He was discharged due to disability in October 1862.............................................................
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51903 - HAS A GAY LIFE IN CAMP, THEIR NEW HOUSE IS COMPLETED, THE DRUMMER WHO TENTS WITH US BROUGHT A VIOLIN, LIFE IN CAMP IN KENTUCKY, April 5th, 1863. 3 plus large pages in ink with a stamped postal cover addressed to his sweetheart Salina by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Infantry. He relates in part...They went to get some boards and three of them built a small house to live in while they are guarding the city, they used straw and rubber blankets on the floor and it is the best house in camp...we just had a Sunday inspection by the Colonel and the major, he mentions peddlers bringing into camp everything they could want...goose eggs are 5 cents each...the DRUMMER who tents with us brought in a violin, mentions that the 36th Regiment moved into camp last night. A well written letter by Daniels giving many more details of their makeshift camp in Kentucky..........................................SOLD

51935 - LINCOLN WINS IN HIS REGIMENT BY A LANDSLIDE, November 9th, 1864, 4 pages in ink with a stamped postal cover addressed to his sweetheart Salina by Pvt. Herbert Daniels, 7th Rhode Island Infantry. He relates in part...The regiment has gone out for brigade drill - yesterday I was busy with the election [Presidential], he discussed complications Salina has at home in Massachusetts, the vote in the regiment was 152 for LINCOLN and 28 for McClellan, much more news from camp. Letter and cover, 2 items..........................SOLD

51940 - HEAVY FIRING ON THE LEFT, SHERIDAN'S CAVALRY PASSING ALL DAY, WANTS TO SHARE HER BED, un-datelined but near Petersburg, VA, March 26th, 1865, 2 pages in ink with an attractive dark blue postal cover stamped and cancelled Washington, DC from Pvt. Herbert Daniels of the 7th Rhode Island to his sweetheart Salina. He relates in part...we have heard heavy firing from out left this morning but have not heard anything about it...when I come home I want to find you alone or just with the girls, gives sexual overtones about being in bed with her, Monday, Sheridan's cavalry have been passing near all day much more about posting letters at the headquarters. Well written with a beautiful blue cover...................................................SOLD

4258 - THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, THE REBS MARCHED UP ON US AND WE MOWED THEM DOWN BY THE THOUSANDS, THEY FOUGHT LIKE TIGERS, 3 page letter from Pvt. David Brett, 9th Massachusetts Light Artillery, Warrenton, VA, July 28th, 1863. H